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PUBLISHER COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI FIRE and RESCUE DEPARTMENT EDITOR-IN-CHIEF FIRE CHIEF KENNETH MOORE EDITOR ANTHONY COLOM ART DESIGN & LAYOUT ANTHONY COLOM PHOTOGRAPHY ANTHONY COLOM CAPTAIN WES MIMS CONTRIBUTING WRITERS ASSISTANT CHIEF MARTIN ANDREWS CHIEF OF TRAINING DUANE HUGHES FIRE MARSHAL TODD WEATHERS FIRE and LIFE SAFETY EDUCATOR / PIO CAROLE SUMMERALL STAFF KENNETH MOORE: FIRE CHIEF MARTIN ANDREWS: ASSISTANT CHIEF BOBBY BARKSDALE: A-SHIFT BATTALION CHIEF MIKE GIBSON: B-SHIFT BATTALION CHIEF MARK WARD: C-SHIFT BATTALION CHIEF NEAL AUSTIN: SPECIAL OPERATIONS CHIEF DUANE HUGHES: CHIEF OF TRAINING TODD WEATHERS: FIRE MARSHAL CAROLE SUMMERALL: FIRE & LIFE SAFETY EDUCATOR / PIO TABITHA BARHAM: ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Columbus Fire and Rescue Department 205 7th Street S. Columbus, MS 39701 (662) 329-5121

This publication may not be reproduced in whole nor in part without the written permission of the publisher. Copyright © 2013, Columbus, Mississippi Fire and Rescue Department.


ENGINEER billyCLARK FIREFIGHTER codyCANTRELL PHOTO BY anthonyCOLOM

DEPARTMENTS N TRAINING SECTIO 10-13 PHOTOS ..... PAGE TION AROUND THE STA 16 PHOTOS ..... PAGE FIRE & LIFE SAFETY DS RESIDENTS IN EM R E U C ES R D N COLUMBUS FIRE A GE 18 HEN FIRES ..... PA C IT K T EN EV R P TO AGE 20 FETY MONTH .... P A S E R FI IS ER B OCTO E ON AND HOME FIR TI EN EV R P E R FI M BEDROO 2 SAFETY .... PAGE 2 ND OTHER NEWS A , S N O TI A U D A R G PROMOTIONS, 23 PHOTOS .... PAGE Y IN THE COMMUNIT ALE DISASTER C -S LL FU TY N U O LOWNDES C E 26-27 EXERCISE ..... PAG

EDITORIAL CHIEF 'S CHAIR: FI

RE PREVENTION, B UDGET, AND ACCREDITATION ... . PAGE 6 EDITOR 'S NOTE: C OULD YOU IMAGIN E ?..... PAGE 8

STAFF SPECIAL CONTINUOUSLY EDUCATING ....... PAGE 14 ENJOY THE JOB ...... PAGE 24 BUSINESS INSPECTIONS: An Integral Component of Fire Prevention .... PAGE 28

EXTRA MY FIRE INSPECTION CHECKLIST ..... PAGE 7 FIREHOUSE RECIPES...... PAGE 17 THE FIRE SAFETY CHECKLIST .... PAGE 19 ESCAPE THE MAZE ..... PAGE 21 CFR GIVES .... PAGE 30 WORD SEARCH .... PAGE 31


chief's chair

by CHIEF kennethMOORE kmoore@columbusms.org

Fire Prevention, Budget, and Accreditation September and October are a busy time for Columbus Fire & Rescue, and all of its members. The 2014 budget is almost finalized, building inspections have started and fire prevention month begins in October. National Accreditation is wrapping up, and as the weather changes, fire season begins.

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First, the 2014 budget will be hard on Columbus Fire & Rescue and its members. The department took cuts in all areas, including equipment, training, fire prevention, supplies and overtime. The term "overtime" is oversimplified in a sense, as the wage and hour laws, OSHA, and other regulations as they apply to emergency services are complex, and an eighthour day schedule for emergency services would more than triple personnel costs for the department. As we know, other cities have attempted such a schedule and quickly abandoned it due the exorbitant costs. As we have always done over the recent years with lack of increases, no budget in some line items, with this years cuts we will be conservative with tax payer dollars while providing the best services that we can. All citizens and members of the department understand, at some point, the limits of resources will limit services. I have been very proud of how we have been able to do so much more with less in these tough economic times, and core services will be maintained. However, tough decisions will have to be made in order to be realistic in meeting this year's budget. Next, September 3 started our annual fire inspections of all businesses within the City limits. This process will take approximately three months with all engine companies throughout the City working and walking into businesses. The purpose of inspections is to ensure businesses are maintaining fire code and safety regulations. They also provide an opportunity for our personnel to familiarize themselves with the layout of different buildings, which is vital in the event of a fire. Our intent is to support your safety and not to penalize. Please invite these firefighters to look around and spend as much of your valuable time as you can getting to know them and letting them get to know you. Fire prevention and response is a team effort, and protecting you and your investment is our honor. Quickly following is Fire Prevention month in October. What a treat it is for us to visit every K through 5th grade student in the Columbus City Schools! As we discuss home safety, the use of 911, and smoke detectors, students will be asked to take this material home and talk to their parents or guardians about it as well. I encourage all residents to help by engaging your child and talking with them about what they have learned. Columbus Fire & Rescue was recognized by the National Association of State Fire Marshals for our prevention programs. We will continue to educate the public to make Columbus a safer place.

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Our goal to become nationally accredited is drawing closer. We have approximately one month to finish our documentation. Becoming the first nationally accredited department in the State of Mississippi is close to becoming reality. If we are successful in meeting our deadline it will be followed up by a site visit from the National Accreditation Team within 45 days. They will examine all aspects of what we do, how well we do it, and then determine if we meet the national standards for performance. Columbus Fire & Rescue would not be this far along nor would it even be possible had it not been for the long, tireless efforts of our accreditation manager for this project, Capt. Mike Chandler, and all of the personnel who assisted with the project. I would like to personally thank Capt. Chandler for his hard work and dedication, knowing that he will be the first to say it was, as with all things, a team effort. Whether CF&R is accredited this go-round or not, ultimately we undertook this mission with a focus on looking objectively at what we are doing, finding ways to improve, and comparing ourselves to the best of the best. The citizens of Columbus expect and deserve the best, and you have our word that the personnel of CF&R will and do put their lives on the line to give you our all. With cooler temperatures approaching and the holiday season not far behind, we encourage all residents to be fire safe by removing combustible materials from around wall and space heaters, use only approved and appropriate extension cords, check your smoke detectors, and never leave your stove unattended while cooking. Help make this a fire-safe time for you and the hard-working and dedicated members of Columbus Fire & Rescue. (662) 329-5121


editor's note Could You Imagine?

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It 's 2:00 AM and there’s a home on fire in a neighborhood of 50 homes built 25 feet apart. There 's a family of 2 adults and 4 children asleep inside of the burning home. There is no local fire department or volunteer fire station. The neighbors want to help but are afraid to enter the burning house. No one knows what to do.

Could you imagine not having a local fire department to respond ? Or in having a department, not having the manpower needed to save the family and their home ? There 's an accident on the highway. The accident involves 2 vehicles. One vehicle is a two-door sports car, and both doors are bent and jammed. The driver is unconscious and gas is leaking from the punctured tank. The other vehicle has rolled over and the driver is trapped in her seatbelt; there 's an infant in the back seat strapped in it’s car seat upside down. Could you imagine your local fire trucks not being equipped with the Jaws of Life to help free the victims from entrapment? Or not having skilled personnel who are able to use the equipment? An employee of your local water company has climbed a 120 ft. water tower and has gotten entangled 85 feet up. His co-workers are not trained to effectively and safely release him. They have had no rope-rescue training.

Could you imagine your local fire and rescue department not having the rope, harnesses, other equipment, and training needed to rescue the victim? Columbus Fire and Rescue 's Fire and Life Safety Divison was created in 2002. Since that time, the number of residential fires in the city has decreased by 52%. A lot of the decrease has come from public education work done in the city schools and daycares during the month of October (National Fire Prevention Month). Could you imagine the statistics today if our children weren ' t being taught fire safety in school ? Columbus Fire and Rescue Magazine is a fire and life safety tool used to educate and inform the citizens of Columbus and Lowndes County, using photos, articles, and games. Could you imagine not having this publication in your hands right now ? Without it, you probably never would have known what it is that Columbus Fire and Rescue really does.

Columbus Fire and Rescue' s Fire and Life Safety Divison was created in 2002. Since that time, the number of residential fires in the city has decreased by 52% by anthonyCOLOM, Public Relations acolom@columbusms.org

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training

Cleveland Hose Roll Training: Engineer lamarcusPHILLIPS Photo by anthonyCOLOM


Training Photos Photos by anthonyCOLOM


Columbus Fire & Rescue and Columbus Air Force Base Fire Department’s Collaborative firefighter training


Training Photos Photos by anthonyCOLOM


command staff Continuously Educating

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The fall season is almost here. Along with it comes cooler temperatures, changing of leaves, and football. Summer vacation is over and students are back in school. Nonetheless, the work of Columbus Fire & Rescue continues on when seasons change. Our men and women have redirected their focus to business inspections throughout the city and fire prevention for grades K-5. We decided to begin business inspections in September this year. We felt the earlier start would benefit the business owners, as well as the members of CFR. In past years, our inspection period lasted from October to December; however, it will now run from September 2013 to November 2013. Business inspections in the city limits are important for many reasons. The two that stand out in my mind the most are fire codes compliance and safety regulations. Annual inspections help CFR members to remain familiar with the business layout in their response area. They also allow the engine companies to update business information that may have changed since the last inspection. Our goal is to make it safe for the business owners and its patrons. Fire Prevention month is approaching! Columbus Fire and Rescue will administer hands-on fire education to over 4,000 children in October. While we understand October is nationally recognized as Fire Prevention Month, Columbus Fire and Rescue focuses on it year round. We are dedicated to educating the community on fire prevention to ensure safety within our homes, schools, daycare centers, healthcare facilities, etc. Fire fighters and students alike are excited about the opportunity to visit the schools and demonstrate procedures and techniques. The exchange of war stories by many of the students gives the firefighters enjoyment that is priceless. Demonstrating the fire trucks and equipment always seem to be the highlight of the trip. More importantly, the highlight for the firefighters is seeing the joy and laughter in the students' eyes. Making the City fire safe year around is the goal and focus of the CFR prevention division.

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While we understand October is nationally recognized as Fire Prevention Month, Columbus Fire and Rescue focuses on it year round. by ASSISTANT CHIEF martinANDREWS mandrews@columbusms.org

(662) 329-5121


prevention

Fire Prevention Month at Local Schools: Engineer michaelMILLER Photo by anthonyCOLOM

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Around The Station

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Ingredients: 12 frozen waffles 1 pound maple sausage 12 eggs 0.5 cup maple syrup 2 cups milk 0.5 teaspoon salt 0.25 teaspoon pepper 1.5 teaspoon dry mustard 2 cups shredded cheddar cheese

WAFFLE BREAKFAST CASSEROLE

Directions: Spray a 9Ă—13 dish (or 2 8Ă—8 dishes) with cooking spray. Brown sausage and drain fat. While sausage cooks, toast waffles and cube. In a large mixing bowl, mix eggs, maple syrup, milk, salt, pepper and dry mustard with whisk. In bottom of baking dish, layer 1/2 of cubed waffles, 1/2 of sausage, sprinkle with 1/2 of cheese. Repeat layers. Pour egg mixture over layers, giving the dish a shake to make sure the egg mixture is distributed evenly. Bake at 325 for 50-60 minutes, or until a knife inserted in center comes out clean. Let sit 5 minutes before serving. Freezing Directions: Prepare as directed above, but DO NOT bake, cover, label and freeze. To serve: Thaw. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Bake, uncovered for 5060 minutes or until a knife inserted in center comes out clean. Let sit for 5 minutes before serving. Servings: 8 Ingredients: 5 Granny Smith apples (peeled, cored, chopped small) 1/4 cup chopped pecans 3 tablespoons all purpose flour 1/2 cup brown sugar 2 tablespoons maple syrup 1 tablespoon lemon juice 3/4 cup all-purpose flour 1/3 cup brown sugar 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon salt 6 tablespoons chilled butter

APPLE CRISP

Directions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. For the filling, mix all ingredients together and place into 7-8 oz ramekins. For topping, mix brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt in a large bowl. Blend the butter into the mixture. Bake for 35-40 minutes. Cool for 10 minutes before serving. SMOKE ALARMS SAVE LIVES

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fire and life safety Columbus Fire & Rescue Reminds Residents to 'Prevent Kitchen Fires'

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It's time for Fire Prevention month and in October Columbus Fire & Rescue is joining forces with the nonprofit National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) to remind local residents to 'Prevent Kitchen Fires.' During this year's fire safety campaign, firefighters and safety advocates will be spreading the word about the dangers of kitchen fires--most of which result from unattended cooking-and teaching local residents how to prevent kitchen fires from starting in the first place.

According to the latest NFPA research, cooking is the leading cause of home fires. Two of every five home fires begin in the kitchen-more than any other place in the home. Cooking fires are also the leading cause of home fire-related injuries. Often when we're called to a fire that started in the kitchen, the residents tell us that they only left the kitchen for a few minutes. Sadly, that's all it takes for a dangerous fire to start. We hope that Fire Prevention Month will help us reach folks in the community before they've suffered a damaging lesson.

Among the safety tips we will be emphasizing: Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling, broiling, or boiling food. If you must leave the room, even for a short period of time, turn off the stove. When you are simmering, baking, or roasting food, check it regularly, stay in the home, and use a timer to remind you. If you have young children, use the stove's back burners whenever possible. Keep children and pets at least three away from the stove. When you cook, wear clothing with tight-fitting sleeves. Keep potholders, oven mitts, wooden utensils, paper and plastic bags, towels, and anything else that can burn, away from your stovetop. Clean up food and grease from burners and stovetops.

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Two of every five home fires begin in the kitchen-more than any other place in the home. A cooking fire can quickly turn deadly. I have seen too many homes destroyed and people killed or injured by fires that could have been easily avoided. Please heed these simple safety rules. We firefighters would like to be in your kitchen, but only when you invite us for dinner!

by FIRE and LIFE SAFETY EDUCATOR /PIO caroleSUMMERALL csummerall@columbusms.org

(662) 329-5121


Fire & Life Safety

IS

OCTOBER

FIRE SAFETY MONTH

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Photos by Anthony Colom

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Escape the maze


Fire & Life Safety

Bedroom Fire Prevention and Home Fire Safety Stop a bedroom fire before it starts: NEVER smoke in bed. Replace mattresses made before the 2007 Federal Mattress Flammability Standard. Keep lighters and matches in a locked drawer or cabinet out of reach of children. Children are one of the highest risk groups for death in home fires. Do not run electrical cords under your bed or trap them against a wall where heat can build up. Never put too many plugs into an extension cord. Keep lit candles away from bedding, curtains, papers, and anything else that can catch fire easily. Take extra care when using space heaters. Keep bedding, clothes, curtains, and other flammable items at least three (3) feet away from them. Only use laboratory approved electric blankets and warmers. Check to make sure the cords are not worn away or coming apart.

Be prepared for a fire: One of the best ways to protect yourself and your family is to have a working smoke alarm that can sound fast for both a fire that has flames, and a smoky fire that has fumes without flames. It is called a "Dual Sensor Smoke Alarm." A smoke alarm greatly reduces your chances of dying in a fire. Make sure everyone in your family knows at least two (2) escape routes from their bedrooms. Make and practice a home fire escape plan and set a meeting place outside. In case of a fire, stay low to the ground beneath the smoke. Get out, stay out.

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PROMOTIONS

NEW HIREES

Taylor Mitchell

Darryl Brown

Gregory Pack

RICHARD McBRIDE Engineer to Captain RETIRING

Jeremy Harpole

Brock Edmund

CAPTAIN DERRICK PARNELL 1988 - 2013 OTHER NEWS

Eli Oswalt

Ryan Thompson

Firefighters Josh Reynolds & Kyle Posey take the oath before Mayor Smith and Chief Moore SMOKE ALARMS SAVE LIVES

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command staff Enjoy The Job

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I began working at the Columbus Fire Department in October of 1995. I had no previous firefighting experience, and no idea of what to expect. With a myriad of new task to grasp and responsibilities to uphold, I was expected to learn the contents of every compartment of the fire truck. While learning the purpose of a gate valve, I was expected to know the difference between a wye and siamese connector. Throughout those early days of training, there was never a shortage of persons constantly helping or offering words of encouragement. I and the other new members of the department came to realize that those we worked with had a personal stake in our success as firefighters. We began to understand that the department was only as strong as its weakest member. Every emergency call depended on each person performing to the best of their ability. United, we were capable of accomplishing task far beyond the means of any one individual. As I began to feel more confident, the task and responsibilities required increased. Terms such as senior man, and two man job were introduced to me and the other new recruits. One day, I was told by then Engineer Martin Andrews that learning and mastering skills meant nothing if you did not help the next man. He told me to share what you learn with others. Only then have you truly mastered a skill. This sage piece of advice was coupled with the words of Captain Jim Vaughn, who told me to remember that the job comes first, but never forget to have fun. The other new recruits got the same advice, and we took it to heart. Whether it was training for smoke divers, or firefighter school, we worked hard and got the job done. At the end of the day, we made sure to have fun. I look fondly back on those early days of my career. Many of the people I began my journey with have left the department for other pursuits. Those that remain have achieved great things in their tenure, becoming engineers and officers. One thing I have noticed and admired in my fellows is that every one of them remembers the advice we were given in those early days. I daily see examples of them imparting the knowledge and skills they obtained to those new firefighters beginning their careers. I am especially delighted that once the job is done they still remember to have fun. We've all heard the saying "Find a job that you love, and you'll never have to work a day in your life". The Fire Service fits this example perfectly. Rare are the days when I dread coming to work.

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The norm is to experience a sense of challenge for what the day will bring. The sounding of the alarm still raises the hairs on my neck. I still make a point of personal pride to know what each truck compartment holds. I smile when the new guys try to stump the older heads with what they think are impossible to know addresses. Through the good and bad days, Columbus Fire and Rescue has provided an excellent place of employment for all those fortunate to wear her colors. The highs have far outnumbered the lows in my days here. Although the hours have been long, the work hard, and the thanks few, the job got done. I, along with the rest of my brothers and sisters may punch a time clock, but we don't consider this work. Firefighting is a calling to which many are called, yet few are chosen. If there is one thing I would like to say to the new generation of firefighters, it would be the following: At the end of the day, enjoy the job and have fun.

by CHIEF of TRAINING duaneHUGHES dhughes@columbusms.org

(662) 329-5121


best customer

Photo by anthonyCOLOM

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10:30 am House Fire: Engineer brooksPOPE and Captain markCONNORS

service


In The Community

Lowndes County Full-Scale Disaster Exercise

SCENARIO : Two bomb blasts occur on the campus of Mississippi University For Women (in Columbus, MS) while students are engaging in intramural sports activities. MUW Police; FBI; MUW nursing students; Lowndes County Emergency Management; Columbus Fire and Rescue; Columbus Police Department; Columbus Air Force Base Fire Department and Bomb Squad, Tupelo, MS Police Department Bomb Squad; Lowndes County Coroner; East Mississippi Community College Police; Baptist Memorial Hospital (Golden Triangle); Mississippi Department of Health, and MEMA all respond to the incident. 26 l COLUMBUS FIRE and RESCUE MAGAZINE l Photos by Anthony Colom

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code enforcement BUSINESS INSPECTIONS : An Integral Component of Fire Prevention

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According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), there are approximately 17,000 fires involving mercantile and business occupancies each year. This statistic equates into a fire occurring nationwide every 30 minutes. A common myth about fire is that “It will not happen to me,” or “It will not happen to me, but if it does I have insurance.” In business, these beliefs could have devastating consequences.

According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), 40% of businesses that suffer a disaster never reopen, and another 25% fail within the first year. Futhermore, the Small Business Association estimates that over 90% of these businesses fail within two years. The reason for failure includes loss of knowledgeable employees, loss of revenue, loss of customers (find other suppliers), loss of merchandise or stock, and loss of business records. At Columbus Fire and Rescue, our goal is simple: we want to minimize the risk of life and property loss due to fire. Annual business inspections is one of the processes we use to achieve this goal. Business inspection is designed to identify hazards that could result in injury and fire, to repair or remove these hazards, and to educate you, our customers, about the importance of fire safety. Beginning September 3, and continuing through November, members of Columbus Fire and Rescue will conduct annual business inspections. Department personnel follow a checklist based upon fire prevention codes to identify potential hazards. As a means of making your business safe and promoting a violation-free inspection, the department is providing a checklist of items that most often result in code violations. We want to take this opportunity to thank you for your patience and cooperation during this time.

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INSPECTIONS CHECKLIST This is a list of the most common violations we encounter Portable Fire Extinguishers: Have no current inspection tags, not hung on wall, & not in plain view Spinkler System: Has no current inspection tag, sprinkler heads are painted, system is blocked, & connections blocked Address: Address not posted outside building, letters are not 4 inches & no address on rear doors of strip malls Fire Alarms: Pull stations are obstructed from view, testing is not current, system is not operable Extension Cord Use: Being used as permanent wiring; found extending through walls, ceilings, and floors; found being used with multi-plug adaptors & affixed to structures Electrical Hazards: Electrical panel blocked; exposed wiring, electrical panel, light switch, and receptacle covers missing Kitchen Hood Systems: Filters, nozzles, and hood are not clean; no current inspection tag; & no Class K extinguisher present Emergency and Exit Lights: Lights are not illuminated, backup battery not operating Means of Egress ( The way out): exit aisles are not clear & exit doors don’t operate properly.

by Fire Marshal toddWEATHERS tweathers@columbusms.org

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SMOKE ALARMS SAVE LIVES

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In The Community

Tabitha Barham Administrative Assistant tbarham@columbusms.org

CFR

GIVES

big hearts that are dedicated to help- fund raiser. The department already ing the community in so many ways. had an informal cookbook that was really just a bunch of recipes that This cookbook will be a tool to help were put together in a notebook, so I raise funds for the "CFR Gives" pro- asked if I could use these existing gram. This program was started sev- recipes as well as gather new recipes eral years ago. Fire department per- for this book. All of the proceeds of sonnel would buy each other gift cer- this cookbook will go to the "CFR tificates or small tokens of apprecia- Gives" program. tion for each other at Christmas. It was decided that these gifts, or the monies used to purchase these gifts City of Columbus Fire Department could be better put to use and could Ph: 662-244-3500 Ext. 4100 benefit needy families throughout the Fax: 662-329-5169 community; thus began "CFR Gives". It has since grown to include several There are 18 engine companies with other fundraisers within the departColumbus Fire & Rescue, any monies ment. raised are divided among the different engine companies and they decide as I loved this idea so much that I was a team who they may have seen anxious to contribute myself. As the through the year that could use a little year has passed, I have watched the help at Christmas. From buying gifts firemen cook some amazing dishes, to paying electric bills, or any other and have had the pleasure of tasting a number of ways that they feel will few of them, so I thought a cookhelp a family. These guys really have book would be an awesome idea as a

I came to work for Columbus Fire and Rescue in November 2012. The fiscal year had just begun, but the calendar year was almost over. And my days were a whirlwind of learning my new job and trying to remember the names and faces of my new "family". While I was trying to settle in, Christmas was fast approaching, and I heard some of the guys talk about "CFR Gives". When I asked what this was, they explained to me that "CFR Gives" is something they do every year at Christmas time to raise money to donate to needy families.

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Columbus Fire and Rescue Magazine