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2 0 0 C O L U M B U S 2 0 1 2 | Honor. Celebrate. Innovate.

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c o m m e m o r at i v e c e l e b r at i o n

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THE OFFICIAL BICENTENNIAL GUIDE

Honor. Celebrate. Innovate.

A supplement to Columbus Monthly

The Official Bicentennial Guide


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THRIVES LOCALLY

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We’re committed to helping the community and everyone who lives here achieve more than ever. That’s why we’re proud to support the Columbus Bicentennial Celebration. To learn more about PNC, stop by your local branch, call 1-877-CALL-PNC, or visit pnc.com

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©2011 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. All rights reserved. PNC Bank, National Association. Member FDIC. ACHIEVEMENT is a registered mark of The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.

COMMSERV AD JUN 2010 013


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CELEBRATING OUR COMMUNITY! Over the past six decades, this spirit of generosity has helped strengthen local nonprofit organizations, and will continue to provide valuable support for generations to come.

Photo: ©Randall L. Schieber

Every day, The Columbus Foundation works with dedicated individuals, families, and businesses—champions for our community who support the people and places that make Columbus a remarkable city.

The Columbus Foundation has served as the trusted philanthropic advisor® to more than 1,800 individuals, families, and businesses since 1943. Visit www.columbusfoundation.org to learn how The Columbus Foundation can help you achieve your charitable goals and strengthen the community.


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Global reach, Ohio roots. From humble beginnings in 1971 right here in central Ohio, Cardinal Health has grown to become one of the largest healthcare companies in the world. As the business behind healthcare, we equip healthcare providers with the products and services that enable them to focus on what matters most — their patients. And while much has changed over the past 40 years, our dedication to the people and community of the central Ohio region has remained constant. With the support of the community, Cardinal Health continues to grow right where our roots are firmly planted.

© 2011 Cardinal Health. All rights reserved. CARDINAL HEALTH, the Cardinal Health LOGO, and Essential to care are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cardinal Health. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. Lit. No. 5BR7734 (10/2011)

cardinalhealth.com


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the date just

6280 Sawmill Road, just south of 161 Easton Town Center, across from McCormick & Schmick


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Columbus has just reached its bicentennial and Kroger wants to say congratulations! We’re proud to be committed to a community as vibrant as Columbus.

Š The Kroger Co. 2012


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BEST ADULT HOSPITAL

CANCER HOSPITAL

HEART HOSPITAL DOCTORS

PERIOD

Nationally ranked in 11 specialties in the recently released 2011-12 U.S.News and World Report rankings, including cancer, cardiology & heart surgery, diabetes & endocrinology, rehabilitation, women’s health (gynecology), nephrology, neurology & neurosurgery, orthopedics, pulmonology, urology and ear, nose & throat. 95% of central Ohio’s Top Doctors who treat adults are at Ohio State. These rankings showcase the incredible advances happening here at Ohio State that benefit you and your health. BUT FOR OHIO STATE, NONE OF THIS WOULD BE POSSIBLE.


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A great moment in time inspires not just one of us...but all of us.

For more information, please contact: Jeff Hastings Market President Commercial Banking Manager 614-232-2249 Karen Bigelow Government Banking 614-232-8078 Jerry Archambualt Business Banking 614-232-8079 Adam Szuszkiewicz District Manager Traditional Banking West 614-232-2646 Robyn Norris District Manager Traditional Banking East 614-232-8139

Our strengths have never been more aligned with the needs of our community...and our nation. At U.S. Bank, we take great pride in our employees – and our company – and reaching out to all of our Columbus neighbors and communities. That's why we are pleased to commemorate this monumental occasion honoring, celebrating and envisioning our city's 200th birthday. A bicentennial year of

Regina Masoni District Manager In-Store Banking 614-232-8072 Bob Lovell The Private Client Reserve 614-232-8045 Sean Whalen Treasury Management 614-232-2647 John Hart Commercial Real Estate 614-232-8093

engagement and inspiration. Here's to the next 200 years of an even brighter future...with us.

usbank.com Member FDIC. ©2011 U.S. Bancorp. All rights reserved. 5838

Scott Stuart Home Mortgage 614-232-2235


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200COLUMBUS the Bicentennial is a community-wide celebration. Hundreds of people and organizations are involved in the planning for 2012, investing their time, talent and resources. Major contributors as of November 2011 include:

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A n

i n t r o d u c t i o n

FRIENDS, NEIGHBORS AND 200COLUMBUS PARTNERS, There is a spirit to our nation’s great eras, one that’s also evident in the emergence of America’s greatest cities. It’s a collective passion that unites citizens toward a shared future. We’re proud to see that spirit ignited in Columbus, where every day our citizens hone new ideas, launch new projects, start new businesses and expand their creative horizons. We are working to build upon that energy and amplify it during 200Columbus the Bicentennial—a year we dedicate to honoring our 200 years of history, celebrating the city we live in today and envisioning our future. We stand at the beginning of an exciting new era for Columbus, and 200Columbus offers a rallying cry for each of you to get involved and play a role in it. This is a bicentennial like no other, and it will be so much more than just a birthday party. Now is the time for our doors to swing open wide as we celebrate all the great things we love about Columbus. 2012 also is about engaging residents in a thoughtful discussion of how we create a lasting legacy for Columbus. We are working to bring together the entire region to make our hometown a national leader in economic prosperity, environmental stewardship, entrepreneurship, social justice and quality of life. In doing so, we will leave a historic mark to be remembered by generations to come, as Columbus takes its place among the nation’s innovative leaders. Meet some of the city’s visionaries, enjoy stories of our past and see how all the 200Columbus plans and events are coming together in the pages of this special bicentennial publication. We look forward to seeing you engaged in our city like never before as we celebrate with neighborhood and cultural festivals, world-class arts events, music, fireworks, celebrations of our culinary, design and innovation industries and much, much more. Sincerely,

Join . Visit 200Columbus.com —there will be numerous opportunities to participate throughout the year.

Michael B. Coleman Mayor, City of Columbus

Ty D. Marsh Chair, 200Columbus the Bicentennial

Jamie A. Greene Program Manager, 200Columbus the Bicentennial

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“Banking may have changed, but people haven’t.” At Heartland Bank, we’re proud to have been part of Columbus for more than 100 of its first 200 years. In that time, we’ve

G. Scott McComb President and CEO

all seen our little corner of the country grow and change. But there’s one thing that hasn’t changed: the integrity and caring of the people who live here. Heartland offers

Always jjust one call awayy from e President

a variety of sophisticated banking solutions and remains a close knit part of the communities we serve.

Locally owned local decisions

Call today or visit heartlandbank.com

Capitol Square Croton Dublin Gahanna Grove City Johnstown Newark Reynoldsburg Stygler Road Westerville West Columbus

(614) 416-0244 (740) 893-2191 (614) 798-8818 (614) 337-4605 (614) 875-1884 (740) 967-6500 (740) 349-7888 (614) 416-0400 (614) 475-7024 (614) 839-2265 (614) 351-2100

Strong

commitment to community

Team effort The latest

technology Preferred

SBA lender Member FDIC

“Where Banking Feels Good” ®

2


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DAN TRITTSCHUH

FROM THE EDITORS:

200 WE’RE HAPPY TO GIVE Lucas Sullivant his due. After all, he is credited with founding

Franklinton in 1797 near the confluence of the Olentangy and Scioto rivers, setting the stage for the establishment of Columbus.

But let’s also pause to acknowledge a lesser-known figure instrumental in the city’s

origin: Gen. Joseph Foos, a tavern owner and state senator living in the area in 1812 when it was decreed this plot of land in the center of Ohio would become home to the state

capital. Apparently, if not for him, we all could be living or working in a town called Ohio City (a popular choice at the time). Instead, Foos, a big fan of Christopher Columbus,

succeeded in persuading enough folks to name this new place after the famous explorer. And so with a tip of the cap to Foos, we welcome you to this special publication

honoring the 200th anniversary of Columbus. This joint effort by Columbus C.E.O. and Columbus Monthly celebrates the city’s past, present and potential by focusing on the

COLUMBUS

known and not-so-well-known people, events, landmarks and businesses, among others, that have combined to make Columbus, well, Columbus.

Revel in 200 memorable moments of the city’s history. Find out about Columbus’s

favorite icons. See how the city rates compared to its peers. Discover 10 historical figures you should know but most likely don’t. Get a glimpse of possibly the next great

downtown spaces. Learn about the events throughout 2012 celebrating the bicentennial. Visit with familiar folks such as Jack Hanna and Aminah Robinson. And turn to the last

page for a bit of insight by the city’s most famous author, who, thankfully, never had to write about a town named Ohio City.

Jill Hawes, senior editor, Columbus Monthly Julanne Hohbach, editor, Columbus C.E.O. Ray Paprocki, editor, Columbus Monthly

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20 0 contents ★

OHIO STOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

COLUMBUS

WEXNER CENTER FOR THE ARTS/PHOTO © BRAD FEINKNOPF

Profiles of the people, places and businesses that make up the city of Columbus.

TIM JOHNSON

99 12

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Future Reimagining downtown spaces 100 Columbus2020 109 Calendar of events 116

««

19

Present


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STATEAUTO.COM

Proud to be a part of Columbus’ past, present and future


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COURTESY OHIO STATEHOUSE PHOTO ARCHIVE

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contents 127 135

COURTESY COLUMBUS METROPOLITAN LIBRARY, GENEALOGY, HISTORY & TRAVEL DIVISION

200 memorable moments 10 people you should know

143 14

By the numbers Ranking Columbus icons How the city rates Growth stats

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145 148 150

COURTESY OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

125

Past


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200

#

COLUMBUS

Honor. Celebrate. Innovate. The official bicentennial guide

Group Publisher Roy Biondi Associate Publisher/Advertising Director Rheta Gallagher EDITORIAL Editors Jill Hawes, Julanne Hohbach, Ray Paprocki Editorial Staff Michelle Davey, Emma Frankart, Dave Ghose, Jennifer Wray, Ben Zenitsky Editorial Contributors Richard Ades, Melissa Dilley, Ed Lentz, Eric Lyttle, Brett Nuckles, Jon Theiss, Steve Wartenberg ADVERTISING Account Executives Mindy Bates, Jenna Cameron, Holly Gallucci, Susan Kendall, Evi Lopez, Bryan McMahan, Crystie O’Neil, SueAnn Shetler Marketing/Events Manager Ashley Curl DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Production Director Roy Gray Design Director Craig Rusnak Senior Graphic Designers Kimberly Colston-Woodruff, Kyle Seyfferth Contributing Photographers Tim Johnson, Jeffry Konczal, Dan Trittschuh BUSINESS Controller Charles Hause Accountant Leanne Brandell Accounts Receivable Manager Sarah Novak Accounting Clerk Amy Snyder Systems Administrator Charles Berry Receptionist Barb Mason C I R C U L AT I O N Circulation Manager Jim Campbell Circulation Assistant Christine Dougal All contents of this magazine are copyrighted © 2011; all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without written permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited.

RICART HYUNDAI

Columbus C.E.O. Columbus Monthly 5255 Sinclair Rd. P.O. Box 29913 Columbus, Ohio 43229-7513

1-877-773-0180

columbusceo.com • (614) 540-8900 columbusmonthly.com • (614) 888-4567

WWW.RICARTHYUNDAI.COM MONDAY - SATURDAY 9AM-8PM • SUNDAY 12 NOON - 6PM

4255 S. HAMILTON RD. • COLUMBUS, OH 16

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The Hadler Companies

DEVELOPERS, OWNERS & MANAGERS OF SHOPPING CENTERS

HELPING SHAPE COLUMBUS FOR THE PAST 65 YEARS! Today, The Hadler Companies are making aggressive, tenant-friendly deals, offering: Big cities, small towns, varied demographics in Ohio and Wisconsin Anchored destination centers Recently renovated properties Key retail property maintenance & promotion Skilled management team Creative leasing opportunities & incentives Construction management services

0VSUIJSEHFOFSBUJPO GBNJMZPXOFEBOEPQFSBUFECVTJOFTTDPOUJOVFTUPUISJWF XJUITUSPOHMPDBUJPOT TVQFSJPSNBOBHFNFOUTUBOEBSETBOEQSPHSFTTJWFBUUJUVEFT

Call us about the creative solutions we can offer to distressed property owners and managers. THIRD GENERATION AND FAMILY-OWNED SINCE 1947

8FTU)FOEFSTPO3PBEt$PMVNCVT 0IJP       XXXIBEMFSDPNQBOJFTDPNXXX5"CVJMEJOHDPN Proudly affiliated with Transamerica Building Company, General Contractors since 1962

Congratulations to Columbus for 200 years of greatness!


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COLUMBUS MUSEUM OF ART

AND AQUARIUM

FRANKLIN PARK CONSERVATORY AND BOTANICAL GARDENS COSI

Adventure. Innovation. Discovery.

Columbus. From inspiring art and horticulture, to wildlife and wild science, Columbus is a vibrant center of learning and creativity with endless opportunities to explore new worlds. Happy Birthday, Columbus!

F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N , V I S I T 2 0 0 C O L U M B U S . C O M / E V E N T S


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200COLUMBUS

Present


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★ People ★

DAN TRITTSCHUH

Jack Hanna

Putting the zoo on the map WHEN JACK HANNA is at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, he might be a bigger attraction than any of the animals. This summer, the zoo’s director emeritus gave a reporter and photographer a glimpse of Jack Hanna’s Base Camp, a Mongolian-style yurt inside the zoo grounds that includes mementos from Hanna’s three decades in Columbus. Word spread that Hanna was there. Faces pressed against the windows. People waved to friends to come down. As always happens at the zoo—or anywhere else in Columbus, for that matter—a crowd greeted Hanna, pens ready, once he left the yurt. Today, the zoo is one of Central Ohio’s most beloved institutions, a nationally acclaimed tourist destination with a solid financial base and top-of-the-line facilities and animal care. A lot of people contributed to those achievements, of course, but it’s no exaggeration to say Hanna did more than anyone else (excluding the animals). When Hanna arrived in 1978, the zoo was struggling. It had one claim to fame—the home of Colo, the first captive-born gorilla—but that was pretty much it. Hanna worked tirelessly; 18-hour days were common in the early years. His energy, enthusiasm and PR skills put the zoo on the map, if for no other reason than he was an interesting and charismatic guy. 20

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His motto was if the people weren’t coming to the zoo, he’d bring the zoo to the people. The results were unpredictable. Hanna always seemed to be flirting with disaster: losing animals, getting bitten. But Columbus loved his goofy charm. And so did national TV producers. He became a regular on “Good Morning America” and David Letterman’s shows. Hanna also was no slouch as an administrator. Under his stewardship, attendance skyrocketed and funding stabilized with the passage of several zoo levies. In 1993, Hanna passed on day-to-day oversight to even more skilled managers who’ve continued to grow the institution: Record numbers of guests (more than 2.4 million in 2010) visit the zoo and its adjacent water park, Zoombezi Bay. Meanwhile, Hanna has kept up what he does best: promoting the zoo. He spent 260 days on the road in 2010—making speeches, appearing on TV shows, filming episodes of his nationally syndicated program, “Jack Hanna’s Into the Wild.” He says he plans to keep up the demanding schedule for at least three or four more years as long as his health remains good. “I love what I do,” he says. —Dave Ghose


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To some, 200 years of innovations and success is an accomplishment. To us, it’s just the beginning. We have a proud history full of freethinking individuals and innovative events. And now as we celebrate our 200th year, it’s time to take stock, not only in what we’ve accomplished, but the amazing things that await us in the future. Working together, we’ll make Columbus an even stronger, more vibrant place to live and do business. Here’s to another 200!

The Columbus Partnership, Columbus Chamber and Columbus2020 wish Columbus a happy bicentennial.


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FAMOUS PEOPLE WHO HAVE DOTTED THE “I” IN THE OSU MARCHING BAND’S SCRIPT OHIO AT

Ohio Stadium

INCLUDE BOB HOPE, JOHN GLENN AND WOODY HAYES.

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★ Places ★

COURTESY OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

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★ People ★

JEFFRY KONCZAL

kenneth ramos

Cop and community activist THE PANORAMIC VIEW of Columbus from a hovering helicopter has given veteran police officer, community activist and entrepreneur Kenneth Ramos a clear vision and some perspective on his adopted city. “Columbus is a city of opportunities; that’s why I moved here in 1987 and it’s still the same way,” he says. Ramos—whose parents came from Puerto Rico and settled in Cleveland—has kept an especially keen eye on the city’s Latino population. “When I moved here, there wasn’t much of a Hispanic community,” he says. “Now, we have the second and third generations here, graduating high schools and going to college and getting jobs here.” He was a helicopter mechanic with the Ohio National Guard when he came to Columbus. The National Guard later sent him to flight school, fulfilling his boyhood dream to be a pilot. Ramos joined the Columbus Division of Police in 1993, and, after three years as a patrol officer, he became a pilot in the helicopter unit. Ramos also has served as a board member of the Hispanic Chamber of Columbus, the Ohio Hispanic Coalition and the Community Refugee and Immigration Services (CRIS). And in his spare time, he and his daughter, Kristin, run KRamos

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Photography, which specializes in aerial imagery. He is certified by the Federal Aviation Administration to license would-be helicopter pilots, too. “Of the 21 pilots with the police helicopter unit, I’ve licensed 18,” he says. “I take pride that when you look up and see a police helicopter, the chances are I licensed that pilot.” A few years ago, Ramos decided he wanted a groundlevel view of Columbus, so he became a community liaison officer. “I loved the helicopter unit, but I felt a need to participate more directly in the community,” he says. “Now, I’m dealing with every possible issue, from a neighbor’s dog barking to speed enforcement to neighborhood block watches.” And Ramos continues to keep a watchful eye on the Hispanic community. “I can talk to them in their own language and this job allows me to stay connected throughout my day,” he says. “There’s still a long way to go, but now I see Hispanic people in every part of the community—in government, owning restaurants and bakeries and grocery stores. They’re financial consultants and jewelry store owners. . . . We are part of the fabric of the community.” —Steve Wartenberg


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Wishing you a happy

200

th!

You don’t know

what you’ve

meant to

Thank you, Columbus, for playing such a big role in making us the company we are today. As one of the only truly full-service marketing and communications companies in the country, we’re proud to tell the 2012 Columbus Bicentennial story. Please join us in celebrating all the great things that make Columbus Columbus.


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amanda harper

★ People ★

Learning to lend a hand

TIM JOHNSON

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AMANDA HARPER was on duty as a pharmacy volunteer at the Columbus Free Clinic when a doctor burst in, asking if anyone spoke Spanish. A patient needed care, and the clinic’s only translator was occupied. Just back from studying abroad in Chile, Harper raised her hand. She was thrilled to help, though she longed to be the one in the white doctor’s coat—the person calling the shots at the Columbus Free Clinic. Today, Harper helps run the clinic, where Columbus residents can see a doctor and receive medical care free of charge. A student in OSU’s medical scientist training program, she’s one of nine graduate students who make up the clinic’s steering committee. The Columbus Free Clinic is a place where first-year med students can get their hands dirty. Harper recalls the nerve-racking experience of donning her white coat and stethoscope for the first time. Though a team of experienced doctors make the final call on patient diagnosis and treatment, the stakes for her are higher than ever before. For Harper, volunteering at the clinic was more than a chance to diagnose illnesses. It was her first opportunity to experience the human side of medicine, working face-to-face with sick, worried patients. And they couldn’t be happier that she is there to listen. When one Hispanic patient got a new inhaler, an item he never could afford on his own, he was so grateful he gave her a kiss on the cheek and asked to bring his family in to meet her. The clinic serves dozens of low-income and unemployed patients each week. But meeting people who are down on their luck and suffering critical health conditions only energizes Harper. She thinks back to her senior year of high school, living in the small town of Ironton, when a girl at her church was diagnosed with melanoma. Despite a poor prognosis, Harper watched her friend survive and thrive thanks to a quick diagnosis and expert care. She felt inspired and soon applied to OSU’s biomedical science program. Harper has a long road ahead before she can fulfill her dream of running her own private practice and researching cures for cancer. But she cherishes the lessons she has learned during her time at the clinic: Never forget the difficult times patients are going through, and always be eager to lend a helping hand. —Brett Nuckles


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celebrating the arts in Columbus ✸

1IPUP3BOEBMM-4DIJFCFS

✸

11/29/11


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★ Places ★

Franklin Park Conservatory, A VICTORIAN-STYLE GLASS HOUSE, OPENED TO THE PUBLIC IN 1895. ANIMALS LATER WERE KEPT IN THE LOWER ROOMS FOR A BRIEF PERIOD, DEPARTING IN 1929 TO BECOME PART OF THE NEW COLUMBUS ZOO.

BRAD FEINKNOPF/COURTESY FRANKLIN PARK CONSERVATORY

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★ Business ★

Battelle

FILE/TODD YARRINGTON

“THERE’S VERY LITTLE THAT YOU TOUCH that we haven’t somewhere along the line had something to do with,” said Battelle President and CEO Jeff Wadsworth—speaking about you, and pretty much everyone you know. The Wadsworth quote, told to Columbus C.E.O. for a September 2010 story, isn’t corporate hyperbole. The world’s largest independent research and development organization has had a hand in the development of copying machines, compact discs, UPC bar codes, reusable insulin injection pens, cut-resistant golf balls, solar energy, fiber optics and even no-melt chocolate. For much of its history, which began in 1923, Battelle Memorial Institute and its scientists and researchers were content to remain in their labs and out of the spotlight. Battelle was a bit of a secret outside the scientific community, even in Central Ohio. This began to change under former CEO Carl Kohrt (2001-08) and now Wadsworth. Battelle forged partnerships with Ohio State University and other local and national organizations—and began to encourage and support STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education in schools. In recent years, the not-for-profit organization (formed in the will of Gordon Battelle) has annually donated between $17 million and $20 million to help

create the next generations of technology workers, with the bulk of the money remaining in Central Ohio. More than 80 years after its birth as a small, metallurgical laboratory, Battelle is now responsible for more than 5,000 industrial and governmental projects for 1,500 corporate and governmental clients. Battelle oversees 22,000 employees in more than 130 locations worldwide and manages or co-manages seven national laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and one international nuclear laboratory in the United Kingdom. All this fee-for-service research and management adds up to more than $6 billion in annual revenue. Battelle’s current focus is on the development of alternative energy sources; advances in medicine and health care; national security and defense; laboratory management; and promoting STEM education. In 2009, Battelle announced plans to invest nearly $200 million to expand and renovate its local facilities and create an additional 200 local jobs. The centerpiece of that plan, the $90 million Center for Life Sciences Research in West Jefferson, opened in September 2011. —Steve Wartenberg

Tailored luxury with a glamorous twist. Elegance: A Signature Lifestyle.

MCVAY’S AN AUTHORIZED ETHAN ALLEN RETAILER 6767 NORTH HIGH STREET WORTHINGTON 888.8865 MON., WED. 10-8 TUES., THURS., FRI., SAT. 10-5:30 SUN. NOON-5 ethanallen.com

©2011 Ethan Allen Global, Inc.

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★ People ★

Gordon Gee

TIM JOHNSON

Back home again 30

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IT SEEMS ODD to describe the relationship between the 15th-largest city in the United States and a geeky looking university president as a love affair. But how else to explain the affection that bonds Columbus and Gordon Gee? This romance began in 1990 when the self-described Orville Redenbacher clone (complete with ever-present bow tie) became Ohio State’s 11th president and swept the region off its feet with a comic’s timing for a punch line, irreverent antics and endless energy. There was substance as well as style: He battled with the state legislature for more funding for higher education, outwitted the city of Columbus to secure $15 million from the state to construct the Schottenstein Center and aggressively improved the university’s academic reputation. While the city cheered his accomplishments, it also seemed to forgive his stumbles (such as calling the football team’s 13-13 tie with Michigan “one of our greatest wins ever”). And it grieved with him during times of tragedy. In 1991, his wife, Elizabeth Gee, died at age 46 of breast cancer, leaving him to raise his teenage daughter, Rebekah. But like most storybook affairs, there came a dramatic breakup. In 1997, Gee left for an uptown suitor, Brown University, leaving Columbus with a broken heart. Ten years passed as Gee moved on to Vanderbilt and OSU presidents came and went (Brit Kirwan and Karen Holbrook). Then came the cinematic twist and happy ending. In a stunning move, Gee returned to Ohio State in 2007 for his second tenure as president. It felt like a hero’s welcome as a city celebrated. Although there were doubts about the wisdom of trying to rekindle the romance, Gee returned as energetic and bold as before, pushing for big changes, from overseeing a $1 billion building project at the medical center to launching a $2.5 billion fundraising effort. Sure, there still have been missteps, most notably the scandal in 2011 that derailed the football program and Gee’s now famous tone-deaf quip—“I’m just hopeful the coach doesn’t dismiss me”—in defending Jim Tressel, who later was forced to resign. But through good times and bad, the love affair seems to grow stronger. Maybe the city and Gee are just made for each other. As Gee emotionally acknowledged in his first speech during his second stint as president: “I thank all of you for letting me come home.” —Ray Paprocki

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GROVE CITY Southern Gateway to Columbus

visitgrovecityoh.com

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TIM JOHNSON

★ People ★

Aminah Robinson

Artistic brilliance at work AMINAH ROBINSON’S ART is rooted in family, community and history. Her work has become a familiar sight at the Columbus Museum of Art and other institutions in Central Ohio—and beyond. She is an intrinsic part of the artistic face Columbus presents to the world. Robinson has been most inspired by Poindexter Village, the east-side housing project in which she was raised in the 1940s. But she also has sought to capture the essence of other neighborhoods—past and present—in her work. The art itself is a diverse mixture of formats and materials. Handmade books are a favorite medium, as are paintings, scrolls and installations. Materials range from conventional paint, ink and charcoal to rags, animal skins, found materials and a concoction called “hogmawg,” which is made from mud, grease and other ingredients. Robinson learned how to make the latter material from her father, a school custodian. No doubt inspired by his artistic propensities, as well as those of her seamstress mother, she

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began teaching herself how to make art at an early age. Later, she studied her craft formally at the future Columbus College of Art & Design, Ohio State University and other institutions, in addition to being mentored by Columbus barber and legendary folk artist Elijah Pierce. As a result of her formal education, she’s technically not a folk artist, though her work’s homespun quality and local focus sometimes fool people into giving her that label. Over the years, her reputation slowly grew and spread. Robinson received an Ohio Arts Council grant in 1979, and in the early 1980s she began exhibiting in museums and galleries. Sales of her art soon brought in as much as $20,000 per piece. Then, in 2004, she was the recipient of a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation award—more commonly known as the genius grant. The world had discovered what many in Columbus already knew. —Richard Ades


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C a r d i n a l H e a lt h

COURTESY CARDINAL HEALTH

WHEN HE STARTED HIS COMPANY IN 1971, Robert D. Walter had no idea he’d end up running one of the top 20 companies on the Fortune 500. But 40 years later, Cardinal Health—Ohio’s largest company— is omnipresent in the health-care industry. If you’ve passed through a hospital in the last decade, you’ve likely seen the Cardinal Health name on something—a box of gloves, a suction canister hanging on the wall or that bag of supplies for new patients. Walter, a St. Charles Preparatory School grad, earned a mechanical engineering degree at Ohio University. An uninspiring first job prompted him to get an MBA from Harvard Business School. At the suggestion of his food broker father, Walter rounded up $135,000 and bought a small food distributor named Monarch. A subsequent lack of opportunities in that industry led him into health care. Walter’s 1980 acquisition of a family-owned Zanesville drug company saw Cardinal Foods take flight as Cardinal Distribution. Cardinal Health has made nearly 70 subsequent acquisitions. An initial public offering in 1983 provided capital to expand. At the time, the company had $200 million in annual revenue— $170 million of it in food. By 1988, pharmaceutical distribution had become double the size of the food segment, so the latter was sold. Revenue topped $1 billion for the first time in 1991.

★ Business ★

But in the last decade, Cardinal has experienced some growing pains, including inquiries by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, the U.S. Attorney and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. The company restated multiple years of earnings, underwent a major restructuring and defended itself against multiple class-action lawsuits filed by employees and shareholders. Ultimately, Cardinal paid more than $867 million in fines and settlements to resolve the issues. Cardinal’s founding father stepped down as president and CEO in April 2006, replaced by R. Kerry Clark. (Walter remained on the company’s board of directors until 2008.) One of Clark’s first major moves was an expansion of the company’s Dublin headquarters, a $50 million, 250,000-square-foot West Campus facility that incorporates an open environment, a fitness center and walking paths. In 2009, Cardinal spun off its clinical and medical products divisions as CareFusion Corp. Clark retired after the deal was finalized. Today, Cardinal is led by chairman and CEO George Barrett, whose tenure so far has been sure and steady. In fiscal year 2011, the company posted record revenue of $102.6 billion and increased operating earnings by 16 percent to $1.5 billion. It was ranked No. 19 on the 2011 Fortune 500. —Julanne Hohbach

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★ People ★

Jeni Britton Bauer

JEFFRY KONCZAL

Entrepreneur extraordinaire

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IT’S LUCKY for Central Ohioans that Jeni Britton Bauer didn’t make a career at Graeter’s. Otherwise, we—and the world— may never have known the decadent bliss of Salty Caramel, Thai Chili or Queen City Cayenne. Fortunately for local ice cream connoisseurs, Britton Bauer has an entrepreneurial spirit as well as a flair for flavor. Britton Bauer co-founded Jeni’s in 2002 with then-fiancé Charly Bauer. (The two have since married.) She dabbled in the dessert business behind the counter at Graeter’s, then moved to La Chatelaine French Bakery & Bistro, where high-quality ingredients became her mantra. In her spare time, Britton Bauer experimented with homemade ice cream. Britton Bauer opened Scream Ice Cream in the North Market in 1996 at friends’ suggestion, but it closed after four years and she and her business partner parted ways. She dreamed of opening another shop, but one thing stood in her way: a $1,200 ice cream maker. Bauer, though, bought her the machine as a gift in 2001. The pair opened Jeni’s at the North Market the next year. Bauer’s brother Tom signed on as a partner. More shops followed. Local restaurants added her inventive flavors to their menus. More shops followed. Now, thanks to a mailorder business, customers can get their Jeni’s fix, even if they’re thousands of miles from one of her 10 stores. Yet as the Jeni’s empire grew, its namesake found herself pulled away from the part of her job she loved most. And so Britton Bauer handed the CEO reins to John Lowe in 2009 so she could focus on the creative aspects of the business. From the start, Britton Bauer has refused to compromise on quality, crafting her artisan ice creams and ice cream sandwiches from scratch in small batches. Local ingredients, including cream from Snowville Creamery near Athens, rule. Britton Bauer’s 2011 cookbook, Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams at Home, hit the New York Times’ nonfiction bestseller list. Her flavors have been touted by Bon Appetit, Food Network’s “The Best Thing I Ever Ate” and the Washington Post, which opined “Ice cream perfection in a word: Jeni’s.” But perhaps the company’s Facebook page describes Jeni’s best: “Kick ass ice creams built from the ground up with tasty and compelling ingredients.” Short, sweet and perfectly crafted, just like her unique desserts. —Julanne Hohbach

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WE’RE HERE FOR GOOD! Serving Columbus since 1855! ymcacolumbus.org

YOUR GUIDE TO CULTURAL EVENTS, ORGANIZATIONS AND ARTISTS IN CENTRAL OHIO A SERVICE OF THE GREATER COLUMBUS ARTS COUNCIL

More Arts. More Culture. More Columbus.

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“THE SPACESHIP THAT CRASH-LANDED ON THE PRAIRIE.” —THE LATE MONOLOGUIST SPALDING GRAY ON THE

Wexner Center for the Arts

ALEX KOTRAN

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ÂŽ

Medical Mutual congratulates Columbus on its Bicentennial Celebration. We are proud to serve the healthcare needs of your community.

Health & Life Insurance Š 2011 Medical Mutual of Ohio


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★ People ★

DAN TRITTSCHUH

Mike Coleman

A new kind of city leader YOU DON’T NEED A BUNCH of statistics to appreciate the impact Mike Coleman has had on Columbus. Just walk around downtown. Columbus Commons, a nine-acre park, sits on the former site of the maligned City Center mall. More new green space, the Scioto Mile, runs along the riverfront, while construction crews put the finishing touches on a 500-room hotel near the bustling Arena District. Some 5,600 new residents have moved into the city center since Coleman made downtown revitalization his administration’s signature issue—and the mayor has led by example. He lives in a condo on Town Street. Coleman has enjoyed a charmed life as mayor. In November, he won a fourth term in another landslide victory over a weak, poorly funded opponent. Neighborhood activists, unions, the business community, young professionals, the Dispatch’s editorial page, pretty much everyone supports Coleman. The Columbus police union even endorsed Coleman in the latest race, though his Republican opponent, Earl Smith, was a respected former city police sergeant. To be sure, Coleman has been lucky. Incumbency is a powerful advantage; no sitting mayor has lost since Tom Moody knocked off Jack Sensenbrenner in 1971. If things are going well in Columbus—and they usually are, thanks to the city’s strong economic base—it’s hard for a mayor to 38

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lose, especially a Democratic one. (In recent years, Columbus has turned into a solidly blue city.) Still, Coleman can point to an impressive record. The downtown transformation is his most obvious achievement, but the mayor’s financial stewardship might be more significant. While the Great Recession has pushed other cities to the brink of bankruptcy, Columbus’s finances are in good shape. The city’s aggressive land annexation, a policy that predates Coleman, has contributed to the strong revenue, but the economic picture would no doubt look much different if Coleman hadn’t pushed for an income tax increase, which voters approved in 2009. Coleman is a new kind of Columbus leader. He’s brash, confident and idealistic, though no ideologue. (When he realized a proposed streetcar system would be too costly to build, he gave up on his dream.) He also is quick to take credit for accomplishments and doesn’t suffer from an inferiority complex. Columbus is the greatest city in the world, and he’ll challenge anyone who thinks otherwise. Such bluster once seemed out of place in a city more accustomed to quiet, unassuming professionals. No more. When Columbus Monthly asked community leaders recently what Columbus needs, several suggested “swagger,” one of Coleman’s favorite words. —Dave Ghose


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Donatos pizzeria

COURTESY DONATOS PIZZERIA

IT’S ONE OF THOSE RAGS-TO-RICHES, pepperoni-andmushroom stories that sounds too good to be true. In 1963, Ohio State University sophomore Jim Grote borrowed some money, put down $1,300 and purchased the pizza shop on Thurman Avenue in Columbus where he’d worked for several years. That shop—called Donatos— grew into a large chain that continues to follow Grote’s formula for success: “To make the best pizza and treat others the way I would like to be treated.” Donatos quickly came to dominate the Central Ohio market with its signature thin crust, rectangle-cut pies and its mantra of putting at least 100 pieces of meat on every large pepperoni pizza. Grote began to expand throughout the state and beyond. By the late 1990s, Donatos Pizzeria LLC (then called Donatos Pizza Inc.) had about 150 restaurants, and attracted the attention of fast-food giant McDonald’s. The company was looking to expand beyond burgers and fries and purchased Donatos in 1999. The marriage was short-lived, however, and Grote and one of his daughters, Jane Grote Abell,

★ Business ★

bought back the company in 2003. Today, Donatos has 157 restaurants in six states (and one being constructed in Virginia), including 61 in the Columbus market. The original Thurman Avenue shop is still going strong. The company created Jane’s Dough Foods in 2008, a division that provides pre-risen dough, par-baked pizza crusts and pre-topped pizzas for food service distributors and retailers. Donatos has big plans for the coming decade. Abell, the company’s chairwoman, and Tom Krouse, who was named CEO in 2010, want to more than double the number of restaurants and eventually become a national chain. Although not involved in the dayto-day operations, Grote is still the philosophical leader of the company—and TV pitchman. “The Donatos legacy is our mission to promote goodwill through product and service, principles and people,” Grote said in an October 2010 press release. “We’re excited for the future of our company.” —Steve Wartenberg

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★ People ★

Yvette MCGee Brown

JEFFRY KONCZAL

A trailblazer with a killer smile

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IT’S AN INSPIRING SIGHT when Yvette McGee Brown dons the black robe and takes a seat in the majestic chambers of the Ohio Supreme Court. Yes, she’s the first African-American woman to sit on the state’s highest court—adding to her collection of firsts, which includes being the first black female to serve as a Franklin County Common Pleas Court judge when elected in the early 1990s. But it’s her back story that distinguishes her ascension in the fields of law, politics and social services. She was born to a teenage mom and an absent dad, hardly the kind of circumstances signaling a successful career path. But McGee Brown cites as significant the work ethic of her mother, who held down two jobs and earned a college degree over 10 years. In addition, her mother suffered a serious illness that nearly killed her. While she survived, it took her two years to recover. During that time, a 12-yearold McGee Brown and her two brothers came under the care of their grandmother, who infused into McGee Brown life lessons about overcoming obstacles. After graduating from Ohio University, she pursued her interest in politics by attending Ohio State’s law school. A series of career moves and an upset election victory in 1992 put her on the bench in the juvenile and domestic division of Common Pleas. At first glance, she came across as a soft touch as a judge, mainly for her magnetic personality: a buoyant smile and an infectious laugh resembling a highpitched explosion. But she mixed compassion with tough love in running her courtroom with passion and presence, as well as a sharp tongue. She changed course in 2002 by stepping away from the bench to become the president of the Center for Child and Family Advocacy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital before then-Gov. Ted Strickland selected her as his running mate in his re-election bid in 2010. Although lighting up the campaign trail, she and Strickland lost to John Kasich. But before leaving office, Strickland, filling a vacancy on the Ohio Supreme Court, named McGee Brown, a Democrat, to join the all-Republican lineup of judges. And it didn’t take long for her to register another milestone. In late August 2011, she became the lone justice to use a Twitter account. —Ray Paprocki

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Talk v. Walk On the occasion of Columbus’ bicentennial, Barnes & Thornburg salutes the entrepreneurial spirit that makes Columbus one of the Midwest’s most vibrant cities. Leaders and business owners in Columbus know that success requires more walk than talk. So do we. Barnes & Thornburg is a full-service law firm with the energy and valuedriven focus of a small start-up. We look forward to helping Columbus continue to walk the talk.

btlaw.com

AT L AN T A

CHICAG O

M ICHIG AN

DE L AWAR E

M IN N E APO L IS

IN DIAN A

O HIO

L O S AN G ELES

WAS HIN G T O N , D . C .

WILLIAM A. NOLAN | 614-628-1401 | BILL.NOLAN@BTLAW.COM

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★ Places ★

“A TRUE LANDMARK IN COLUMBUS SINCE IT OPENED [IN 1927],

LeVeque Tower IS STILL PROBABLY THE CITY’S BEST-KNOWN SKYSCRAPER. . . . PILOTS DUBBED IT ‘THE FIRST AERIAL LIGHTHOUSE.’ ” —AIA GUIDE TO COLUMBUS, BY JEFFREY T. DARBEE AND

FILE

NANCY A. RECCHIE

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★ People ★

DAN TRITTSCHUH

Archie Griffin

Everybody loves Archie “HE’S A BETTER YOUNG MAN than he is a football player, and he’s the best football player I’ve ever seen.” Any Buckeyes fan worth his cornhole bags knows that quote. In the 35 years or so since it was first recorded, it’s become part of Ohio State football folklore, in no small part because of the man who said it—legendary coach Woody Hayes—and the man he was describing—former tailback Archie Griffin. Griffin, college football’s only two-time Heisman Trophy winner, has done nothing but uphold the high praise in the decades that have since passed. He’s the epitome of everything Buckeyes fans hold dear: success, devotion and a Midwest purity that sadly seems lost in these days of ego, scandal and greed that no throwback uniform can erase. For the past eight years, he’s been president and CEO of the 130,000-member Ohio State University Alumni Association. Of all the jobs on the planet that don’t require shoulder pads, it’s the one Griffin seems most suited to. Instead of compiling rushing yardage, such as the 5,589 he racked up from 1972 to 1975 for the Buckeyes or the 2,808 he gained in seven seasons with the Cincinnati Bengals, he now accrues frequent flyer miles jetting all over the country

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attending alumni events and fulfilling speaking engagements as the university’s star attraction, spreading a good word and a broad smile wherever he goes. It’s a life, Griffin says, shaped by two guiding principles. The first, instilled by his mother (Margaret) and his father (James), was “to trust in God,” says Griffin. “They said that if God controls your life, He can help you in any situation you might encounter. I believe that to this day. I try to glorify Him in everything I do, and make sure He knows I’m thankful for the gifts He has given me.” The second principle came from Hayes. “It was his ‘Pay Forward’ message,” says Griffin. “I’ve kind of made that my mantra as well. He used to preach that daily, and I think he got that message across to us. I see lots of my teammates to this day helping others, paying forward.” Those principles, he says, have afforded him more opportunities than he’d ever dreamed for himself, at the university he loves and in the city he’s called home for all of his 57 years. “In the work I’ve done, I’ve seen the world a bit,” says Griffin. “But this is where I want to be. It’s not the biggest place. It’s not the smallest place. But it’s a good place.” —Eric Lyttle


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Huntington Bancshares

COURTESY HUNTINGTON BANCSHARES

IT WAS FAR FROM THE BEST OF TIMES at Huntington Bancshares when Stephen Steinour took over as chairman, president and CEO in January 2009. The economy was in free fall and banks were losing billions; several financial institutions went under, while others— including Huntington—received bailouts from the federal government. Huntington was hemorrhaging money, losing $113 million in 2008 and $3.1 billion the following year. Its stock price plummeted and there was talk the bank could go under or be sold. Fast forward three years. The economy is still struggling, and the only certainty in the banking industry and economy is more uncertainty. But Huntington—and Steinour— are starting to turn things around. In 2010, the company posted a $312.3 million profit, and earned $272.4 million in the first half of 2011. Huntington repaid its $1.4 billion Troubled Asset Relief Program funds in December 2010. The problems for Huntington, which was founded in 1866 and grew into one of the Midwest’s largest banks, began soon after it purchased Sky Financial Group for $3.6 billion in 2007. Huntington inherited about $1.5 billion in toxic subprime loans from Sky’s affiliation with Franklin Credit Management Corp.

N E W

E X H I B I T

★ Business ★

When the housing bubble burst and the economy tanked, Huntington was hit hard—and paid the price. So did then CEO Tom Hoaglin. Hoaglin, who succeeded longtime my-way-or-thehighway CEO Frank Wobst, had made great strides in his nearly eight-year tenure, improving performance, eliminating the executive ivory tower and empowering employees to make decisions to better serve customers. But it wasn’t enough to save his job. Soon after Steinour took over, he cut jobs, pay and benefits and began the painful task of dealing with the Franklin Credit losses, including a whopping $2.6 billion writedown in early 2009. Since then, Huntington has rallied, improving its capitalization ratios, fiscal soundness and Central Ohio market share. It is one of the largest lenders in the country for U.S. Small Business Administration loans, and its new Fair Play banking system aims to be user-friendly, reducing and eliminating many of the now-common penalties and fees associated with checking accounts. “We asked our customers what they wanted, we listened to their input and responded with a simpler, more straight-forward approach,” Steinour said in a May 2011 press release. —Steve Wartenberg

C O M I N G

T O

C O S I

A Project of American Anthropological Association. Funded by Ford Foundation & National Science Foundation.

JANUARY 28 – MAY 6, 2012 Looking through the lens of history, science and personal experience, the RACE exhibit explores differences among people and explains the realities of race. Add your voice to the conversation that will bring our community closer together.

Presenting Sponsor:

Group admission rates and corporate teambuilding experiences are available! Call 614.228.2674 for details.

Supporting Sponsor:

“I think [the RACE exhibit at COSI] presents great possibilities. I hope – and expect – that companies across the city will get very engaged with this exhibit, because this is a topic that Columbus cares about.” Candice Barnhardt, Chief Diversity Officer, Nationwide Insurance

614.228.2674 | cosi.org

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★ People ★

Abigail and Les Wexner

JEFFRY KONCZAL

The ultimate power couple 46

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HE WAS THE FIFTYSOMETHING bachelor billionaire. She was the young New York City attorney. Both grew up in Jewish families, and each had to work hard to make their marks in the world. They met on a blind date in London and a few years later, on Jan. 23, 1993, at his $29 million New Albany mansion named for her, they married on a night lit up by fireworks over the rural landscape. At that point, Columbus knew plenty about Les Wexner, among the richest men in the country based on turning a $5,000 loan from his aunt into a retail empire that developed such dominant brands as Victoria’s Secret, Bath & Body Works, Abercrombie & Fitch and many more. His bold philanthropic and civic strokes ushered in a different attitude and changed the status quo of the city, from creating the über suburb New Albany to donating $25 million to help build the Wexner Center for the Arts. The former Abigail Koppel, though, was an unknown at the time of the marriage, with rumors claiming she was the daughter of legendary newscaster Ted Koppel (she grew up in a lower-middleclass family, the daughter of immigrants from Israel). Questions among the Wexner watchers in town came thick and fast, including: Would she stand in the shadows of her husband or find a way to carve out her own path? The city soon found out. The Wexners, while producing four children in the first four or so years of marriage, became the city’s ultimate power couple, with Abigail’s influence broadening the scope of the Wexner impact on the region. Her interest in women’s and children’s issues manifested in leadership roles at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and the creation of the Family Violence Coalition. They also brought some cachet to the area with the New Albany Classic, opening up the grounds of their estate for a familycentered festival combined with a worldclass equestrian competition—as well as hosting multiple fundraisers at their home. Abigail is credited with easing smoothly into the city’s civic scene and helping her husband develop a more patient leadership style. As a couple, they are continuing the work started by Les Wexner in Columbus—especially his alma mater, Ohio State University, the recipient of about $200 million of Wexner wealth over the years. As Les Wexner once said about his own accomplishments, which also can apply to them as a team, “It’s like the record’s the record.” —Ray Paprocki 2 0 0 C O L U M B U S

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SCOTTISH-BORN ARCHITECT THOMAS LAMB DESIGNED THE SPANISH BAROQUE-STYLE

Ohio Theatre IN 1928 AS “A PALACE FOR THE AVERAGE

MAN.” DESIGNER ANNE DORNAN FILLED IT WITH MORE THAN $1 MILLION IN ART

DR GOFF

AND FURNISHINGS—MORE THAN THE COST OF THE BUILDING ITSELF.

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Jan Benadum Coldwell Banker King Thompson www.JanBenadum.com 614-206-3373

Mike Carruthers Coldwell Banker King Thompson www.MikeCarruthers.com 614-324-4321

Amy Conley Prudential Metrix www.ConleyandPartners.com 614-792-7500

Jean Ann Conley Prudential Metrix www.ConleyandPartners.com 614-792-7500

Bruce Dooley, CRS Keller Williams Classic Properties www.DooleyCo.com 614-297-8600

Sarah Eagleson Keller Williams Classic Properties www.ColumbusClassicProperties.com 614-804-8470

Don Faust Keller Williams Capital Partners www.Fausts.com 614-402-4107

Kathy Faust Keller Williams Capital Partners www.Fausts.com 614-402-4107

Phil Giessler Cam Taylor Company, LTD www.CamTaylor.com 614-888-0307

Doug Green Prudential Metrix www.DougGreenRealtor.com 614-893-8772

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★ People ★

DAN TRITTSCHUH

Mike Sewell

The band leader MIKE SEWELL HAS PLENTY of stories about his 32 years directing the marching band at Pickerington High School Central (previously known as Pickerington High School). Perhaps his favorite is bringing the band to New York City to participate in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade just two months after the 9/11 attacks. Sewell, along with the directors of the other high school bands invited to march, met to discuss whether the parade would even take place. Unexpectedly, New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani arrived and pleaded with them to participate. “ ‘Please come,’ ” he recalls the mayor saying. “ ‘Show the world we’re not afraid.’ ” Sewell’s Marching Tigers wound up leading the procession just behind Giuliani’s float. A graduate of Whitehall High School and later Otterbein College, Sewell’s passion for music took him to Crooksville, where he directed the high school marching band for two years. Then he landed a job at Pickerington before taking a leave of absence to get his master’s degree at Florida State University. There, he served as a graduate assistant for the Marching Chiefs band. Following graduation, he returned to Pickerington. Four Macy’s parades, four Rose Bowl parades, two Orange Bowl parades, two Fiesta Bowl parades and a Cotton Bowl parade later, he’s still at the helm—a lone, steady figure amid

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a sea of bodies moving in unison on a field. Asked his teaching philosophy after all these years, Sewell hesitates before saying: “Teach always, and if necessary use words,” borrowing from St. Francis of Assisi. As the economy fell into decline in recent years, Sewell says it became apparent that music programs at the school might be on the chopping block as the district attempted to save money. Though the marching band ultimately survived, it was a trying time for the director. “What scared me is that I don’t know how to do anything else,” he says. Now, with his eyes set on retirement (he hopes in 2015), Sewell says he and his wife plan to migrate somewhere warm—Florida, perhaps, or Arizona. Not content to merely sit around, however, he says the goal is to get a part-time job working with a high school marching band. Sewell, who works with several hundred students each day at three different schools and has touched the lives of many thousands more during his 32 years, says faith is what has driven him. “God put me here for a reason,” he says. (At least 80 of his students have gone on to careers in music.) Borrowing from yet another historical figure, it’s fair to say that old band directors never die; they just fade away. “Part of me will live on in the music of these kids,” Sewell says. —Ben Zenitsky


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★ People ★

TIM JOHNSON

Bobby Floyd

Another jazz giant COLUMBUS HAS A LONG HISTORY of jazz musicians, featuring such acclaimed figures as organist Hank Marr, trumpeter Harry “Sweets” Edison and saxophonists Rusty Bryant and Roland Kirk, to name a few. Carrying on that tradition now is Bobby Floyd, whose skill and flair on the keyboard has cemented his reputation as a Columbus institution. And while Floyd has released four solo albums, you really miss his essence if you don’t catch him live. It’s his infectious energy, the head bobbing in time to the beat, his face an uninhibited display of emotions—plus the pure artistry of whatever he’s playing. It could be a piano or the mighty Hammond B-3 organ. In fact, Floyd is one of the forces who helped make Columbus— in the words of local jazz journalist Lee Brown—“the B-3 capital of the world.” Asked which instrument is his favorite, Floyd refuses to take sides. “It really depends on the type of venue and the style of jazz that I’m playing,” he says. “It depends on my mood, too. I might be in a mood to play some blues on the organ.” Floyd has an easier time talking about his musical heroes and mentors—the artists who helped to shape his sound. 52

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“Erroll Garner is probably my biggest one. He was a great pianist,” he says, adding that Thelonious Monk was another influence. Several B-3 organists also make the list, including Marr and another Columbus native, Bobby Pierce. “I listened to them when I was growing up—and learned a lot,” Floyd says. The future keyboardist was born on Christmas Eve, 1954, in Marion. He began playing the piano as a precocious 2-year-old and, by 15, he was performing in a jazz trio with another Marion native, drummer Robert Breithaupt, now executive director of Columbus’s Jazz Arts Group. Floyd moved to Central Ohio in 1974 to study music at Ohio State University. Though he never got around to graduating, he’s been a full-time musician ever since. Besides leading his own trio, he’s played piano and organ for JAG’s Columbus Jazz Orchestra since the 2004 death of his mentor, Marr, whom he replaced. In 1984, he spent nine months traveling the world with Ray Charles and his band. But while he still tours today, Floyd has said he’s never away from Columbus for more than two weeks at a time. That’s fortunate for jazz aficionados who enjoy hearing, as well as seeing, him hold court. —Richard Ades


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COURTESY COSI

★ Places ★

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“I THOUGHT THIS BUILDING SHOULD HAVE A SIDE THAT SPEAKS ABOUT TRADITION, MEMORY, THE PAST, AND A SIDE THAT SPEAKS ABOUT INNOVATION, HOPE, THE FUTURE.” —ARCHITECT ARATA ISOZAKI IN 1999 ON HIS DESIGN FOR

C O S l , WHICH COMBINED A

NEW ELLIPTICAL STRUCTURE WITH THE FORMER CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL, BUILT IN 1924

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★ People ★

TIM JOHNSON

mequanent berihun

Food and family IF YOU’VE EVER DINED at the Blue Nile, an Ethiopian restaurant just north of the Ohio State University campus, you’ve undoubtedly heard some version of this refrain: “Hello, sister, brother, how are you?” The welcoming man at the door is Mequanent Berihun, and for more than 15 years, he and wife Meaza have served traditional food from their native Ethiopia: spicy vegetable and meat dishes atop injera, a flat, sourdough-like bread. Growing up in Ethiopia, he never imagined this life for himself. But in 1984, Berihun, then a university student, left his war-torn home for Sudan, where he and his friends “did whatever work we found,” he says. Five years later, he resettled in Chicago; two and a half years after that, his wife and daughter, Sefanit, joined him. In Chicago, Berihun attended pharmacy classes and worked at his aunt’s restaurant, but with a second child on the way, they moved in 1993 to Columbus, where Meaza had relatives. Soon, Berihun realized his family’s needs and his long absence from school made it too difficult to continue his education. He worked as a parking lot attendant and a taxi driver to make ends meet before deciding to open a restaurant. After a little over a year at an east-side location— and with loans from friends and family—Berihun relocated his 56

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business to Old North Columbus in early 1996. Within a year and a half, he’d paid off his debts. “And then I was free,” he says, a grin overtaking his face. The days are long—Berihun typically arrives at the Blue Nile at 10 a.m. to prepare for lunch and works until dinner ends at 10 p.m.—and they are many: The restaurant is open six days a week, and Berihun is there for each of them. He sometimes wonders what life would have been like had he continued his pharmacy studies. But, “I am a Christian . . . and I believe that the way something goes is the will of God, so I accept it the way it is,” he says. The Berihuns have become U.S. citizens; Sefanit, now 22, is in her final year of college, studying chemical engineering, middle child Fassil is 18, and the youngest, Zelalem, is 8. Berihun last traveled to Ethiopia in 2000, and he says he doesn’t expect to return any time soon. The political situation remains troubled; genocide, famine and racism run deep. Still, Berihun says, the relationships he’s built at the Blue Nile help keep him going. “One thing that makes me motivated is the people. . . . Some people say, ‘How come you always smile? Do you have sad days?’ I do, but this is what makes me forget the sadness.” —Jennifer Wray


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jane brooks

★ People ★

Of life and death

JEFFRY KONCZAL

WHEN JANE BROOKS GRADUATED with a degree in nursing from Ohio University’s Zanesville campus in 1974, her uniform stopped four inches above her knee. When her mother graduated from nursing school in 1953, her uniform stopped four inches above her ankle. Today, nurses wear scrubs, use electronic charts and watch their patients’ family members post Facebook updates in the middle of procedures. “Nursing has changed over the years. It’s just been amazing to see the explosion of things that we do now and the technologies that we have available to us,” says Brooks, a labor and delivery nurse at Riverside Methodist Hospital. “It used to be that the family would go home [after a delivery] and tell their family members what they had, or call them on the phone at home. Now it’s instantaneous. They’re calling on their cellphone at the time of the delivery.” Brooks has worked at Riverside for 35 years, the last 10 in labor and delivery. She’s heard a few interesting baby names—including Ransom (“As in, holding your baby for?” she asked the couple)—and has sad and happy memories alike. One patient, a nurse from another OhioHealth hospital, used Skype to talk to her mother in Poland throughout the labor. Death also is part of her profession, and a 14-year-old girl who died from a cardiac issue when Brooks was working in the critical care unit left an equally strong memory. “I teach a class on high-risk obstetrics, and she is the reason I teach that class,” Brooks says. Perhaps the biggest benefit of working at Riverside was meeting her husband, Tony, then a patient escort, in 1977. The two married in 1982. When he died in 2010, “My family at Riverside was such a good support system,” she says. Brooks says she wouldn’t choose another profession. “When I started out, it wasn’t a job that you went into for money. I think now most people would say it is a job that you can go into for money, but the true nurse who is going to be great is the one who goes into it because she has a passion for that livelihood and a compassion for her patients,” she says. —Michelle Davey

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★ Business ★

Limited Brands

COURTESY LIMITED BRANDS

THERE’S NOTHING LIMITED about the success of Les Wexner and his company, Limited Brands Inc., one of the world’s largest retailers—and home of those oh-so-sexy and scantily clad angels. It all started in 1963, when Wexner borrowed $5,000 to open The Limited, a women’s clothing store at the Kingsdale Shopping Center in Upper Arlington. The company went public in 1969, with initial shares selling for $7.25. Today, Limited Brands is trading around the $40 range and boasts annual sales of about $9.6 billion through its brands: Victoria’s Secret, Pink, Bath & Body Works, La Senza, C.O. Bigelow, White Barn Candle Company and Henri Bendel. The company operates 2,600 stores in the United States, and its products are sold in more than 800 company-affiliated locations around the world. Over the years, Wexner and Limited Brands (formerly The Limited Inc.) built or bought, and eventually sold, such notable chains as Express, Lane Bryant, Abercrombie & Fitch, Lerner and Limited Too for children. It also maintained and divested interests in Galyan’s Trading Company and Alliance Data Systems. In 2007, the company began exiting its core apparel brands,

selling off Express as well as a majority interest in Limited Stores. It sold its remaining Limited Stores stake in June 2010. Like other retailers, Limited Brands has struggled in recent years as the economy collapsed and people cut back on shopping. In early 2009, 400 employees were laid off, including 230 in Central Ohio. But things are starting to improve. In the company’s annual report, Wexner called 2010 “the best year Limited Brands has ever had.” The retailer reported a 9 percent increase in comparable store sales in third quarter 2011 and net sales of $2.17 billion, up from $1.98 billion a year ago. Yet Wexner and the Limited Brands Foundation are almost as well known for their charitable contributions as those alluring angels. In 1989, Wexner, a Dayton native, and his mother, Bella, were the first to make a $1 million personal donation to the United Way of Central Ohio. More recently, he donated an unprecedented $100 million to his alma mater, Ohio State University, saying: “But for Ohio State and the education I received, I never would have started the business.” —Steve Wartenberg

We aare proud to be among the City Columbus Business Community. of Colu

“Celebrating 65 Years” “C 1947-2012

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★ People ★

dottie coldren

Holding court at the Florentine IT’S 3:30 P.M. and Dottie Coldren is prepping to start her shift at the Florentine. She doesn’t take to the floor for another half hour, but she wants to make sure her Parmesan cheese shakers are full and plates are on the table. “The other girls don’t do that,” she says, but it’s something that her 30 years at the restaurant have taught her makes things run smoother and, more importantly, keeps her customers satisfied. Two of Coldren’s other rules are never leaving the check without asking if a guest wants dessert and bringing the bread and butter to the table within minutes of a patron being seated. Her methods work, because just like the Italian pot roast on a Saturday night, Coldren is in demand, and sometimes there’s not enough of her to go around. Every other customer who walks through the Italian eatery’s door asks for Coldren. On weekends, it’s more. So much more that years ago the manager had to give her the same front section she was promised when she first started and the third and final room in the notoriously lengthy restaurant.

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Over the years, Coldren says she and the restaurant regulars have had to stand up to the owners and fellow servers to ensure their dining traditions stay the same. Changes, though, have come regardless. T-shirts paired with black pants replaced the white blouses, black knee-length skirts and hose of the early 1970s, just as booths made room for tables in the ’80s and the two large wine barrels next to the bar stopped pumping rose and red in the ’90s. The Bottoms—as Coldren and other locals refer to the stretch of West Broad Street the 66-year-old business sits on—has changed, too. But she says that decline doesn’t stop her from working the evening shift, where she is certain she makes more money than she did doing doubles for her first 16 years—especially if there’s an event at the nearby Franklin County Veterans Memorial or COSI. Coldren hasn’t come in early to straighten her tables and shown up for all but 11 days in the last 30 years just for the tips. “I really love my customers,” she says. “I feel if I wasn’t here, they’d be upset with me.” —Melissa Dilley


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★ Places ★ “[ARCHITECT PETER EISENMAN] MADE A BUILDING THAT IS LUMPISH BY NATURE INTO A BRILLIANT PIECE OF URBAN DESIGN. . . . IT IS BOTH PLAYFUL AND FUNCTIONAL. DEFINITIVELY, IT GIVES LIFE TO THE STREET.” —THE WASHINGTON POST ON THE

Greater Columbus Convention Center

D.G. OLSHAVSKY

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★ Business ★

M a n ta m e d i a

FILE/TODD YARRINGTON

THE DEVELOPMENT AND GROWTH of small businesses is the key to unlocking a market rebound, according to economists and analysts. If that’s the case, Manta Media may be poised for a lot more success. This Columbus-based small business has found a niche connecting small businesses with each other through its website. As of November 2011, manta.com had more than 1 million registered users and more than 64 million company profiles. This modern-day version of businessto-business marketing offers a way for small companies that lack websites to make themselves known and attract new customers and business. “We’re creating a network for businesses,” says Manta President and CEO Pamela Springer. In 2010, Manta had $15 million in revenue—a figure Springer says the company is on pace to double in 2011. The company is the third-largest business news/research website, according to Internet marketing researcher comScore. Manta’s roots go back to ECNext, an

e-commerce business that worked with publishers to sell their products online. Springer joined the company in 2003 as vice president of sales and was named CEO the following year. She began to transition the company in a new direction, citing an untapped opportunity to create a digital marketing company. “Eighty percent of U.S. companies have nine or less employees and 50 percent of companies with five or less employees don’t have a website,” Springer told Columbus Monthly for a November 2011 story. The company was renamed Manta, a made-up word that is simple as well as easy to remember and market, she says. In June 2011, Manta was awarded a 55 percent, seven-year tax credit from the state and will use it to add 130 fulltime jobs over the next two years. And when Gov. John Kasich named the members of his new, nonprofit JobsOhio board, Springer was on the list. “I’d like to think it’s because Manta is something special,” Springer told Columbus Monthly. —Steve Wartenberg

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WorldCat.org OCLC is the world’s largest library cooperative. From our headquarters in Dublin, we provide the infrastructure and services that help connect people to knowledge through library cooperation. Record by record, keystroke by keystroke, OCLC and member libraries collaboratively create and maintain WorldCat, the most comprehensive database of library resources from around the world. Search WorldCat on the Web at www.worldcat.org to see what libraries have in store for you.

www.oclc.org

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JEFFRY KONCZAL

★ People ★

amy neiwirth

Pretty crafty ON ANY GIVEN DAY, you may find Amy Neiwirth pulling a luscious confection from her kitchen oven. It could be a strawberry-and-kiwi-topped tart, a cinnamon roll or perhaps a pair of smiling gingerbread men. They look good enough to eat . . . but you probably shouldn’t indulge. For the last five years, Neiwirth has made crave-worthy treats out of polymer clay, much of which she makes into jewelry for her company, Sweet Stella Designs. A halfdozen tiny doughnuts become a pendant necklace. A cherry pie no larger than a quarter is transformed into a ring. In addition to creating her delectable wares, Neiwirth is a member of the Couchfire Collective, a group united by their interest in growing as artists and raising the profile of the city’s creative community. (They’re the ones behind the annual Agora art and music event at Junctionview Studios in Grandview Heights, and they helped found the Independents’ Day festival downtown.) “I would say we’re a lot less active now than we used to be, mainly because everyone in the group is involved in a lot of different projects,” Neiwirth says. She’s also a member of the Columbus Crafty Cotillion, a group of artists, crafters and designers that gathers socially and hosts craft-related events around town. 64

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The Bexley High School graduate earned a bachelor’s degree in fine arts from Ohio State University in 2003 and a master’s in art education from OSU in 2005. Not long after graduation, she discovered that crafting polymer beads and selling them to scrapbookers was a potentially lucrative gig; by 2007, she was using the material to make jewelry to sell at boutiques such as What the Rock?, Wholly Craft and the Columbus Museum of Art’s gift shop. In the meantime, Neiwirth also landed a full-time job at the Columbus Torah Academy, a small, K-12 Jewish school where she teaches art. On her arrival at the academy in the morning, Neiwirth leads fifth- and sixth-grade girls through their morning prayers. “That’s a good way to start the day,” she says. Then the academic day begins, stretching until 4 p.m. Many an evening finds her at home, baking her wares. After work on Wednesdays and Sundays, Neiwirth teaches religion classes to seventh-graders at Congregation Tifereth Israel, where her father is executive director. Ironically, Neiwirth, who keeps kosher, often finds herself making miniature versions of food she herself does not eat. “I made the little prizes for Bacon Camp, and I was like, ‘I think this is what bacon looks like,’ ” she says. “I had to look it up online, because I didn’t know.” —Jennifer Wray


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So much to celebrate. Including America’s largest pediatric expansion. In June 2012, Nationwide Children’s Hospital will reshape the city’s downtown skyline by completing our new campus and America’s largest pediatric expansion. In the process we’ll have recruited the country’s best pediatric physicians and scientists. All to provide the finest care available for your children and find discoveries to the diseases that affect them. Like you, we’re proud to call Columbus home.

Mark your calendar – Grand Campus Rededication: June, 2012 Learn more: NationwideChildrens.org/grandopening


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★ Places ★

PRISONERS FROM THE OHIO STATE PENITENTIARY HELPED BUILD THE

Ohio Statehouse, WHICH WAS COMPLETED IN 1861 AFTER 22 YEARS

OHIO STOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

OF CONSTRUCTION.

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★ Business ★

Minimally Invasive devices

FILE/GREG BARTRAM

DR. WAYNE POLL had a problem. His solution was a new invention, which led to a successful startup company, which in turn created jobs. Poll, a urologist, laparoscopic surgeon and entrepreneur, founded Minimally Invasive Devices, a medical device company, in 2007 after he became frustrated with a particular downside of laparoscopic surgery. During a laparoscopic procedure, a surgeon makes a small incision and places video cameras inside a patient; the doctor then uses specially designed, sometimes robotic, instruments to operate. However, blood and other debris can accumulate on the camera lens, obscuring the surgeon’s view. He or she is then forced to remove the camera and clean the lens, sometimes multiple times during a procedure. Poll’s solution to the problem is FloShield, an FDA-approved device that utilizes airflow to defog and deflect debris from the lens. FloShield dramatically reduces, and often eliminates, interruptions to clean the lens. “The advent of HD ten years ago was the last breakthrough in laparoscopic vision,” Poll said in a July 2011 press release.

“FloShield represents the last hurdle in laparoscopic visualization.” FloShield, in the early stages of distribution in the United States, is being used in about 40 hospitals. More than 2,000 operations have been performed using FloShield, according to the company, and the second generation of the product “produces an even more consistently clear image” for surgeons. Minimally Invasive Devices (MID) won the 2009 Excellence in Surgical Products Award from Surgical Products magazine, and Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry magazine named the company among its “50 Companies to Watch” in 2010. At the 2010 TechColumbus Innovation Awards, MID won Outstanding Startup Business and Innovation in Strategic Fundraising, and Poll earned CEO of the Year for companies with fewer than 50 employees. The company has been contacted by several European and Asian distributors who are interested in the device. FloShield was awarded CE Mark Certification in July 2011; the designation is required for the sale of all medical devices in Europe. —Steve Wartenberg

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★ People ★

David Kabbes

JEFFRY KONCZAL

Attracted to the city’s flourishing gay scene

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HAILING FROM A SMALL TOWN outside of Dayton didn’t stop David Kabbes from dreaming big. Kabbes, who graduated from Wittenberg University in 2009 with degrees in theater and dance, says that moving to a large city was the obvious next move, but he had two major requirements: It had to sustain his acting career, and it had to be gay-friendly. So Kabbes headed to Columbus, where he began to work for Shadowbox Live, the sketch comedy and musical theater company. Although he continues to perform sporadically with Shadowbox, the bulk of his time is spent shooting regional and national commercials. He’s landed 14 TV and Internet spots in about a year, including the Ohio Lottery, Frito-Lay and Safe Auto Insurance (which aired during the 2011 Super Bowl). “It was when I started performing with Shadowbox Live, performing for audiences of hundreds of people on a regular basis, that I realized that acting wasn’t just something I wanted to do—it’s what I should be doing,� he says. But it was more than Columbus’s thriving creative community that led Kabbes to stay; he credits that to the city’s flourishing gay scene. “Columbus is so welcoming, it’s so accepting,� he says. “Actually, it wasn’t until I came to Columbus that I went to my first Gay Pride festival.� Columbus’s Pride parade and festival is one of the largest in the country, attracting more than 200,000 people to Central Ohio every year, according to Stonewall Columbus. The experience “was surprising to see,� he says. “It was heartwarming to know that not just the GLBT community was there, but friends, family, co-workers, neighbors—everyone was out showing support. It really was a celebration of acceptance.� Regarding why he continues to stay in Columbus, Kabbes’s feelings are simple. “It has heart. Anybody can find whatever they’re looking for here. Any person can move to Columbus and in the first couple weeks meet some really nice people. It’s very familial. We are a community,� he says. “The gay scene here is more than most people would think, considering we’re in Ohio, but whether it’s a hole-in-the-wall bar where everyone’s friends or a downtown club with hundreds of people, there’s something for everyone,� he adds. “And if you can’t find it, you’re not looking hard enough.� —Jon Theiss

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Thank you, Columbus, for 20 Years! Celebrating our 20th Anniversary in 2012. $PNFDFMFCSBUFXJUIVT BRAVO!#FUIFMt)BZEFO3PBEt   BRAVO!$SPTTXPPETt7BOUBHF%SJWFt   BRAVO!-FOOPYt0MFOUBOHZ3JWFS3PBEt  

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★ People ★

TIM JOHNSON

Dick Hoffman

An American tale ONE DAY IN EARLY 2011, Dick Hoffman received a handwritten letter with a request: The writer wanted a glimpse of the graves of his ancestors, and he thought Hoffman was just the guy to help. It was midwinter, and a white blanket of snow coated the ground at Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery on the west side of Columbus. A Union military training camp during the Civil War, Camp Chase was one of the largest prisoner-of-war sites in the North. The cemetery holds the graves of more than 2,000 Confederate soldiers who died at the camp, and it didn’t take Hoffman long to find the names of the three brothers he was searching for: John, Jacob and James Kelly, Confederate infantrymen who died within seven days of each other in January 1865. He photographed the graves and sent the picture off to the writer. Hoffman, a member of the Hilltop Historical Society, loves to learn about the men who rest at Camp Chase. The Hilltop resident is a history nut who gobbles up history books and documentaries. He’s particularly keen on military history, and with good reason: As a veteran of the Vietnam War, Hoffman feels a personal connection to the plight of the American soldier. Personal stories are his favorite—he seeks out tales of individual hardship and duty, preferably told by the soldiers 70

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themselves. When he hears their sagas, he sometimes reflects on the six months he spent trekking through the jungles of Vietnam. Hoffman enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1966. He left for Vietnam just before the birth of his first son, whom he wouldn’t see for nine months. He served for 33 years, first as an infantry platoon leader and later as a teacher in the Army Reserve’s military history detachment in Columbus, where he still lives with his wife, Linda. After his retirement, Hoffman was asked to photograph a Civil War reenactment at Camp Chase, and he never looked back. Today, he spends hours at a time researching the history of the camp. He leads school groups on tours through the cemetery and organizes an annual memorial service featuring reenactors and a portrayal of the Gray Lady, a ghost who is said to haunt the graveyard, mourning her fallen husband. Hoffman wants to tear down the prejudices that linger among some visitors to the cemetery. Though the Civil War was divisive, he is quick to point out that the arch guarding the gateway of Camp Chase doesn’t say “Union” or “Confederacy,” “North” or “South”—it simply reads, “Americans.” —Brett Nuckles


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★ People ★

abdirizak ahmed

From Somalia to law school WHEN ABDIRIZAK AHMED’S 6-year-old daughter recently told him she wants to be a lawyer when she grows up, he couldn’t have been prouder. An aspiring lawyer himself, Ahmed never would have dreamed so big at such a young age. He and his siblings—17 brothers and five sisters—had too many other things to worry about. In the Kenyan refugee camp where they spent much of their youth, resources were scarce. There was not enough shelter, not enough water, and at times families went without food for days. Temperatures soared beyond 110 degrees in the dry desert climate. Violence was rampant, and Ahmed saw 10 family members slain. People simply did whatever it took to survive, he says. Born in Mogadishu, Somalia, in 1979, Ahmed fled to the refugee camp with his family in 1991 amid the violence and political strife of the Somali Civil War. Life was hard, but he showed promise among his peers. In 2002, he got his big break courtesy of a United Nations refugee agency: a comfortable job as a translator and, later, tuition to attend school in the Kenyan capital of Nairobi. Ahmed says he’ll never forget how fortunate he was for that opportunity, which opened doors he’d never dreamed of. In 2005, following a lengthy immigration process, he moved to Dallas, Texas, with his family. Just two months later, they 72

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settled into their new home in Columbus. With the secondlargest Somali population in the country, the city was a natural fit. In Somalia, people had told Ahmed going to America would be like going to heaven. But when he arrived, he knew he would have to work hard for his family. His first job in Columbus was at a car rental service. Later, he became a case manager at an immigration services center, where he relished the opportunity to help others facing the same struggles he did. That same charitable spirit inspired his next big venture. In 2009, he quit his job and started a small home health business to assist elderly Somalis who needed assistance around the house, but struggled to find it due to language and cultural barriers. In fall 2011, Ahmed took another big step: He enrolled at Capital University, where he’s studying corporate law. When he finishes his degree, he hopes to help Somali small business owners in Columbus be successful. With his wife, Hamdi, Ahmed is watching his five children grow up in an American society he sees as rich with opportunity. In this country, he believes, the sky is the limit— as long as you’re willing to work for it. —Brett Nuckles


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Nationwide

COURTESY NATIONWIDE

COMPLETE THIS ADVERTISING JINGLE: Nationwide is on your … You’d have to be living under a rock not to know that the company has long claimed to be On Your Side—it even registered the slogan as a trademark. Nationwide is one of the largest insurance companies in the country and has been a Columbus fixture since it began operations in 1926 as the Farm Bureau Mutual Automobile Insurance Company. About all the current company has in common with its predecessor, which sold automobile policies to Ohio farmers, is that it still offers auto insurance and remains a mutual company. (It doesn’t sell stock or have shareholders, but instead is owned by policyholders.) Today, Nationwide offers a full range of insurance and financial services. The company earned net operating income of $1.1 billion on total revenues of about $20 billion in 2010. That year, Nationwide was the sixth-largest auto insurer in the United States, the seventh-largest homeowners’ policy issuer and ninth-largest variable annuities provider, according to its annual report. The company was ranked No. 127 on the 2011 Fortune 500. CEO Steve Rasmussen has led the company since February 2009, taking over from Jerry Jurgensen, a former Bank One exec

★ Business ★

who joined Nationwide in 2000. Nationwide prospered and grew under Jurgensen, and the company—as well as the Nationwide Insurance Foundation—became major community players. In honor of a $50 million donation, Children’s Hospital was renamed Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Nationwide also became a major sponsor of NASCAR and the PGA Tour. But Nationwide struggled in 2008, losing $342 million. Jurgensen lost his job in a surprise ouster, and Rasmussen, a longtime employee, was promoted from chief operating officer. Aside from its primary business and civic ventures, Nationwide has made a significant mark on Columbus through Nationwide Realty Investors, its real estate development arm. NRI led the way on construction of Nationwide Arena, home of the NHL’s Columbus Blue Jackets, and pioneered development of the surrounding Arena District. (Nationwide owns 90 percent of the arena, and the Dispatch Printing Company, parent company of Columbus C.E.O. and Columbus Monthly, owns the remaining 10 percent.) NRI also is developing Grandview Yard, Jerome Village northwest of Dublin and Northstar Communities in Delaware County. —Steve Wartenberg

Benesch proudly celebrates Columbus’ bicentennial. We are honored to be part of a special city and look forward to its bright future.

MY BENESCH MY TEAM

Cleveland • Columbus • Indianapolis • Philadelphia • Shanghai • White Plains • Wilmington • www.beneschlaw.com 2 0 0 C O L U M B U S

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★ People ★

DAN TRITTSCHUH

rick nash

Sticking with the Blue Jackets IN 2009, RICK NASH found himself at a crossroads. Should the hockey star continue on with the Columbus Blue Jackets, whose slim hopes of making the playoffs rested mostly on his shoulders, or jump ship to a squad with a much better chance of competing for the Stanley Cup? Seemingly every other NHL club wooed him and multiple media reports said he was seriously considering returning to his hometown to play for his childhood favorite Toronto Maple Leafs. Nash, however, stayed true to Columbus, signing an eightyear contract extension. “Rick made a significant statement to Columbus and for Columbus in terms of how he feels about playing here,” Blue Jackets General Manager Scott Howson said then. “He loves Columbus; he never wanted to leave. That’s what made me so optimistic all along that we could sign him to an extension.” The first overall pick in the 2002 NHL Entry Draft, Nash’s impact on the roster of the nascent Blue Jackets was immediate. In his first professional appearance, on Oct. 10, 2002, he scored the team’s first goal of the season off a rebound against the visiting Chicago Blackhawks. Asked by a

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reporter at the time if he considered himself the future of hockey in Columbus, Nash—in a momentary break from his trademark modesty—replied, “I want to be that guy.” Nearly 10 years and an Olympic gold medal later, Nash, who was named team captain in 2008, continues to be the rock on the Blue Jackets roster, consistently atop the team’s stat sheet for goals scored. The two-time Olympian and multiple all-star has left quite a mark off the ice with his charitable endeavors, too— supporting scholarships for Ohio State University studentathletes and joining the fight against pediatric cancer. In 2009, Nash won the NHL Foundation Player Award, given to the person who most exemplifies the league’s commitment to service and philanthropy. While other athletes would leap at the opportunity to compete for the title every year, Nash knows that his team needs more time to mature, often under his own leadership. His loyalty to the Blue Jackets, as well as to the city, is what has endeared him to fans and will enshrine him in Columbus lore. —Ben Zenitsky


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CONVENIENTLY LOCATED AT THE CORNER OF EYE CONTACT AND FIRM HANDSHAKE. Our roots here run deep. And after nearly 150 years, we’re still proud to call Columbus home. As the city celebrates its Bicentennial, we look forward to many more years of doing business right here where it all started. So, to our hometown, happy 200th birthday. Here’s to the next two centuries.

The Huntington National Bank is an Equal Housing Lender and Member FDIC. ¥® and Huntington® are federally registered service marks of Huntington Bancshares Incorporated. Huntington.® Welcome.™ is a service mark of Huntington Bancshares Incorporated. © 2011 Huntington Bancshares Incorporated.


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Jez Alogla Construction Management He had been in homebuilding since graduating from high school. But as the economic downturn hit the industry, Jez decided to build something else: his skills and credentials. So he enrolled in Columbus State’s Construction Management program. “I felt that I knew everything there was to know about construction. Boy, was I wrong!” he confesses. He especially values the convenience of the class schedule, and the real-world expertise and mentoring of his instructors in every facet of construction.

We have a historyof

BUILDING FUTURES Since 1963, Columbus State has helped build Central Ohio’s workforce one student at a time. We’ve partnered with thousands of businesses to train and retrain their employees. And, we’ve helped students of every age and background launch careers and businesses. We’ve been a part of many success stories of invention and reinvention over the decades. Here are just a few of them.


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Walker Evans Interactive Media The founder of “columbusunderground.com” has linked to Columbus State many times over his short and spectacular entrepreneurial career. He chose our Interactive Media program after an online search, finding that it “offered the right mix of the technical and the artistic.” He secured an internship through the program, and took advantage of guidance from the Small Business Development Center to help launch, incorporate and develop a business plan for his successful website.

Muzinga Mungongo Nursing After losing her husband to a heart attack, this native of the Democratic Republic of the Congo had a big decision to make. “Go on welfare, or pick up the pieces and make something of my life,” she said. Muzinga chose the latter, and selected Columbus State’s Nursing program. Today, she cares for the tiniest patients in Nationwide Children’s Hospital Newborn ICU at Riverside Hospital. “Parents trust me to care for their precious babies, and I do that confidently, thanks to my professional preparation at Columbus State.”

Amanda Coleman Paralegal Studies A combination of boundless energy and a knack for managing details led this Northridge High School graduate to Columbus State’s Paralegal Studies program. “I saw paralegal studies as a career area that was progressive and demanding. Both of those characteristics suited me,” she says. After completing her degree, she now works for one of the largest law firms in Columbus. In 2007, she was named “Paralegal of the Year” by the Paralegal Association of Central Ohio.

cscc.edu 614-287-5353


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★ Places ★

“CHALLENGING ALL PRECONCEIVED NOTIONS OF WHAT PASSES FOR COOL IN THE MIDWEST.” —THE NEW YORK TIMES ON THE

Short North Arts District 78

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COURTESY SHORT NORTH BUSINESS ASSOCIATION

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★ People ★

Wayne Shingler

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GROWING UP, Wayne Shingler imagined a future in which he lived as a homesteader, sleeping in a cabin and feeding himself off the land. At first blush, his present circumstances may seem a far cry from that dream: Shingler lives in Mifflin Township, in a densely populated neighborhood where modest homes sit on small parcels of land only a few miles from downtown Columbus. But the vision that spoke to him as a teen growing up near Portsmouth continues to inspire him. From its origins in 2004 as a backyard farm, Frijolito Farm has grown into a fulltime business on several plots of land, collectively covering almost six acres. In 2008, Shingler participated in his first farmers’ market, selling chickens, eggs and vegetables raised and grown using organic-approved methods. Shingler, wife Mayda Sanchez and their two small children live on a quarter-acre plot near Gahanna; he primarily farms on a larger parcel on nearby Woodland Avenue he hopes someday will house both his family and a farm store. Twice a day, Shingler collects eggs from the chickens, which, weather permitting, roam freely. Every other Tuesday during the summer, Shingler rises at “Oh-my-God-in-the-morning,” loads up some of the chickens and drives to near Dayton to have them processed for meat. In warm-weather months, Shingler sells his wares at the Easton and Clintonville farmers’ markets; customers also pick up food from his home or have it delivered. He plans on fixing the ramshackle and currently unoccupied house on the Woodland property over the winter, and soon it will be time again to start seedlings and raise a new generation of chicks. Shingler’s not making money hand over fist—“yet,” he is quick to note—but he has found his calling. “If I’d won the lottery, this is how I would be spending my days, largely,” he says. His plans for the farm include expanding his property, building a larger vegetable garden and adding space for a small number of livestock or fowl, such as hogs, goats, ducks or turkeys. He also wants to fell trees on the property and turn them into rough-hewn chairs. Of all the challenges he grapples with— Swiss chard-chomping deer, inclement weather, inconsistent cash flow—Shingler says one of the greatest is overcoming urban sensibilities. “You can have a dog bark all night, you can have jackhammers, garbage trucks, booming stereos, but the moment a chicken squawks, people get bent out of shape.” —Jennifer Wray

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Celebrating our community, our heritage and our future.

“Congratulations City of Columbus on 200 years.”

the Memorial Tournament Founder and Host

M AY 2 8 – J U N E 3 , 2 0 1 2

UNITED WAY OF CENTRAL OHIO:

BUILDING THE PEOPLE Building a great city starts with building its people. For more than 85 years, Columbus residents have joined together to improve the lives of others, so that everyone has the aspirations, resources, and opportunities to reach their fullest potential. We are your neighbors, co-workers and friends, united to make Columbus and central Ohio a better place—for all of us.

GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER. LIVE UNITED. LIVEUNITEDCENTRALOHIO.ORG 2 0 0 C O L U M B U S

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IF A COUPLE HOLDS HANDS AS THEY WALK FROM THE UNIVERSITY SEAL AT THE EAST END OF THE

Oval TO THE

WILLIAM OXLEY THOMPSON STATUE ON THE WEST END, THEY’LL BE TOGETHER FOREVER. —OSU TRADITION

COURTESY OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

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tim friar

★ People ★

Short North proprietor

JEFFRY KONCZAL

TIM FRIAR IS LOOKING to lead a revolution. He wants to change the way people buy furniture in Columbus, and he purposefully chose the Short North to open Grid Furnishings. For 22 years, Friar worked as a product developer for Artromick and Design Central, but even before that, he appreciated good design and clean lines. When most guys head off to college, they take a futon or some handme-downs from the family basement. Not Friar. He asked his parents for a steel tubular Wassily chair, which his mother bought at Lazarus. Later, as Friar and his wife furnished their Sunbury home, he was the one searching for the just-right piece that would tie modernism with minimalism. Often, he found he had to shop out of town, hunting for furniture Columbus couldn’t provide. In early 2010, Friar’s corporate career ended after the firm he worked for was sold. If there was a time to incorporate his love of modern furniture into the Columbus shopping scene, he knew this was it. He spent seven months searching for North American designers and the perfect location, where his idea of furniture as art would be embraced. Friar’s choice of the trendy Short North would seem obvious, but he initially had reservations about investing in the area. His research showed that those who live beyond the Short North tend to go to the city’s shopping malls for furnishings. To attract shoppers to the Short North, Friar founded a marketing campaign, Home on High; it’s a Sunday showcase of the district’s home décor retailers. He hopes that designers, redecorators and others will think about the Short North for couches and chairs that signify more than just places to take afternoon naps and coffee tables on which shoes and drinks won’t be welcome. Friar grins as he describes his satisfaction when he sells a piece of furniture, such as the black leather Trudeau chair, to a customer who may never have seen or understood modern furnishings before stepping into his store. It takes three to six trips on average, Friar notices, for those shoppers to commit to a piece. But that doesn’t leave him on edge. Much like his time spent determining the placement of furniture in his shop, he wants buyers to think carefully, choose what they’ll love and, most importantly, be proud to show it off. —Melissa Dilley 84

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the Wendy’s company

COURTESY WENDY’S

WENDY’S AND CENTRAL OHIO go together like, well, a square hamburger patty and a chocolate Frosty. And now, after a dalliance in Atlanta, Wendy’s headquarters is back where it belongs. This is, after all, where Dave Thomas started selling old-fashioned hamburgers in 1969, in a restaurant on East Broad Street named after his daughter. Thomas started his hamburger empire with a simple motto: “Quality is our recipe.” It was a winning formula, and his second Wendy’s Old Fashioned Hamburgers, which included the industry’s first pick-up window, opened a year after the first restaurant. In 1972, Thomas began to franchise. The 1,000th Wendy’s opened in 1978, and the company continued to add hundreds of stores every year. The company went public in 1976 and rose to a spot on the Fortune 1000. Wendy’s introduced its now iconic “Where’s the beef” commercial in 1984, spawning a million imitations, jokes and quips by presidential candidates. The campaign was recently resurrected. Thomas became the face of Wendy’s when he started doing commercials in 1989. His down-to-earth style and everyman life and look made him an instant star. But since his death in 2002, the company has had its share of ups and downs. In 1995, Wendy’s merged with Tim Hortons, which it spun off in

HISTORY

★ Business ★

2006, and also acquired and sold Baja Fresh under pressure from investors, including Nelson Peltz. The company became a target of Peltz’s Triarc Companies Inc., which gobbled up Wendy’s International Inc. in 2008 to form Wendy’s/Arby’s Group Inc. Arby’s was sold to Roark Capital Group in July 2011, though Wendy’s retains an 18.5 percent stake. The business was renamed the Wendy’s Company; Wendy’s International Inc. is the franchise arm. For 2010, Wendy’s/Arby’s reported a net loss of $4.3 million on revenues of $3.4 billion. In August 2011, company officials announced Wendy’s would move its headquarters back to Dublin, investing $11 million to upgrade its offices and scoring $12 million in state and city incentives. Wendy’s is the third-largest quickservice hamburger chain in the nation, with more than 6,500 restaurants in the United States and 25 other countries. Adopted by a Michigan family when he was 6 weeks old, Thomas used his celebrity to become an advocate and philanthropist, creating the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption in 1992. It has helped thousands of children find foster and permanent homes. “Giving back is the right thing to do,” he once said. The quote remains on the company’s website. —Steve Wartenberg

From horse-drawn street cars to hybrid buses, public transportation has kept Columbus moving. COTA is proud to continue the legacy and committed to providing quality transportation services now and in the future.

Plan your trip at www.cota.com.

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GRAHM JONES/COURTESY COLUMBUS ZOO AND AQUARIUM

★Animal ★

Colo

The matriarch WHEN SHE WAS BORN, Colo was the city’s golden girl, the world’s first captive-born gorilla, a spoiled princess dressed in frilly dresses and hats and celebrated in the pages of Life magazine. Even today, Colo is best known for her remarkable 1956 birth, but she might have ended up as just a historical footnote—instead of the city’s most beloved animal—if it weren’t for what happened after the initial excitement died out. The Columbus Zoo, quite frankly, was learning on the fly with Colo. Keepers did some things right—around-the-clock care as an infant, for instance. But there were grave mistakes, too. The zoo wisely introduced Colo to another gorilla, Bongo, a wild-born animal brought to Columbus to be Colo’s mate, at an early age, but created tension by putting the pair together in a 12-by-15-foot cage with a cement floor, tile walls and no place to escape the public eye. When Colo gave birth to three offspring—Emmy, Oscar and Toni—all were taken away from her to be hand-reared by humans, just as Colo was. She wasn’t trusted to raise her own children. Slowly, the zoo realized its missteps. Colo’s life improved

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when she and the other gorillas moved into a new “gorilla villa” in the early 1980s. The exhibit offered more space and an outdoor play area with ropes and climbing areas. It also allowed the gorillas to live together in groups, as they would in the wild, and go off display whenever they wanted to. Most importantly, the zoo changed how it cared for newborn gorillas. Keepers no longer would take away infants from their mothers automatically. And if they had to do so, they tried to make sure other gorillas, not keepers, would care for the babies. Amazingly, Colo became the zoo’s first surrogate, caring for her grandson JJ. Despite her misguided upbringing, Colo’s instinctive nurturing survived. “She knew she was a gorilla,” says Dusty Lombardi, a former gorilla keeper who’s now in charge of animal care at the zoo. “People had a hard time figuring that out.” Near the end of 2011, Colo was the world’s oldest living gorilla, the matriarch of a family of 31. Her health is good— she has arthritis, but that’s her only ailment. When asked how long Colo might live, Lombardi wouldn’t hazard a guess. Again, Colo is in uncharted territory. —Dave Ghose


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Working to ensure the country’s best kept secret doesn’t stay that way. HAPPY 200TH TO A CITY THAT’S BECOMING A FAVORITE OF TOURISTS EVERYWHERE. At Experience Columbus, we know firsthand all the incredible things Columbus has to offer. It’s why more and more tourists and meeting planners fall in love with the city year after year. Happy 200th Columbus. You are a city definitely worth celebrating.


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IN THE

Arena District,

“EXCITEMENT AND ENERGY WERE AS INTEGRAL TO THE MASTER PLAN AS BRICKS AND MORTAR.” —THE ARENA DISTRICT: A NEIGHBORHOOD 170 YEARS IN THE MAKING, PUBLISHED BY NATIONWIDE REALTY INVESTORS

COURTESY NATIONWIDE REALTY INVESTORS

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Paul Heller

★ People ★

Banking on technology

JEFFRY KONCZAL

PAUL HELLER WORKS IN BANKING, but he doesn’t spend his days balancing cash drawers. Instead, he logs a lot of hours surfing the Internet and trying out new apps. Heller, a senior vice president at JPMorgan Chase & Company, leads the corporate Internet group, which maintains the bank’s consumer websites and develops mobile phone applications such as Chase Quick Deposit. The program, which allows customers to deposit a check by snapping a picture, received two prominent tech awards in 2011. “My team primarily develops the service that we enable on our mobile applications, and we have a partner group in San Francisco that does a lot of the front-end development—the actual phone development,” he says. Heller’s group employs 700, nearly 400 of whom are based locally. The Columbus native earned a bachelor’s degree in business and finance from Miami University and an MBA from Ohio State University. He worked for Bank One when it merged with Chase in 2004, and has led the corporate Internet group for seven years. “Developing things that are on the bleeding edge, so to speak, is exciting. It’s got a lot of challenges. A lot of things we try don’t work, and a lot of things we try do work,” Heller says. “I like the fact that I can see on a day-to-day basis what I actually do for a living,” he adds. “It’s a very concrete product that I can talk to my neighbors about, because they use it as well. It’s also a space where you get to experiment, both good and bad, with new technology.” Outside the office, Heller sits on the boards of St. Stephen’s Community House, his alma mater St. Charles Preparatory School and the JPMorgan Chase Foundation. “There are a lot of places to give back to, and that’s been an important thing for the firm to make sure we’re an active part of the community,” he says. “We’ve given over $50 million to various charitable organizations over the last 10 years just in Columbus.” “I like making a difference,” he says. “We’ve been able to extend our products and services—virtually every product and service that we have—to the Internet. By doing that, we’ve enabled our customers to do their jobs better because it’s easy to access our products and services through the Web.” —Michelle Davey 90

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©2011 OhioHealth

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★ Places ★

“THE

Topiary Park IS A LANDSCAPE OF A PAINTING OF A LANDSCAPE. . . . IF AN

A SCULPTOR CREATING A LANDSCAPE OF A WORK OF ART—NATURE MIMICKING ART?” —SCULPTOR JAMES MASON, CREATOR OF THE TOPIARY INTERPRETATION OF SEURAT’S “A SUNDAY AFTERNOON ON THE ISLE OF LA GRANDE JATTE.”

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OHIO STOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

ARTIST CAN PAINT A PICTURE OF A LANDSCAPE—ART MIMICKING NATURE—THEN WHY NOT


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Worthington Industries

COURTESY WORTHINGTON INDUSTRIES

THE STORY OF WORTHINGTON INDUSTRIES is the tale of two Johns: John H. McConnell and his son, John P. McConnell. Using his 1952 Oldsmobile as collateral for a $600 loan, John H. McConnell created a small steelprocessing company in 1955. Worthington Industries quickly grew into a world leader in the manufacture of diversified metals and steel products, including pressure cylinders, camping cylinders, framing systems, steel pallets and racks, and suspension grid systems. Today, Worthington Industries has 8,500 employees and 76 facilities in 12 countries. John H. McConnell served as CEO until 1996 and retired from the board in 2002. He died in 2008. Mr. Mac, as he was called by many people, was known for the way he treated his employees and his charitable leanings. His philosophy—“We treat our customers, employees, investors and suppliers as we would like to be treated”—provided the foundation for and title of his 2004 book, Our Golden Rule. McConnell’s donation of more than $15 million led to the creation of the McConnell Heart Health Center at Riverside

★ Business ★

Methodist Hospital. He also helped bring the NHL to the region when the Columbus Blue Jackets, of which he was majority owner, played their first game in 2000. John P. McConnell took over as CEO of Worthington Industries in 1996. He continued to oversee steady growth, until the company was hit hard by the downturn in the economy and the resulting bust in the construction industry. The company posted a $108 million loss for fiscal year 2008—its first ever annual loss. McConnell predicted the company would rebound, and it has. For fiscal 2010, Worthington Industries posted a $115 million profit on sales of $2.4 billion—up significantly from 2009, when it had profits of $45 million on sales totaling $1.9 billion. “I am proud of the efforts of our entire team as they have stayed focused on our production and operational improvements to deliver solid results despite an uneven economic recovery,” McConnell said in a June 2011 press release. —Steve Wartenberg

2012 a year to

Congratulations to Columbus on its bicentennial anniversary! Central Michigan University is proud to be a part of the Columbus community, providing quality, educational opportunities to students in Columbus for 40 years.

We make it possible. Central Michigan University in Columbus. Call 614-235-1645 today!

www.cel.cmich.edu/columbus Columbus.Center@cmich.edu Central Michigan University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. CMU is an AA/EO institution (see www.cmich.edu/aaeo). www.cmich.edu/offcampus 32381 11/11

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★ People ★

Olga Hesch

The shield at the Statehouse 94

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OLGA HESCH has nearly a dozen boxes underneath her office desk. They contain items she’s collected while moving from the Ohio Statehouse to the Riffe building, and back, about as many times as she has boxes in her 24 years on the job. As a legislative aide in Sen. Nina Turner’s office, Hesch serves not only as a sounding board and problem-solver for Turner’s constituents in Cuyahoga County, but also as a constant in a building where change is inevitable with every state election. She’s helped piece together 200 articles of legislation (30 that have become law, including one that resulted in the formation of the Ohio Lottery), seen the Statehouse completely renovated and supported constituents and legislators alike through difficult times. Hesch’s agenda changes depending on the day, but she makes time to keep on top of three e-mail accounts and endless phone calls. She’s the person on the other end of the line when a constituent calls. It’s because of this that Hesch describes herself as a shield—the first line of defense for her legislators, who over the years have included Rep. Bob Hagan, Ron Mattl (former state rep) and John Boccieri (exstate senator and representative who later served one term in Congress). But as deeply as Hesch has become ingrained in Ohio’s political system, she never dreamed of working for the state. That was until she serendipitously ended up on the phone with then–House speaker Vern Riffe on her last day of work at Pfizer Pharmaceuticals. When he learned the company was moving its headquarters and Hesch’s job was going with it, he asked her to stop by the Statehouse. She was sure Riffe was kidding, but Hesch walked over on her lunch break anyway. The meeting went so well she started the next day. There wasn’t much help in learning the new job (no handbook or tour). So she approached it the same way she did her marriage at the age of 17, when she taught herself to become a seamstress and cook. Over the years, she has come to relish the long hours. Hesch says the numerous, varied and sometimes unexpected responsibilities remind her of her 20 years at home taking care of three children. Today, those new to the Statehouse become accustomed to the job by flipping through the House’s new hire book. They’ll learn in time that around the office, the handbook has an informal title: Olga’s Resource Book. —Melissa Dilley

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Blue has never looked so green. Natural gas is a domestically abundant, safe and environmentally responsible solution to our nation’s energy needs today and tomorrow. Columbia Gas of Ohio is investing billions of dollars to improve the safety and reliability of our pipeline system and to ensure that our customers have access to adequate supplies of this environmentally friendly fuel for years to come. This isn’t just good for our environment, it’s great for our economy, creating more than 500 new jobs for Ohio workers and building a modern energy system that will help keep Ohio business and industry globally competitive. It’s just one of the many ways that Columbia Gas is doing more for you.

To find out more about how Columbia Gas is working for you, visit our website at ColumbiaGasOhio.com.

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TIM JOHNSON

★ People ★

David Pickering

Developing a world view KENTON NATIVE DAVID PICKERING first checked out Capital University because his sister was a student at the Bexley school. A scholarship offer solidified his decision to be a Crusader. Now, as the senior approaches graduation, Pickering credits several trips abroad through Capital for helping him develop a perspective that stretches outside the borders of the Buckeye State and around the globe. It all started with a conversation about gravy conducted in “Spanglish” while on a service-learning trip to Panama during spring break in 2009. Pickering wanted to teach the residents of Ustupu, a square-mile island with fewer than 7,000 inhabitants, how to compost so they could grow their own food rather than travel to the mainland. One man told Pickering a story that made a lasting impression in terms of cultural relativity. “He said, ‘When I worked in the army, we made gravy from vegetables. When I worked for a five-star hotel, we made gravy from powder,’ ” says Pickering. “He’s saying it’s different. He’s saying you get your food differently than I do mine.” Pickering taught composting techniques, but because he and the residents didn’t have a chance to form a long-term relationship, the lesson was never applied. “That was my first foray into developmental work, and it went horribly,” says the dual major in environmental science and Spanish. 96

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When he returned to Ohio, Pickering signed up for intermediate Spanish, rented every Spanish-language movie the Bexley Public Library had and joined the Columbus Spanish Language Meetup. He then took more trips abroad. In Costa Rica, Pickering’s Spanish began to flourish with the help of his host mother. And during two months with a host family in Sicchezpampa, Peru, Pickering learned about day-to-day life, from butchering a pig and cutting sugar cane to poverty and racism. “For the first time in my Ohio-raised, white male life, I feel like I have a real insight on what it feels like for people to look at you and just see your skin color, maybe where you’re from, and not want to see anything else,” he says. These days, Pickering is interning with Hemisphere Coffee Roasters, a fair trade seller in Mechanicsburg. He’s considering teaching in Spain or attending graduate school for Latin American studies. Ultimately, he sees himself as a college professor. “A good professor has a healthy balance of being nerdy and kind of weird,” he says. Four of his Capital instructors have fit the description, and offered him inspiration. “I feel like I have real friendships with them,” Pickering says. “It’s certainly a testament to how Capital is set up, and what you can do if you have a little drive and interest in a subject.” —Michelle Davey


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Happy 200th birthday,

Columbus.

We’re proud to have been part of your growth and progress for nearly half a century. And we couldn’t be more honored to be involved in your history and future. Thanks for letting us join the party. We look forward to the next 200 years.

www.turnerconstruction.com

Greater Columbus Convention Center

Nationwide Children’s Hospital Campus Expansion

Huntington Park

The Lazarus Building Renovation

OSU Medical Center Expansion

Nationwide Arena

Hilton Columbus Downtown

OSU Thompson Library Expansion


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200COLUMBUS

Future


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The Next Great Downtown Space T H R E E V I S I O N S FO R T H E F U T U R E . ONE OF THE KEYS to any successful metropolitan city is a thriving downtown. Ideally, it’s a lively mix of business and residential components, and the sidewalks don’t roll up at 5 p.m. During the last decade, much effort has been focused on making downtown Columbus more vibrant. In anticipation of the city’s bicentennial, we decided to take things a step further. We asked three local design firms/developers—

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Moody•Nolan, MSI+KKG and the Pizzuti Companies—to choose the last great undeveloped space in downtown Columbus and show how it could be utilized. As you’ll see on the following pages, their suggestions are thoughtful, innovative, even inspired. Perhaps they’ll become conversation starters for local leaders. Who knows—maybe one or more will have become reality by the time the city celebrates its 300th birthday.


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E TH S IE N PA M O C TI U ZZ PI

KG +K SI M

N LA O •N Y D O O M

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DOWNTOWN CORPORATE THE AREA BOUNDED BY EAST STATE, HEADQUARTERS DEVELOPMENT SOUTH FOURTH, SOUTH THIRD AND EAST CAPITAL MUCH RECENT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT in Central Ohio has been concentrated in the suburbs. It has become almost the default choice for companies considering moving to the region, or relocating within the area. But imagine for a moment that economic development partners aggressively recruited a large corporation to locate in downtown Columbus. It would require continued cooperation among downtown development agencies and government entities. Approvals would need to accelerate, tax incentives must improve and permitting has to be expedited. Public-private partnerships would be financially encouraged to create the requisite infrastructure, such as commercial and retail development as well as proximate, convenient parking. Mass transit would require a more serious integration to move people to the city core. 102

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Moody•Nolan’s Plan Our selection of the most underutilized remaining site in Columbus is the area bounded by East State, South Fourth, South Third and East Capital streets. Building plans for this area are not new; a portion of the site was once considered by the Dispatch Printing Company on a smaller scale, but never gained traction. Moody•Nolan’s vision of a larger and more encompassing development is driven by the following scenario: A large corporate entity (such as Sears) would consider bringing its headquarters or a regional office— and resultant jobs—to Central Ohio. Our premise is that the urban core in the city of Columbus should be given equal consideration as a corporate campus solution. The Tower at Capitol Square includes two phases: a 60-story tower, which at 1,000 feet would be the tallest building in Ohio, and a 33-story tower to be added later.


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COURTESY MOODY•NOLAN (3)

BROAD

STREET

TREET

TREET

S 4TH S

S 3RD S

TREET

STATE S

This site would be a compelling choice: • For the relocating firm, the list of advantages must begin with the assumption that the state, county and city would offer a very aggressive incentive package, competitive with other regions of the country. In addition to a competitive, highly educated, diverse workforce, the company would immediately benefit from a centralized location in the state; access to the city’s political, financial and medical services; and be surrounded by the cultural and lifestyle advantages of downtown Columbus. • For the city, this relocation would contribute to the stabilization and improvement of the Columbus urban core. It would have an enormous impact not only on the area around Capitol Square, but also would accelerate linkages between the Arena District and the city center. • Parking for thousands of new workers could be

created within the existing infrastructure, with new and expanded parking garages to serve both the new “Sears” building as well as existing businesses in and around the new development. • The infusion of thousands of new jobs would support the growing downtown residential stock. A larger urban population would spawn businesses to support that growth. These would include restaurants, groceries and shops, among others. • Columbus Commons would be an ideal location as a park to accommodate the new downtown workers, both for those who commute and those electing to remain in the city. • From a more global standpoint, environmental and sustainable concepts encourage the re-use of existing locations and covering “holes in the city” rather than consuming more farmland and rural areas. 2 0 0 C O L U M B U S

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FROM THE SCIOTO RIVER RESTORATION OF THE TO THE NEAR EAST SIDE BROAD STREET CORRIDOR HISTORICALLY, Broad Street has acted as the civic spine for the city of Columbus. As such, it used to have a streetscape that reflected its importance. Today, at eight lanes across, Broad Street is comparable in width to state Route 315. While the mansions have been replaced by office towers, there is still an opportunity to restore the grandeur to this once majestic street. It is no longer necessary for Broad Street to be eight lanes wide through downtown Columbus. The Interstate 70/71 improvements will remove ramp access to and from Broad 104

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Street, lessening its importance as an access corridor to those entering and leaving downtown from the highway. Even before this change, the street has been carrying fewer and fewer cars on a daily basis. In 1994, Broad Street served a daily average of 36,320 trips. In 2006, that number was 22,500. As a point of comparison, that is roughly the same amount of traffic that is served by Main Street in Bexley. While Broad Street will continue to be an important eastwest connection, it is clearly time to put it on a “road diet.” Broad Street was originally designed with an esplanade


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BROAD STREET TODAY COURTESY MSI+KKG (2)

and carriageway that reduced the width of the street to a more human scale. Previous proposals have suggested that Broad Street be retroďŹ tted with medians to improve its civic presence. However, it may be possible to revisit the historic intent of Broad Street and, instead of creating a median that no one can use, develop a new linear system of green space that brings life back to the street and encourages reinvestment. Utilizing the same right-of-way that is available today, this concept for Broad Street removes travel lanes to create

additional space for pedestrians, bicyclists and landscaping on both sides of the street. This is more than a street: It is a linear park of usable green space that activates the streetscape, engages people, provides an amenity for nearby residential development and enhances adjacent property values. Running from the Scioto River to the near east side, Broad Street is an essential east-west connection. Added trees and green space could also be designed to manage stormwater runoff, making it the most sustainable street in the Midwest. 2 0 0 C O L U M B U S

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TECH-PLACE THE SCIOTO PENINSULA WHEN ASKED TO IDENTIFY and plan the “last great undeveloped space in downtown Columbus,” it took little more than a glance through our window to recognize the opportunities awaiting the redevelopment of the Scioto Peninsula and the land adjacent to COSI. This area serves as the gateway to Franklinton and stands at the doorstep of the center of commerce in the center city—indeed the last great space in downtown Columbus. Our approach to creating a vision for this site is based on two specific criteria: the presence of COSI as a destination driver and the land mass necessary to attract significant investment to the city. 106

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This approach, as well as ideas identified in the 2010 Downtown Columbus Strategic Plan, was the basis for the development of the Pizzuti Vision. The Pizzuti Vision Our vision for the peninsula is to create a vibrant neighborhood where opportunity meets desirability and research and sustainability intersect with people and places. A true community that incorporates science, technology, academics and recreation into a unique lifestyle offered in a robust urban setting. We call this vision Technology Place (tech-Place)—a corridor of research, sustainability, public spaces and


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COURTESY GLAVAN FEHÉR ARCHITECTS INC. (2) *GROUND LEVEL ONLY

OFFICE commerce that connects to the existing assets of the area and to the rest of downtown. Tech-Place is a hub of living and learning that takes COSI— the Center of Science and Industry—and opens its doors to a practical living laboratory of places. Places where people can live, play, learn and earn. Places that showcase facilities developed with the latest techniques in energy efficiencies and sustainability and that can serve as home to some of the top researchers anywhere. Our vision, illustrated by Glavan Fehér Architects Inc., is a place where: • Students, educators, researchers, city residents, businesspeople and visitors interact in a unique, green

RESEARCH/EDU

RESIDENTIAL

COMMERCIAL*

development with views and access to the river, the downtown skyline and the Scioto Mile. • People can work, learn and create in an environment that supports collaboration and innovation. • Buildings house businesses that are anxious to create new technologies and identify new opportunities, and are eager to locate in a community of thinkers and doers. • Young professionals, graduate students, retirees and others choose to live and stay in a community of lifelong learning that adds vitality and interaction to our downtown. • Columbus attracts the best and brightest to speak in a redeveloped Veterans Memorial Hall on topics that inform, entertain and challenge those who attend. 2 0 0 C O L U M B U S

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new albany Our historic neighborhood is honored and proud to take part in 200Columbus in celebrating the city's great past, dynamic present and boundless potential. As our third century begins, the best is yet to come. Happy 200th Birthday, Columbus!


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CREDIT

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Columbus A vision for the region’s economic future

OHIO STOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

By Jennifer Wray

THE NEWS, ultimately, was good: NetJets announced it would not only remain in Columbus, but also expand—adding 800 jobs to the 2,000 it already had in the city. But around every silver lining is a dark cloud. The fact that the region had almost lost the operational headquarters of NetJets, a fractional jet ownership/charter company, proved to be a wake-up call for local business and economic development leaders. They vowed not to let such a close call happen again. Before its 2008 announcement, NetJets had considered expanding elsewhere. It took a several months-long, allhands-on-deck effort—one that included $67 million in direct state and local incentives, as well as indirect support from the state, city and the Columbus Regional Airport Authority—to persuade the company to stay.

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Congratulations

Columbus

From Bishop Frederick F. Campbell & the people of the Diocese of Columbus

Celebrating 200 years of God’s blessings 110

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Shortly afterward, Alex Fischer, then a senior vice president at Battelle, was invited to a dinner hosted by Limited Brands Chairman and CEO Les Wexner, who’s also chairman of the powerful Columbus Partnership. The Partnership, whose members represent some of the region’s biggest businesses, was troubled by what the NetJets situation said about Central Ohio’s approach to economic development, says Fischer. “The conversation that night was that we had come dangerously close to losing an important corporate citizen,” he says. In addition, a weak national economy revealed systemic problems in the region’s development approach, as it had in other communities, says Kenny McDonald, senior vice president and chief economic officer of the Partnership. “This really strongly impacted every industry and every institution, and so a lot of people had to do a gut-check about what they were doing, and Columbus was no exception to that,” he says. It was from that sense of urgency that Columbus2020 was born. At the Partnership’s behest, Fischer and other civic leaders convened a working group to study the matter, visiting competing cities to talk with government, civic and business leaders and better understand their respective approaches to economic development. Fischer was hired as the Partnership’s president and CEO in November 2009. Leadership roundtables involving roughly 1,500 local CEOs, community organizers, city council members and others shaped what was introduced in 2010 as Columbus2020, a 10-year effort to aggressively pursue economic development via a public-private partnership. “This has got to be a community effort, not a single organization’s effort,” says Fischer, chairman of Columbus2020’s board of directors.

An Ambitious Initiative The Columbus2020 vision calls for the addition of 150,000 net new jobs, a 30 percent increase in per-capita income and $8 billion in capital investment. (Its stretch goals: 180,000 jobs, a 40 percent per-capita income boost and $10 billion in investment.) Columbus2020 also aims to be recognized as a national leader in economic development. The 2020 initiative was built on a solid foundation: In 2009, a year marked


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DAN TRITTSCHUH

by the continuing Great Recession, Columbus Chamber efforts helped 80 Central Ohio companies keep or add 14,000 jobs— making a $1.6 billion investment in the region in the process, according to chamber statistics. Recent times have seen the region earn a bevy of top rankings. They include: No. 2, “10 Best Cities for Commuters” (Kiplinger, March 2011); No. 9, “U.S.’ Biggest Brain Magnets” (Forbes, February 2011); and No. 9, “Best Cities for New College Grads” (Bloomberg BusinessWeek, August 2010). According to Columbus2020’s Comprehensive Strategy for Economic Development, released in July 2010, the region has a “solid foundation” of corporate, academic and research institutions; high-profile companies and a “solid mix” of Fortune 1000 companies; one of the largest

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concentrations of college students in the country; some of the best research capabilities in the country, anchored by organizations such as Ohio State University, Battelle, Chemical Abstracts

Service and a vital health-care community; and a high quality of life. Still, a trio of issues threatens those strengths, said the study: “We lack a common aspiration and shared vision

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As Columbus commemorates its bicentennial, we join in honoring the past, celebrating the present and envisioning the future of this great city. Thompson Hine LLP, celebrating our first 100 years of serving clients and 30 years as a member of the Columbus business community.

about how to achieve that aspiration, our collaboration is too limited and we fragment our resources. The result is simple, yet daunting: sub-optimized efforts.” The local economy is growing, the study opined, but multiple factors limit expansion: low-paying jobs are rising faster than average (in 2002, Central Ohio’s per-capita income was almost $1,500 above the national average; by 2010, it was nearly $1,000 less); too many students leave after graduation; site-selection professionals have an inaccurate perception of the region as a “rust belt” location “with a high union concentration”; the area lags peers in commercializing innovations; and “government and nonprofit budget realities in a tough economic climate endanger many of the elements that make up our quality of life.”

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By Columbus2020’s own admission, organizers have a steep hill to climb. But business leaders have thrown their support behind the undertaking. An initial—and ambitious—goal of securing $25 million in pledges to fund economic development efforts was increased to $30 million. As of mid-November, more than $30.2 million had been committed by public donors such as Ohio State University and private supporters large and small, from Alterra Real Estate Advisors to Zimmer Ohio. Money raised by Columbus2020 helps pay for staff, improve previously underfunded programs and make oneon-one contacts with potential employers, says McDonald, who serves as president of Columbus2020. In fiscal year 2011, Columbus2020 had an operating budget of $4.6 million and a dedicated team of 13 full-time economic development professionals. The Partnership and chamber provide the employees as well as support in administration, marketing and finance. That’s a substantial boost from prior years, which saw roughly $2.2 million in annual investment for economic development. In 2012, Columbus2020 has a budget of more than $7 million. Beyond providing operating dollars, the fundraising represents “a big effort to broaden the base, to get more people engaged,” says Fischer. “We cannot simply sit here and think our way to a better economy; we have to get our shoes dirty and get on planes, get into our car and go see people and


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connect the dots between the assets that we have and the opportunities that exist in the world,” McDonald says. Columbus2020 got a shot in the arm in September 2011 when it was named a network partner of JobsOhio, Gov. John Kasich’s economic development strategy that aims to create new jobs and capital investment through a controversial hybrid private-public organization. Columbus2020 and several other participating regional development agencies are tasked with a twofold mission: identifying companies that could benefit from financial incentives to locate or stay in Ohio, and helping those businesses connect with the statewide JobsOhio network. A $2.26 million state grant to Columbus2020, which required matching private-sector dollars, funds the personnel and operating expenses associated with attracting, retaining and helping promote the growth of entrepreneurs and younger, high-growth businesses. Aside from its emphasis on metrics and its active pursuit of increased funding, Columbus2020 marks a significant change in how economic development duties are divvied up. The Columbus Partnership now drives attraction efforts, while the Columbus Chamber, which previously held both attraction and retention responsibilities, is focused solely on retaining and expanding existing businesses. To encourage cross-organizational collaboration, the two organizations share office space in downtown Columbus. Other active members of the Columbus2020 initiative include TechColumbus, the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission, the Mid-Ohio Development Exchange and state and local government representatives. “We recognize that no single organization can attempt to ‘do it all,’ but that better collaboration and coordination are the keys to optimizing this community effort,” said the Columbus2020 Comprehensive Strategy for Economic Development.

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Early Results Although barely out of its infancy, proponents of the Columbus2020 initiative say it’s headed in the right direction. As of early September 2011, Columbus2020 staff members had already visited five countries and 30 cities, generating 93 qualified projects year-to-date. In May 2011, Site Selection 2 0 0 C O L U M B U S

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CAS

Global Researchers know CAS. Do you?

Did you know? • The United States Patent and Trademark Office called CAS “the database of record for chemical patents.” • China’s largest contract research organization, WuXi AppTech, relies on CAS’ SciFinder to “advance R&D competitiveness.” • 47 universities in the largest academic consortium in the UK and Ireland chose CAS’ SciFinder for its “world class information scope and timeliness to materially increase scientific research productivity and accelerate innovation.” CAS, the world leader in chemical information, is proud to bring the attention of global science to Columbus and to be a member of this community for more than 100 years.

www.cas.org

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magazine awarded Columbus2020 an honorable mention in its annual list of top economic-development groups in the United States. And TechColumbus’s 2010 Central Ohio Innovation Capital report found that funding for local startups reached a record-setting $307.56 million in capital for 117 companies, a 73 percent increase over 2009. There are still a few dark clouds among the blue sky, though. For example, NetJets lost about $720 million in 2009 and, as a result, cut 350 office workers and furloughed nearly 500 pilots. Amid the economic turbulence and some executive shakeups, it scaled back plans for a $200 million Columbus campus to a $21 million, 140,000-squarefoot facility that is set to open in spring 2012. In 2010, NetJets reported a $207 million profit. “The downturn in the global economy has definitely made it more challenging, but we’re fortunate in that we have a lot of people here who are extremely creative and innovative, and who are undaunted by the economy,” says Columbus Chamber President and CEO Michael Dalby. The end goal of Columbus2020 is to “build a great Central Ohio,” says Dalby. “We want to take our city and make it even better, but you have to have the financial means to be able to do that, and it all starts with having an extremely strong and prosperous economy.” The measurements upon which Columbus2020 is based “are great metrics,” Dalby says. “If we can increase per-capita income, increase the total number of jobs created and increase the capital investment, that rising tide is going to lift not only the economy, but also put more money into the community for social services, philanthropy, the arts, education—all of those. Our tax base will expand, and it allows us to build that great 21st-century community.” Although the initiative is called Columbus2020 and its economic development goals are pegged to that year, community leaders’ commitment won’t conclude come 2021. “I think by that time, things will have once again changed, and we will need not only new tactics, but it will be time again to rethink this—and we will be doing that not long before 2020, I hope,” says McDonald. As Fischer puts it: Transforming the Columbus economy “is going to take decades. Plural.” ★


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Celebrating all the great things that make Columbus COlumbus. Experience dozens of events and festivals – some new, others are special editions of perennial favorites – plus grand openings, innovative and diverse programs and more.

200Columbus.com

Like us on facebook.


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A year-long

celebration

COLUMBUS IS A CITY abuzz with activity, and the bicentennial year is no exception. Special events throughout the year will highlight the city’s artistic community, celebrate its diversity, explore its history, cheer on its athletes and showcase its entrepreneurs. Here are just some of the don’t-miss activities of 2012. To learn more about all of the happenings celebrating the city’s bicentennial, check out the continuously updated calendar of events at 200Columbus.com. THRU MARCH 31

Columbus Views This exhibit celebrates the bicentennial by highlighting artistic depictions of the city by artists such as George Bellows, Emerson Burkhart, Edmund Kuehn, Robert Chadeayne and others who translated the charms of various neighborhoods onto canvas. Columbus Museum of Art, 480 E. Broad St., 2214848, columbusmuseum.org. THRU APRIL 22

Monet to Matisse: Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of the Sirak Collection When it was aquired by the Columbus Museum of Art in 1991, the Howard C. and Babette L. Sirak Collection was saluted in ARTnews as one of the finest private collections in the world. CMA celebrates the 20th anniversary with an exhibit of the entire collection, featuring 78 works by masters such as Monet, Degas and Renoir. Columbus Museum of Art, 480 E. Broad St., 221-4848, columbusmuseum.org. JAN. 12-MARCH 10

Cityscapes Yesteryear

RANDALL L. SCHIEBER/COURTESY JAZZ & RIB FEST

To commemorate the bicentennial, Cityscapes Yesteryear: Watercolors by Harvey Gilliam—presented in collaboration with the nonprofit group Art for Community Expression—explores the Columbus scene from the 1940s to today. The King Arts Complex, 867 Mt. Vernon Ave., 645-0642, kingartscomplex.com. JAN. 16

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration

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The city celebrates the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with a gathering at City Hall, followed by a march to Franklin County Veterans Memorial, where performances will include theatrical reenactments and the Martin Luther King Children’s Choir. Franklin County Veterans Memorial and City Hall, 645-1993, www.crc.columbus.gov.


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Columbus Arts Festival JAN. 16

MLK Day Open House The King Arts Complex’s annual MLK Day Open House offers a vast menu of cultural activities to commemorate the holiday, including African dance, modern dance, spoken word and inspirational music. The King Arts Complex, 867 Mt. Vernon Ave., 645-5464, kingartscomplex.com. JAN. 23-APRIL 27

Columbus Cartoonists: A Bicentennial Celebration COURTESY COLUMBUS ARTS FESTIVAL

An extraordinary number of notable cartoonists have Columbus connections. In honor of the bicentennial, this exhibit features original cartoon art and other artifacts created by many of them, including Billy Ireland, Milton Caniff, James Thurber and Jeff Stahler. Reading Room Gallery, The Ohio State University, 27 W. 17th Ave. Mall, 292-0538, cartoons.osu.edu. JAN. 26-APRIL 15

100 Years of Art: Celebrating Columbus’ Legacy More than 100 years of artistic endeavors are highlighted in a variety of media and artistic styles, giving a sense of the city’s arts community and how it’s changed through the years. Ohio Arts Council’s Riffe Gallery, 77 S. High St., 644-9624, riffegallery.org. JAN. 28-MAY 6

Race: Are We So Different? Developed by the American Anthropological Association in collaboration with the Science Museum of Minnesota, Race is the first nationally traveling exhibition to tell the stories of race from the biological, cultural and historical points of view. Combining these perspectives offers an unprecedented look at race and racism in the United States. COSI, 333 W. Broad St., 447-8894, cosi.org. FEB. 2-12

BalletMet, Jazz Arts Group and WOSU present Jazz Moves Columbus From gospel to Motown, jazz to classical ballet, Jazz Moves commemorates the city’s heritage through a synthesis of music, movement and imagery. Capitol Theatre, Riffe Center, 77 S. High St., 469-0939, balletmet.org. FEB. 10

200Columbus Birthday Bash The city is celebrating its 200th birthday with a weekend of festivities, kicked off by the Birthday Bash of the century. The spectacular party will include interactive displays and performances by many of the city’s favorite artists, joined by some surprise guests. Dynamic presentations of images and stories from Columbus’s past and present, local heroes and a mouthwatering selection of local foods all will be a part of this celebration of the

city’s milestone. Battelle Grand, Greater Columbus Convention Center, 400 N. High St., 224-2606.

celebrate the values of the city. Jeanne B. McCoy Center for the Arts, 100 W. DublinGranville Rd., New Albany, 323-1237, newalbanysymphony.com.

FEB. 11

Artists’ inFormal

FEB. 14

Artists and art supporters are encouraged to attend this fun event celebrating the city’s strong arts community through videos, the 2012 Artists of Columbus photo and a signature wall. Dress with artistic flair and enjoy hors d’oeuvres, wine and entertainment. Cultural Arts Center, 139 W. Main St., 645-7514, culturalartscenteronline.org/gala.

Columbus’ 200th Birthday celebration with the Columbus Historical Society

FEB. 11

The Ruby Elzy Story Students from the OSU School of Music take the spotlight in this program celebrating the rise to stardom of Ruby Elzy, who was discovered by an OSU professor and rose to fame in the 1930s. Her story will be told through narration, projections and performances from Elzy’s repertoire, including pieces from Porgy and Bess. Lincoln Theatre, 769 E. Long St., 292-2295, music.osu.edu.

Join the Columbus Historical Society at its new home inside COSI for the grand opening of its gallery and exhibition space. Graduate students at the Harvey Goldberg Center for Teaching Excellence at OSU have developed an interactive exhibit utilizing the most current technology available to tell the story of the city’s many innovations. COSI, 333 W. Broad St., 224-0822, columbushistory.org. FEB. 14

Columbus Blue Jackets vs. St. Louis Blues The National Hockey League’s Columbus Blue Jackets take on the St. Louis Blues on the evening of Columbus’s 200th birthday. Nationwide Arena, 200 W. Nationwide Blvd., 246-4625, bluejackets.com.

FEB. 11-15

FEB. 14

200Columbus Days

WOSU Presents Columbus Neighborhoods: Franklinton/Downtown Viewing

Experience all of the great things that make Columbus Columbus, and enjoy discounts on attractions and entertainment. Throughout Central Ohio, 221-2489, 200columbusdays.com. FEB. 12

New Albany Symphony: Portraits of a Columbus Bicentennial The New Albany Symphony celebrates the 200th birthday of Columbus through local photography and the quintessentially American music of Aaron Copland. The stirring words of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address will honor Black History Month and President’s Day and

Attend a free showing of a documentary detailing the history of Franklinton and downtown, including its determined pioneers, devastating floods and vision for the state capital. Ohio Theatre, 39 E. State St., 292-9678, columbusneighborhoods.org/about. FEB. 25-MARCH 4

Central Ohio Home & Garden Show Stroll through spectacular gardens designed to incorporate a party theme in celebration of the city’s bicentennial. This annual event is renowned for its live 2 0 0 C O L U M B U S

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gardens, HGTV talent appearances, cooking demos, interactive features and more than 400 exhibitors and attractions. Ohio Expo Center, 717 E. 17th Ave., 4615257, dispatchevents.com.

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by trombonist and composer Wycliffe Gordon, commissioned by the Jazz Arts Group. Lincoln Theatre, 769 E. Long St., 294-5200, jazzartsgroup.org. MARCH 16 AND 18

NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Second- and Third-Round Games

MARCH 1-4

Arnold Sports Festival The largest multi-sport event in the nation, this festival draws 175,000 sports and fitness fans to watch 18,000 athletes compete in more than 45 sports and athletic activities. Highlights include 12 Olympic events, the 2012 U.S. Olympic Team Trials for Weightlifting and the 2012 National Weightlifting Championships. Greater Columbus Convention Center, Franklin County Veterans Memorial, Nationwide Arena and other venues, 431-2600, arnoldsportsfestival.com. MARCH 1-24

Ohio High School Athletic Association Championships Cheer on the best in high school sports as Columbus hosts the state championships in wrestling (March 1-3), girls’ basketball (March 15-17) and boys’ basketball (March 22-24). Value City Arena, 555 Borror Dr., 267-2502, ohsaa.org. MARCH 2-3

Jazz Arts Group: Beyond the Blackberry Patch Ten musicians tell the story of the historic King Lincoln District in this world première

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The championships return to Columbus with eight teams playing in four secondround games March 16 and the winners competing in third-round games March 18. Nationwide Arena, 200 W. Nationwide Blvd., 292-2624, ncaa.com. APRIL 20-28

APRIL 21-28

African American Heritage Festival Celebrate African-American history and culture at this annual event that brings thousands of visitors to Columbus. Throughout the OSU campus, 688-8449, heritagefestival.osu.edu. APRIL 24-26

Downtown Digital Arts Festival Admire creativity in the digital arts at this third annual event that showcases work by student artists in animation, digital design, digital photography and video. Columbus State Community College, 315 Cleveland Ave., 287-5353, cscc.edu/ddaf.

BalletMet: DanceTech Contemporary dance and cutting-edge technology come together in this multimedia theatrical experience. Realtime video images are created in direct response to the movement of the dancers, so no two performances are the same. Capitol Theatre, Riffe Center, 77 S. High St., 469-0939, balletmet.org. APRIL 21

MAY 5

Capital City Half Marathon Runners can participate in the Capital City Half Marathon (13.1 miles), the Capital City Quarter Marathon (6.55 miles), the popular Commit To Be Fit 5K or the Capital Kids Mascot Chase. Starts at Scioto Mile and ends at Columbus Commons, 296-6351, capitalcityhalfmarathon.com.

Earth Day 2012: Root Down Connect with the local environment and enjoy the fifth annual Earth Day celebration organized by Green Columbus, featuring live music, food trucks, info booths, an art show, kids’ activities and more. Location to be decided, 285-4535, rootdown2012.org.

MAY 5

Columbus Bicentennial Pavilion Grand Opening The grand opening of the Columbus Bicentennial Pavilion at Columbus Commons will be a day-long celebration with family activities, the Capital City Half Marathon finish line and the kickoff


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concert for the pavilion’s 2012 season. Columbus Commons, 160 S. High St., 5454700, columbuscommons.org.

And there ’s

more...

MAY 26-27

Asian Festival

columbusmonthly.com

The cultural heritages of 15 Asian communities are celebrated through art demonstrations, interactive dances, martial arts workshops and Asian music, games and cuisine. Franklin Park, 1777 E. Broad St., 451-3550, asian-festival.org. MAY 28-JUNE 3

the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide Insurance The world’s best golfers tee off at the Memorial Tournament, an official PGA Tour event founded by golfing great Jack Nicklaus. Muirfield Village Golf Club, 5750 Memorial Dr., Dublin, 889-6700, thememorialtournament.com. /11

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Columbus Arts Festival The Columbus Arts Festival returns to its former home along the downtown riverfront in 2012. Works by the finest artists and craftspeople from throughout the country and around the world are joined by continuous entertainment and food from area restaurants. Downtown riverfront, 480 E. Broad St., 224-2606, columbusartsfestival.org. $4.9 5

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More than 85,000 participants will celebrate the city’s bicentennial with the theme “Have a Blast. Read. Celebrate 200 Years of ColumbUS Fun.” All branches, 6452275, columbuslibrary.org. JUNE 9

Stop and Smell the Roses

c o l u m b u s c e o.c o m

Spend a rosy day with 11,500 roses in peak bloom at the Park of Roses. Stroll through 13 acres of garden beds, consult with horticulturists, enjoy educational and artistic exhibits and listen to live music. Park of Roses, 3923 N. High St., 645-3391, parkofroses.org.

Along with these featured events (current as of Dec. 1, 2011), many others are planned for 2012. One to note in September is Innovation, Design, Engineering and Arts (I.D.E.A.), an engaging 10-day celebration of creativity and innovation showcasing technology, design, food, fashion and healthy living. The Columbus Public Art 2012 project will feature works by 56 artists over the course of the year, transforming public spaces, plazas, parks, streets and alleys in a 360acre area of downtown into an open-air gallery. The Ohio Homecoming will celebrate Columbus—and all of Ohio—on a grand scale in July, when the city hosts the popular annual event for the first time. Also in the works are a 200Columbus Parade, Citizen Summit and more. To learn more, visit 200Columbus.com. JUNE 15-17

Juneteenth Celebration There’s fun for the entire family at this celebration of the historic Emancipation Proclamation, recognizing the struggle by African-Americans for freedom. Franklin Park, 1777 E. Broad St., 258-4633, juneteenthohio.net. JUNE 24

German Village Haus und Garten Tour Explore historic homes and gardens at your own pace, stopping along the way to enjoy all the food, shopping and fun German Village has to offer. Throughout German Village, 221-8888, germanvillage.com. JULY 3

JUNE 15-16

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The largest Pride event in the Midwest, the Pride Festival entertained more than 200,000 attendees last year with a parade, marketplace, food court, family area and music. Goodale Park, corner of Goodale Boulevard and Park Street, 299-7764, columbuspride.org.

Creekside Blues & Jazz Festival

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The best blues and jazz from throughout Ohio will fill the air at Creekside Park and Olde Gahanna. Enjoy more than 90 hours of entertainment on five stages, a fun run, amusement rides, food and more. Creekside Park & Plaza, 123 Mill St., Gahanna, 418-9114, creeksidebluesandjazz.com.

Red, White & Boom! Enjoy great food, live music and fireworks at the 32nd Red, White & Boom, the biggest and best Independence Day celebration in the Midwest. Downtown riverfront, 421-2666, redwhiteandboom.org. JULY 4

Doo Dah Parade Exercise your First Amendment right through humor: Watch (or march in) the craziest parade in history. No entry fee, just show up. Along High Street in the Short North Arts District, 228-0621, doodahparade.com. JULY 20-22

Jazz & Rib Fest This highly anticipated summer tradition


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has offered jazz and rib connoisseurs the finest in music and barbecue for more than 30 years. Arena District/North Bank Park, 645-7995, hotribscooljazz.org. JULY 25-AUG. 5

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AUG. 11-12

10TV Health & Fitness Expo Discover easy ways to make healthier life decisions. Greater Columbus Convention Center, 400 N. High St., 461-5257, 10tv.com/expo.

Ohio State Fair Find fun for the entire family at the 159th Ohio State Fair. Attractions include a midway with more than 60 rides, sporting competitions, a fine arts show, exotic animals, helicopter rides, roving performers, youth agricultural competitions, horse shows, 175 food vendors and more. Ohio Expo Center, 717 E. 17th Ave., 644-3247, ohiostatefair.com. AUG. 3-4

King Lincoln District Heritage Festival Building on the history and heritage of the King Lincoln District, this festival celebrates African-American arts, music and dance. Lincoln Theatre, 768 E. Long St., 253-1880, lincolntheatrecolumbus.com. AUG. 3-5

Dublin Irish Festival The festival marks its 25th year with dance and music on seven stages. Performers from Ireland and the United States will entertain more than 100,000 visitors, who also can enjoy Irish cultural exhibits, children’s activities and plenty of food and drink. Coffman Park, 5600 Post Rd., Dublin, 410-4545, dublinirishfestival.org.

AUG. 11-12

Festival Latino This annual fiesta includes local and national Latin-American music acts, a showcase of Ohio-based Latin artists, Latin dance demonstrations, a Latin-inspired fashion show and vendors specializing in LatinAmerican cuisine. Genoa Park, 303 W. Broad St., 469-0939, festivallatino.net. AUG. 31-SEPT. 2

celebrates independent art, music and entrepreneurship in the heart of Columbus. Along Gay Street, 488-5600, thisisindependent.com. SEPT. 21

Columbus Food & Wine Affair Grand Tasting Enjoy delectable offerings from Central Ohio’s premier restaurants and pourings from the finest domestic and international wineries. Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, 1777 E. Broad St., 264-5505, foodandwineaffair.com. SEPT. 28-30

via Columbus

SEPT. 3

At this outdoor celebration, enjoy live music, see the work of more than 100 national artists and dine at some of the city’s best food carts. Via Columbus kicks off Friday with MTV’s U-Nite, a “welcome home” event for Central Ohio’s 142,000 college students. Along the downtown riverfront/ Washington Boulevard, 299-9221, dispatchevents.com.

Upper Arlington Labor Day Arts Festival

OCT. 5-7

Greek Festival Traditional music and dance and authentic food pay tribute to Greek culture, while tours of the striking cathedral explain how it was painstakingly decorated by hand. Greek Orthodox Cathedral, 555 N. High St., 224-9020, greekcathedral.com.

Celebrate the arts at this juried showcase of nearly 200 fine art and craft artists from around the country. Northam Park, 2070 Northam Rd., 583-5310, uaoh.net. SEPT. 15

Independents’ Day 2012 The Fifth Annual Independents’ Day Festival

Columbus Italian Festival The celebration of Italian-American culture includes live entertainment, open-air markets, Italian dancing and food, a parade, a bocce ball tournament and an AmericanItalian Idol vocal contest. Italian Village, 720 Hamlet St., 294-8259, columbusitalianfestival.com.

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OCT. 5-8

Experience Columbus Days During this city-wide event, guests showing an Experience Columbus Days flier get 50 percent or more off admission to participating attractions and 25 percent discounts at nearly 50 locally owned and operated restaurants that are part of Dine Originals Columbus. Visit experiencecolumbusdays.com to print a flier. Throughout Central Ohio, 221-6623, experiencecolumbusdays.com. OCT. 5-28

All American Quarter Horse Congress Now in its 46th year, the All American Quarter Horse Congress is the world’s largest single breed horse show. Check out the competition and the amazing array of riding and horse-related products on sale. Ohio Expo Center, 717 E. 17th Ave., 740-943-2346, oqha.com. OCT. 21

Columbus Marathon More than 20,000 runners, walkers and wheelchair racers are expected to participate in the 33rd annual Columbus Marathon and 12⁄ Marathon as thousands of spectators line the streets to cheer them on. 421-7866, columbusmarathon.com. LATE OCTOBER

HighBall Halloween: Masquerade on High This cross between Carnivale and Mardi Gras—with a pinch of Halloween and a healthy splash of the Short North’s artistic spirit—has become one of the most highly anticipated Halloween events in the Midwest. The focal point is a dramatic runway stage built on High Street beneath the neighborhood’s iconic arches. Short North Arts District, High and Fifth streets, 299-8050, highballhalloween.com. NOV. 2-FEB. 17

Elijah Pierce As the final show in its celebration of the city’s bicentennial, the Columbus Museum of Art presents one of America’s foremost woodcarvers and folk artists, Elijah Pierce, who lived and worked in Columbus. His narrative carvings are regarded as some of the most individual, personal, whimsical and spiritual ever produced by an American folk artist. Columbus Museum of Art, 480 E. Broad St., 2214848, columbusmuseum.org. DEC. 31

First Night Columbus Wrap up the bicentennial year at this community-oriented, family-friendly, alcohol-free event. More than 40 live performances include jazz, funk, ragtime, storytelling and magic, along with handson activities and a children’s festival. Throughout downtown, 299-9221, firstnightcolumbus.com. ★

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Capturing ColumbUS History Since 1871

Our ďŹ rst edition consisted of four printed pages. Today, our news reaches millions of people in print, on the Internet, on their computers, on their phones, on their e-Readers and on their iPads.

We’ve come pretty far. Just like Columbus.


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200COLUMBUS

Past


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Information courtesy the Columbus Metropolitan Library (Genealogy,

MEMORABLE MOMENTS

History and Travel division), the Columbus Dispatch Research Library

ALL PHOTOS COURTESY COLUMBUS METROPOLITAN LIBRARY (GENEALOGY, HISTORY AND TRAVEL DIVISION)

and Columbus Monthly archives. 1 The town of Columbus was platted. 1812 2 The first Statehouse was constructed. 1814 3 The first state penitentiary opened. 1815 4 William Neil opened his first inn, a precursor to three Neil House Hotels on High Street. 1823 5 Lucas Sullivant, who platted Franklinton in 1797, died. 1823 6 Columbus became the Franklin County seat. 1824 7 Capital University opened. 1830 8 Columbus was incorporated as a city. 1834 9 The first kindergarten opened. 1836 10 Charles Dickens arrived by #5 stagecoach and stayed at the Neil House. 1842 11 The first locomotive ran through Columbus after Union Station was built. 1850 12 Dr. Lincoln Goodale donated land for Goodale Park, the first city park. 1851 13 Camp Chase opened as a Civil War encampment and Union prison. 1861 14 President Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train traveled through Columbus. 1865 15 Ohio State University was founded. 1870 16 Simon Lazarus, founder of the Lazarus Department Store, died. 1877 17 The Rev. James Poindexter was the first African-American elected to city council. 1880 18 Franklin Park was established. 1886 19 Columbus became a shoe and buggy capital. 1890 20 First electric streetcar debuted. 1891 21 Construction began on the Wyandotte Building, the first Columbus skyscraper. 1894 22 The Columbus Main Library opened. 1907 23 A violent streetcar strike crippled the city for three months. 1910 24 The Columbus centennial was celebrated. 1912 25 The Scioto River flooded downtown, killing 94 people. 1913 26 Ohio Stadium opened. 1922 27 Central High School was dedicated. 1924 28 Palace Theatre opened. 1926 29 Battelle Memorial Institute opened. 1929 30 Port Columbus opened. 1929 31 Ohio Penitentiary fire killed more than 300 people. 1930 32 Columbus Museum of Art opened. 1931 33 Artist and newspaper cartoonist Billy Ireland died. 1935 34 OSU track star Jesse Owens became the first athlete to win four gold medals in the Olympics—during the Berlin Summer Games in front of Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler. 1936 35 Olentangy Amusement Park closed. 1937

36 Olentangy Village Apartment Complex was built. 1938 37 Last streetcar service ran. 1948 38 Artist Alice Schille died. 1955 39 The Columbus Zoo was the site of the first captive-born gorilla (Colo). 1956 40 Mershon Auditorium at OSU was dedicated. 1957 41 The German Village Society was formed. 1960 42 The Ohio State men’s basketball team, led by Jerry Lucas, John Havlicek and coach Fred Taylor, won the national championship. 1960 43 The Kahiki Restaurant opened. (It closed in 2000.) 1961 44 Luci’s Toy Shop began broadcasting. 1961

#44 45 Les Wexner opened The Limited in Upper Arlington’s Kingsdale Shopping Center. 1963 46 COSI opened at the former Memorial Hall. 1964 47 The first Wendy’s opened, on East Broad Street. 1969 48 City National Bank & Trust (which later became Bank One) introduced the nation’s first ATM. 1970 49 Following the shootings at Kent State University, riots broke out at OSU, closing the campus. 1970 50 Chittenden Hotel closed. 1972 51 I-270 was completed. 1975 52 OSU running back Archie Griffin was the first college football player to win two Heisman Trophy awards. 1975 53 Dispatch publisher Edgar T. Wolfe Jr., along with civic

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leader Fred LeVeque and attorney Carlton Dargusch, died in a plane crash near Washington, D.C. 1975 54 The first Memorial Tournament was held. 1976 55 A wrecking ball brought down the Columbus Union Station for construction of the Ohio Center. (Union Station Arch was dismantled and now stands at McFerson Commons in the Arena District). 1976

#47

56 Hustler publisher Larry Flynt moved into a mansion across from the Columbus School for Girls. 1976 57 Nationwide Plaza was completed. 1977 58 The Columbus Clippers made their home debut in the refurbished Franklin County Stadium. (It was renamed Cooper Stadium in 1984.) 1977 59 Federal court judge Robert Duncan issued his verdict in the Penick v. Columbus Board of Education suit, finding the Columbus School Board guilty of intentionally creating and maintaining an illegally segregated school system. 1977 60 Bob Marvin, as Flippo the Clown, hosted his final “Armchair Theater” television show on Channel 10. 1977 61 The renovated Ohio Theatre reopened. 1977 62 Columbus was one of six cities selected to be part of Warner Amex Cable’s experimental interactive television system referred to as QUBE, which lasted for six years. 1977 63 The city was crippled when more than 34 inches of snow fell in January—and a total of 54.1 inches for the winter, which simply became known as The Blizzard of ’78. 1978 64 Battelle announced its Renaissance plan to improve housing around the research institute’s near north side headquarters. 1978 65 Billy Milligan drew national attention after he pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to a series of campus-area rapes and was diagnosed with 10 separate personalities. 1978 66 The Columbus Zoo hired a new director: Jack Hanna. 1978 67 Ohio State football coach Woody Hayes was fired after punching a Clemson player during a loss in the Gator Bowl. 1978 68 Two years after Judge Robert Duncan’s order, buses rolled to begin desegregation. 1979 69 The Ohio Center and the adjacent Hyatt Regency opened. 1980 70 The first Red, White & Boom was held. 1981 71 The downtown Neil House Hotel, with origins dating to 1839, was demolished. 1981 72 Following a nine-hour dinner meeting with a group of Shriners and admitting to drinking five scotches, Mayor Tom Moody rear-ended another vehicle on the I-71 exit ramp at Cleveland Avenue at 3:40 a.m. in March. He said he was “going to inspect the city.” 1981 73 Opera/Columbus made its debut, with a production of Tosca. 1981 128

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74 State Route 315, then referred to as the Olentangy Freeway, opened to traffic. 1981 75 The Drexel Theatre was restored to its original 1930s luster, and Ginger Rogers appeared at the reopening ceremony for a showing of the Rogers and Fred Astaire film Top Hat. 1981 76 Cheryl Krueger, a 29-year-old buyer for The Limited, opened her first Cheryl’s Cookies shop, in the French Market at the Continent. 1981 77 Sue Doody opened Lindey’s, which became one of the most popular upscale restaurants in Columbus, featuring the copper-trimmed bar that had served Neil House patrons. 1981 78 Central High School closed. 1982 79 Actors Summer Theatre made its debut. 1982 80 Former OSU and Baltimore Colts quarterback Art Schlichter told FBI agents that he owed $389,000 to gamblers. 1983 81 Woody Hayes dotted the “i” during the OSU Marching Band’s performance of “Script Ohio” at halftime of the Wisconsin game, marking Hayes’s first return to Ohio Stadium since his firing. 1983 82 The first Gallery Hop was held. 1984 83 Watergate conspirator-turned-preacher Jeb Stuart Magruder was chosen as executive minister of First Community Church. 1984 84 Boxer Jerry Page won Olympic gold at the Los Angeles Games. 1984 85 The 150-year-old Ohio Penitentiary closed five years after a federal judge ordered it shut down. 1984 86 Acclaimed folk-art carver Elijah Pierce died of a heart attack at age 92. The son of a Mississippi slave, Pierce completed many of his works between haircuts at his Long Street barbershop. 1984 87 The renovated home of author and humorist James Thurber opened to the public. The site, at 77 Jefferson Ave., was the setting for many of his most famous tales. 1984 88 The Citizen-Journal stopped publishing. 1985 89 The Contemporary American Theater Co. (CATCO) gave its first performance. 1985 90 Les Wexner initially gave OSU $10 million toward a visual arts center, and he ultimately contributed $25 million for what became the Wexner Center for the Arts (which opened in 1989). 1985 91 Federal judge Robert Duncan ruled the Columbus police department had discriminated against blacks from the 1940s through the 1970s and ordered revised promotion, assignment, transfer and recruiting policies. 1985 92 Judge Duncan freed Columbus schools from court jurisdiction, ending eight years of federal rule over the district’s racial desegregation policies. 1985 93 The 37-floor Huntington Center, built on the site of the former Neil House, opened. 1985 94 At age 46, Jack Nicklaus won his 18th and final major golf tournament, The Masters. 1986 95 A water and sewer main collapsed on West Broad Street, opening a large sinkhole downtown that swallowed a Mercedes driven by an attorney (who was uninjured). The incident generated international publicity. 1986 96 Dublin’s Bobby Rahal won the Indianapolis 500, driving for the Hilliard-based Red Roof Inns team owned by Jim Trueman. 1986 97 It was revealed that Les Wexner and developer Jack Kessler had purchased some 4,000 acres near New Albany with the intent of building an upscale development. 1987 98 Woody Hayes died at age 74. Former President Richard Nixon delivered the eulogy, quoting Sophocles: “One must wait until the evening to see how splendid the day has been.” 1987 99 OSU president Ed Jennings triggered an uproar by firing


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football coach Earle Bruce during Michigan week. Athletic director Rick Bay resigned in protest and the Buckeyes players, many wearing “Earle” headbands, rallied to defeat Michigan. 1987 100 The Martin Luther King Jr. Center for the Performing and Cultural Arts opened. 1987 101 The U.S. team was beaten 15-13 by the Europeans in the Ryder Cup matches played at Muirfield Village—America’s first loss on home soil. 1987 102 Mikhail Baryshnikov performed at the Ohio Theatre as a fundraiser for BalletMet. 1987 103 Without consulting City Council, Mayor Dana Rinehart proposed giving the city-owned “Brushstrokes in Flight” sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein to officials in Genoa, Italy, for the 1992 Christopher Columbus celebration. He later rescinded the offer. 1988 104 John W. Galbreath died at the age of 90 at his Darby Dan Farm home. The Rev. Norman Vincent Peale delivered the eulogy for the noted businessman and sportsman. 1988 105 Pink Floyd played in front of 64,000 fans at Ohio Stadium—the first concert held in the Horseshoe. 1988 106 The Vern Riffe Center opened the same day the cylindrical Christopher Inn was demolished (June 14). 1988 107 Waterford Tower, the city’s first downtown residential high-rise, opened. 1988 108 Columbus City Center opened. 1989 109 James “Buster” Douglas shocked the sports world by knocking out previously unbeaten Mike Tyson in Tokyo to claim the world heavyweight championship. He lost

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the belt seven months later, falling to Evander Holyfield. 1990 110 James G. Jackson became the first black Columbus police chief. 1990 111 Gordon Gee was named president of OSU. 1990 112 The Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital at OSU opened. 1990 113 John Middleton became the first black superintendent of the Columbus Public Schools. 1991 114 The Santa Maria, a replica of Christopher Columbus’s ship anchored in the Scioto River downtown, was dedicated. 1991 115 The Sirak Collection of paintings arrived at the Columbus Museum of Art. 1991 116 AmeriFlora ’92, an international floral exhibit, was held at Franklin Park Conservatory. 1992 117 A panda exhibit opened at the Columbus Zoo, drawing record crowds during their three-month stay on loan from China. 1992 118 The death of Players Theatre: Crippled by massive debt, the community’s only Equity troupe folded after 70 years. 1993 119 The Greater Columbus Convention Center opened. 1993 120 The plaid-cloaked Jimmy Crum retired as the NBC 4 sports anchor. 1993 121 Columbus was among the original seven cities awarded a Major League Soccer franchise. 1994 122 John Walton Wolfe, the head of the Dispatch Printing Company and the Ohio Company, died at age 65. 1994 123 Opening night (Billy Ray Cyrus) at Polaris Amphitheater. 1994 124 Ohio State and Notre Dame met in Ohio Stadium for the first time in 59 years with the Buckeyes winning 45-26 en route to an 11-2 season, capped when running back Eddie George became Ohio State’s sixth Heisman Trophy winner. 1995 125 The Schottenstein family made a $12.5 million donation to OSU for an arena that became known as the Schottenstein Center. 1995

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126 The Jai Lai Restaurant closed after 63 years. 1996 127 Columbus public schools ended forced busing. 1996 128 The NHL approved an application for a Columbus franchise. Voters, however, rejected a tax levy to build an arena. Nationwide CEO Dimon McFerson announced the company would build an arena with the Dispatch as a 10 percent partner. 1997 129 The Ohio Penitentiary was demolished. 1997 130 CompuServe, the Columbus-based Internet pioneer, was sold in a three-way split with WorldCom and America Online. 1997 131 OSU’s popular president, Gordon Gee, announced he was going Ivy League, accepting the presidency at Brown University. 1997 132 Bank One merged with First Chicago NBD; the company’s headquarters would move to Chicago. 1998 133 Stefanie Spielman learned she had breast cancer, and her husband, Chris, a former Ohio State and then Buffalo Bills linebacker, announced he would forego the 1998 season to help his wife and their children. After raising millions of dollars for breast cancer research, she died in 2009. 1998 134 Groundbreaking at Easton Town Center took place, with Les Wexner, Mayor Greg Lashutka, actor Arnold Schwarzenegger and hockey legend Wayne Gretzky on hand. (It opened a year later.) 1998 135 Ground was broken for Miranova, developer Ron Pizzuti’s 26story condominium complex along the downtown riverfront. 1998 136 The Southern Theatre reopened. 1998 137 Ohio State hosted an International Town Meeting on the ongoing Iraq conflict, but the CNN-televised event turned rowdy when the crowd baited anchor Bernard Shaw and Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. 1998 138 Mike Coleman, the former Columbus City Council president, defeated Franklin County Commissioner Dorothy Teater to become


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Columbus’s first black mayor and end 27 consecutive years of Republican dominance in the mayor’s office. 1999 139 The French Market closed. 1999 140 The Columbus Crew successfully introduced its new stadium with a 2-0 win over New England before a sellout crowd. 1999 141 The new COSI opened on the west bank of the Scioto River downtown. 1999 142 The Columbus Blue Jackets made their debut in Nationwide Arena as part of the Arena District. 2000 143 The Garage on East Long Street, one of Columbus’s gay-nightclub pioneers, closed. 2000 144 Ohio Stadium reopened after extensive renovations. 2001 145 John Cooper was fired after 13 years as Ohio State’s head football coach; he was replaced by Jim Tressel. 2001 146 James Rhodes, whose 16 years as Ohio governor matched the longest tenure of any governor in post-Colonial American history, died at OSU Medical Center. He was 91. 2001 147 Michael Moritz, a two-time graduate of Ohio State University, gave $30 million to his alma mater’s law school—the largest single donation in OSU history at the time. He died in 2002 at age 68. 2001 148 Polaris Fashion Place opened as Central Ohio’s largest mall. 2001 149 Dave Thomas, the founder of Wendy’s International, died at age 69. 2002 150 Thirteen-year-old Brittanie Cecil died after getting hit in the head with a puck at a Columbus Blue Jackets game, the first spectator to die of a puck-related injury since the National Hockey League started in 1917. 2002 151 OSU named Karen Holbrook as its first woman president. 2002 152 After an OSU football victory over Michigan, students vandalized a campus neighborhood by overturning cars and torching couches in the street, resulting in 57 arrests and plenty of national attention. 2002 153 Northland Mall closed. 2002 154 The OSU football team won the Fiesta Bowl to clinch its first national championship since the 1968 season. 2003 155 Five OSU students were killed in a house fire near campus. The arson became the biggest murder investigation in the city’s history. 2003 156 Ben Curtis, a 26-year-old PGA Tour rookie raised in Ostrander, won the British Open. 2003 157 Columbus City Council banned smoking from public places and businesses, including bars. 2004

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the community’s conversation www.columbusmetroclub.org

P IZZA H OUSE O F C OLUMBUS

Check website for Specials! ! rs ea Y www.pizzahousecolumbus.com 0 5 ng ti Celebra Billy Colasante has proven that independent pizza restaurants can be on top in a large “pizza chain” market. His PIZZA HOUSE Restaurant has successfully been in business for 50 years. The Pizza House is a full service Italian restaurant with made from scratch menu items using family recipes. We offer traditional homemade pizza’s along with new items such as white pizza, Hawaiian Pizza, BBQ Chicken Pizza, Pesto Pizza and of course build your own! Colasante believes that sticking to one successful location has been a big part of his success. He gives a lot of credit to the experience of his managers. On behalf of the Pizza House management, staff and me -

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Let’s Explore the exciting changes at the Ohio History Center! Whether you dig archaeology and old buildings, or enjoy exploring your history through the stories of your own family tree, there’s so much new to see and do at the Ohio History Center. • Newly renovated welcome lobby • Over 26,000 sq. ft. of new exhibits • Special appearances by colorful characters • New programs and hands-on activities • 19th-century Ohio Village special events (seasonally) • Expanded Ohio History Store

The museum and Ohio History Store are now open Wed.–Sat. 10–5, Sun. 12–5.

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OPEN 7 DAYS

158 The downtown Lazarus store closed after 153 years. 2004 159 Guitarist “Dimebag” Darrell Abbott of Damageplan and three others were murdered when Nathan Gale opened fire during a concert at the Alrosa Villa. 2004 160 Sniper Charles McCoy Jr. was sentenced to 27 years in prison after pleading guilty to 11 criminal counts, including involuntary manslaughter for the death of Gail Knisley. 2005 161 Danica Patrick of the Rahal Letterman Racing team in Hilliard became the first woman to lead the Indianapolis 500 (18 of the last 29 laps) before finishing fourth. 2005 162 Acclaimed OSU marketing professor and business adviser Roger Blackwell, who had pledged $7 million to the university in return for his name on a campus building, was found guilty of 19 counts of insider trading and related infractions. After serving five years in federal prison, he was released in 2010. 2005 163 Cardinal Health founder Bob Walter, who turned a small food wholesaler into one of the country’s largest providers of health-care products and services, stepped down as CEO. 2006 164 Ray Hanley, who guided the Greater Columbus Arts Council for two decades, died after accidentally falling from a fifthfloor terrace at a Miranova condo. 2006 165 The Nationwide Foundation pledged $50 million to Children’s Hospital (which was renamed Nationwide Children’s Hospital). 2006 166 The Gay Pride Parade celebrated its 25th anniversary. 2006 167 Former OSU football star Maurice Clarett agreed to a plea bargain in two criminal cases and would spend at least three-and-a-half years in prison; he was charged with aggravated robbery and also arrested following a highway chase (and found with four loaded guns in his truck). 2006 168 OSU quarterback Troy Smith won the Heisman Trophy. 2006 169 The original Wendy’s restaurant closed. 2007 170 The University of Florida defeated the Ohio State men’s basketball team 8475 in the NCAA national championship game. 2007 171 Columbus-based Skybus made its first flight from Port Columbus. 2007 172 Paul Tibbets, who flew the plane that dropped the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, died at age 92. 2007 173 Gordon Gee returned as president of OSU. 2007 174 The Ohio State football team lost


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its second straight national championship game, falling to LSU 38-24. 2008 175 The Schottenstein brand name disappeared from the retail scene after nearly a century of offering discounted goods. 2008 176 A record 20.5 inches of snow fell from March 7-9. 2008 177 Skybus suddenly shut down, leaving hundreds of ticket holders stranded across the country. 2008 178 John H. McConnell, who founded Worthington Industries and was the majority owner of the Columbus Blue Jackets, died at age 84. 2008 179 Parents magazine named COSI the No. 1 science center in the country. 2008 180 The Columbus Crew won its first MLS Cup. 2008 181 Huntington Park opened with the Columbus Clippers facing the Toledo Mud Hens before an overflow crowd of 11,950 fans. 2009 182 USA Travel Guide named the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium the best zoo in the country. 2009 183 City Center was demolished. 2009 184 The Columbus Blue Jackets qualified for the NHL playoffs for the first time. 2009 185 Starting from the lawn of Chemical Abstracts Service, an estimated 2,500 bicyclists joined Lance Armstrong as part of Pelotonia, a fundraiser for cancer research. 2009 186 The OSU board of trustees approved a $1 billion expansion of its medical center, the biggest project in the hospital’s history. 2009 187 After bending to considerable community pressure, Penn National Gaming announced it would move its casino from the voter-approved location in the Arena District to the old Delphi plant site on the west side. 2010 188 The city of Columbus reached a settlement with Derris

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Lewis for $950,000 after he was wrongfully arrested (spending 18 months in prison) for the murder of his twin brother; police acknowledged a “communication breakdown” regarding the key piece of evidence: a bloody handprint. 2010 189 The Columbus Metropolitan Library was named Library of the Year by Library Journal. 2010 190 Community leader and banker John G. McCoy died at age 97. 2010 191 Popular CD101 deejay John “Andyman” Davis, known for his Andyman-a-Thon in which he would spend 48 hours on the air for an annual Christmas holiday fundraiser, drowned in Michigan. 2010

192 The new $60.1 million Main Street Bridge, the world’s longest inclined arch bridge, opened. 2010 193 Fred Holdridge, the unofficial mayor of German Village, died at the age of 86; with his life partner, Howard Burns, who died in 2001, he operated Hausfrau Haven, a landmark German Village shop. 2010 194 Mia McGhee gave birth at the OSU Medical Center to the first sextuplets born in Central Ohio. 2010 195 John Kasich of Westerville won election as governor. 2010 196 Les Wexner, his wife, Abigail, and Limited Brands Foundation donated $100 million to OSU. 2011 197 OSU football coach Jim Tressel was forced to resign after revealing he had lied about his involvement in the Tattoo-gate scandal. 2011 198 The new Franklin County Courthouse opened. 2011 199 Scioto Mile and Columbus Commons (at the site of the old City Center mall) both opened downtown. 2011 200 Mayor Mike Coleman was elected to his fourth consecutive term as mayor. 2011 ★

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A COLLECTION OF TITLES AS DIVERSE AS COLUMBUS ITSELF. The Columbus Dispatch family of niche publications wishes the city and its people a jubilant bicentennial.


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by Ed Lentz

Anna Bishop HISTORIAN OF THE NEAR EAST SIDE

EVERY COMMUNITY HAS its historians, and the Columbus African-American community is no exception. Some of them have been journalists. Others have been scholars and researchers. But for most of the last two-thirds of the 20th century, the single person who knew and shared the most about the history of black Columbus was an astonishing lady named Anna Bishop. Born in Columbus as America entered World War I, Anna Steward was recognized early as a bright and accomplished young woman. Graduating from East High School at 14, she was only 19 when she graduated from Ohio State University with a degree in education. With some study at Capital University and the Juilliard School in New York, she embarked on a 35-year career as a teacher in Columbus public schools and as a singer, composer and musician. All of that led to her receipt of an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Wilmington College in 1960. But in a real sense, the career of Anna Bishop—teacher, mother and community

leader—really began in earnest after she retired in 1973. Convinced that the heritage and history of her community was being lost, she returned to OSU and earned a master’s degree in black studies. A strong supporter of Ohio State, she helped established the university’s extension center on Mount Vernon Avenue. And she collected the stories, memories and folklore of the people who called the near east side “the Blackberry Patch.” In four volumes of Beyond Poindexter Village: The Blackberry Patch, she set a standard for what community history could and should be. By the time Bishop died in 2004, her work had come to be recognized as something as special as the remarkable woman who wrote it.

COURTESY OHIO STATEHOUSE PHOTO ARCHIVE

JEFF BRIGGS/COURTESY ARNETT HOWARD

These mainly forgotten historical figures played significant roles in and beyond Columbus.

Carrie Nelson Black HEALTH-CARE ADVOCATE

A LOOK AT many of the older houses remaining in the inner city of Columbus will reveal small enclosed porches, usually at the back of the house on the second story. These were sleeping porches for hot summer nights. They were used for

that, but they had another, grimmer purpose as well. The fact that many of us have forgotten the other purpose in Columbus is largely due to the efforts of a woman named Carrie Nelson Black. Born in 1858, she lived in Columbus with her husband, Samuel Black—an attorney, one-term mayor and longtime probate and juvenile court judge. Like many women in the Gilded Age of the 1890s, she was concerned about health and hygiene in an increasingly urban America. Coal dust was everywhere. Tuberculosis, the White Plague and other respiratory diseases killed one person in nine in Columbus in the early part of the 20th century. One of the only treatments for these diseases was to sleep yearround on sleeping porches at the houses of people affluent enough to have one. Unlike many of the women of her time, Black decided to do something about these problems. Virtually untiring, she founded the Instructive District Nurses Association in 1898 to bring professional nursing assistance to the low- to moderate-income neighborhoods of Columbus. LifeCare Alliance is the direct descendant of this organization. In 1906, she started the Columbus Society for the Prevention and Control of Tuberculosis, now the Breathing Association. And in 1921, she helped found the Columbus Cancer Clinic, the first free cancer clinic in America. By the time Black died in 1936, most houses no longer needed sleeping porches and Columbus was literally breathing easier. 2 0 0 C O L U M B U S

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Washington

Gladden A RELIGIOUS GIANT MOST PEOPLE are not aware of the fact that one of the most important figures in 136

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BELOVED ACTRESS ELSIE JANIS was simply one of the bestloved actresses in America in her own time. Born in 1889 and managed by a classic stage mother, Elsie Bierbower began

BOTTOM: COURTESY COLUMBUS IN HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPHS COLLECTION/COLUMBUS METROPOLITAN LIBRARY (2)

Elsie Janis

TOP: ORIGINALLY APPEARED IN THE MIAMI DAILY METROPOLIS IN 1922

American religious thought spent most of his time preaching and teaching in Columbus. Washington Gladden not only preached the Social Gospel, he also Mary practically invented it. K a t h e r i n e He was born Solomon Washington C a m p b e l l Gladden in 1836 in Pennsylvania. His COLUMBUS’S FIRST father died when he was 6 and he grew up on the farm of an uncle in upstate New (AND SECOND) York. Wishing to become a clergyman, he MISS AMERICA eventually graduated from Williams MARY KATHERINE CAMPBELL was born College. While there, he wrote its alma in Columbus in 1905 in comfortable mater, “The Mountains.” circumstances. She was only 16 when she Wishing to “realise the Kingdom of graduated from East High School in God in this world,” Gladden was a pastor February 1922, and she seemed destined in Massachusetts and New York, married for a quiet life in Columbus. Jennie Cohoon and had three children. His Decisions made several hundred miles to newspaper work for the New York the east would change all of that. The 1920s Independent helped with the exposure were something of a golden age of economic and fall of Boss Tweed in New York. prosperity in the years after World War I. It In 1882, he became pastor of the First was, as one writer observed, “The Age of Congregational Church in Columbus and Ballyhoo.” The president of the chamber of would lead that spiritual center for the commerce in Atlantic City, N.J., persuaded next 35 years. His congregation was quite hotel owners in the resort city that a new conservative politically and theologically. event might keep people coming to town. The Gladden was not. He supported Atlantic City Pageant would include, among unionization of workers, settlement other things, a beachfront beauty contest houses and many of the reforms of what with entrants from across the country. came to be called the Progressive In the first year, 1921, Margaret Gorman of Movement. Washington, D.C., became the first “Miss His congregation did not cast him out. America.” In 1922, Campbell beat out 170 Instead, they supported many of the ideas other young women to become Miss that came to be called the Social Gospel. Columbus (and Miss Ohio) and went on to A man of absolute integrity, Gladden defeat Gorman to be the second Miss opposed a gift of $100,000 to his church America. In 1923, she won the title a second by John D. Rockefeller as “tainted money.” time. The following year, she was first runnerOpposed to the anti-Catholicism of the up to Ruth Malcolmson of Philadelphia. At American Protective Association, he was that point, contest officials made a new rule: later awarded an honorary degree by the A person could only win the title once. University of Notre Dame for his stand. Campbell retired from competition as Author of 40 books, Gladden also wrote the only (and only possible) two-time Miss the music and lyrics to “Master Let Me America. She attended Ohio State Walk with Thee,” among other hymns. University and Ohio Wesleyan University, Washington Gladden died in 1918. married DuPont executive Frank Townley and spent a long and quiet life out of the public eye until her death in 1990.


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doing song and dance routines as Little Elsie at age 5. She got her big break when she was 11 by performing in the White House, then occupied by William McKinley of Ohio. After that, she had little trouble getting bookings on the vaudeville circuit and in London and New York. Among her theater credits were The Vanderbilt Cup (1906), The Hoyden (1907) and The Century Girl (1916). Her lasting fame resulted from her work during World War I. She traveled to Europe and performed hundreds of times for the troops and earned the nickname Sweetheart of the American Expeditionary Force. After the war, she pursued a career as a screenwriter, composer and occasional actress. Marrying in 1932, she lived in Tarrytown, N.Y., and later moved to Hollywood. Her song, “Oh, Give Me Time for Tenderness,” was featured in Dark Victory with Bette Davis and Ronald Reagan in 1939. Through most of her years on both coasts, she maintained her home in Columbus. Always wanting to be close to the cheering, her rambling frame home called El-Jan stood on the east side of High Street directly across from Ohio Field, where OSU played football and

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other sports until Ohio Stadium was built. Today, El-Jan is the site of a McDonald’s. When Janis died in 1956 at the age of 67, her old friend Mary Pickford was at her side. For her contributions to the motion picture industry, Janis has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Alfred Kelley THE MAN WHO SAVED OHIO IF ONE WERE LOOKING for the quintessential Ohio politician, one might look no further than Alfred Kelley of Cleveland, Columbus and points in between. Born in Middlefield, Conn., in 1789, Alfred Kelley was part of the restless generation that came of age after the American Revolution. He came to Cleveland in 1810. At the time, the town consisted of three frame houses and seven log cabins. Kelley liked the place and persuaded his parents and five brothers to join him. He saw his future in law and politics. He was the first mayor of Cleveland and then represented the area in the Ohio House of Representatives. Marrying Sarah

Welles, the Kelley family would have 11 children, six of whom lived to adulthood. Kelley became a strong advocate of canals and personally helped supervise the construction of Ohio’s canal system. As the years went by, Kelley found himself spending more time in Columbus than Cleveland. So he moved to Columbus and in 1838 built a magnificent Greek Revival mansion on Broad Street. He went on to represent the city in the Ohio Senate. When Ohio could not pay the interest due on its canal bonds in the late 1830s, Kelley pledged his house as collateral to ensure payment. His home came to be known as “the house that saved Ohio.” After the canals were completed, Kelley turned his attention to other matters. He sponsored reforms of Ohio’s rather erratic banking laws and served as president of the Columbus and Xenia Railroad, the first railroad to arrive in the capital city. Kelley was brilliant, though austere. His staunchly conservative politics earned him opponents, but few personal enemies. He was a hard man, and an even harder man to know. By the time he died in 1859, however, his honesty and courage were unquestioned.

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Hannah Neil FRIEND TO THE FRIENDLESS WILLIAM NEIL came to Columbus in 1818. He was a rough, aggressive sort of fellow who over several years came to be known as Billy Neil, the Stagecoach King. Part of the reason for his good fortune was his drive and ambition. But much of his success was due to his wife. She was, as one might put it, “the white gloves on the hard hand” of William Neil. Hannah Schwing was born in Franklin, Va., in 1794 and moved with her parents to Louisville, Ky., when she was 6 years old. When she was 22, she married Neil, moved with him to Urbana and then traveled to Columbus in 1818. The Neils built a log house and opened an inn and tavern across the street from the brick two-story Ohio Statehouse. Leaving Hannah in charge, William went off to buy some stagecoaches. In 1839, the log inn was replaced with what would be the first of three Neil House hotels. With success and prosperity, Hannah had more time to raise her six children and do what she really liked to do: help people less fortunate than herself. A granddaughter later wrote that Hannah would pack large amounts of

138

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P A S T

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pork, ham and sausage in barrels and distribute them to the poor in the winter. Late in her life she gave away every dress she owned except a black silk one she always wore. Directly involved with founding the Columbus Female Benevolent Society, she also started what came to be called the Hannah Neil Mission and Home for the Friendless. When Hannah died in 1868, large numbers of people lined the street for several blocks to watch the funeral procession pass by. She was one of the best loved people of her time.

COURTESY COLUMBUS IN HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPHS COLLECTION/ COLUMBUS METROPOLITAN LIBRARY (2)

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Frank Pa c ka r d SHAPING THE ARCHITECTURE OF MODERN AMERICA

FRANK PACKARD was a well-respected architect in America at a time when

architecture in its modern form was literally coming into being as a profession. Designing more than 3,400 buildings, Packard was one of the people directly involved in shaping the form of modern America. He was born in Delaware in 1866. Always interested in engineering, he found a job when he was 15 as a chain carrier for a surveyor and worked as an office boy for a Delaware engineering company. After taking some courses at Ohio State University, he completed his education at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1887 and worked for some of the leading architects of New York before returning to Ohio in 1891. Marrying Delaware resident Eva Elliot, Packard opened his own architectural office in Columbus. The Packards lived in several places, but finally ended up in a home on Franklin Park South. In 1892, he went into partnership with Joseph Yost. The firm of Yost and Packard went on to become nationally known for the design of government and institutional buildings. Packard’s buildings often included arched entryways, tall windows and columns, but his designs include examples of the widest variety of styles. Some of his more


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notable work in Columbus included Memorial Hall, the Seneca Hotel and the plan for several buildings and what would become the Oval at OSU. As president of the Chamber of Commerce, Packard worked to bring forth a civic center for Columbus along the Scioto River. It was well under way by the time he died unexpectedly from a stroke in 1923. A local paper said of the civic center at the time, “What a monument this will be to a great architect and to a great citizen.”

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Visit the Riffe Gallery in downtown Columbus. Admission is FREE. RIFFE GALLERY LOCATION Downtown Columbus Vern Riffe Center for Government & the Arts 77 South High Street, First Floor Use the State St. entrance on Thursday evenings, Saturdays and Sundays.

1OO

GALLERY HOURS Tu......................... 10-4 W, F..................... 10-5:30 Th......................... 10-8 Sat, Sun.............. 12-4 Closed Mondays and state holidays.

For more information visit www.riffegallery.org or call 614/644-9624. Supported by OHIO BUILDING AUTHORITY and these media sponsors:

Ohio Arts Council’s RIFFE GALLERY

January 26 - April 15, 2O12

YEARS OF ART Celebrating Columbus’ Legacy

Curated by Melissa Wolfe, Columbus Museum of Art

Image: Robert Chadeayne, Down Town, 1966, courtesy of The Butler Institute of American Art

James Preston Poindexter THE FIRST AFRICANAMERICAN ELECTED TO COLUMBUS CITY COUNCIL POINDEXTER VILLAGE was one of the first federally supported public housing projects in the United States when President Franklin Roosevelt came to Columbus for its dedication in 1937. It was named for James Preston Poindexter. Thirty years after his death, he was still a prominent presence in the AfricanAmerican community. Poindexter was born in Richmond, Va., in 1819. His mother was of AfricanAmerican and Cherokee heritage. His father was a white journalist with the Richmond Enquirer. His mother died when he was 4. At a young age, he was apprenticed to a local barber. He would work in that profession for many years. In 1837, Poindexter married Adelia Atkinson, moved to Ohio and had settled in Columbus by 1838. He became an active participant in the Underground Railroad and helped runaway slaves escape to freedom. An early member of the Second Baptist Church, Poindexter conducted services until an ordained minister could be found. Later an ordained minister himself, Poindexter would become the pastor of his church. After the 15th Amendment permitted blacks to vote in Ohio, Poindexter began a political career. He was the first AfricanAmerican elected to Columbus City Council (in 1880). In 1884, he became the first black member of the Columbus Board of Education. In 1896, he was

YO U R

S O U R C E

For Early Learning and Child Care Services

CELEBRATING 40 YEARS OF SERVICE

www.actionforchildren.org

Happy 200th Columbus! MORPC salutes Columbus as one of our outstanding partners in regional prosperity, sustainability and enhancing the quality of life for central Ohio residents.

Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission 111 Liberty Street, Suite 100•Columbus, Ohio 43215 T 614.228.2663 F 614.228.1904 www.morpc.org

Find us on Facebook twitter.com/morpc

2 0 0 C O L U M B U S

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appointed to the board of trustees of Wilberforce University. After a lifetime of striving to improve the condition of the African-American community in Columbus, Poindexter died of pneumonia in 1907. His funeral, one of the largest in the city’s history, was attended by more than 2,000 people, white and black. It was a remarkable tribute at a time when the AfricanAmerican community was still distinctly hidden from view. But Poindexter’s life work had made it less so.

Celebrating the Capital Connection

Ta r h e

At Capital University, we create purposeful leaders of tomorrow. We build relationships and connect community. We transform lives through higher education.

www.capital.edu

Celebrate the Bicentennial with products that are unique and authentic to our community. s $ESIGNEDANDCREATEDBY#OLUMBUSARTISTS s -OSTPRODUCTSAREPRODUCEDBYLOCALOR Ohio businesses s!LLPRODUCTSAREMADEINTHE53!

Visit the web store TODAY!

Proceeds support the operation of 200Columbus a 501(c)(3) NONPROlTORGANIZATIONDEDICATEDTODEVELOPINGAROBUSTAND TRANSFORMATIVECOMMEMORATIONOFTHECITYSBICENTENNIAL

140

2 0 0 C O L U M B U S :

P A S T

WYANDOT CHIEF TARHE WAS a principal leader of the Wyandot people living in Ohio in the years of early settlement following the American Revolution. Coming to what is now Columbus during the War of 1812, Tarhe made a decision that changed the course of the war in the west. Born near Detroit in 1742, Tarhe was a Wyandot—a people called Hurons by the French—and the traditional enemy of the Iroquois nation of upstate New York. Tarhe was called The Crane by his French friends. He was 6-foot-4 in a time when most people rarely were taller than 5-foot-6. The name stuck even though in Wyandot his name means “at the tree.â€? Tarhe and his people fought against Gen. Edward Braddock in the French and Indian War and in Pontiac’s War against the British. Then they fought against generals Harmar, St. Clair and Wayne in the Northwest Indian War. As settlement proceeded, Tarhe moved his village from what is now Lancaster to Columbus and ďŹ nally to Upper Sandusky. In the wake of Anthony Wayne’s victory, Tarhe and other Native American leaders signed the Greenville Treaty of 1795. Tarhe pledged he would never again ďŹ ght against the United States. As the War of 1812 commenced, things were not going well in the west. Gen. William Henry Harrison wondered if Tarhe and the Wyandots would keep their word when other Ohio tribes were ďŹ ghting for the British. In a conference held in frontier Franklinton in July 1813, Harrison got his answer. Tarhe would support the Americans. The 72-year-old man walked north with Harrison’s army. He and his people were present as Harrison defeated Tecumseh and the British. Tarhe died in 1816 at Cranetown in Logan County. A memorial stone remembers him as “a distinguished Wyandot Chief and a loyal American.â€? ★


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Happy 200th Birthday Columbus and thank you to everyone who helped make our first 115 years so great.

www.byersauto.com

Just Need A Rental? We Have 15 Hertz Locations To Serve You. © 2012 The Byers Automotive Group. All rights reserved.


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Congratulations Columbus!

 @LHYZ

of perseverance, excellence and accomplishments.

from a family of companies proud to commemorate this great occasion.

American Eagle Outfitters, Inc. American Signature, Inc./ Value City Furniture DSW Inc. SB Capital Group, LLC Schottenstein Luxury Group Schottenstein Property Group

Schottenstein Family of Companies


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200COLUMBUS

By the

Numbers


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Upper Arlington

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# City of Upper Arlington Cultural Arts Division 3600 Tremont Rd. Upper Arlington, OH 43221 (614) 583-5310 www.uaoh.net

# Hilton Garden University Area 3232 Olentangy River Rd. Columbus, OH 43202 (614) 263-7200 www.columbusuniversityarea.stayhgi.com

# Jack Seibert Goldsmith & Jeweler 1741 W. Lane Ave. Upper Arlington, OH 43221 (614) 486-4653 www.jackseibert.com

# Stephanie Marxen, ISR Senior Executive Unit Leader www.youravon.com-smarxen (614) 888-3588

# Teleperformance Over 250 call centers in 42 different countries Transforming Passion into Excellence www.teleperformance.com

upper arlington Our historic neighborhood is honored and proud to take part in 200Columbus in celebrating the city's great past, dynamic present and boundless potential. As our third century begins, the best is yet to come. Happy 200th Birthday, Columbus!


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places/things Ohio Stadium 71.8%

1

icons Favorite

Columbus Zoo and Aquarium 57.9%

2

Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens 41.1%

3 4

German Village 38.8% (tie) LeVeque Tower 38.8% (tie) North Market 36.6%

6

Ohio Theatre 32.5% (tie)

7

of Columbus

The Oval 32.5% (tie) Ohio Statehouse 30.1%

9

Short North arches 23.0%

10

Here are the results of a survey asking about the

11

biggest icons of Columbus, both people (with the

12

Easton Town Center 21.3% Nationwide Arena 19.4% Entrance to the Ohio State Fair 18.9%

13

exception of one animal) and places/things. The poll—respondents could vote on up to 10

14

COSI 17.5%

15

Columbus Museum of Art 17.0% (tie) Mirror Lake 17.0% (tie)

candidates—was posted on the websites of Columbus C.E.O. and Columbus Monthly.

FILE (2)

#10

17

Park of Roses 16.7%

18

Huntington Park 16.0%

19

Wexner Center for the Arts 13.6%

20

CCAD’s “art” sign 13.4%

21

The Newport 13.2% (tie) Goodale Park 13.2% (tie)

23

Schiller Park 11.5%

24

Any White Castle 11.2%

25

Great Southern Hotel (now the Westin Columbus) 11%

26

Main Library 10.5%

27

St. John Arena 10.3% Union Station arch 10.0%

28

Short North arches 23%

29

Muirfield (the neighborhood) 8.6%

30

Crew Stadium 8.1%

31

Southern Theatre 7.7%

32

Santa Maria 7.4%

33

Ohio History Center 7.2% Field of Corn 6.0% (tie)

34

Schottenstein Center 6.0% (tie)

#20 COURTESY WHITE CASTLE SYSTEMS

White Castle 11.2%

Thurber House 5.5%

37

Scioto Country Club 5.0% (tie)

39

Wexners’ house 4.8%

Valley Dale 5.0% (tie)

CCAD’s “art sign” 13.4%

#24

36

40

Topiary Park 4.3%

41

Greater Columbus Convention Center 4.1%

42

Cooper Stadium 3.8%

43

Brushstrokes in Flight 3.6% Lincoln Theatre 3.1% (tie)

44

Polaris/Germain Amphitheater 3.1% (tie) Christopher Inn 2.6% (tie)

46

Lifestyle Communities Pavilion 2.6% (tie) Miranova 2.6% (tie) 49

Christopher Columbus statue 1.7%

50

Main Street Bridge 1.2% (tie) Rush Creek Village 1.2% (tie)

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

2 0 0 C O L U M B U S

80% 145


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icons

FILE (5)

Favorite

of Columbus

People Woody Hayes 60.7 %

1

Jack Hanna 58.2%

2

#1

3

Jack Nicklaus 56.2%

4

Les Wexner 53.5% Archie Griffin 46.7%

5

Dave Thomas 39.5%

6

Woody Hayes 60.7%

John Glenn 33.9%

7 8 9

Jesse Owens 31.2% Gordon Gee 28.0% Stefanie Spielman 27.1%

10

#3

11

Jim Grote 20.8%

12

Chris Spielman 20.3%

13

Jim Tressel 19.4%

14

Eddie George 17.2% John H. McConnell 14.2%

15

James Thurber 12.9%

16

Jack Nicklaus 56.2%

Jimmy Crum 11.1%

17 18

Fritz the Night Owl 10.4%

19

Bobby Rahal 10.2%

20

Flippo the Clown 9.9%

21

Colo (OK, but she’s close to being human) 9.7%

22

Jym Ganahl 9.5%

23

Andyman 9.3%

24

Eddie Rickenbacker 9.0%

25

#6

Mike Coleman 7.7% (tie) Buck Rinehart 7.7% (tie)

Dave Thomas 39.5%

27

John Galbreath 7.2% (tie)

29

J.W. Wolfe 7.0%

30

Charles Lazarus 6.3%

31

Hopalong Cassady 6.1%

32

Mel Schottenstein 5.9%

33

Sue Doody 5.6%

34

Arnett Howard 5.4%

Abigail Wexner 7.2% (tie)

#10

35

Buster Douglas 5.2%

36

Aminah Robinson 4.7%

37

Angela Pace 4.3% (tie) Elijah Pierce 4.3% (tie)

Stefanie Spielman 27.1%

39

Jim Rhodes 4.1%

40

Jerry Lucas 3.6% (tie) Katie Smith 3.6% (tie)

42

George Bellows 3.2% (tie) Mike Harden 3.2% (tie)

44

#14 2 0 0 C O L U M B U S :

45

Irving Schottenstein 2.7%

46

Cheryl Krueger 2.5% (tie) Luci (of Luci’s Toy Shop) 2.5% (tie)

Eddie George 17.2%

146

Katherine LeVeque 2.9%

48

Bob Conners 2.3%

49

Jim Karnes 2.0%

50

Chic Harley 1.8%

0% B Y

T H E

N U M B E R S

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%


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Two centuries after Lucas Sullivant settled on the banks of the Scioto River, Columbus continues to shine bright. Congratulations from all of us at Hollywood Casino.

hollywoodcasinocolumbus.com Opening subject to ďŹ nal licensing by the Ohio Casino Control Commission. Gambling Problem? Call 800-522-4700 for help.


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How the City Ranks Here’s a sampling of some of the recent claims to fame. All honors went to the city itself unless otherwise noted.

THE CITY OF COLUMBUS, its suburbs and even the region have landed numerous accolades as a great place to work, do business and have fun.

9

NO. 9, “BEST CITIES FOR NEW COLLEGE GRADS”

GAHANNA MAKES THE LIST OF “8 CITIES THAT WANT YOUR BUSINESS!”

—Bloomberg BusinessWeek,

—CNNMoney, November 2010

August 2010

ONE OF “AMERICA’S ECONOMICALLY

NO. 18 DELAWARE COUNTY TAKES THE SPOT ON “BEST PLACES TO GET AHEAD”

NO. 2

ON THE LIST OF “AMERICA’S MOST WIRED CITIES”

METRO AREAS” NO. 32 IN EXPORTS AMONG THE COUNTRY’S 100 LARGEST METROPOLITAN AREAS —Brookings Institution, July 2010

FINALIST, SIEMENS SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY AWARDS 2011 —U.S. Chamber of Commerce Business Civic Leadership Center

—Forbes, February 2010

NO. 4 ON THE LIST

6

WITH GOOD JOBS

DELAWARE COUNTY RANKED NO. 6 ON A LIST OF THE 25 U.S. COUNTIES THAT HAVE EXPERIENCED THE MOST JOB GROWTH IN THE LAST 10 YEARS.

OF “5 PLACES

AND CHEAP HOUSING” —Investopedia, July 2011

—Money magazine, August 2011

NO. 8 CITY ON THE VITALITY INDEX —Creative Cities International, July 2011 148

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8

B Y

T H E

STRONGEST

—Forbes, March 2010

NO. 13, “THE NEXT BIG BOOM TOWNS IN THE U.S.”

N U M B E R S

—Forbes, June 2011

—The Brookings Institution’s MetroMonitor, June 2011 TIED FOR NO. 6 AMONG “AMERICA’S BEST HOUSING MARKETS” —Forbes, February 2010

NO. 3 ON THE LIST OF “7 BEST CITIES TO FIND IT JOBS IN 2011” —CIO.com and Modis

ONE OF THE “BEST ICE CREAM SPOTS IN THE U.S.” —Food & Wine magazine, October 2011


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NO. 3 ON THE LIST OF “7 GREAT CITIES FOR COLLEGE GRADS” —Fox News, May 2011 NO. 25, “THE BEST PLACES FOR BUSINESS AND CAREERS”

NO. 5, “AMERICA’S MOST RELAXED CITIES” —Forbes, November 2010

—Forbes, June 2011

16

NO. 16 AMONG “AMERICA’S TOP 20 GAYEST CITIES” —The Gay/Lesbian Index, developed by UCLA’s Williams Institute, July 2010

AMONG THE “SAFEST CITIES

NO. 7 “25 GREAT SHOPPING DESTINATIONS COAST TO COAST” —APARTMENT THERAPY, JULY 2010

FOR FAMILIES WITH YOUNG CHILDREN” —Underwriters Laboratories, September 2010

NO. 9

17

17TH BEST VOLUNTEER RATE AMONG AMERICA’S LARGEST CITIES

—2010 Volunteering in America report from the Corporation for National and Community Service

RANKED NO. 9 AMONG “U.S.’ BIGGEST BRAIN MAGNETS”

NO. 12 ON THE LIST OF “AMERICA’S MOST AFFORDABLE CITIES” —Forbes, January 2011

—Forbes, February 2011

NO. 34 AMONG “AMERICA’S TOP 50 BIKE-FRIENDLY CITIES” —Bicycling magazine, May 2010

3

ONE OF THE SMART21 COMMUNITIES OF 2012 (COLUMBUS REGION) —Intelligent Community Forum NO. 18 ON THE LIST OF “TOP 25 CITIES FOR DESIGNERS AND ARTISTS” —ArtBistro, January 2010

NO. 4 AMONG “THE BEST SHOPPING CITIES IN THE U.S.” —Forbes, December 2010 Source: Columbus Chamber, Mayor Michael Coleman’s office 2 0 0 C O L U M B U S

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Columbus growth Population Year

Population

National rank

% White

1830

2,435

-

91.1

1840

6,048

70

90.5

1850

17,882

37

92.9

1860

18,554

49

94.6

1870

31,274

42

94.1

1880

51,647

33

94.2

1890

88,150

30

93.7

1900

125,560

28

93.4

1910

181,511

29

92.9

1920

237,031

28

90.6

1930

290,564

28

88.7

1940

306,087

26

88.3

1950

375,901

28

87.5

1960

471,316

28

83.4

1970

539,677

21

81.0

1980

564,871

19

76.2

1990

632,910

16

74.4

2000

711,470

15

67.9

2010

787,033

15

61.5

Area

The majority of Columbus’s growth occurred between 1950 and 1975, during which time the city added an average of slightly more than five square miles each year. Since 1975, the pace of Columbus’s territorial expansion has slowed considerably due, in part, to the increasing growth of suburban jurisdictions and the presence of water and sewer systems in neighboring counties. —Compiled by Eric Lyttle 150

2 0 0 C O L U M B U S :

B Y

T H E

N U M B E R S

Year

Columbus square mileage

1950

42

1960

93

1970

146

1980

186

1990

201

2000

220

2010

217


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ADVERTISEMENT

Our historic neighborhood is honored and proud to take part in 200Columbus in celebrating the city's great past, dynamic present and boundless potential. As our third century begins, the best is yet to come. Happy 200th Birthday, Columbus!

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★ Stephanie Marxen, ISR Senior Executive Unit Leader www.youravon.com-smarxen (614) 888-3588

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Over 250 call centers in 42 different countries Transforming Passion into Excellence www.teleperformance.com


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“Columbus is a town in which

almost anything

is likely to happen, and in which almost

©R.T./COURTESY THURBER HOUSE

everything has.”

—James Thurber My Life and Hard Times, 1933

152

2 0 0 C O L U M B U S


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CHASE CONGRATULATES THE CITY OF COLUMBUS ON YOUR

BC

icentennial elebration

© 2011 JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. Member FDIC.


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Well-rooted in

2012

OHIO Happy 200th Birthday, Columbus!

AEP CELEBRATES COLUMBUS American Electric Power and AEP Ohio’s roots run deep in central Ohio. Today, we’re proud to be a part of Columbus’ 200th birthday and look ahead to the city’s continued growth as a hub for education, economic development, arts and culture and stable housing in our community. We’re proud to call Columbus home for our headquarters and a good place for our employees to live and work. Columbus, we celebrate with you.

Since 1926, Ohioans have trusted the local Ohio Farm Bureau Mutual Automobile Insurance Company to help them protect what’s important. Today, we’re known as Nationwide Insurance® and Ohioans still trust us to protect the things they care about: cars, homes, lives, farms, retirements and businesses. We’ll always stay close to our farming roots. The Ohio Farm Bureau Federation — an organization that shares in our commitment to improving our community — is one of our most valued partners.

Some ways we’ve helped Ohioans: 25%

40%

21 million

67 years

2-time

of Mid-Ohio Foodbank’s 2010 volunteers

of 2011 Operation Feed Campaign donations

meals for Operation Feed

of blood donation

United Way Spirit of America Award® winner

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Products underwritten by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Affiliated Companies. Home Office: Columbus, OH 43215. Subject to underwriting guidelines, review, and approval. Products and discounts not available to all persons in all states. Nationwide, the Nationwide framemark, and On Your Side are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. © 2011 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. All rights reserved. FBO-0105AO (11/11)


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