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PUBLISHER COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI FIRE and RESCUE DEPARTMENT EDITOR-IN-CHIEF FIRE CHIEF KENNETH MOORE EDITOR ANTHONY COLOM DESIGN & LAYOUT ANTHONY COLOM PHOTOGRAPHY ANTHONY COLOM CAPTAIN WES MIMS CONTRIBUTING WRITERS ASSISTANT CHIEF MARTIN ANDREWS CHIEF OF TRAINING DUANE HUGHES FIRE and LIFE SAFETY EDUCATOR / PIO CAROLE SUMMERALL STAFF KENNETH MOORE: FIRE CHIEF MARTIN ANDREWS: ASSISTANT CHIEF BOBBY BARKSDALE: A-SHIFT BATTALION CHIEF MIKE GIBSON: B-SHIFT BATTALION CHIEF MARK WARD: C-SHIFT BATTALION CHIEF NEAL AUSTIN: SPECIAL OPERATIONS CHIEF DUANE HUGHES: CHIEF OF TRAINING TODD WEATHERS: FIRE MARSHAL CAROLE SUMMERALL: FIRE & LIFE SAFETY EDUCATOR / PIO TABITHA BARHAM: ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Columbus Fire and Rescue Department 205 7th Street S. Columbus, MS 39701 (662) 329-5121

This publication may not be reproduced in whole nor in part without the written permission of the publisher. Copyright © 2013, Columbus, Mississippi Fire and Rescue Department.


VOLUME 2 NUMBER 2 Columbus Fire & Rescue Magazine

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CONTENTS Protecting Homes Against Arson .... PAGE 7 After The Smoke Has Cleared: Life After 20+Years Of Service .... PAGE 20-22

DEPARTMENTS THE TRAINING SECTION Photos ..... PAGE 10-13

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EDITORIAL CHIEF S CHAIR: SUPPORTING OUR FELLOW MISSISSIPPIANS AS THEY SUPPORT US ..... PAGE 6 EDITOR S NOTE: IMAGE IS EVERYTHING ..... PAGE 8 -

FEATURES

SPECIAL

STAFF SPECIAL: Finally Crossing The Finish Line ..... PAGE 14 The Family Fund ..... PAGE 22 A New Approach ..... PAGE 24

AROUND THE STATION Photos .... PAGE 16

PROMOTIONS, GRADUATIONS, & OTHER NEWS Photos .... PAGE 23 IN THE COMMUNITY Photos ..... PAGE 27

EXTRA MAYOR SMITH S UNITY PICNIC .... PAGE 15 FIREHOUSE RECIPES .... PAGE 17 RELAY FOR LIFE PHOTOS ..... PAGE 25 MARKET STREET PHOTOS ..... PAGE 26 Jr. FIRE MARSHAL QUIZ..... PAGE 28 WORD SEARCH ..... PAGE 29 CFR DISABILITY & SCHOLARSHIP FUND CRAPPIE TOURNAMENT PHOTOS ...PAGE 30 -

FIRE & LIFE SAFETY Safety Tips For Babysitters .... PAGE 18-19


Photo by Captain Wes Mims

SUPPORTING OUR FELLOW MISSISSIPPIANS AS THEY SUPPORT US BY CHIEF KENNETH MOORE kmoore@columbusms.org

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Many of you reading this magazine remember the challenges faced by the victims and survivors of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Events of that storm put a face and a focus on the need for more unified large scale response, here and around the country. Since its inception in 2006, Columbus Fire & Rescue has been a proud participant in the statewide emergency preparedness and response initiative of the Mississippi Department of Homeland Security and Mississippi Emergency Management.

At any given time, approximately 21 members of CFR stand ready to respond anywhere they are needed with such specialized skills as boat/water rescue, overland search and rescue (including a trained and certified SAR canine) collapsed building rescue, and communications. These personnel are members of Task Force II, which is comprised of 62 personnel from 10 central Mississippi departments. Additionally, Task Forces I and III are drawn from the northern and southern regions of our state. While these personnel have responded to innumerable events, the ones that have been foremost in the news recently were the Smithville, Choctaw and Yazoo City tornados, and the wide scale flooding from Hurricane Isaac in the coastal counties. So what happens here at home when these emergency response teams are deployed? Their brother firefighters step into their shoes. As a vital part of the whole, firefighters do whatever is necessary to continue to keep protection of the citizens of Columbus and our support role to Lowndes County functioning smoothly and effectively. Without the whole, neither could do what they do. The support of their brother firefighters of the teams involved in statewide response is a microcosm of the philosophy of change that Katrina left in its path. As human beings we all watched and recognized the suffering caused by lack of unity and preparedness, and we resolved to be a part of a better future. The citizens of Columbus can be very proud of the role their firefighters have taken in that future, and you may be assured that their love and respect for you is in their hearts wherever they are called to serve. They think of you, knowing that it could be you in harm's way, and give all that they can - as they would want given to you if the unthinkable happens here at home.

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According to the U.S. Fire Administration and the National Fire Protection Association, there are more than 16,000 intentionally set fires in homes every year, resulting in an estimated 300 deaths, 700 injuries and $500 million in direct property damage. The average dollar loss for an intentionally set fire in a residential building is $21,320. The fatality rate for intentionally set residential fires is more than twice that of other residential building fires. Arson robs communities of its valuable assets, lives and property. Arson destroys more than buildings; it can devastate a community resulting in the decline of the neighborhood through increased insurance premiums, loss of business revenue, and a decrease in property values. The fire service can help communities reduce the occurrence of arson and reduce its devastating effect by making residents aware of these measures to safeguard their homes. Illuminate Exterior and Entrances Install lights covering all sides of the house. Motion-activated lighting, which is inexpensive, should be placed near the entrances. Interior lights on timers give the illusion that a residence is occupied.

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Clear Obstructions Trim or remove shrubbery that blocks the view of the house from the street. During the growing season, bushes and trees may need to be trimmed frequently.

Install Burglar and Fire Alarm Systems Alarm devices can be inexpensively wired to transmit an alarm to the police or fire department. Check the cost of contracting with a security firm for response to alarms. Install Smoke Alarms and a Fire Sprinkler System The combination of working smoke alarms and home fire sprinklers reduces the likelihood of death from fire by more than 82 percent. The most effective fire loss prevention and reduction measure for both life and property is the installation and maintenance of fire sprinklers.

Keep Doors and Windows Locked All external doors should be equipped with dead bolts. A simple locked door could be the deterrent that saves a house from arson. The best type of window hardware has spring-loaded bolts that insert through the window frame into the wall frame.

Clean House Oftentimes, arson is a crime of opportunity. Remove excess vegetation and piles of leaves. Clean around your house and garage, removing unused and unneeded paper, trash, cleaning supplies, partial cans of paint and other materials that could become kindling and fuel a fire for an arsonist.

Clean Up Vacant Homes Secure abandoned and vacant homes, which are potential arson targets. This may include adding additional locks or boarding up broken windows or other openings with plywood. Remove abandoned vehicles. Most car fires are started to cover up other criminal activity or simply as an act of vandalism.

Communicate with the owner that authorities are concerned about the vacant home and explain why. Contact public works to disconnect all utilities at the street. This includes natural gas, water and electricity. If there are liquefied petro- leum gas tanks, they should be disconnected and removed. Encourage Neighborhood Watch members to patrol these areas and write down descriptions, license plates of suspicious vehicles, and potential suspect descriptions.

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Photo by CaptainWes Mims

E G A IM IS

G N I H T Y R E V E BY ANTHONY COLOM, PUBLIC RELATIONS acolom@columbusms.org

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Believe it or not, Columbus Fire and Rescue, like any Fortune 500 company, is a business. A non-profit business, but still a business. It’s a service-oriented business. Look at it as a subsidiary of its corporate parent : City of Columbus. In order for any business to succeed, its brand has to be strong and recognizable, and its leaders reputable. Its product or service has to be of at least “good” quality.

In every business image plays an important role in its success : the way employees walk, talk, dress, and perform. A terrible image can lead to lack of public trust.

Our customers (the public) expect to see members of the fire department with shined shoes, shirts tucked in, combed hair, and a belt in pants. It’s part of the perceived image of the way a good firefighter should look. When our firefighters respond to calls, home and business owners expect great service from courteous and respectful professionals. Everything that’s done in business is either building the brand or tearing it down. Our brand, Columbus Fire and Rescue, began in 1840, and every firefighter that’s walked through our station doors, worn our uniform, and provided service to Columbus, has played a role in building the brand. Every employee should be responsible for building the brand, and every employee should be responsible for protecting the brand. We hope that each of you feel we’ve done a great job in buliding and trying to protect our brand. After all, in business....... Image IS Everything.

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Firefig hter Alan L ewis Firefighter Eric Minga & Engineer Kevin Brown

Battalion Chief Mike Gibson Fire & Life Safety Educator Carole Summerall

Firefighter Phillip Hewitt

Engineer Jeff Edmondson & Assistant Chief Martin Andrews

s, Robbin in Jim lds & Capta Reyno c M l Wil r son te d h n o Firefig ff Edm eer Je Engin

Chief of Training Duane Hughes

Chief Moore & Captain Brett Thompson

Engineer Ray Whitson


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Photo by Captain Wes Mims

Finally Crossing the Finish Line BY ASSISTANT CHIEF MARTIN ANDREWS mandrews@columbusms.org

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After 10 years of hard work and dedication, I finally completed another milestone in my career: finishing my Certified Public Manager program. I started this program in 2003 and finally graduated in Jackson on June 11, 2013. During this period, I received two promotions and was able to take the knowledge I gained from the classes and put it into action.

This program entailed over 300 hours of classroom and research. Looking back, this program helped me to become a better manager of personnel and time management. The skills that I learned are utilized daily to help better organize, research, and delegate various tasks & events in my daily duties. Although this training is normally for State Personnel, It definitely creates a win-win situation for the employees of Columbus Fire & Rescue and the community in which we serve. I would like to encourage personnel who would like to advance to consider this training. It is a commitment that would pay exceptional dividends in your career. The City of Columbus supports this program and the only cost is your dedication and diligence. The networking opportunities are priceless when dealing with other agencies within the state. It was hard work but well worth the research and projects to be able to say that I am a proud member of Certified Public Managers of Mississippi.

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10. 1. Engineer Kevin Brown 2. Engineer Shannon Murphy 3. Engineer Ray Whitson 4. Engineer Melvin Junkin, Ashley Massey, & Captain Tommy Massey 5. Captain Larry Webber 6. Captain Jr. Lancaster & Engineer Josh Westbrook 7. Engineer Randall Beatty & Engineer Eric Grant 8. Captain Derrick Parnell 9. Engineer Dale Ballard 10. Battalion Chief Mark Ward 11. Captain Frederick Hargrove 12. Captain Mark Connors & Captain Andy Perkins (All photos by Anthony Colom)


1 small head cabbage, shredded 2 cups shredded Cheddar cheese 1 (10.75 ounce) can condensed cream of celery soup 2 tablespoons butter, melted 1 1/2 cups Ritz Crackers Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Mix cabbage, Cheddar cheese, cream of celery soup, and butter in a large bowl. Mixture will be dry. Transfer to a large baking dish, spreading vegetables evenly; sprinkle with Ritz Crackers. Cover baking dish with aluminum foil.

Cabbage Casserole

Bake in preheated oven for 45 minutes and remove foil. Continue baking until bubbly and lightly browned, about 15 minutes more. Recipe makes 8 servings 1 1/4 cups chocolate cookie crumbs 1/4 cup white sugar 1/4 cup butter 1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese, softened 1 cup creamy peanut butter 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, softened 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup heavy whipping cream 1 1/4 cup cookie crumbs, 1/4 cup sugar, Peanut Butter Pie Combine and 1/4 cup butter or margarine; press into a 9 inch pie plate. Bake at 375 degrees F (190 degrees C) for 10 minutes. Cool. In a mixing bowl, beat cream cheese, peanut butter, sugar, butter, and vanilla until smooth. Whip the cream, and fold into the peanut butter mixture. Gently spoon filing into crust. Garnish pie with chocolate or cookie crumbs if desired. Refrigerate.


Photo by Captain Wes Mims

SAFETY TIPS FOR BABYSITTERS BY FIRE and LIFE SAFETY EDUCATOR / PIO CAROLE SUMMERALL csummerall@columbusms.org

Planning and prevention are the keys to fire safety. Protect yourself and the children you're watching against fire by taking simple precautions.

the children with a different plan.

P Plan Your Escape

Every household should have an escape plan. When you baby-sit, discuss with the parents what to do in case of fire. Be familiar with the home at which you are babysit ting. Learn all the exits and know how to unlock all the doors and windows. Know two ways out of every room, especially bedrooms.

All house holds should have a meeting place outside where every one meets after escaping a fire. Have the parents show you the meeting place and don't confuse

Discuss the escape plan and meeting place with the children. Make sure every child knows where to meet outside.

Be sure to have a listing of all emergency numbers and a number where the parents can be reached. Also, be sure to know the location of a neighbor who will be home. In case of a fire, call the fire department from a neighbor's phone.

Be Kitchen Wise

Cook only if you have cooking experience and you have permission from the parents. If you do cook, remember :

Never leave the kitchen area while cooking until you have turned everything off.

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Don't let pot handles stick out over the edge of the stove where they can be bumped or grabbed. Turn them in, pointing toward the back of the stove, to prevent spilling of hot liquid. Never put anything into a microwave unless you are absolutely sure it is safe. Paper, glass, and microwaveproof dishes are safe. In most cases, metals are not. Read and follow all directions on packaged microwave meals. Keep children away from the microwave. Be careful when removing covers from microwave containers; escaping steam can cause severe burns. Cool all foods suffi ciently before serving them to children.

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Tips to Remember : Keep matches and lighters out of the reach and sight of children. Keep everything, including children, at least 3 feet away from space heaters. Keep children in your sight at all times. While they are sleeping, make sure that you can hear them should they wake up. In Case of Fire Get Out! Stay Out! If you smell smoke, hear a smoke alarm, or see flames, everyone is to get out immediately! Go directly to your meeting place and remember, stay out! Never go back inside, not for any reason! Crawl Low Under Smoke. If you encounter smoke while you are escaping a fire, use another exit route. If you must escape through smoke, remember that heat and smoke rise, so cleaner air is always near the floor. Crawl on your hands and knees, keeping your head 12 to 24 inches above the floor. Go first, making sure the children follow you. Call the Fire Department. Take the children to a neighbor's home and call 911 or your local emergency number. Don't hang up until the 911 operator tells you it's ok to hang up. Then call the children's parents. Emergency Tips Cool a Burn. The best first aid for burns is to run cool water over the burned area for 10 to 15 minutes. If a burn blisters or appears charred, get medical help immediately. Stop, Drop, and Roll. If your clothing catches fire, remember, don't run. Drop to the ground and cover your face with your hands. Roll over and over until the fire goes out. Babysitters may have to help children do this. Pull the child to the ground and roll him or her over and over to smother the flames.

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The city of Columbus has been blessed to have had firefighters who’ve stayed with the department for 20 to 25 years, but even more blessed to have had those who’ve given 30 plus years of their lives protecting lives and property. Recently, we spoke with four retired firefighters: James “Beetle” Bailey, Donald Ward, Lewis Jaynes, and James Earl Cunningham about some of their experiences while with the department, and to see what they’ve been doing after 20 plus years of service.

CFRM : You all served 20 to 32 years in the department. Exactly how many fire chiefs did each of you serve under ? Donald Ward: I served under 4 chiefs: Gene Waldrop, Jack Steverson, Hugh Mann, and Bobby Gale.

Lewis Jaynes: I served under 4 chiefs, also: Jack Steverson, Hugh Mann, Bobby Gale, and James Massey. James Bailey: I worked under 5 chiefs: Spruill, Roy D’Shields, Gene Waldrop, Jack Steverson, and Hugh Mann. Earl Cunningham: I worked under 4 chiefs: Hugh Mann, Bobby Gale, James Massey, and the current chief, Kenneth Moore. I even served as Interim Chief between Chiefs Massey and Moore. CFRM: You gentlemen worked in a different era: a time when departments didn’t have fire education divisions to educate the

public on fire and life safety; so I’m sure you saw a lot more fires than we do today. Are there any that you just can’t forget?

Lewis Jaynes: Yeah, there was Jeans and Things, Chism Trail, Parker Furniture, and the old Varsity Theatre downtown. There were so many. We saw a few severe injuries, and deaths in those days.

Earl Cunningham: Parker Furniture... that was a big fire. I was the senior driver with no captain on the truck at that time, and had to pump the truck and direct the staging of other trucks coming. That was the most pressure I’ve ever been under. I’ve had a unique experience. I’ve served in every position in the department except Training Chief and Fire & Life Safety Educator. I’ve even done your job. I’ve got some old photos I took when I was here.

CFRM: (laughing) Yeah, that’s funny. I see you’ve worked as a comedian, also. Firefighters in this department have pulled some good pranks over the years. Would you share some? Donald Ward: Our old #1 Station use to be next to City Hall. I remember working there, and the guys told me where to sleep one night. It turned out to be the Chief ’s bed. He made me get up and move my turnouts. James Bailey: Well this wasn’t a prank, but a funny story. I was riding the tailboard of the truck once, when the driver hit a bump while spitting tobacco. The stuff hit me in the face. It was all in my eyes. I couldn’t see anything when I got ready to hook to the

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hydrant. Later, I asked the Chief if he would move me to another truck or make him stop.

Lewis Jaynes: We put a mannequin in Donald Ward’s bed one night, and he thought someone was sleeping in his bed. It was dark, and he was trying to make the mannequin get out of his bed. CFRM: What have you all been doing since retirement?

James Bailey: I worked as a sewing machine mechanic at Techno-Med for 15 years; sold sewing machines out of my home; and co-owned a used car lot, body shop, and shoe shop. I worked for Carquest for 3 years. My wife and I bought a motor home, and for several years, we visited 5 or 6 states. Donald Ward: I drove an 18wheeler (hauling fuel). I always told my wife that I wanted me a moped; so I bought me one. It’s outside right now. I’m 74, and that’s how I like to get around town. I don’t get on the highway with it. Lewis Jaynes: I work 3 days a week at Sunflower Grocery, and I do some gardening around the house. Earl Cunningham: I own and manage my rental property here in Columbus. I have some houses, apartments, and mobile homes. CFRM: Thank you all for your time, and we wish you the best in everything that you do.

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Photo by Captain Wes Mims

A NEW APPROACH BY CHIEF of TRAINING DUANE HUGHES dhughes@columbusms.org

Moving from the tried and true and embracing the new can be difficult. Whether it's a lane change on a busy highway, or choosing a new baby sitter, moving from the known to the unknown can be hard. All the things you were previously accustomed to are now gone. Will the new be just as good as the old? Is the replacement worth the effort of removing the original? The old saying "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" certainly comes to mind.

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Columbus Fire and Rescue was recently faced with such a decision. Mr. Darnell McNeal of McKellar Vocational Center approached Fire Chief Moore with a unique proposal last year. Mr. McNeal stated that he instructed the Law and Public Safety class at McKellar. He said that the program was the first of its kind in the State of Mississippi, and designed to introduce High School students to the legal and emergency response professions. The two-year program would give students a better understanding of these professions, and provide them with the necessary skills and knowledge to pursue a career in those areas. Mr. McNeal asked if Columbus Fire and Rescue was willing to assist in the program. The Fire Department's involvement in schools has always been to provide safety programs. From the early days of stop, drop, and roll, to the modern life safety message, Fire Departments have restricted themselves to only providing safety materials and training within the school system. To suddenly begin to train and actively recruit high school students for future fire department careers was certainly new territory. With the McKellar program being the first of its kind in the state of Mississippi, there was nothing to draw comparisons to. Columbus Fire and Rescue would definitely be braving uncharted territory. Once Chief Moore committed to the program, all that was familiar and comfortable was left behind. McKellar Vocational allowed Columbus Fire and Rescue two hours every Thursday to introduce students to the Firefighting profession. The students earned certificates in National Incident Management and CPR/First Aid. Learning to use the thermal imaging camera and operating the Jaws of Life were just a couple of the many activities in which the students participated. Two of the highlights of the program were when the students investigated an actual fire scene, and an emergency driving course set up in the school parking lot. Participants in this year's program graduated in May, and became the first Law and Public Safety "Completers" in the State of Mississippi. By taking a chance and embracing change, Columbus Fire and Rescue was able to become part of a historic event. The McKellar Vocational Law and Public Safety class has become the state model, with identical programs being instituted in South Mississippi. These students have gained valuable insight into the emergency response profession. Hopefully, the students will make informed decisions leading them to jobs in Fire, Law, and other emergency response careers. Change can be difficult, but the rewards gained from taking a new approach can be well worth the effort.

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THE FAMILY FUND BY CAPTAIN TOMMY MASSEY

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Eleven years ago, Columbus Fire and Rescue lost one of its own: Gerald Wayne Allbritton. One night after a medical call, the engine company came back to the station and retired to bed. During the night, Wayne suffered a massive heart attack. Wayne left behind a wife, Donna, and two children, Jenna and Darren. At the time of Wayne's death, Columbus Fire and Rescue had no support for his wife or children, except what was received from the State of Mississippi. That is when things began to change. CFR developed the Columbus Fire Scholarship and Disability Fund. This fund furnishes college scholarships to the children of fallen firefighters. It also supplements income for those that have been injured in the line of duty. Since the fund’s establishment, it has aided several injured firefighters. CFR hosted it’s annual fundraiser this year on May 4, 2013. The event was a crappie tournament. The winners are as follows: 1st Place - Joe Wilson & Steve Perritt 2nd Place - Josh Reynolds & Mike Reynolds 3rd Place - C.D. Walker

Special thanks to our gracious supporters : Aflac, Columbus Municipal Credit Union, Biddy Saw Works, Carl Hogan Chevrolet, Electric Motor Sales and Service, ReMax, Falcon Contracting, Triangle Federal Credit Union, Days Inn, Columbus Scrap Materials, Snyder's Bait Shop, Boat Gallery and K&S Outdoors. The firefighters and their families thank you for giving back to your community.

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Answers: 1)B 2)B 3)A 4)A 5)C 6)C 7)D 8)C 9)D



Columbus Fire and Rescue Magazine