Page 10

of the posthuman era as ‘disembodied  information’, surely this information has no  relationships, morality or meaning until it  comes in contact with human cognition?   Carr (1986) would agree with this, arguing  that the reality of human experience, of life,  is not a ‘mere’ or ‘pure’ sequence of isolated  events, or chunks of information.  Human  experience, even posthuman experience,  Carr (1986) would argue is ‘characterised by  a complex temporal structure akin to the  configuration of the storied form’.    With this in mind the concept of ‘narrative  learning environments’ have been examined  by numerous theorists (Laudrillard et al  2000; Walker 2006; Mott et al 1999, Pachler  and Daly 2009).  Within these environments,  learning can be examined by analysing the  relationship between narrative structure and  human thought.  According to Campion (2006) narratology  and cognitive psychology focus on different  aspects of narrative – narratology on the  structure of texts and cognitive psychology  on the role of the reader and what the  reader does with the text.      When looking at Twitter, we can first  consider how the ‘text’ is structured. Pradl  (1984) adds    “….without stories our experiences would merely be unevaluated sensations from an undifferentiated stream of events.”   Campion (2006) reminds us that narratives  are generally linear and there are  consequences for comprehension in non‐ linearity, some of which we will examine in  this paper. Brown (2000) in his turn, was  convinced that the digital ‘story’ was created  as a form of ‘bricolage’, a concept studied by  Claude Levi‐Strauss.  It related to the ability  to find something – a tool, a document, 

video – and use it to build something with  the critical factor being the judgement  necessary to become an effective ‘digital  bricoleur’.    “Distributed discussion offers many points of entry, both for readers and for co-writers. And it offers a new environment for storytelling.” (Levine 2008)   Twitter, as a story ‘genre’, appears to  function like a personal anecdote, rather  than a crafted story – repetition,  backtracking, interaction with others who  share the story. The #itf10 conference  Twitter ‘narrative’ was not linear – there  were digressions, discussions and  interactions as well as openings, middles and  closings as in a typical story. Some  participants were working as ‘bricoleurs’,  some as ‘storytellers’ and some were  providing the ‘problems’ and ‘issues’ which  drove the ‘narrative’. The narrative was also  self referential – talking about itself as a  narrative as well as talking about the speaker  or the conference (see full analysis, using  some of Bruner’s (1991) ten features of  narrative p7)    However,    “…narratives suppose such a double mechanism of story comprehension and construction of a situation model.” (Campion 2006) What the Twitter trend for the IT Futures  conference was doing was constructing a  ‘situation model’ both for the conference  participants and the non‐participants trying  to follow the action through the Twitter  hashtag.  The flow of commentary,  particularly from the main ‘storyteller’ or  commentator ‘kicking_k’ contextualised the  events.   

The place of narrative in posthuman cyberculture  
The place of narrative in posthuman cyberculture  

In posthuman cyberculture, how do we still use narrative to learn and make sense of the world?