Page 8

Canonicity and breach – sequence of events  can have all first three but need a  precipitating event to be a narrative. Breachs  of canonical – betrayed wife, fleeced  innocent etc    The conference and its agenda set the  ‘canon’, the expectations of how the space  will be used, how the speakers will behave,  how the story will be told.  Both participants  and tweeters can break these conventions –  by using the ‘space’ differently, exactly as  one of the speakers at the conference was  discussing. The ‘asides’ of the tweeters give  an example of this – they set another  ‘narrative’ in train. The first tweeter makes  this comment:   

  It is at least 10 tweets further on,  chronologically, that another participant  ‘picks up’ this narrative and continues it (see  below)   

  Referentiality – narrative ‘truth’ is judged by  its verisimilitude    The #itf10 trend reflects the ‘real’ events of  the conference – not only that but the  ‘tweets’ are openly self‐referential,  reflecting openly on the act of ‘tweeting’  about the shared reality of the conference  and taking part in ‘tweeting about it.   

       

Genericness – recognisable kinds of  narrative help readers to interpret the  events.     There appears to be a certain universality to  representations of human plights in all  cultures. Genres may shape our way of  thinking about the world and the realities  they depict.  Since Twitter is a new ‘genre’ in  the sense that it is not exactly a  conversation, nor exactly a ‘blog’ or  discussion thread, but a hybrid, does it  change the mode of thought with the mode  of ‘telling’?  Is the quality of the reflection  different?    Normativeness – Bruner (1991) says “the  normativeness of narrative is not historically  or culturally terminal. Its form changes with  the preoccupations of the age and the  circumstances surrounding its  production………Narrative……designed to  contain uncannincess rather than resolve it.”    Normativeness changes and has changed  with Web 2.0 technologies.  What is the  cultural normativeness which applies to  Twitter?  The ‘uncanniness’ Bruner (1991)  mentions seems to stem from the  interactivity, the distributed narrative, the  collective and multimodal ways digital  storytelling uses.           

The place of narrative in posthuman cyberculture  

In posthuman cyberculture, how do we still use narrative to learn and make sense of the world?

The place of narrative in posthuman cyberculture  

In posthuman cyberculture, how do we still use narrative to learn and make sense of the world?