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Columbus College of . Pushing Me to Be the Smartest Person in the Room


Table of Contents FOUNDATION STUDIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 LIBERAL ARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 ADVERTISING & GRAPHIC DESIGN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 ANIMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 CINEMATIC ARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 FASHION DESIGN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 FINE ARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 ILLUSTRATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 INDUSTRIAL DESIGN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 INTERIOR DESIGN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 PHOTOGRAPHY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 MINORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 MASTER OF FINE ARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 BEYOND THE CLASSROOM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 CAMPUS MAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 ADMINISTRATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 CONTACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89


Foundation Studies START WITH THE BASICS At CCAD, everything starts with the freshman year in Foundation Studies, when students polish their basic skills into the fundamental competencies needed by all successful creative professionals. Sequential courses develop versatile aesthetic understanding, technical proficiency, broad problem-solving ability, and awareness of our culture and times (as well as those of others). FS@ccad.edu ccad.edu/programs/foundation

02 CCAD Foundation Studies


Course Requirements REQUIRED FOR ALL STUDENTS FS010X Photoshop Fundamentals FS020X Illustrator Fundamentals FS030X InDesign Fundamentals FS091X New Student Seminar FS1057 Design: Projects and Strategies FS1058 Design: Contemporary Practice FS1139 Painting and Color Theory: Research and Practice FS1140 Painting and Color Theory: Applied Concepts FS127 Drawing I: Drawing Fundamentals FS128 Drawing II: Figure and Anatomy LA132–133 Art, Design, and Culture I–II LA190 Writing and the Arts

There are specific additional Foundation Studies requirements for students who intend to declare majors in Advertising and Graphic Design, Fashion Design, Illustration, Industrial Design, and Interior Design; see the discussions of those majors for details.

Foundation Studies CCAD

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Course Descriptions FS010X PHOTOSHOP FUNDAMENTALS Provides the fundamental skills to be successful with Adobe Photoshop. Five lessons and two practice projects are completed in sequence, concluding with a Pass/Non Pass test. This course must be completed during the freshman year.

FS020X ILLUSTRATOR FUNDAMENTALS Provides the fundamental skills to be successful with Adobe Illustrator. Five lessons and two practice projects are completed in sequence, concluding with a Pass/Non Pass test. This course must be completed during the freshman year.

FS030X INDESIGN FUNDAMENTALS Provides the fundamental skills to be successful with Adobe InDesign. Five lessons and two practice projects are completed in sequence, concluding with a Pass/Non Pass test. This course must be completed during the freshman year.

FS091X NEW STUDENT SEMINAR Addresses the transition needs of freshmen and transfer students through monthly discussions on topics ranging from time management to personal finance to finding resources in Columbus. Students are also assigned a common reading and write a reflection paper

FS1057 DESIGN: PROJECTS AND STRATEGIES Introduces fundamental principles of 2D, 3D, and 4D design. Challenging projects emphasize concept research, development, and actuation. Students move through progressively more complex methods of composition, visual storytelling, and creative problem solving. Digital media applications, safe studio practices, and competency with various 2D and 3D materials developed and expected.

FS1058 DESIGN: CONTEMPORARY PRACTICE Emphasizes creative problem solving and research. Projects challenge students to use fundamental principles to develop meaning and concept. Conceptual issues examined include abstraction, interactivity, and collaboration. Digital media applications, safe studio practices, and competency with various 2D and 3D materials developed and expected.

FS1139 PAINTING AND COLOR THEORY: RESEARCH AND PRACTICE Skill in digital and physical media developed through a variety of fine art and design projects and exercises. Teaches effective observational image making and creative color management, including color organization, additive and subtractive mixing systems, and analysis of artists’ pigments. Students develop complex color sensitivity and a familiarity with color strategies used by artists and designers.

FS1140 PAINTING AND COLOR THEORY: APPLIED CONCEPTS Explores color as a vehicle for conceptual, expressive, cultural, symbolic, or associative impact. Projects follow an inquiry-based model and expand to encompass personal interests, allowing room for exploring concepts as they will be used in the student’s major. Builds proficiency and develops effective observational and creative color strategies in wide array of studio and digital painting media. Often includes working from the human model.

FS127 DRAWING I: DRAWING FUNDAMENTALS Introduces the traditional skills involved in representational drawing, including measuring proportion accurately, rendering light and form through value, and analyzing observed linear perspective to create space. Students use a number of media and technical processes while drawing from a variety of life sources, including still lifes, interiors, and the human figure.

FS128 DRAWING II: FIGURE AND ANATOMY Focuses on drawing the live model accurately and rendering it within space. The study of human anatomy and gesture drawing aims to create a greater mastery when rendering the dynamics of movement and subtleties of the surface form. Explores more drawing media and approaches to push drawing’s expressive potential in later coursework.

LA132 ART, DESIGN, AND CULTURE I Introduces the principles and history of art and design, focusing on the period between about 1500 and the present. Examines major artists, periods, and movements in both Western and non-Western art and design through readings, exams, and discussions. Develops students’ visual literacy and art vocabulary in preparation for advanced history coursework in art, media, and design.

LA133 ART, DESIGN, AND CULTURE II Focuses on art and design created before about 1500, including ancient Greek and Roman art. Examines major artists, periods, and movements in both Western and non-Western art and design. Readings, quizzes, and exams stress the understanding of the relationship between context and artwork.

LA190 WRITING AND THE ARTS Teaches the principles of college-level writing with a focus on the needs of art students to express themselves; to analyze experience, culture, and art; and to communicate effectively. Written assignments begin with the search for a subject and voice, and culminate with an emphasis on precision and clarity of writing.


Foundation Studies Faculty CCAD’s faculty consists of more than 200 practicing artists, designers and scholars with broad teaching experience and appropriate degrees in art, design, and liberal arts. CCAD’s student-to-faculty ratio is 12:1. Full-time Foundation Studies faculty and their credentials are listed below; for biographical information on all faculty (full-time, part-time, adjunct, and emeritus), visit ccad.edu/programs-of-study/faculty-bios.

ABIJANAC, JULIE Assistant Professor, Foundation Studies; BFA in Fine Arts, Columbus College of Art and Design, 1992; MFA in Fine Arts, Cranbrook Academy of Arts, 1994 FAIST, LORI Assistant Professor, Coordinator, Electronic Publishing Curriculum; BS in Electrical Engineering, Ohio State University, 1989

FLEGLE, MATTHEW Instructor, Foundation Studies; BFA in Fine Arts, Ohio State University, 1995; MFA in Fine Arts, Stanford University, 2003

FRENZ, ALICE Associate Professor, Foundation Studies; BFA in Advertising Design, Columbus College of Art and Design, 1982 GRIFFITH, CAROL Professor, Fine Arts and Graduate Studies, Head,

Painting & Color Theory; Associates Degree in Visual Communications, Art Institute of Pittsburgh, 1976; BFA in Art, Carnegie-Mellon University, 1982; MFA in Painting, Ohio University, 1985

KELLOGG, DAWSON Associate Professor and Head of Dimensional

Studies; Associates Degree in Glass, Palomar College, 1991; BA in Art Education, San Francisco State University, 1993; MFA in Glass, Kent State University, 1997

PETERSON, TAMARA Associate Professor, Foundation Studies; BFA in

Fine Arts, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1983; MFA in Painting, Ohio University, 1986

ROBBINS, ROBERT Professor and Head of Drawing & Printmaking; BFA

in Painting, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1990; MFA in Painting, Yale University, 1992

YATES, CHRISTOPHER Associate Professor and Director of Foundation Studies; BFA in Painting, Columbus College of Art and Design, 1987; MFA in Painting, State University of New York at Buffalo, 1992; MLS in Library and Information Science, Kent State University, 1998

Foundation Studies CCAD

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Liberal Arts DEFINE “INTELLECT.” While CCAD specializes in studio majors, there is much more to the undergraduate curriculum than studio coursework. The BFA degree is 40 percent liberal arts requirements: writing, literature, social and natural sciences, math, business, and much more, including a strong art and design history component. The liberal arts help to create context for studio work, advance critical thinking and cultural awareness, and enhance verbal and written communication skills. They round out students’ education and are essential to quality careers and lifelong learning. But in addition to building intellect, the liberal arts have highly practical applications. This is true for everyone: from a fashion designer who needs to research and understand market psychology when forecasting fashion trends to a fine artist who needs to be an effective writer when applying for grants. LA@ccad.edu ccad.edu/programs-of-study/liberal-arts

08 CCAD Liberal Arts


Course Descriptions LA080 ESL BASIC WRITING Strengthens the skills of students who have learned English as a second language. Students study grammar, vocabulary, syntax, paragraph writing, and the essay. They practice reading, listening, and speaking and develop strategies to continue improving their English using resources like tutoring, ESL textbooks, and websites.

LA090 BASIC WRITING Develops understanding of English grammar and syntax through the writing of sentence patterns that employ complete and subordinate structures. Includes assigned readings, individualized work on spelling and vocabulary, and practice developing paragraphs and essays.

LA132 ART, DESIGN, AND CULTURE I Introduces the principles and history of art and design from the Baroque through the present. Examines major artists, periods, and movements in both Western and non-Western art and design. Focuses on methods of analysis, style, role of the artist, and interpretation, all in relationship to the broader cultural context of the work.

LA133 ART, DESIGN, AND CULTURE II Focuses on art and design created from the ancient world up to the Baroque. Examines major artists, periods, and movements in both Western and nonWestern art and design. Focuses on methods of analysis, style, role of the artist, and interpretation, all in relationship to the broader cultural context of the work.

LA190 WRITING AND THE ARTS Provides scaffolding for college writing by developing vocabulary, sentence craft, and paragraph and essay skills. Connects personal writing, critical analysis, and research and documentation to students’ lives as artists. Typical assignments include reflections on personal experience as well as analysis of works of literature, art, architecture, music, or film.

LA220 MUSIC APPRECIATION Aims to increase the enjoyment and appreciation of music by listeners with little or no previous background. Emphasizes classical music, but includes examples of a variety of other styles. Classes are devoted largely to listening and group discussion.

LA222 BASIC GUITAR Introduces the fundamentals of playing the guitar to students with no previous guitar experience.

LA223 INTERMEDIATE GUITAR Further develops guitar skills for players who have taken Basic Guitar or have otherwise grasped the instrument’s fundamentals.

LA230 HISTORY OF DESIGN 2D Provides 2D design students (graphic design, illustration, and advertising) a more specific contextual understanding of design history as it is applied in their fields or industries. Includes typography (including early alphabets), manuscripts, mass media formats (magazines, posters, books), illustration, and printmaking. Themes include visual literacy, consumerism, technology, gender and social issues, and popular culture. Surveys early cultures through the mid19th century, but focuses on the late-19th-century through contemporary work, including digital media.

LA231 HISTORY OF DESIGN 3D Provides 3D design students (fashion, interior design, and industrial design) a more specific contextual understanding of design history as it is applied in their fields or industries. Includes architecture, interiors, furniture, aesthetics, space, and ornamentation. Themes include authorship, consumerism, technology, gender and social issues, and popular culture. Surveys early cultures through the 16th century, but focuses on the 17th-century through contemporary design.

LA240 CONTEMPORARY BUSINESS Introduces the terms, principles, and methods of contemporary business. Emphasizes the practical application of economics, management, and marketing to art- and design-centered careers.

LA250 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY Teaches critical thinking through philosophical dialogue on topics such as morality, laws, free will, reality, space and time, knowledge, and truth. Explains inductive and deductive reasoning and develops students’ ability to verbally articulate and defend ideas. Students increase their critical reading and writing skillst through oral discussions and the writing of essays and tests.

LA256 PHYSICS AND ITS APPLICATIONS Presents physics as a quantitative science based upon observation and experiment. Provides an appreciation of the experimental laws and fundamental principles that describe the behavior of the physical world. Students investigate and discuss widely applicable laws which affect design and its purposes.

LA258 HUMAN ANATOMY Presents basic biological principles through study of anatomy and physiology of the human body. Laboratory work includes dissection to further illustrate course material.

LA259 SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS FOR THE ARTIST Introduces the physical sciences specifically as they apply to the study of art. Topics include sensation, chemical formulas and chemical hazards, and the physics of light and color. Pathological conditions will also be discussed as they relate to art materials.


LA261 ECOLOGY: EARTH’S LIFE

LA321 HISTORY OF CINEMA: BEGINNING TO 1980

Reveals connections between individuals and the world’s ecology, as well as exploring contemporary ecological issues such as recycling, green roofs, ecological footprinting, biodiversity, deforestation, invasive species, and climate change. Includes readings, discussion, written assignments, field trips, and films.

Offers a study of American and international fiction film from its beginning up to 1980. Viewings, discussions, and tests assist students in developing the ability to critically examine films, recognize their contexts, and understand this art form’s evolution over time.

LA262 MATHEMATICS FOR THE DESIGNER

LA322 HISTORY OF CINEMA: 1980 TO PRESENT

Develops the student’s practical mathematical background. Covers topics from basic algebra and geometry that are essential to the designer. Includes problem solving, computer function and language, metrics, and three-dimensional geometry.

Examines American and international narrative film from 1980 up to the present. Stresses the importance of understanding the context and physical environment in which films are made, including social and political influences. Exams and essays develop the ability to analyze and verbally interpret this visual art form.

LA263A NATURAL SCIENCE TOPICS Addresses the most current topics in scientific research and the news, including the Human Genome Project, genetic engineering, cloning, stem cell research, nanotechnology and viruses. Considers our personal role in these topics, how they affect us, and how to speak intelligently about them.

LA263B SOCIAL SCIENCE TOPICS Covers controversial topics in social science ranging from evolution, sexual selection, gendered socialization, and depth psychology to sexual orientation, crossing cultures, and dysfunctions. Discusses the topic’s effects on society and what directions society may be going in the future.

LA270 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY Investigates memory, creativity, discovery of oneself, and the human mind. Topics include the science of psychology, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, memory, cognition and mental abilities, motivation and emotion, lifespan development, personality, stress and health psychology, psychological disorders, and therapies.

LA274 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY Examines all aspects of how people have lived in all places, throughout all time, emphasizing how diverse humans are and how we create, convey and interpret meaning. Considers religion, gender, racial construction, conflict, human history, and how all that relates to the environment around us, including what happens when cultures come in contact with each other in our ever more globalized world.

LA275 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY Presents the scientific study of human social behavior and society, including the scientific method, the family, education, religion, culture, socialization, government, gender role development, deviance and social control, social stratification, minority group issues, and social change.

LA280 INTRODUCTION TO ART THERAPY Invites students to explore their own symbolism used through art. Discusses case studies with the use of visual aids. Addresses the developmental stages of art, the older adult population, art therapy assessments, and various clinical matters related to art therapy.

LA323 HISTORY OF DESIGN An integrated history of design from about 1700 to the present, including consideration of design styles and principles in such diverse forms as furniture, fashion, graphic design, illustration, advertising design, and industrial and interior design with an emphasis on how the design professions function in relation to political, economic, and social history.

LA329 HISTORY OF DOCUMENTARY CINEMA Presents a comparative overview of the evolution of the non-fiction film within broader historical, functional, social, and ethical contexts. Examines the use of cinematic conventions and how to interpret and understand this genre. Viewings, readings, exams, essays, and class discussions serve to develop the students’ ability to critically view documentary films and to complete and present relevant research.

LA330 MEDIEVAL ART Presents the developments in Western European art and architecture from the Migration Period through the 15th century with an interdisciplinary focus on literature and history and their relationship to the visual arts. Examines the diverse foundations of medieval art, the impact of the Islamic culture on the art of the West, and the origins of many 20th-century cultural and religious conflicts.

LA331 ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ART Presents and discusses fine art in Italy from 1300 to 1580. Emphasizes the development of naturalism and classicism; the interaction of social, political, religious, and cultural events with the visual arts; and regional variations in Italian Renaissance art.

LA332 BAROQUE ART Presents the painting, sculpture, and architecture of the 17th century in Italy, Flanders, Spain, Holland, and France. Addresses issues such as the effect of politics and religion on art, the artist’s changing status and training, the emergence of new subjects and new genres, the changing nature of patronage, and the relationship of Baroque art to that of the Renaissance.

Liberal Arts CCAD

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LA333 ROMANTICISM IN ART

LA341 MARKETING FOR DESIGNERS

Studies paintings and sculptures from Europe and North America in the period between 1760 and 1850. Emphasizes how philosophical, aesthetic, and political developments, such as the French and Industrial Revolutions, are manifest in the form and imagery of the works from this time. Assists students in developing skills in oral and written communication and analytical thinking.

Analyzes past, current, and future marketing practices as they relate to consumer behavior, promotion, pricing, product design, packaging, distribution, and marketing research. Emphasizes current marketing practices used by business and non-business organizations.

LA334 IMPRESSIONISM AND POST-IMPRESSIONISM

Examines paintings, sculptures, graphic arts, architecture, and photography, as well as writings and theories about the social climate between 1800 and 1900. Includes movements such as Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism and artists including J.M.W. Turner, Theodore Gericault, Gustave Courbet, Edouard Manet, Claude Monet and Vincent van Gogh.

Explores art in France from 1850 to 1900. Includes the evolution from Realism to Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, Courbet, the Barbizon School, Van Gogh, and Cézanne. Emphasizes artists’ associations, exhibitions, and careers. Requires critical analysis of material and explains the social and political contexts influencing these artists. Assists students in understanding the impact of earlier and contemporary artistic influences.

LA335 EARLY MODERN ART Examines the origins and development of art in Europe and Russia from 1880 to 1940, including Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, and Constructivism. Emphasizes artists considered to be avant-garde in their own time. Presents an understanding of social, political, and biographical information related to these styles and strengthens students’ ability to analyze and identify influences of a given style on subsequent artists.

LA336 LATE MODERN ART Studies the visual arts from 1940 to the advent of Postmodernism, including intellectual, aesthetic, social, and political influences on the art of the mid- and late 20th century. Includes the exploration of Abstract Expressionism, Color Field, Pop, Minimalism, and Conceptual and Process art. Readings and discussions assist students in developing the ability to recognize influences in contemporary art and to articulate the interpretation of works.

LA337 HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY A survey of the history of photography from its invention in 1839 to the present. Emphasizes photography’s relationship to other visual arts and the social and historical issues of the period.

LA338 TOPICS IN ANIMATED FILM Surveys major themes and artists in animation, using slide lectures and film viewings. Topics include origins of the medium and its relationship to the comic strip, individual artists, and social themes. Individual artists and producers discussed include Emile Cohl, Winsor McCay, Walt Disney, Max and Dave Fleischer, Oskar Fischinger, and Norman McLaren.

LA339 NORTHERN RENAISSANCE ART Examines paintings, sculpture, and the graphic arts in France, Germany, the Low Countries, and England from the 14th to the 16th centuries. Includes Jan van Eyck, Hieronymus Bosch, Albrecht Dürer, Hans Holbein, and Pieter Bruegel the Elder. Addresses the issues of the status of the artist’s profession in Northern European society, physical production and original location, the connection between art and devotional life, art and civic life, and the effect of Humanism and the Reformation on art.

LA342 19TH CENTURY ART

LA351 PHILOSOPHY OF VISUAL ART Examines issues about subject matter in art, art as an expression of emotion, aesthetic form, and the relationship between form and function with special emphasis on contemporary visual art and its problems.

LA354 PHILOSOPHY OF MEDIA Study of the media and its relationship to culture, including gestural media, dance, ritual, music, spoken and written language, myth, film, broadcast and print media, and computer-based media. Mass media and globalization are also discussed.

LA370 THEORIES OF PERSONALITY Illustrates differences in personality among peers and among significant historical personalities. Students develop a fuller understanding of their own personality, their behaviors, and the contributing factors which develop our minds.

LA371 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Considers applications of social influence to areas such as interpreting visual imagery, understanding advertising methods, public education campaigns, propaganda techniques, overcoming prejudices, shaping public opinion in politics, and managing all of our human relationships effectively.

LA372 PSYCHOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT Introduces the study of human development from conception through very old age. Focuses on conditions that promote optimal development throughout life.

LA373 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY Uses the scientific method to describe, explain, and predict behaviors considered to be “abnormal” within Western culture. Recognizing that behaviors are often attributable to more than traits alone, includes the contributions of biological, psychological, and sociocultural variables that cause various behaviors. Also discusses anxiety, depression, mania, schizophrenia, substance abuse, eating disorders, personality disorders, sexual disorders, dissociative disorders, sleep disorders, and childhood disorders.


LA376 SOCIAL PROBLEMS IN MODERN SOCIETY

LA422 WRITING CREATIVE NONFICTION

Uses sociology, psychology, economics, political science, ecology, and a little physic to examine significant global issues that have local and personal impact. Issues addressed include terrorism, inequality, population growth, climate change, food security, natural disasters, and water wars.

Focuses on producing either a series of writings or one or two longer writings, working in traditional or experimental forms. Explores many different modes, from autobiography and character studies to reportage based on research and interviews. Students read and critique one another’s work.

LA377 PSYCHOLOGY OF CREATIVITY

LA424 ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP

Studies the interplay of the biological, psychological, and social factors that explains the origins and maintenance of creativity throughout the lifespan. Introduces the various components that contribute to the construct of creativity and examines factors related to personality traits, cognitive styles, and creative thought processes.

Hones students’ writing through deeper exploration of traditional and experimental poetic, narrative, and essayistic forms. Encourages long-form works and artistic risks. Students write in one genre — nonfiction, fiction, or poetry — but have the option of exploring all three, including crossdisciplinary forms. Also examines the contemporary literature landscape with an eye toward publication.

LA378 DEVIANCE Studies and analyzes behavior that contemporary society considers deviant.

LA390 READINGS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE Critical study of selected readings from the Americas, generally drawn from EuroAmerican, African American, and Native American works from a wide range of periods and forms. May focus on a period, genre, or issue. Emphasis varies with professor.

LA391 READINGS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE Critical study of selected readings in English literature. Generally drawn from the major writers of the British Isles, but may include various colonial writers and a wide range of periods and forms. May focus on a period, genre, or issue. Emphasis varies with professor.

LA394 READINGS IN WORLD LITERATURE

LA431 ART OF AFRICA Introduces art from throughout the continent of Africa, and from ancient times until the present. Demonstrates how African art and life are intertwined and how history has transformed the cultures of the continent.

LA432 AFRICAN AMERICAN ART An examination of art created by Americans of African descent, including sociopolitical, cultural, and aesthetic influences on the artists and their work.

LA433 STUDIES IN MODERN ART An intensive study of a selected topic in Modern Art. Recent examples include Color Theory and Color Expression in Modern Art, Modern Sculpture, Expressionism, and Surrealism.

LA434 STUDIES IN DESIGN HISTORY

Examines literature from around the globe, considering geographical, political and cultural factors that influence the works and writers. Specific selections will vary with professor.

A study of a designer, movement, theme, or other topic not ordinarily covered by the course curriculum.

LA395 FILM AND LITERATURE

A study of an artist, movement, theme, or other topic not ordinarily covered by the course curriculum.

Examines the correspondences between books and films, based on their shared ways of communicating and on techniques that are unique to each medium.

LA419 RESEARCH PROJECTS IN LIBERAL ARTS Special humanities, science, or business-related projects.

LA421 MYTHOLOGY Studies a wide range of myths from a comparative and cross-cultural perspective. Encourages reflection on how shared experience and universal images influence cultural narratives and how groups separated by great distances often present similar patterns and archetypes in their myths.

LA435 STUDIES IN ART HISTORY

LA436 ART OF CHINA, KOREA, AND TIBET A study of the art of China, Korea, and Tibet from the prehistoric period (c. 8000 BCE) to the 20th century, as well as some of the aspects of culture that helped shape the art of this civilization, including religion, mythology, political system, and social structure.

LA437 ART OF JAPAN A study of art and architecture in Japan from about 12,000 BCE to the 20th century, as well as some of the aspects of Japanese culture that helped shape its art, including religion, attitude toward the natural world, myths, political and social systems, and borrowings from other cultures.

Liberal Arts CCAD

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LA438 GREEK AND ROMAN ART

LA494 SPEECH

Examines Greek and Roman painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Greek Bronze Age to the late Imperial period of Rome with a focus on the relationship of art and architecture to contemporary intellectual, social, religious, and political developments. Explores issues including sexual and gender politics, representation and identity, the human form, and the changing function of art in society.

Offers practice in listening and speaking skills through individual speeches, both prepared and extemporaneous, and through group discussion on a wide range of questions, including impasse (when rational discourse fails) and consensus building.

LA439 CONTEMPORARY ART A study of contemporary art from the roots of Postmodernism to the art of the present, with emphasis on the impact of critical theory and the emergence of artistic diversity among various ethnic, gender, and cultural groups.

LA440 AMERICAN ART

LA495 ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP Allows work in one genre—nonfiction, fiction, or poetry—or exploration of all three, including cross-disciplinary forms. Investigates traditional and experimental poetic, narrative, and essayistic forms and encourages longform works and artistic risks.

LA496 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE Critical study of recent fiction, emphasizing characteristic forms and themes. Gives attention to the short story, novel, and experimental prose forms.

A study of American art, with an emphasis on painting and sculpture from colonial times through the 1950s. Examines how the visual arts have helped to create a unique sense of American identity. Includes artists and movements such as the Hudson River School, the Ashcan School, and the New York School and issues such as the arts’ relationship to intellectual, social, and political developments such as the founding of the republic, the settlement of the continent, industrialization, cultural diversity, the Gilded Age, and European modernism.

Prepares students for the kinds of writing required of practicing designers. Students write letters, briefs, and proposals, and learn how to communicate effectively about projects with colleagues, clients, and the public.

LA488 COPYWRITING FOR NEW MEDIA

LA498 LITERARY STUDIES

Introduces the principles of copywriting for interactive media, teaching students how to create advertising ideas and write copy for videos, the web, CDs, DVDs, and the like.

LA490A WRITING FICTION

LA497 WRITING FOR DESIGN PROFESSIONALS

Intensive study of a literary figure, movement, genre, theme, or critical topic. Includes assigned secondary readings and critical papers.

LA499 CRITICISM OF LITERATURE AND ART

Focuses on the art of writing stories. Examines literary strategies, sentence structure, and the craft and technique that comprise the most accomplished stories.

Investigates the nature and purpose of literary criticism, as well as art criticism. Includes assigned secondary readings and papers.

LA490B WRITING POETRY

LAFA4791 HISTORY OF CERAMICS

Introduces the art of writing poetry, studying aspects of poetics while reading and responding to both contemporary and canonical poets.

LA491 SCREENWRITING Teaches the basic conventions of screenwriting. Includes peer critiques as well as formal and informal responses to classic and contemporary scripts in a variety of genres and styles.

LA492 COPYWRITING Emphasizes the verbal half of advertising. Focuses on creating and shaping the idea which underlies an ad or an ad campaign, and moves from that to the headline and body copy. Gives attention to techniques for generating advertising ideas.

LA493 ADVANCED COPYWRITING Extends and develops the principles taught in LA492.

Surveys world pottery and ceramic sculpture in their many forms from 30,000 years ago to the present. Considers a variety of aspects of the medium useful to the art or craft maker, the art historian, the collector, and the appreciator. Background in ceramics not required.

LAIL3310 INFOGRAPHICS Explore the origins and evolution of infographics. Discusses common design styles and popular layout formats; the proper way to organize visual data for a variety of delivery methods; how to source accurate and unbiased data; how to interpret datasets for clients from scientific communities; and how to read tables and plot results.

LAPH4341 ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHY Surveys the artists, literature, and ideas shaping the contemporary photographic arts. Contextualizes photographic art, aesthetics, and philosophies within the lens of critical, cultural, commercial, and social perspectives.


Liberal Arts Faculty CCAD’s faculty consists of more than 200 practicing artists, designers and scholars with broad teaching experience and appropriate degrees in art, design, and liberal arts. CCAD’s student-to-faculty ratio is 12:1. Full-time Liberal Arts faculty and their credentials are listed below; for biographical information on all faculty (full-time, part-time, adjunct, and emeritus), visit ccad.edu/programs-ofstudy/faculty-bios.

CESARE, CARLA Assistant Professor, History of Art & Design; BA

in International Business, Marymount College, 1988; Certificate in Arts Administration, New York University, 2000; MA in the History of Decorative Arts and Design, Parsons The New School for Design, 2007; PhD in Art History, University of Northumbria, 2012

FELTON, GEORGE Professor, English & Philosophy; BA in Psychology, DePauw University, 1970; MA in English, Ohio State University, 1976 FIX, CHARLENE Professor, English & Philosophy; BS in Education, Ohio State University, 1968; MA in English, Ohio State University, 1976

JENIKE, LESLEY Assistant Professor and Head of English & Philosophy;

BFA in Writing, Emerson College, 2000; MFA in Poetry and Drama, Ohio State University, 2003; PhD in Poetry and Drama, University of Cincinnati.

LANDSBERGEN, KIMBERLY Associate Professor and Director of

Liberal Arts; BS in Chemistry and Biology, University of Memphis, 1991; MS in Ecology, Duke University, 1994; PhD in Forest Ecology, University of Washington, 2000

LOSS, ROBERT Instructor, English & Philosophy; BA in English and Theatre, Ohio Wesleyan University, 1996; MFA in English (Creative Writing), Ohio State University, 2005 MANLEY, MICHAEL Associate Professor, English and Philosophy;

BA in Writing, Ohio State University, 1967; MA in Writing, Johns Hopkins University, 1975.

MITCHEM, MATTHEW Assistant Professor, English & Philosophy;

BA in Philosophy and Comparative Religion, Miami University, 2001; MA in Philosophy, Miami University, 2003; PhD in Philosophy, Europäische Universität für Interdisziplinäre Studien

POSEY, JULIE Associate Professor and Head of Sciences; BS in Biology,

Ohio State University, 1991; MS in Pharmacology, University of Toledo, 1994.

KARTSONIS, ARIANA-SOPHIA Associate Professor, English and

Philosophy and Graduate Studies; BFA in Literature and Poetry, University of Utah, 1994; MFA in English, University of Alabama, 2000; PhD in Literature and Poetry, University of Cincinnati, 2008.

KNOTTS, ROBERT Assistant Professor, History of Art and Design; BA in Theatre, Ohio State University, 1975; MA in Theatre, Ohio State University, 1977; PhD in Theatre, Ohio State University, 1982; PhD in Art History, Ohio State University, 1995 KRAFT, JEANNINE Assistant Professor and Head of Art & Design History;

BA in English, Ohio State University, 1993; MA in Art History, Ohio State University, 1996.

Liberal Arts CCAD

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Advertising & Graphic Design CHANGE MINDS WITH DESIGN It’s not just ads, it’s full-on visual communication—creating concepts that influence ideas and move people to take action. CCAD’s Advertising & Graphic Design program arms you with the skills to make work that attracts, communicates, and persuades. From typography and color palettes to of-the-moment technology and brand building, we expose you to the endless possibilities of today’s media-saturated world and to the potential for design to influence it. Internships, freelance work, professional organizations, and participation in projects with off-campus businesses add real-world experience to your coursework. CCAD graduates work as designers, creative directors, and webmasters at agencies worldwide, including TBWA/Chiat/Day, BBDO, and Resource Interactive. AD@ccad.edu ccad.edu/majors/ad-graph

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CCAD Advertising & Graphic Design


Course Requirements This chart reflects Fall 2013 requirements and is subject to change.

FOUNDATION YEAR REQUIREMENTS:

FOURTH-YEAR REQUIREMENTS:

AD1011 FS091X FS010X FS020X FS030X FS1057 FS1058 FS1139 FS1140 FS127 FS128 LA190 LA132–133

AD4016–4026 AD4256 AD4701

Introduction to Advertising & Graphic Design New Student Seminar Photoshop Fundamentals Illustrator Fundamentals InDesign Fundamentals Design: Projects and Strategies Design: Contemporary Practice Painting and Color Theory: Research and Practice Painting and Color Theory: Applied Concepts Drawing I: Fundamentals Drawing II: Figure and Anatomy Writing and the Arts Art, Design, and Culture I–II

SECOND-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: AD2013–2014 AD2056 AD2291–AD2301 IL2023 PH2012

Advertising & Graphic Design Concepts Typographic Communication Design Lab I & II Illustration for Graphic Designers Photography I

THIRD-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: AD3016–3026 AD3421 AD3631

Advertising & Graphic Design Concepts II Online Marketing for Business Web Design I

Advertising & Graphic Design Concepts III Brand & Market Development Advertising Portfolio and Professional Practice

RECOMMENDED ART/DESIGN ELECTIVES (3 COURSES REQUIRED): AD3134 AD4621 AN3336

Package Design Web Design II Motion Graphics

LIBERAL ARTS REQUIREMENTS: LA Advanced History of Art (1 course) LA Advanced Writing/Literature (1 course) LA Business Course LA Literature (1 course) LA Science (1 course) LA Social Sciences (2 courses) LA230 History of Design: 2D LA492 Copywriting LA293X Student Progress Assessment

LIBERAL ARTS ELECTIVES REQUIRED: 2 courses

Choose 1 course from: AD4212 Trends in Design AD4851 Internship

Advertising & Graphic Design CCAD

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Course Descriptions FS140 INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS Introduces fundamental visual communication concepts that enhance design skills and prepare freshmen for majors in Advertising & Graphic Design, Fashion Design, and Illustration. Students learn how to conduct design-related research, critically evaluate that research, and apply it to design projects with specific target audiences in mind.

AD101 INTRODUCTION TO ADVERTISING & GRAPHIC DESIGN Freshman preparation for Advertising & Graphic Design majors. Students gain experience with the design process: research, brainstorming, proposing multiple possible solutions, thumbnail and sketch creation, typography, copywriting, and final design production. Also introduces students to professional opportunities in the field of Advertising & Graphic Design.

AD2013, AD2014 ADVERTISING & GRAPHIC DESIGN CONCEPTS Group and individual design projects utilize multiple communication forms, including print, web, ambient, and social media. Students present their final projects in several formats, including verbal, visual, and electronic.

AD2056 ADVANCED TYPOGRAPHY Presents the study of the letterform as an element of design and explains its potential as a means of communication. Includes instruction on typography’s capacity to inform, emote, and visualize thought. Students are assigned increasingly complex design problems.

AD229 ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING TECHNIQUES I Introduces the digital tools used in graphic design. Students explore the creation and manipulation of pixel images and vector graphics using Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator and develop proficiency in executing concepts digitally. Requires basic 2D and computer skills taught in the foundation year in order to successfully complete projects.

AD230 ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING TECHNIQUES II Continues the exploration of the digital tools used in graphic design. Students learn how to effectively use Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign in conjunction with creating pixel images, vector graphics, and page layouts. Develops students’ skills in solving design problems with the best choice of software and prepares students to produce professional graphic images digitally for a variety of purposes.

AD3016, AD3026 ADVERTISING & GRAPHIC DESIGN CONCEPTS II Explores a broad spectrum of advertising and graphic design problems, including assignments directed toward work in print media, direct mail, corporate identity, brochures, multimedia, and self-promotion. Individual and group projects investigate design as a means of disseminating information to sell or gain acceptance of ideas. Builds on previous 2D design coursework and leads students to further advanced study.

AD313, AD314 PACKAGE DESIGN Explores the research, development, and design of creative receptacles for containing, transporting, protecting, dispensing, using, storing, explaining, and attracting attention to a product. Discusses new technology, 2D and 3D design, typography, color, form and structure, and advertising psychology. Critiques review progress in aesthetics, practicality, client relevance, and market competitiveness. Projects in this class are applicable to a variety of majors.

AD321, AD322 TRENDS IN DESIGN I Introduces the trends which propel design culture, demography, psychographics, marketing, current events, technological advances, behaviors, entertainment, and more. Projects ask students to develop solutions that research, follow, and set trends. Requires basic 2D, drawing, computer, and writing skills to effectively communicate concepts. Course material is relevant for all design areas.

AD323 TRENDS IN DESIGN WORKSHOP Develops awareness of the trends which push design, culture, marketing, technological advances, and entertainment. Research emphasizes an anticipatory investigation of events and developments which influence design. Stresses strategies and specific problem analysis. Students develop design concepts that reflect cutting-edge trends in color, form, materials, subject, voice, and emotion.

AD3421 ONLINE MARKETING FOR BUSINESS Focuses on the fundamentals of online marketing for small- to medium-sized businesses, with a focus on a practical and functional introduction to increasing market share by creating stronger relationships with clients and customers. No advanced HTML experience is required, but interface design specific to each medium will be addressed.

AD346 ILLUSTRATOR GRAPHICS Introduces Adobe Illustrator, which creates object-oriented vector graphics. Focuses on the tools and techniques needed to use Illustrator effectively in graphic design and illustration. Requires use of skills learned in foundationlevel work and assists students in all majors to produce clean images for use in portfolios, 2D designs, and fine art pieces.


AD347 PAGE DESIGN (ADOBE INDESIGN)

AD425, AD426 ART DIRECTION

Explores the techniques required to effectively produce professional page layouts using InDesign. Students create a variety of projects, including advertisements, brochures, posters, newsletters, and catalogs. Requires basic computer and 2D design skills. Techniques and skills from this class can be used in projects for all majors.

Projects require research and the development of unique yet practical solutions incorporating marketing, budget, and client concerns along with design considerations. Taught by a team of graphic design professionals who each assign and review a current design project offering extensive critiques. Uses skills students have accumulated in previous graphic design courses and prepares students for a professional environment.

AD348 PHOTOSHOP IMAGING Introduces Adobe Photoshop, a software used for manipulation and enhancement of pixel-based graphics. Focuses on the development of images for print, multimedia, and the Internet. Requires basic computer and 2D design skills. Techniques and skills from this class can be used in projects for all majors.

AD3631 WEB DESIGN I Introduces the world of online communications through commercial services and Internet resources. Students learn the foundations of building web pages and exploring tools and techniques to create their own basic site using Dreamweaver. Requires basic computer and 2D design skills. Techniques and skills from this class can be used in projects for all majors.

AD4001 B2B BRAND & PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT Provides the opportunity to work with InPower LLC and the CCAD Mind Market to develop new branding and identity, product concepts, and collateral for B2B and trade shows. A cross-disciplinary studio of Industrial Designers, Graphic Designers, Advertising Designers and Cinematic Artists.

AD4016, AD4026 ADVERTISING & GRAPHIC DESIGN CONCEPTS III Presents advanced advertising and graphic design problems which emphasize client- and market-specific solutions. A corporate identity project asks students to research a company, analyze its needs, and update its graphic image, from logo design through varied print and media applications. Uses the skills learned in previous design studio courses and merges them, preparing students for the professional world.

AD460 ELECTRONIC PREPRESS PRODUCTION Explores the electronic prepress process, including creating artwork, preparing files, using a service bureau, and sending completed files to the printing press for reproduction. Requires basic computer and 2D design skills. Prepares students for producing quality physical results of their 2D design projects and for working in industry.

AD4621 WEB DESIGN II Focuses in depth on the design and construction of web pages, including design strategies, tools, techniques, and emerging technologies. Advanced site-building projects develop students’ abilities to organize and present information and graphics on a global scale. Skills from this class are integral to any student interested in professional work in web design.

AD470, AD471 ADVERTISING PORTFOLIO AND PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE Provides direction in the preparation and organization of a successful professional portfolio. Students work individually with instructors to develop strategies for showcasing their talents, focusing on specific directions and self-promotional ideas. Uses projects completed in other courses and builds toward high-quality portfolios and presentation skills.

AD485 INTERNSHIP Provides apprentice-like experience with professional partners.

AD413, AD414 ADVANCED PACKAGE DESIGN Continues study of packaging with emphasis on investigating new market needs and consumer lifestyle issues. Includes production techniques, budgets, and materials. Corporate sponsor involvement creates a realistic atmosphere for projects. Incorporates product lines, copywriting, and social service advertising into assignments. Stresses portfolio preparation.

AD421, AD422 TRENDS IN DESIGN II Explores design culture, psychographics, marketing, current events, technological advances, behaviors, entertainment, sports, lifestyle, and more. Projects require students to develop solutions with research, and learn how to follow and set trends. Outside professionals assign projects and give guidance. Course material is relevant for all design areas.

Advertising & Graphic Design CCAD

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Ad/Graph Faculty CCAD’s faculty consists of more than 200 practicing artists, designers and scholars with broad teaching experience and appropriate degrees in art, design, and liberal arts. CCAD’s student-to-faculty ratio is 12:1. Full-time Advertising & Graphic Design faculty and their credentials are listed below; for biographical information on all faculty (full-time, part-time, adjunct, and emeritus), visit ccad.edu/programs-of-study/faculty-bios.

BENNETT, DAVID Associate Professor, Advertising & Graphic Design; BS in Industrial Design, Ohio State University, 1986; MS in Graphic Arts, Rochester Institute of Technology, 1999

BURLEIGH, MARK Assistant Professor, Advertising & Graphic Design; BFA in Advertising Design, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1981

DEVORE, KELLYAdvertising & Graphic Design and Interior Design;

Bachelor of Architecture, Iowa State University, 2006; MFA in Design Research and Development, Ohio State University, 2012

GOLDEN, VICTORIA Assistant Professor, Electronic Publishing; BFA in Visual Communications, Columbus College of Art & Design LUTZ, JAMES Associate Professor, Chair, Advertising & Graphic Design; BFA in Advertising Design, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1978; MS in Marketing and Communication, Franklin University, 2010

MOHR, MATTHEW Assistant Professor, Advertising & Graphic Design; BFA

in Graphic Design, Bowling Green State University, 1990; MFA in Design & Technology, Parsons The New School for Design, 2003


Advertising & Graphic Design CCAD

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Animation

TELL YOUR STORY. EVERYWHERE. From wide-release feature and independent short films to the exploding markets for computer gaming, advertising, online media, and television: Animation is an industry in motion and we’re right there with it. CCAD’s curriculum starts with a strong foundation in drawing and design, then builds your skills in storytelling, visual development, storyboarding, and animatics. Using industry-standard software and hardware, you’ll become fluent in 2D and 3D animation, hand-drawn and digital. But it’s not just technical skills: you’ll also learn how to market yourself and build a fan base. The Animation program uses its strong industry contacts to provide professional development and networking opportunities, including participation in the local International Game Developers’ Association chapter, recruiter visits to campus, an extensive alumni network, and Animation on Location, a two-week course in Los Angeles that plugs you into CCAD’s professional network for the first week, then immerses you in the annual SIGGRAPH convention for the second. AN@ccad.edu ccad.edu/majors/animation

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CCAD Animation


Course Requirements This chart reflects Fall 2013 requirements and is subject to change.

FOUNDATION YEAR REQUIREMENTS: FS091X New Student Seminar FS010X Photoshop Fundamentals FS020X Illustrator Fundamentals FS030X InDesign Fundamentals FS1057 Design: Projects and Strategies FS1058 Design: Contemporary Practice FS1139 Painting and Color Theory: Research and Practice FS1140 Painting and Color Theory: Applied Concepts FS127 Drawing I: Fundamentals FS128 Drawing II: Figure and Anatomy LA190 Writing and the Arts LA132–133 Art, Design, and Culture I–II

SECOND-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: AN CA2011 CA2311 CA2312 FA PH2012

Animation (2 courses) Design for Media Visual Narrative & Storyboard Video I Drawing (1 course) Photography I

THIRD-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: AN3071 AN372X CA3134

Media Arts Seminar Student Progress Assessment Interactive Design I

FOURTH-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: AN4712 CA4171

Media Arts Portfolio Collaborative Projects

OVER THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS, CHOOSE 5 COURSES FROM: AN2356/3356/ 4356/4456 AN3151 AN3334/4334/4434 AN3336 AN3346 AN3366 AN3376 AN4362/4363 CA2391 CA3001

Computer Animation I–IV Café Sketch for Animators Animation II–IV Motion Graphics Advanced Motion Graphics Character Design Layout and Timing Computer Game Development I–II Sound Design Acting and Movement

ART/DESIGN ELECTIVES REQUIRED: 4 courses (or 3 studio/art courses and 1 art history course)

LIBERAL ARTS REQUIREMENTS: LA LA LA LA LA LA250 LA320/329 LA351/354 LA293X

Advanced History of Art (1 course) Advanced Writing/Literature (2 courses) Literature (1 course) Science (1 course) Social Sciences (2 courses) Introduction to Philosophy History of Cinema or History of Documentary Cinema (1 course) Philosophy of Visual Art or Philosophy of Media (1 course) Student Progress Assessment

LIBERAL ARTS ELECTIVES REQUIRED: 1 course

Animation CCAD

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Course Descriptions AN2334 ANIMATION I

AN3334 ANIMATION II

Through short, hands-on exercises, provides a basic overview of principles and processes involved in planning and creating animation. Covers testing and production tools, as well as the value of the iterative process of working from simple tests to refined animation with numerous revisions in between. Provides perspective on the historical development of animation, as well as factors involved in its continuing evolution. Presents an internationally diverse range of animation techniques applied both commercially and as a personal form of expression.

Focuses on drawing for animation, storytelling, storyboard and animatic development and refinement, use of sound, and the relationship between gestures and speech. Expands on the principles taught in Animation I. The important relationship of layout and camera motion to story learned in Time-Based Media Design is reinforced through the introduction to digital animation camera techniques. Character design and model sheet design are also introduced.

AN2356 COMPUTER ANIMATION I: INTRO

Introduces the study of moving graphic design. Using Adobe After Effects, students will learn techniques for combining still images, video, animation, and graphics into short dynamic compositions.

Teaches basic components and principles of 3D computer animation design and production through a combination of lecture, demonstration, and hands-on exercises, culminating in production of a short piece of 3D computer animation. Principles covered include directory and scene organization, 3D modeling and manipulating techniques, object attributes, mapping techniques, lighting, shape animation, positional animation, camera animation, incorporation of 2D imagery, and input and output methods and devices. Stresses the relevance of concepts learned in Time-Based Media Design and Animation I to the design and production of computer animation (storyboarding, incorporating solid animation principles, and using an iterative production process). Provides perspective on the historical development of computer animation, as well as factors involved in its continuing evolution. Presents a diverse range of computer animation techniques applied in a wide range of commercial applications as well as in personal expression, to allow understanding of the commercial and aesthetic implications of those techniques.

AN3071 MEDIA ARTS SEMINAR

AN3336 MOTION GRAPHICS

AN3337 ANIMATION ON LOCATION This course will take place in Los Angeles. Provides students the opportunity to visit multiple animation production facilities and film and animation graduate programs in the Los Angeles area and have their work critiqued by working professionals. Students will meet and interact with working professionals, developers, scientists, technicians, educators, and students from all parts of the globe at the SIGGRAPH conference.

AN3346 ADVANCED MOTION GRAPHICS Advanced post-production techniques, with special emphasis on moving graphic design. Some special effects techniques will be introduced. Production of larger individual and group projects is required.

Presents issues of contemporary imaging and new media for discussion. Particular attention is paid to current ideas in visual grammar and literacy.

AN3356 COMPUTER ANIMATION II: LIGHTING AND MODELING

AN3151 CAFÉ SKETCH FOR ANIMATION

Explores in greater depth the concepts and practices learned in Computer Animation I, Time-Based Media Design, and Animation I through the development of a larger project. Focuses on story and animatic development, the relationship of sound to story, and model, attribute, and lighting development based on designed motion.

Multi-location sketching course focusing on the development of observational drawing for animation. Emphasis is placed on the production of quick, storydriven character and environment sketching. Students will blog their progress on a weekly schedule and produce a compilation portfolio book at the end of the semester.

AN3171 EXPERIMENTAL ANIMATION Presents an experimental approach to the computer as an art medium through the creation of animation. Projects include adaptations of various techniques which originated in film animation, including cut-out, collage, silhouette, and kineastasis, as well as an emphasis on the innovative use of available software tools so that they become part of the artistic process. Through presentations, discussions, and readings, students will become familiar with the pioneering work done by independent artists in the animation medium.

AN3366 CHARACTER DESIGN Through lectures, demonstrations, screened work, exercises, and critiques, presents a practical, in-depth approach to the design of characters for use in both traditional and computer animation. Covers all aspects of consideration for character design, as well as design methods.

AN3376 LAYOUT AND TIMING Presents a practical, in-depth approach to the development of effective layout design and timing for use in both traditional and computer animation. Covers all aspects of consideration for layout design, as well as design methods. Includes lectures, demonstrations, screened samples, exercises, and critiques.


Animation Faculty Takes the refined animatic and model sheets developed in Animation II and focuses on animation development, pencil testing, refinement, and “look” or treatment testing. Students begin the process of integrating the pieces through techniques and methods learned in other time-based courses, and expand their use of digital animation camera, effects, and composition techniques.

CCAD’s Animation faculty consists of more than 200 practicing artists, designers and scholars with broad teaching experience and appropriate degrees in art, design, and liberal arts. CCAD’s student-to-faculty ratio is 12:1. Full-time Animation faculty and their credentials are listed below; for biographical information on all faculty (full-time, part-time, adjunct, and emeritus), visit ccad.edu/programs-of-study/faculty-bios.

AN4356 COMPUTER ANIMATION III: MOVEMENT

BELLAND, CHARLOTTE Associate Professor, Animation and

AN4334 ANIMATION III

Continues the in-depth learning process using the project begun in Computer Animation II. Focuses on animating the models, attributes, lights, and environments created in Computer Animation II, and animating cameras based on the revised storyboard. Reinforces the relationships of sound to motion and motion to motivation.

AN4362 COMPUTER GAME DEVELOPMENT I Hands-on introduction to computer game design stressing concept development, storyboarding, flowcharts, character, and environmental design. Covers element construction, design docs, bibles, and issues such as polygon count, palette compression, testing, and optimization. Some programming will be introduced.

AN4363 COMPUTER GAME DEVELOPMENT II

Graduate Studies, Chair, Animation; BFA in Media Studies, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1997; MFA in Media Studies, Ohio State University, 2000

FRIZ, ANDREW Instructor, Animation; BA in Fine Arts, Minor in Art History, Indiana University, 1992

RICHNER, THOMAS Associate Professor, Animation; BFA in Art, Dennison University, 1997; MFA in Animation, UCLA, 2001

ROBBINS, TRACY Associate Professor, Animation; BFA in Painting, Art Academy of Cincinnati, 1990; MFA in Electronic Arts, University of Cincinnati, 1993

Continued in-depth presentation of practical issues of computer game development and production. Completes the production of games begun in Computer Game Development I. Areas of emphasis include flow charts, design docs and bibles, character animation, overall art direction, 3D modeling, character rigging and animation, FX, textures and shaders, documentation, and graphics user interfaces (GUIs).

AN4434 ANIMATION IV Takes the refined, pencil-tested animation further. Using decisions made from “look” tests and full integration of compositing and editing techniques learned in other time-based courses, students complete their animated piece at a quality and format suitable for distribution and inclusion in their portfolio.

AN4456 COMPUTER ANIMATION IV Completes the in-depth learning process. Focuses on finishing the animated project by incorporating digital batch-render processes, compositing techniques (some new and some integrated from other advanced time-based courses). Finished pieces output at a quality and format suitable for inclusion in the student portfolio.

AN451 ANIMATION INDEPENDENT STUDY AN4712 MEDIA ARTS PORTFOLIO Focuses on the production of quality reels and photographic portfolios, with an emphasis on personal career development, self-promotion, and packaging.

AN485 ANIMATION INTERNSHIP Provides apprentice-like experience with professional partners.

AN499 ANIMATION OFF-CAMPUS STUDY

Animation CCAD

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Cinematic Arts

MOTION. PICTURES. If you envision yourself in the film and video industry, whether it’s putting your name in movie credits as a director, cinematographer, or sound designer or producing cutting-edge commercials, broadcast graphics, and music videos: the Cinematic Arts major can be your path to innovative and technology-savvy careers in both the commercial and fine art realms. Whether in the studio, on location, or working with the latest technology to put it all together for the screen, the curriculum immerses you in both the tools and the environments to combine killer concepts, solid design, and awesome technical skills into a film production that’s a great mix. Along the way, you’ll develop a demo reel and portfolio that show your skills as a versatile cinematic artist who can adjust to today’s changing technological and cultural landscape—and it all culminates with showing your final project at the senior show on the big screen. CCAD graduates hold diverse positions in companies such as Pixar, Dreamworks, Spacejunk Media, Leftchannel, Microsoft, and Newsweek. CA@ccad.edu ccad.edu/majors/cinematic-arts

30 CCAD Cinematic Arts


Course Requirements This chart reflects Fall 2013 requirements and is subject to change.

FOUNDATION YEAR REQUIREMENTS:

FOURTH-YEAR REQUIREMENTS:

FS091X FS010X FS020X FS030X FS1057 FS1058 FS1139 FS1140 FS127 FS128 LA190 LA132–133

CA4171 CA4712

New Student Seminar Photoshop Fundamentals Illustrator Fundamentals InDesign Fundamentals Design: Projects and Strategies Design: Contemporary Practice Painting and Color Theory: Research and Practice Painting and Color Theory: Applied Concepts Drawing I: Drawing Fundamentals Drawing II: Figure and Anatomy Writing and the Arts Art, Design, and Culture I–II

SECOND-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: CA2011 CA2311 CA2312 CA3213 CA3312 CA3444 AN2334/2356/3171 PH2012

Design for Media Visual Narrative and Storyboard Video I Documentary Video Video II Digital Cinema Animation I, Computer Animation I, or Experimental Animation (1 course) Basic Photography I

THIRD-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: CA3071 Media Arts Seminar CA3134 Interactive Design I CA372X Student Progress Assessment 4 courses of advanced media arts

Collaborative Projects Media Arts Portfolio

ART/DESIGN ELECTIVES REQUIRED: 4 courses (may use 1 course of liberal arts as part of this total)

LIBERAL ARTS REQUIREMENTS: LA Advanced History of Art (1 course) LA Advanced Writing/Literature (2 courses) LA Science (1 course) LA Social Sciences (1 course) LA Science Elective (1 course, Physical or Social Sciences) LA202/204 Intro to Literature or Intro to Professional Writing (1 course) LA250 Introduction to Philosophy LA351/354 Philosophy of Visual Art or Philosophy of Media (1 course) LA293X Student Progress Assessment Choose 1 course from: LA320 History of Cinema LA329 History of Documentary Cinema LA337 History of Photography LAPH4341 Issues in Contemporary Photography

LIBERAL ARTS ELECTIVES REQUIRED: 1 course

Cinematic Arts CCAD

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Course Descriptions CA2011 DESIGN FOR MEDIA Reinforces and expands design and color issues from the foundation studies curriculum with special attention to how these issues apply to contemporary film, animation, photography, and interactive media. Introduces specific time-based design issues such as transition, sound, rhythm, and movement.

CA3071 MEDIA ARTS SEMINAR Presents issues of contemporary imaging and new media for discussion, with particular attention to current ideas in visual grammar and literacy.

CA3134 INTERACTIVE DESIGN I

Through lecture, sample material, demonstrations, and hands-on exercises, presents basic principles of time-oriented visual dynamics. Extends a 2D design foundation to all cases where images are ordered over a finite time, starting with a 15-to-30-second timeframe and expanding to two to four minutes. Written paper, assigned projects, classroom participation, and final exam required.

Introduces the principles of visual interaction design and the creation of motion-based websites. Projects emphasize the creation of motion sequences, interactive principles, and engaging the viewer in the work. Use of image, FTP, and web creation software focuses on extending work from students’ area of emphasis (Illustration, Fine Arts, Advertising & Graphic Design, Fashion Design, Industrial Design, Interior Design, Photography, Animation, or Cinematic Arts).

CA2312 VIDEO I

CA3213 DOCUMENTARY VIDEO

CA2311 VISUAL NARRATIVE AND STORYBOARD

Introduces video and time-based media production and aesthetics. Includes screenings of video works, in-class demonstrations of equipment and techniques, assignments, and discussions of time-based media concerns in the creation of images and sound tracks for video and other media. Using digital video equipment and nonlinear editing, class members produce works that pursue fine art, design, documentary, and experimental directions.

Explores the theory and practice of documentary video production through a series of short projects. This is a production course that includes some screenings and readings.

CA3312 VIDEO II

Presents video and media as a fine art form used to creatively explore and express one’s perceptions. Starting with historical directions in experimental film, video, theater, sound, and other concrete and conceptual art forms, students explore and create works based on historical legacy and new directions. Focuses on alternative and nonconventional concerns. Evolving curriculum shapes course structures and in time will include all possible forms and presentations.

Building on the foundation of its prerequisite class Video I, Video II continues to use digital video tools to produce fine art and design video works. Presentation of video works, readings, discussions, quizzes, and critiques focus on aesthetic and theoretical aspects of video and art. Assignments deal with documentary, interview, camera work and design, installationperformance, experimental video, and “open” projects. An important part of the class is the creation of a class-video project to demonstrate the basics of advance planning, scripting, shooting, direction, editing, and needed equipment for larger “crew shooting” on location and in studio projection.

CA239 SOUND DESIGN

CA3444 DIGITAL CINEMA

CA2313 EXPERIMENTAL VIDEO

Promotes understanding of the aesthetics of sound as it corresponds with various aspects of the human experience. Presents basic principles of digital recording and the creation of new sounds.

CA3000 MEDIA INSTALLATION Investigates the practical and theoretical applications of installation and performance art. Explores different forms of presentation used in media installation, such as computers, video, and interactive technology, along with more traditional art forms. Students create installations or performances as a final project.

CA3001 ACTING AND MOVEMENT Introduces dramatic methodology and movement analysis to allow a better understanding of physical dramatic communication and movement required in time-based art. Includes participation in dramatic exercises and movement analysis.

Using HD cameras, this course allows students to produce advanced cinematic group projects using motion-picture crewing techniques. Students will take on production responsibilities such as director, camera person, script writer, art director, sound designer, editor, actor, and other roles in the creation of preliminary narrative works. Shooting format is high-definition video using 24p (progressive) and other digital cinema modes.

CA4134 INTERACTIVE DESIGN II Explores interactive design oriented toward works for the web. Discussions center on the critical issues surrounding interdisciplinary computer-based interactivity. Assignments and projects focus on individual production of web and interactive CD works using Flash, Dreamweaver, and Director.


Cinematic Arts Faculty CA4171 ADVANCED TIME-BASED PROJECTS This senior project course provides students the ability to produce larger bodies of work within a critical structure provided by faculty and fellow students.

CA4312 VIDEO III

CCAD’s faculty consists of more than 200 practicing artists, designers and scholars with broad teaching experience and appropriate degrees in art, design, and liberal arts. CCAD’s student-to-faculty ratio is 12:1. Full-time Cinematic Arts faculty and their credentials are listed below; for biographical information on all faculty (full-time, part-time, adjunct, and emeritus), visit ccad.edu/programs-of-study/faculty-bios.

Focuses on the conception, production, and presentation of complete video works by students who have taken all prerequisite video and other media classes. Students are expected to create three to four videos using tools and skills from previous experience. In-class presentations and critiques play a strong role as class members develop, produce, and screen their works during various stages of creation. Works can include documentary, narrative, commercial-design, experimental, and other personal directions.

GARRETT, PHILIP Instructor, Cinematic Arts; Bachelor of Business Administration, Ohio University, 1992; Continuing Education in Film and Television Production, Screenwriting, Film, and Media Studies, De Anza College, 1998–2000; MFA in Theatre, Ohio State University, anticipated 2012

CA4712 MEDIA STUDIES PORTFOLIO

Studies, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1998; MFA in Computer Art, Florida Atlantic University, 2000

Focuses on the production of quality reels and photographic portfolios. Emphasizes personal career development, self-promotion, and packaging.

HOMAN, ERIC Assistant Professor, Cinematic Arts; BFA in Media

PETROCHUK, KONSTANTIN (KON) Professor, Cinematic Arts and Graduate Studies; BFA in Media Studies, Kent State University, 1972; MA in Filmmaking, Kent State University, 1975; MFA in Conceptual Design, San Francisco State University Graduate School of Art, 1988 SAKS, RONALD Dean, School of Design Arts,

Professor and Acting Chair, Cinematic Arts; BA in Electronic Arts, UCLA, 1971; MFA in Animation, UCLA, 1977

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Fashion Design

CLASSIC? EDGY? VINTAGE MOD? Fashion Design emphasizes both design and technical skills with a curriculum that leads students through all aspects of garment design and construction: whether their vision is more traditional and functional or untried and edgy. And to figure out their place in the global retail culture, students gain experience in merchandising methods and the psychology of trends and marketing. The program culminates with each senior designing and producing a personal collection that then may be juried into the annual senior fashion show. Presented on a professional runway, this show is one of CCAD’s most popular events both for the public and for professionals in the fashion industry. Many of our graduates are independent designers; others work for wellknown brands such as Limited Brands, Abercrombie & Fitch, Ann Taylor, Tommy Hilfiger, Nautica, and Pepe Jeans of London, as well as many smaller companies. FD@ccad.edu ccad.edu/majors/fashion

36 CCAD Fashion Design


Course Requirements This chart reflects Fall 2013 requirements and is subject to change.

FOUNDATION YEAR REQUIREMENTS: FD1001 FS091X FS010X FS020X FS030X FS1057 FS1058 FS1139 FS1140 FS127 FS128 LA190 LA132–133

Introduction to Fashion Design New Student Seminar Photoshop Fundamentals Illustrator Fundamentals InDesign Fundamentals Design: Projects and Strategies Design: Contemporary Practice Painting and Color Theory: Research and Practice Painting and Color Theory: Applied Concepts Drawing I: Drawing Fundamentals Drawing II: Figure and Anatomy Writing and the Arts Art, Design, and Culture I–II

SECOND-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: FD2034 FD2230 FD2251 FD2534 FD2556 FD275X AD2291

Fashion Illustration I Computer Aided Fashion Design Intro to Fashion Textiles Beginning Pattern Drafting Construction Techniques Student Progress Assessment Design Lab I

THIRD-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: FD3013 Surface Design FD3015 Fashion Illustration II FD3016 Tailoring FD3534 Advanced Pattern Drafting FD3601 Fashion Design Computer Technologies ID3301 Presentation Techniques

Choose 1 course from the following: FD3551 Specialty Construction FD4851 Fashion Internship

FOURTH-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: FD4011–4021 FD4745 FD4746

Collection I & II FD Professional Practice FD Portfolio

RECOMMENDED ART/DESIGN ELECTIVES (2 COURSES REQUIRED): FD4359 Advanced Surface Design AD2301 Design Lab II AD3631 Web Design I FA2112 Watercolor

LIBERAL ARTS REQUIREMENTS: LA Business Course LA Literature (1 course) LA Science or Social Sciences (1 course) LA204 Intro to Professional Writing LA231 History of Design: 3D LA250 Intro to Philosophy LA260 Elements of Quantitative Literacy LA264 Being Human, Form, Function LA434 History of 20th Century Fashion LA293X Student Progress Assessment

LIBERAL ARTS ELECTIVES REQUIRED: 1 course

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Course Descriptions FD101 INTRODUCTION TO FASHION DESIGN Freshman preparation for Fashion Design majors. Students begin to investigate the skills needed for a career in the fashion design industry, including proper use of the industrial sewing machine, professional sewing techniques, and drawing the elongated fashion figure using various mediums and techniques. Basic design and layout skills will be worked into the finished illustration projects.

FD203, FD204 FASHION ILLUSTRATION Develops drawing skills through sketching garments and accessories for stylistic purposes in advertising. Emphasizes exaggeration and drawing practice in the portrayal of a fashionable figure to show design and detail in an appealing way. Students use a variety of drawing media, and projects are evaluated in critiques. Prepares students to develop concept sketching skills in accordance with industry standards.

FD3011, FD3012 FASHION DESIGN ILLUSTRATION/ LAYOUT Continues to explore the communication of fashion designs through drawing. Students refine illustration styles and techniques by drawing designs for a wide variety of consumers. Includes drawing from live models, illustrating original designs, and researching current fashion design outside of class. Builds on sophomore-level fashion coursework and prepares students for illustrating their final senior collection.

FD305 FASHION DESIGN ILLUSTRATION: MALE/CHILD

FD225 TEXTILES FOR FASHION DESIGNERS

Introduces basic knowledge of rendering male and children’s anatomy, with an emphasis on drawing heads, hair, hands, feet, and shoes. Explores basic knowledge of anatomical development as it occurs at different stages of growth and how to relate this information to the child fashion figure. Uses various media and techniques appropriate to rendering both men and children and their garments.

Introduces students to types of textiles and the textile industry. Includes instruction on the physical and psychological aspects of textiles and how they are incorporated into products. Assignments include written and studio work. Builds upon 2D and 3D design foundation coursework and prepares students to make educated choices for fabrics in their design projects.

Teaches silk-screening techniques used in the fashion industry, including placing motifs on pre-made garments and creating continuous yardage. Emphasizes dye lab safety and proper use of equipment.

FD229, FD230 ELECTRONIC ILLUSTRATION TECHNIQUES

FD325 MILLINERY HAT DESIGN

Introduces the computer as a tool in illustration. Includes instruction in both vector graphic and pixel software, as well as a variety of input and output methods. Assignments use software such as Illustrator, Painter, and Photoshop.

FD2534 PATTERN Students work from a series of measurements to create body-specific patterns which become the basis for all garments for that body. Covers the basic principles and builds the skills necessary to eventually design any kind of garment. Also explores the operation of the factory and the garment industry. Builds on foundation coursework and prepares students to make garments of their own design.

FD2556 CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES Presents basic garment construction techniques for both custom and industry use. Introduces a variety of sewing machines and requires sample notebooks of most construction and finishing methods. Examines the properties of and appropriate uses for common fabrics and sewing techniques. Students construct one garment during the semester and develop the skills necessary to determine solutions for design problems.

FD2589 SURFACE DESIGN Students experiment with a number of design principles and various techniques for putting color and patterns on fabric. Opportunities to work with a variety of dyes and learn their properties and limitations. Explores techniques for industry and for the studio artist. The surface design methods discussed are ultimately suitable for garment and interior fabrics, linens, theatre and dance costume designs, and art objects.

FD309 SILK-SCREENING FOR FASHION DESIGN

Students explore a variety of hatmaking skills in the process of making their own hats.

FD340 FASHION DESIGN: DRAPING Explains the art and mechanics of draping fabric on a dress form to produce desired designs. Students learn to drape and cut to produce pattern pieces for construction. Covers both bias and straight-of-the-grain techniques. Students complete projects in muslin, knit, and a soft woven fabric. Requires knowledge of construction techniques and basic pattern making in order to execute more advanced designs.

FD3534 FASHION DESIGN: ADVANCED PATTERN Explores styles of clothing, techniques, and design principles, allowing students to design and create various styles of clothing for men, women, or children. Original patterns evolve from measurements and basic body-duplicating patterns produced in earlier courses. Provides principles applicable to both industry and mass production, as well as for home use or studio artists.

FD355 FASHION DESIGN: SPECIALTY CONSTRUCTION Presents special construction techniques required for sophisticated fabrics, such as knits, metallics, leathers, sequins, lace, furs, beads, and down. Students complete samples of garments in each category. Students also study synthetic fibers and fabrics. Requires mastery of basic construction techniques in order to produce items using these fabrics.


Fashion Design Faculty FD356 FASHION DESIGN: TAILORING Covers the specialized methods used in the tailoring of fine suits and garments for custom and industrial purposes. Includes the use of advanced techniques such as linings, underlinings, pad-stitching, and felt undercollars. Each student constructs one tailored garment. Incorporates extensive coverage of interfacings and fabrics and develops students’ construction skills for future projects.

FD360 FASHION COMPUTER TECHNOLOGIES Covers two computer software systems that are essential for today’s fashion professional: Gerber Web PDM, a software program that is used for the production of garments, and the Lectra CAD system, which is used to design prints. Students will create a finished technical design and a finished print design.

FD361 RETAIL CONCEPTS Explore the retail fashion industry. Students gain knowledge of the retail industry through weekly lectures and field trips that explore subjects such as store branding, visual merchandising, and store concept work. Students will create their own brand and design a store concept book.

CCCAD’s faculty consists of more than 200 practicing artists, designers and scholars with broad teaching experience and appropriate degrees in art, design, and liberal arts. CCAD’s student-to-faculty ratio is 12:1. Full-time Fashion Design faculty and their credentials are listed below; for biographical information on all faculty (full-time, part-time, adjunct, and emeritus), visit ccad.edu/programs-of-study/faculty-bios.

COTTON, SUZANNE Assistant Professor, Chair, Fashion Design; BFA in Fashion Design, Parsons School of Design, 1990; MS in Marketing and Communication, Franklin University, 2011

ROBINSON, REBECCA Instructor, Fashion Design; BS in Family and

Consumer Science Education, Ohio State University, 1987; CE Certificate in Family and Consumer Science Education, Miami University, Ohio, 1999; MD in Product Development with a concentration in Fashion Design, University of Cincinnati, 2003

FD401, FD402 FASHION DESIGN: COLLECTION Students design and make an original seven-garment collection of clothing to be presented at a fashion show at the end of the second semester. Requires conceptualization of a coherent clothing line, selection of models, and custom fitting garments. Work from this course is appropriate for submission in students’ professional portfolios.

FD440 FASHION DESIGN: ADVANCED DRAPING Expands draping skills through several garment projects. Skills acquired in Draping I enable students to focus on greater challenges and designing both traditional garments and abstract designs. Students design and drape from a defined “item” shape such as a parachute, umbrella top, etc. Discusses additional skills such as twists, various cowls, jackets, and pants, with the focus on hands-on draping and design.

FD474, FD475 FASHION DESIGN: PORTFOLIO Students produce artwork to comprise a portfolio appropriate for submission to prospective employers in the fashion design and fashion illustration fields. Discusses current trends, presentation, and interview techniques. Requires completed projects from previous coursework and the illustration and layout skills from earlier fashion illustration classes.

FD485 FASHION DESIGN INTERNSHIP Provides apprentice-like experience with professional partners.

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Fine Arts

TRANSFORM TALENT INTO A UNIQUE CREATIVE VOICE. The Fine Arts major provides the conceptual, technical, and practical skills required for success as a fine artist. It begins with a broad-based sophomore year during which students expand their aesthetic awareness and essential material skills in two-dimensional and three-dimensional applications. A series of seminar classes on contemporary art criticism, art theory, and professional studio practice combines with classes in philosophy, psychology, and art history. As a whole, the curriculum supports a continuum from assigned projects to the creation of more individual and self-expressive objects and images in the junior and senior years: culminating with an individual student thesis show in a gallery setting. FA@ccad.edu ccad.edu/majors/fine-arts

42 CCAD Fine Arts


Course Requirements This chart reflects Fall 2013 requirements and is subject to change.

FOUNDATION YEAR REQUIREMENTS:

THIRD-YEAR REQUIREMENTS:

FS091X FS010X FS020X FS030X FS1057 FS1058 FS1139 FS1140 FS127 FS128 LA190 LA132–133

FA377X

New Student Seminar Photoshop Fundamentals Illustrator Fundamentals InDesign Fundamentals Design: Projects and Strategies Design: Contemporary Practice Painting and Color Theory: Research and Practice Painting and Color Theory: Applied Concepts Drawing I: Drawing Fundamentals Drawing II: Figure and Anatomy Writing and the Arts Art, Design, and Culture I–II

SECOND-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: FA Drawing (1 course) FA Painting (1 course) FA2056 Sculpture FA2212 Printmaking (1 course) FA277X Student Progress Assessment AN/CA/PH Media Arts (1 course) Choose 1 course from: FA2095 Jewelry FA2256 Ceramics I FA2312 Glassblowing

Student Progress Assessment

Choose 3 courses of intermediate classes from: Ceramics, Drawing, Glassblowing, Jewelry, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture

FOURTH-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: FA470–471

Senior Fine Arts Project I & II

Choose 3 courses of advanced classes from: Ceramics, Drawing, Glassblowing, Jewelry, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture

ART/DESIGN ELECTIVES REQUIRED: 6 courses

LIBERAL ARTS REQUIREMENTS: LA LA LA LA LA LA201/439 LA250 LA351 LA293X

Advanced Writing/Literature (1 course) Advanced Art History (1 course) Literature (2 courses) Science (1 course) Social Sciences (1 course) Crit Issues in Contemp Art or Contemporary Art (1 course) Introduction to Philosophy Philosophy of Visual Art Student Progress Assessment

LIBERAL ARTS ELECTIVES REQUIRED: 2 courses

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Course Descriptions FA2012 FIGURE DRAWING

FA2112 WATERCOLOR

Life drawing skills practiced in Drawing II are refined while adding deeper exploration of lighting, composition, and figure/environment relationships. Includes the clothed and nude figure. Introduces more drawing media and encourages using sketchbooks as a way to begin developing personal artistic thinking and responses. Presents skills applicable to any major.

Introduces various watercolor techniques, such as wet-into-wet, glazing, and flat washes, which are practiced in class, using observational painting from still life and models. Presents the traditions of watercolor, its versatile nature, and its expressive potential. Builds upon foundation-level painting, design, and color coursework, and develops students’ abilities to communicate visually.

FA2034 PORTRAIT DRAWING

FA2134 PAINTING: MODEL

Investigation of the techniques and possibilities in the human portrait drawn from life. Demonstrations are given on how to draw the structure, the anatomy, and the proportions of the face. Includes analysis of images from the tradition of portraiture. Results in a better understanding of the genre of portraiture in both historical and contemporary contexts.

FA2044 LANDSCAPE DRAWING Explores and examines the variety of approaches, conceptually and technically, used by artists to create imagery while outdoors. Examines the tradition of plein-air sketches. Emphasizes the way artists’ perception of land, landscape, and the use of a scenic view has changed over time, and how the contemporary artist might interpret a view of the land. Results in a foundation of knowledge for future Fine Arts coursework.

FA2056, FA3056, FA4056 SCULPTURE Students choose a process or material on which to focus, such as carving, casting, or modeling of bronze, wood, or stone. Stresses the safe use of tools and materials. Expands the horizons of students interested in all 2D and 3D visual art disciplines. Encourages discussions about dimensional ideas within the context of all art disciplines.

FA2066 SCULPTURE: WOOD Explores the possibilities of wood as a material for expressing three-dimensional form. Topics include safe use of hand tools and woodworking machines, hand and machine carving, bending, laminating, and marquetry.

FA2091 SCULPTURE: METALS Explores the identification of metals, their physical and aesthetic properties, metal casting, and fabrication and finishing processes for steel, cast iron, bronze, and aluminum. Stresses the development of welding proficiency (torch, MIG, TIG) and safe shop practices. Students do not need prior experience with shop tools. Course is applicable to any student interested in the properties and possibilities of metal.

FA2095, FA3095, FA4095 JEWELRY: SMALL-SCALE METALS Introduces metalworking processes and techniques of the jeweler and silversmith. Students develop and produce jewelry. Slide presentations and readings for discussion provide historical and contemporary context for investigations of such concepts as ornamentation, scale, utility, and the body as site. Builds upon foundation-level design skills and develops students’ understanding of historical and modern adornments.

Observational painting from the nude and clothed models within environments. Seeks to improve color handling, composition, and representation of human anatomy. Explores various styles of representational painting and approaches to paint application as well as content, especially as related to formal choices. Builds upon foundation-level design skills and develops students’ understanding of the portrayal of the body.

FA2144 PAINTING: LANDSCAPE Explores paint application, color effects, and stylistic choices through observational landscape painting. Emphasizes an understanding of natural light and the illusion of space. Introduces a variety of approaches to landscape painting and explores the potential meanings inherent in these approaches. Builds upon foundation-level painting, design, and color coursework and develops students’ visual abilities.

FA2156 PAINTING: PORTRAIT Focuses on the representational, observed portrait painting. Stresses issues of structural anatomy and a variety of paint applications, color approaches, and lighting effects. Explores the meanings and traditions of portraiture and results in a better understanding of the genre of portraiture, in both historical and contemporary contexts. Builds on foundation-level painting, color, and 2D design skills.

FA2178 PAINTING TECHNIQUES Introduces historical Old Masters techniques in egg tempera, silverpoint, egg-oil emulsion, and a variety of oil applications. Includes demonstrations, examples, and direct observational painting. Builds a greater understanding of image-making and art history, with a widened view into painting’s potential range. Assists students in the development of their artistic vision in paint.

FA219, FA220 DRAWING WORKSHOP: DIGITAL Builds drawing skills while exploring digital tools as a way to expand and extend traditional drawing. Encourages artists to make digital techniques part of the drawing process. Uses various input techniques and incorporates other materials and textures. Emphasizes the development of artistic vision. Techniques presented are applicable to any major.


FA2212I PRINTMAKING: INTAGLIO

FA231, FA232 GLASSBLOWING

Investigates the practices and techniques of intaglio printmaking: including hard ground, soft ground, various aquatints, spit bite, drypoint, sugar-lift, mezzotints, collagraphs, different methods of color printing, and photo processes including image-on and solar plates: using fine papers and oil-based inks with a handoperated press. Focuses on aesthetic and conceptual growth as well as development of technique. Teaches aesthetic and technical concerns through individual projects and group critiques. Presents intaglio history from historical engravings to contemporary artists. Also covers how to effectively and safely operate a hand press while observing health and safety guidelines.

Presents fundamental elements of glassblowing, cold working, and slumping and develops students’ skills over time. Incorporates classroom, laboratory, and field experiences. Requires a minimum of nine hours per week laboratory work in the studio. Builds upon foundation-level color and 3D design skills to produce functional and artistic works in glass.

FA2212L PRINTMAKING: LITHOGRAPHY Investigates the basic practices and techniques of lithography: including the use of traditional Bavarian limestone techniques, ball-ground plates, and positive photo-aluminum plates with fine papers and oil-based inks in a hand-operated press. Methods will include crayon, pencil tusche wash, reductive tools, and transfer processes. Emphasis is placed on creating a black-and-white image using rendered tonal ranges. Teaches aesthetic and technical concerns through individual projects and group critiques. Lectures discuss lithographic history, contemporary artists’ lithographs, professional practices in print ateliers, and multiple-color printing. Also covers how to effectively and safely operate a hand press while observing health and safety guidelines.

FA2212R PRINTMAKING: RELIEF Introduces students to relief printmaking through techniques including collagraph, monoprints, and tak bon, combined with varied materials. Teaches aesthetic and technical concerns through individual projects and group critiques. Emphasis is placed on originality and the skilled use of tools. Fine papers and oil-based inks are used with traditional burnishing and presses. Relief-printing history is presented from wood engravings to modern artworks. Also covers how to effectively and safely operate a hand press while observing health and safety guidelines.

FA2212S PRINTMAKING: SILKSCREEN Introduces the practices and techniques of serigraphy (the artistic application of screen printing), including reduction printing, photo processes, drawing fluid, mono-prints, multiple stencils, and building screens. Encourages the development of technique alongside the development of personal imagery. Fine papers and water-based inks are used with various types of stencils in a polyester stretched screen. Teaches aesthetic and technical concerns through individual projects and group critiques. Also covers how to effectively and safely operate print equipment while observing health and safety guidelines.

FA2256 CERAMICS I

FA233, FA333, FA433 GLASS KILN-CASTING Explores and develops the elements and techniques of cold working, casting, and slumping. Incorporates classroom, laboratory, and field experiences. Requires a minimum of nine hours per week in the studio. Builds upon foundation-level color and 3D design skills to produce functional and artistic works in glass.

FA275 STUDIO PROFESSIONS Offers an orientation to the Fine Arts major at CCAD and provides an expanded understanding of the career potential in the arts. Introduces the business of making and selling art, including taxes and pricing, as well as teaching, licensing, and presentation skills. Includes lectures, discussions, and critiques of work made in other classes and assists students in formulating their plans for their art career.

FA3012 FIGURE DRAWING Continues concentration on life drawing skills working with a variety of nude and clothed models, interior set-ups, and materials. Delves deeply into composition and drawing as a communicative medium, looking at its ability to convey concepts expressively, formally, or as a narrative. Builds upon previous coursework and guides students toward a body of work in figure drawing.

FA3034 PORTRAIT DRAWING Provides an opportunity for students to develop a more personal approach to portraiture while refining skills working from in-class models and set-ups. Explores varied lighting, costumes, poses, and drawing media for their effects on the visual artwork and portrayal of human personality. Students work on creating sophisticated finished portraits.

FA3044 LANDSCAPE DRAWING Continues development in close observational drawings while encouraging students to find a personal voice within the tradition of landscape drawing. Explores issues specific to landscape, such as point of view, level of focus, imaginative compositional decision-making, and lighting effects. Builds upon previous coursework and guides students toward a unique body of work in landscape drawing.

Introduces basic ceramic forming techniques such as slab, coil, and wheelthrowing using stoneware clay. Includes instruction on glaze formulation, glaze application, and basic firing techniques. Students practice in the ceramics lab during class time and out of class. Pieces are critiqued individually and in groups. Uses the principles taught in 3D design foundation coursework and prepares students for further study in 3D art and design media.

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FA3066 SCULPTURE: WOOD

FA3189, FA4189 ADVANCED PRINTMAKING

Builds upon the basic concepts, materials, and processes presented in FA2066, Sculpture: Wood. Supports the use of wood in conventional, mixed media, and non-traditional sculpture as required by the individual student artist.

Builds upon the foundation established in FA200-level print courses. Encourages balance between technical skills and conceptual goals. Faculty guidance offers advice given during individual and group critiques and information from demonstrations and discussions. Health and safety practices relevant to the use of printmaking equipment, solvents, and inks are reviewed and required. Builds upon previous coursework and leads students toward a personalized body of work.

FA3091 SCULPTURE: METALS Builds on processes and techniques encountered in Sculpture I. Students choose a process or material and look to become proficient in it aesthetically and technically. All metal and metal/mixed-media explorations are supported on an individual basis. Includes collaboration in creating a large-scale work in the community and guides students toward a body of work in sculpture.

FA3112 WATERCOLOR: INTERMEDIATE Explores the boundaries of the watercolor medium using transparent, gouache, and mixed media approaches. Emphasizes a more experimental approach to the medium in pursuit of focused personal goals. Instructor guidance, group discussion, and research contribute to achieving results. Builds upon previous coursework and guides students toward a body of work in watercolor.

FA3134 PAINTING: MODEL Seeks to incorporate technical skills and art concepts of the junior painter into a more personally directed and sophisticated body of work. Students pursue artistic exploration and an intellectual grasp of their own goals through individually created projects. Instructor guidance and group discussions become a critical means of receiving feedback on individual progress. Guides students toward producing a body of work in painting.

FA3144 PAINTING: LANDSCAPE

FA3190, FA4190 DRAWING WORKSHOP Explores and develops skills in a variety of media and contemporary concepts. Encourages experimentation, broadening ranges in materials and ideas, and helps define and develop work. Subject matter may extend beyond observational approaches and include sources such as still life, interiors, appropriation of contemporary art ideas, world cultures, and historical periods. Seniors may work on a focused body of work. Stresses individual solutions to problems of content and form.

FA3234, FA4234 PAPERMAKING Investigates a variety of methods using handmade paper to create 2D or 3D artworks. Includes learning sheet forming techniques, using a printing press, making artist books, and casting paper with molds. Students practice processing fibers including cotton linter, plant fibers, abaca, recycled paper, and rags. Emphasizes individual development of projects, craftsmanship, and participation in critiques and assists students in building a range of 2D and 3D skills.

FA3256, FA4256 CERAMICS

Emphasizes greater mastery of color, light, space, and paint usages in reference to personal intention in painting the observed landscape. Students may use on-site observation and photographs to achieve individualized and higher quality body of paintings. Incorporates instructor guidance, research, and group discussion. Builds upon previous coursework and guides students toward a body of work of in painting.

Explores and builds advanced forming techniques with emphasis on expanding the students’ ceramic vocabulary. Discusses glaze information, glaze formulation, and kiln firing. Students are expected to grow and develop through advanced thought, group and individual critiques, and technical practice. Builds upon previous 3D coursework and guides students toward a better understanding of the field.

FA3156 PAINTING: PORTRAIT

FA3256S CERAMICS II: SCULPTURAL

Stresses the challenges of structural anatomy, paint application, color approaches, and lighting effects while working from live models. Students use research and personally determined goals to begin to individualize and expand their artwork in and out of class, while retaining a pursuit of technical excellence. Builds upon previous coursework and guides students toward a body of work of in painting.

FA3178 PAINTING TECHNIQUES Continues exploring a variety of Old Masters techniques with an emphasis on developing technical proficiency and bringing these techniques into the junior-level student’s personal body of work. Encourages research into art history and contemporary examples as well as a more conceptual approach to image making. Builds upon previous coursework and guides students toward a unique body of work of in painting.

Studies the conceptual and technical aspects particular to ceramic sculpture, including plaster molds, clay casting, wheel throwing and their combination. Survey of historic and contemporary ceramic sculpture is included. Safe use of materials and processes is stressed.

FA3278, FA4278 CERAMICS: GLAZE CALCULATION Presents and explores glaze calculation. Includes study in chemical composition, compounding glazes, formulating clay bodies, and using color pigments for ceramic glaze and clay. Students extensively test and develop a range of glazes which fulfill their personal creative visions. Enables students to build a unique body of ceramic work with custom clay bodies and glazes.


FA3312 ADVANCED GLASSBLOWING

FA4066 ADVANCED SCULPTURE: WOOD

Independent and structured study in glass using the different methods of glass working. Emphasizes individual development and glass as a sculptural form. Develops an understanding of the operation and maintenance of a glass studio. Builds upon previous coursework and guides students toward the ability to accurately express concepts in glass.

Aids students in the development of consistent, coherent sculptural work in wood. Uses research, presentation, critique, and discussion to address effective expression, aesthetic awareness, and a strong understanding of material and process. Emphasizes personal style development, professional awareness, and studio practice.

FA3410 FINE ARTS STUDIO WORKSHOP

FA4112 ADVANCED WATERCOLOR

Focuses on development of a body of interdisciplinary work related to contemporary art topics. Promotes analysis of contemporary art ideas, various world cultures and historical periods, and other areas of visual information. Studio production and communication of ideas visually, verbally, and in written form will be assessed. Blended format includes online and in-class time.

Pursues a creative, conceptual, and technically excellent body of watercolor paintings through the creation of an individually designed set of projects. In-class setup, models, or photographs may be used. Encourages research into art historical and contemporary examples. Instructor guidance and group discussion are critical in developing and assessing the final works. Artwork from the course begins to form a student’s professional portfolio of work.

FA370 FINE ARTS JUNIOR SEMINAR Explores contemporary art and artists in the context of art theory, as it relates to creating, discussing, and writing about the student’s own work. Writing, visiting exhibitions, research, and presentations assist students in understanding their professional future. Requires writing skills and develops students’ abilities to analyze and discuss the work of others and their own in preparation for senior thesis.

FA4012 FIGURE DRAWING Encourages students to meld careful observational skills and technical accomplishments of previous life drawing experiences into a more personal and sophisticated body of work. Students become comfortable with drawing as a mode of visual exploration. Makes students more aware of how to discuss their work and its related contemporary milieu.

FA4034 PORTRAIT DRAWING Pursues figurative portraiture at a professional level. Stresses in-depth understanding of the materials, traditions, and accuracy of form in working from in-class models. A personal approach is sought throughout the work in and out of class. Attention is paid to professional presentation issues. Artwork from the course begins to form a student’s professional portfolio of work.

FA4044 ADVANCED LANDSCAPE DRAWING Provides the student with an opportunity to investigate and refine a body of work within the landscape tradition that is personal and communicative. The student should be able to articulate these ideas and discuss their place within the living tradition of rendering the landscape. Attention is paid to professional presentation issues. Artwork from the course begins to form a student’s professional portfolio of work.

FA4056 ADVANCED SCULPTURE Helps the student to excel in craft, aesthetic consideration, and professional organization. Instruction is tailored to meet the special goals of the individual student. Helps the student artist to bring ideas and work to the level of excellence expected in the field. Focuses on preparation of work in anticipation of next steps in an artist’s career.

FA4134 ADVANCED PAINTING: MODEL The goal of producing a personal and professionally accomplished body of painting is pursued by the senior painter through the creation of individualized projects. Setups and models may be used. Focuses on marrying technical excellence with personally determined conceptual goals. Encourages experimentation and research, with group discussions adding to learning goals of understanding and communicating.

FA4144 ADVANCED PAINTING: LANDSCAPE Senior painters work to balance their own conceptual goals with technical proficiency through observational painting and research on the representation of the landscape. Group discussions assess students’ grasp of the art issues and traditions that their work involves and the proficiency of the technical execution. The final body of work is an attempt to prepare for a more professional role as an artist.

FA4156 ADVANCED PAINTING: PORTRAIT Senior painters pursue the successful likeness in both anatomical appearance and expressive insight. Encourages research, observational painting, and exploration of technique and approach in pursuit of the artist’s personal vision of portraiture. Incorporates faculty guidance and group discussion to help the senior painter assess how well they have communicated the objectives of their projects and of their final body of work.

FA4178 ADVANCED PAINTING TECHNIQUES Designed for the student who wants to create their own individualized body of artwork using traditional techniques. The student pursues technical mastery through in-depth practice and research, emphasizing the conceptual relationship between the technique’s history and the student’s application of that technique to the work’s content. The final body of work is an attempt to prepare for a more professional role as an artist.

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FA4312 ADVANCED GLASSBLOWING Senior glassblowers develop individualized projects to explore a direction in glass. Research is required to increase students’ knowledge of glass as an art form. Continues instruction in the operation and maintenance of a glass studio. Artwork from the course begins to form a student’s professional portfolio of work.

FA4410 FINE ARTS STUDIO WORKSHOP Focuses on development of a body of interdisciplinary work related to contemporary art topics. Promotes analysis of contemporary art ideas, various world cultures and historical periods, and other areas of visual information. Studio production and communication of ideas visually, verbally, and in written form will be assessed. Blended format includes online and in-class time

FA470, FA471 STUDIO THESIS: PORTFOLIO A course for all senior Fine Arts majors which includes the completion of a slide portfolio of student’s best work. Faculty reviews each student’s final exhibition, and students complete a thesis explaining in detail the technical and aesthetic problems involved in their work. Prepares students for the realm of the professional, working artist.

FA485 FINE ARTS INTERNSHIP Provides apprentice-like experience with professional partners.


Fine Arts Faculty CCAD’s faculty consists of more than 200 practicing artists, designers and scholars with broad teaching experience and appropriate degrees in art, design, and liberal arts. CCAD’s student-to-faculty ratio is 12:1. Full-time Fine Arts faculty and their credentials are listed below; for biographical information on all faculty (full-time, part-time, adjunct, and emeritus), visit ccad.edu/programs-ofstudy/faculty-bios.

CLARY, JASON Assistant Professor, Fine Arts; BFA in Painting, University of Cincinnati, 1996; MFA in Painting, Indiana University, 1998

DAWSON, ANITA Professor, Fine Arts and Graduate Studies; BA in Visual

Arts, University of South Florida, 1972; MFA in Drawing, University of Florida, 1978

JULIAN-NORTON, DANIELLE Assistant Professor, Fine Arts and

Graduate Studies; BFA in Fine Arts, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1999; MFA in Art, University of Notre Dame, 2002

KORTLANDER, JOHN Professor, Fine Arts and Graduate Studies; BFA in

Art History, Ohio University, 1981; MFA in Painting, University of Colorado, 1983

KUMLIEN, GREGG Professor, Fine Arts; BS in Art, University of Wisconsin-

Madison, 1971; MA in Art, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1981; MFA in Art, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1985

LEE, GORDON Professor, Fine Arts and Graduate Studies; BFA in Art,

PIRASTEH, DJAHANGIR Professor, Fine Arts; BA in Painting, St

Cloud State University, 1976; MA in Painting, St Cloud State University, 1977; MFA in Painting, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1979

RIETENBACH, TIM Professor, Foundation Studies, Fine Arts, and

Graduate Studies; BFA in Fine Arts, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1977; MFA in Fine Arts, Ohio State University, 1991

RILEY, NEIL Associate Professor, Fine Arts; BFA in Painting, Maryland Institute College of Art, 1979; MFA in Fine Arts, Boston University, 1983

SCHRAMER, KRISTINE Associate Professor, Fine Arts; BA in Art

History, The College of William & Mary, 1994; MFA in Fine Arts, Indiana University, 1998

TAGGART, JULIE Dean, School of Studio Arts, Professor, Fine Arts; BFA in Painting, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1991; MFA in Painting, Syracuse University, 1994

TAKADA, KANAME Professor, Fine Arts; BFA in Ceramics, Columbus

College of Art & Design, 1989; MFA in Ceramics, University of Notre Dame, 1992

VIVEIROS, ERNEST Professor, Fine Arts; BFA in Painting,

Concordia University, 1979; MFA in Painting, Cranbrook Academy of Arts, 1971

Southeastern Massachusetts University, 1982; MFA in Painting, Southern Illinois University, 1986

MALEC-KOSAK, KELLY Associate Professor, Fine Arts and Graduate

WANG, CHUN ARTHUR Associate Professor, Fine Arts; BFA in

Studies, Chair, Fine Arts; BFA in Jewelry Design & Metalsmithing, Miami University, 1993; MFA in Jewelry Design & Metalsmithing, California College of Arts & Crafts, 1996

MCGHEE, KATHY Associate Professor, Fine Arts and Graduate Studies,

Coordinator of Printmaking; BFA in Drawing, Ohio State University, 1997; BS in Plant Biology, Ohio State University, 1997; MFA in Printmaking, Ohio State University, 2000

Painting, Central University for Nationalities (Beijing), 1982; non-degree graduate study in Painting, Central Fine Arts Academy (Beijing), 1985–87; BFA in Painting, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1994; MFA in Painting, University of Colorado, 1997

WEIGLE, JAMES Professor, Fine Arts and Graduate Studies; BFA in Printmaking, Carnegie-Mellon University, 1980; MFA in Printmaking, Pennsylvania State University, 1982

NORMAN, DOUGLAS Professor, Fine Arts; BA in Painting, San Diego State University, 1974; MFA in Painting, Claremont Graduate University, 1976

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Illustration

TURN WORDS INTO WORLDS. From images for advertising campaigns and websites to heroes and monsters for children’s books and video games: the Illustration major introduces career possibilities across a variety of media and audiences. The curriculum includes a choice of studio work in traditional and computer mediums, humorous and cartoon styles, and 3D models, to name a few: as well as projects and internships that build students’ skills at working with creative teams. Professional techniques are taught through a broad range of materials, including pencil, ink, and paint as well as the latest in computer imaging. The common ground is storytelling, concepts, and imagination expressed through drawing and image making. Many of our graduates start their own freelance businesses. Others work for employers including Sony Pictures, McGraw-Hill Publishing, Marvel Comics, American Greetings, and Hallmark. IL@ccad.edu ccad.edu/majors/illustration

52 CCAD Illustration


Course Requirements This chart reflects Fall 2013 requirements and is subject to change.

FOUNDATION YEAR REQUIREMENTS:

FOURTH-YEAR REQUIREMENTS:

IL1012 FS091X FS010X FS020X FS030X FS1057 FS1058 FS1139 FS1140 FS127 FS128 LA190 LA132–133

IL4097–IL4098 FA

Introduction to Illustration New Student Seminar Photoshop Fundamentals Illustrator Fundamentals InDesign Fundamentals Design: Projects and Strategies Design: Contemporary Practice Painting and Color Theory: Research and Practice Painting and Color Theory: Applied Concepts Drawing I: Drawing Fundamentals Drawing II: Figure and Anatomy Writing and the Arts Art, Design, and Culture I–II

SECOND-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: IL2101–2102 Illustration Studio: Concepts and Practices IL2105–2016 Illustration Studio: Design and Digital Methods IL2271 Commercial Figure Drawing IL277X Student Progress Assessment AD2013–2014 Advertising & Graphic Design Concepts FA/CA Painting/Media (1 course)

THIRD-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: IL3012 FA FA/CA

Illustration Styles and Concepts Drawing (1 course) Advanced Painting/Media (1 course)

IL Professional Practice Portfolio I & II Advanced Drawing (1 course)

RECOMMENDED ART/DESIGN ELECTIVES (5 COURSES REQUIRED): IL2401 IL3071 IL3111 IL3131 IL3274 AN3356 AN4334 AN4362

Paper Dimensional Illustration I Children’s Illustration Market 3D Illustration I Comic Book Illustration Graphic Illustration for Editorial & Business Computer Animation II Animation III Computer Game Development I

LIBERAL ARTS REQUIREMENTS: LA LA LA LA LA LA LA230 LA250 LA293X

Advanced History of Art (1 course) Advanced Writing/Literature (1 course) Business Course Literature (2 courses) Science (1 course) Social Sciences (1 course) History of Design 2D Introduction to Philosophy Student Progress Assessment

LIBERAL ARTS ELECTIVES REQUIRED: 2 courses

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Course Descriptions IL1012 INTRODUCTION TO ILLUSTRATION Students learn what illustration was, is, and might become as a profession and start to acquire basic skills needed in the profession: drawing, design and composition, research, and use of narrative.

IL2031 ILLUSTRATIVE DRAWING Focuses on drawing for storytelling with observation of the human figure and animals in motion. Students experience drawing costumed models and go on field trips to draw on location. Strongly emphasizes character development, storyboards, sound drawing principles, creativity, and drawing problems based on observation of the human figure. Prepares students for more advanced illustrative work.

IL2101, IL2102 ILLUSTRATION STUDIO: CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES Explores the illustration profession’s past, present, and future. Focuses on basic skills (drawing, design and composition, research, and use of narrative) with traditional materials such as pencil, pen, and paint. Helps students assess interests and potential directions in the illustration field.

IL2105, IL2106 ILLUSTRATION STUDIO: DESIGN AND DIGITAL METHODS Teaches effective integration and application of foundation studies skills within the illustration curriculum. Facilitates continued development of independent working processes. Students use traditional, nontraditional, and digital media (Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and Corel Painter).

IL2271 COMMERCIAL FIGURE DRAWING Develops students’ skills in figure drawing for the commercial artist. Emphasizes the idealization of form, understanding clues to characterization, and the ability to draw the human figure with ease and dexterity. Requires extensive practice in drawing the human figure for practical commercial purposes. Builds upon previous drawing coursework and, over time, readies students for producing professional-quality drawings.

IL240, IL340, IL440 PAPER DIMENSIONAL ILLUSTRATION Explores the decoration and structural aspects of dimensional illustration as experienced in the publishing, greeting card, and retail industries. Projects include paper relief illustration, pop-ups, point-of-purchase displays, and using recycled materials.

IL3012 ILLUSTRATION STYLES AND CONCEPTS Explorates illustrative concepts and issues, with an emphasis on developing directions and a more sophisticated voice. Assignments cover many markets and media, including editorial, humorous, product, and book.

IL3031, IL4031 ILLUSTRATIVE DRAWING An intermediate to advanced-level course emphasizing drawing for storytelling with observation of the human figure and animals in motion. Students experience drawing costumed models and field trips to draw on location. Strongly emphasizes character development, storyboards, sound drawing principles, and creativity. Builds upon previous illustrative coursework and develops a student’s professional portfolio.

IL305, IL306, IL405, IL406 HUMOROUS ILLUSTRATION Focuses on illustration based on design, stylization, and humor. Emphasizes refining drawing and visualizing skills based on concept rather than strict observations of reality. Requires thinking visually, developing characters, and building a sense of animation in contemporary decorative illustration. Builds upon previous illustrative coursework and develops a student’s professional portfolio.

IL307, IL308, IL408 CHILDREN’S ILLUSTRATION MARKET Focuses on illustration based on design, stylization, and humor. Students develop a personal style with a contemporary illustration market in mind. Emphasizes greeting cards and children’s books, as well as refining drawing and visualizing skills based on concept rather than strict observations of reality. Builds upon previous illustrative coursework and develops a student’s professional portfolio.

IL309, IL310 ILLUSTRATION WORKSHOP Presents the nature of the illustrator’s creative process. Individual directions are explored through a stylistically consistent and connected body of work with career objectives in mind. All aspects of expression are open to question, exploration, and enhancement, including procedure, style, technique, and storytelling. Builds upon previous illustrative coursework and develops a student’s professional portfolio.

IL311, IL312, IL411, IL412 DIMENSIONAL ILLUSTRATION Covers a range of materials and processes used in the production of professional quality 3D illustration for industry. Employs various processes in the production of 3D illustration, including but not limited to clay sculpting, stamping, casting, and flexible urethane molding of casting resins. Skills presented are applicable to all students interested in 3D communication.

IL313, IL314 COMIC BOOK ILLUSTRATION Introduces contemporary comic book art, emphasizing the drawing phase of the creative comic book process. Projects are designed to develop skills and knowledge in the use of dynamic perspective, anatomy, and composition for storytelling. Builds upon previous illustrative coursework and develops a student’s professional portfolio.


Illustration Faculty IL319, IL320 BLACK AND WHITE ILLUSTRATION Focuses on the creation and uses of black and white illustration for commercial and editorial purposes. Emphasizes skills in storytelling, creating visual impact, and a variety of techniques while working within realistic parameters for various professional applications. Builds upon previous illustrative coursework and develops a student’s professional portfolio.

IL322, IL323, IL422, IL423 ILLUSTRATION SEMINAR Students work with various visiting illustrators for an advanced exerience in developing a personal style and direction. Content varies with instructor.

IL409, IL410 ILLUSTRATION PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: PORTFOLIO Emphasizes finalizing the professional and creative presentation of work in both the physical and digital portfolio form, including the development of marketing strategies and materials such as promotional mailers, business cards, and social media.

IL413, IL414 COMIC BOOK ILLUSTRATION Further study in contemporary comic book art, emphasizing the drawing phase of the creative comic book process. Advanced projects are designed to develop skills and knowledge in the use of dynamic perspective, anatomy, and composition for storytelling. Builds upon previous comic book coursework and develops a student’s professional portfolio.

IL417, IL418 ADVANCED ILLUSTRATION: STYLES AND CONCEPTS Continues exploration of illustrative concepts and issues, with emphasis on developing directions and a more sophisticated voice. Emphasizes one-on-one student/instructor interaction to help guide the creation of mature, focused work for the graduate portfolio.

IL485 ILLUSTRATION INTERNSHIP Provides apprentice-like experience with professional partners.

CCAD’s faculty consists of more than 200 practicing artists, designers and scholars with broad teaching experience and appropriate degrees in art, design, and liberal arts. CCAD’s student-to-faculty ratio is 12:1. Full-time Illustration faculty and their credentials are listed below; for biographical information on all faculty (full-time, part-time, adjunct, and emeritus), visit ccad.edu/programs-of-study/faculty-bios.

GROFF, DAVID Instructor, Illustration; BFA in Illustration, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1979

HAZLERIG, MARK Professor, Illustration; BFA in Advertising Design, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1974; BFA in Illustration, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1977

KING, WALTER Professor, Illustration; BFA in Fine Arts, Columbus

College of Art & Design, 1981; MFA in Education, Boston University, 1985

KOVACH, JOSEPH Assistant Professor, Illustration; BFA in Illustration, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1985

MAHAN, BENTON Associate Professor, Illustration; BFA in Illustration, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1965

MCKISSICK, STEWART Professor, Illustration and Graduate Studies,

Chair, Illustration; BFA in Illustration, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1979; MFA in Illustration, Syracuse University, 1986

OSGOOD, ADAM Assistant Professor, Illustration; BFA in Illustration,

Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design, 2006; Master of Art and Design in Animation/New Media, North Carolina State University, 2012

PAYNE, C.F. Distinguished Professor, Illustration; BFA Miami

University, Ohio

TARDINO, RONALD Professor, Illustration; BFA in Illustration, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1971

ILAD331 ENTREPRENEURIAL ILLUSTRATION AND DESIGN Guides students through the development of self-generated creative products such as characters, branding concepts, and other visual materials. Emphasizes the business aspects of personal ownership and promotion, licensing, and marketing. Helps prepare students for professional work in commercial 2D fields.

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Industrial Design MAKE IT BETTER. The world is changing quickly, with complicated demands being made of people and their environments., Industrial designers are at the forefront of that change—because everything we work, play, and interact with must at some point be designed. CCAD’s Industrial Design program teaches students how to analyze, define, conceptualize, and implement the design process to arrive at the most appropriate solution for any given design problem. It all begins with research: identifying and investigating problems and situations. Students master 2D and 3D visualization techniques (like drawing, computer-aided design, and modeling), while at the same time learning to incorporate manufacturing, social, and environmental constraints into their design solutions. The curriculum provides opportunities to design furniture, products, packaging, display exhibits, toys, retail settings, and environmental graphics. Students also have the chance to help solve real-world challenges through internships (which are required) and participation in collaborative projects with industry. Our alumni are active in a wide range of corporate, independent, and consulting positions, including work for companies as well known as Disney, Nike, Hewlett-Packard, Ford, Rubbermaid, Mattel, Mead, and Motorola. ID@ccad.edu ccad.edu/majors/industrial

58 CCAD Industrial Design


Course Requirements This chart reflects Fall 2013 requirements and is subject to change.

FOUNDATION YEAR REQUIREMENTS:

FOURTH-YEAR REQUIREMENTS:

ID1011 FS091X FS010X FS020X FS030X FS1057 FS1058 FS1139 FS1140 FS127 LA190 LA132–133

ID4012 ID4781 ID4791 ID4851

Introduction to Industrial Design New Student Seminar Photoshop Fundamentals Illustrator Fundamentals InDesign Fundamentals Design: Projects and Strategies Design: Contemporary Practice Painting and Color Theory: Research and Practice Painting and Color Theory: Applied Concepts Drawing I: Fundamentals Writing and the Arts Art, Design, and Culture I–II

ID Senior Studio Practice ID Professional Practice Senior Thesis Industrial Design Internship

Choose 1 course from: ID3071 Furniture Design ID3161 Exhibition Design ID3201 Toy Design

ART/DESIGN ELECTIVES REQUIRED: 2 courses

SECOND-YEAR REQUIREMENTS:

LIBERAL ARTS REQUIREMENTS:

ID2012 ID2034 ID2051 ID2052 ID2078 ID2256 ID279X AD2291

LA Advanced History of Art (1 course) LA Business Course LA Literature (1 course) LA Social Sciences (1 course) LA Science Elective (1 course, Physical or Social Sciences) LA204 Intro to Professional Writing LA231 History of Design 3D LA250 Intro to Philosophy LA256/264 Topics in Physics, Being Human—Form, Function LA260 Elements of Quantitative Literacy

Sophomore Studio Practice ID Model & Prototype Construction ID Methods Design Research Seminar ID Form & Brand Development ID CADD Seminar ID Manufacturing Assembly Tech. Sem. Student Progress Assessment Design Lab I

THIRD-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: ID3012 ID3091 ID3092 ID3278 ID3301 ID3467

ID Innovation & Culture ID Direct to Manufacturing ID Emerging Mat. Sustainability Digital Drawing ID Presentation Tech. Seminar ID CAD-CAM

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Course Descriptions ID101 INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL DESIGN Freshman preparation for Industrial Design majors. Reviews skills, processes, values, and traditions fundamental to the industrial design profession, including design drawing, modeling, research, development, presentation, problem finding, and problem solving.

ID201, ID202 INDUSTRIAL DESIGN STUDIO II Introduces basic design principles supporting industrial design through a series of 2D and 3D projects. Emphasizes learning and implementing fundamental skills such as problem solving, drawing, critical thinking, modeling, design methods, and communication. Requires a strong background in foundation-level 2D and 3D design as well as the ability to describe concepts verbally.

ID203, ID204 MODELING TECHNIQUES Provides experience in modeling techniques, currently used in the profession, which represent potential design solutions throughout the design process. Includes instruction on scratch building using various sheet materials, casting and molding techniques, and finishing techniques. Uses principles taught in 3D design foundation coursework and prepares students to produce quality models in future 3D projects.

ID217, ID218 INDUSTRIAL DESIGN DRAFTING: CADD Teaches the principles of product drafting as a method of communicating design requirements to the industrial and manufacturing community. Also introduces the design principles surrounding computer-based drafting. Requires computer literacy and structural drawing skills and provides a foundation to learning 3D computer modeling principles and software.

ID225, ID226 MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES Introduces the current production methods, opportunities, and constraints surrounding contemporary materials. Includes exploring the technologies commonly used in modern manufacturing as they relate to the design of products. Assignments include research and written exams. Information taught in this course is used in the completion of all design projects.

ID230, ID231 ADVANCED STRUCTURAL DRAWING Demonstrates assorted drawing styles, methods, and techniques centered on the communication of ideas through the use of freehand perspective sketching. Emphasizes the development of skills important to design drawing and includes pencil, pen, and marker assignments. Requires solid background in structural drawing and prepares students for quick visual concept generation within the design fields.

ID301, ID302 INDUSTRIAL DESIGN STUDIO III Presents advanced problems which focus on the application of a variety of research methods, ergonomic studies, and methodologies relating to the design of consumer and industrial products. Emphasizes integration and application of skills introduced in Studio II, plus market and user need investigation, product semantics and branding, and aesthetics. Skills practiced in this course prepare students for further advanced projects.

ID307 FURNITURE DESIGN Explores principles surrounding the design, fabrication, and finishing of furniture. Projects vary each semester and result in the construction of a full-size prototype. Each project offers a new set of design objectives that develop and refine skills and knowledge. Requires a solid foundation in 3D design, drafting, and ergonomics. Provides the opportunity to practice techniques and produce a portfolio-quality piece.

ID316 EXHIBITION DESIGN Simulates a professional studio environment and investigates traveling and permanent museum exhibits, lighting, space planning, barrier-free design, and interactive media. Projects vary each semester and require students to exercise the proper design methods to generate appropriate solutions. Students design an exhibit from concept through to implementation, with the finished result suitable for use in students’ portfolios.

ID317 DISPLAY DESIGN Introduces the display design field, including point-of-purchase and retail display. Emphasizes the design process, techniques, developing design criteria, and presentation. Projects vary each semester and have included displays such as kiosks. Students develop a working knowledge of the field, its vocabulary, and its methodologies while producing a quality display that builds upon the skills taught in sophomore year.

ID320 TOY DESIGN Projects and objectives are selected each semester from the many elements that determine a successful toy, including form and image, function, age group, market pricing and placement, manufacturing constraints, mechanical and structural requirements, and degree of fun. Projects vary each semester. Students use sketching, computer, and 3D modeling skills to produce completed portfolio-quality projects.

ID330, ID331 PRESENTATION TECHNIQUES Explores techniques in design drawing and illustration by using a wide range of media toward the generation of concepts and presentation. Tools such as pen, pencil, pastels, markers, and software contribute an assortment of communicative visual skills to the exploration and practice of developing. Draws on the skills taught in all drawing courses and trains students to bring their product drawing skills to a professional level.

ID342 ENVIRONMENTAL GRAPHICS Introduces the field of environmental graphics, which includes the design and implementation of interior and exterior graphics. Presents techniques for communicative and aesthetic applications and explores architectural graphics, way finding, manufacturing methods, and material applications. Projects vary each semester and result in completed projects appropriate for use in students’ professional portfolios.


Industrial Design Faculty ID346 COMPUTER MODELING: SOLIDWORKS Introduces 3D computer modeling using Solidworks. By using parametric modeling, students learn techniques which address production concerns and downstream modifications. Students generate 3D models, 2D reference drawings, and images. Provides students with the experience and knowledge to translate product design ideas into professionally accepted formats.

ID347 COMPUTER MODELING: RHINO Designed to introduce 3D modeling using Rhino, including the use of various commands and techniques inherent to the software. Students generate surfaces, objects, and images for presentation. Requires use of the principles presented in sophomore drafting and provides students with the experience and knowledge to translate product design ideas into professionally accepted formats.

ID401, ID402 INDUSTRIAL DESIGN STUDIO IV Focuses on advanced design projects including a competition and thesis project which engage students’ personal interests. Emphasizes in-depth research, cutting-edge materials and technologies, and environmental issues affecting design. Critical thinking about the application of previously learned methods and techniques is orchestrated throughout the semester in close conjunction with the instructor.

ID478 INDUSTRIAL DESIGN PORTFOLIO Focuses on the creation of a portfolio for professional purposes. Presents issues concerning appropriate presentation methods, page layout, resume writing, interviewing techniques, and professional standards and expectations. Includes lectures, field trips, individual critiques, and at-large discussions, with a finished portfolio required at the end. Employs all previously taught skills and techniques in a capstone experience.

CCAD’s faculty consists of more than 200 practicing artists, designers and scholars with broad teaching experience and appropriate degrees in art, design, and liberal arts. CCAD’s student-to-faculty ratio is 12:1. Full-time Industrial Design faculty and their credentials are listed below; for biographical information on all faculty (full-time, part-time, adjunct, and emeritus), visit ccad.edu/programs-of-study/faculty-bios.

BURGHY, DAVID Associate Professor, Foundation Studies; BFA in

Industrial Design, Columbus College of Art and Design, 1989; MA in Art Education, University of Rio Grande, 2009

GATTIS, THOMAS Professor and Chair, Industrial Design; Bachelor of Industrial Design, Auburn University; Master of Science Education in Industrial Technology, Bemidji State University

GUNDLACH, JOEL Professor, Industrial Design; BFA in Industrial

Design, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1986; MA in Education, Capital University, 1993

THUNE, GREG Instructor, Industrial Design; BA in Industrial Design, Auburn University, 1989

WILLIAMSON, THOMAS Assistant Professor, Industrial Design; BA in History, George Washington University, 1967; BS in Industrial Design, University of Cincinnati, 1982; MBA in Organizational Development, George Washington University, 1972

ID485 INDUSTRIAL DESIGN INTERNSHIP Provides apprentice-like experience with professional partners.

IDIN350 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES Investigates and studies subjects that focus on contemporary issues of importance to the field of design. Topics change and are referred to in the course title and semester offered. Previous topics have included the Tao of Design and Interior Historical Restoration.

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Interior Design DREAM IN SQ. FT.? Interior designers create and influence the interior environments where people live, work, and interact with the world. Accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA), CCAD’s Interior Design program focuses on industry-specific knowledge, design processes, critical thinking, professional practices, and career preparation. Students learn to design outstanding spaces that take into consideration aesthetic theories, historical precedents, human behavior, functionality, and professional directives regarding sustainability, health, safety, and welfare. Real-world techniques for research, planning, design, and problem solving are key: students develop both technical and design skills through exercises based on simulated clients’ goals and objectives. They also sharpen their ability to convey ideas clearly through hand sketching, computer modeling, and verbal and electronic communication. Internships are required, and the program’s strong ties to the design community create many opportunities for students to interact with professionals and design firms. IN@ccad.edu ccad.edu/majors/interior

64 CCAD Interior Design


Course Requirements This chart reflects Fall 2013 requirements and is subject to change.

FOUNDATION-YEAR REQUIREMENTS:

FOURTH-YEAR REQUIREMENTS:

IN1011 FS091X FS010X FS020X FS030X FS1057 FS1058 FS1139 FS1140 FS127 FS128 LA190 LA132–133

IN3121 Professional Practice IN4011–4012 IN Studio IV IN4801 IN Professional Practice IN4851 Internship

Introduction to Interior Design New Student Seminar Photoshop Fundamentals Illustrator Fundamentals InDesign Fundamentals Design: Projects and Strategies Design: Contemporary Practice Painting and Color Theory: Research and Practice Painting and Color Theory: Applied Concepts Drawing I: Drawing Fundamentals Drawing II: Figure and Anatomy Writing and the Arts Art, Design, and Culture I–II

SECOND-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: IN2011–2021 IN2181 IN2190 IN2201 IN281X AD2291

Interior Design Studio II Comp. Aided Design & Drafting Interior Design Materials & Furnishings Interior Design Materials & Construction Student Progress Assessment Design Lab I

ART/DESIGN ELECTIVES REQUIRED: 2 courses

LIBERAL ARTS REQUIREMENTS: LA LA LA LA LA231 LA260 LA303 LA497 LA293X

Business Course Literature (1 course) Science (1 course) Social Sciences (2 courses) History of Design 3D Elements of Quantitative Literacy History of Western Architecture Writing for Design Professionals Student Progress Assessment

LIBERAL ARTS ELECTIVES REQUIRED: 1 course

THIRD-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: IN3011–3021 IN3131 IN3151 IN3181 IN3302 INID3441

Interior Design III Codes and Specifications Lighting Design IN Construction Communication IN Dimensional Analysis Presentation 3-D Computer Modeling

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Course Descriptions IN101 INTRODUCTION TO INTERIOR DESIGN Students learn to develop creative and technical interior design solutions in response to social, aesthetic, cultural, historical, and physical contexts. A variety of communication and investigation tools are explored. Includes study of the interrelationship of interior design with art and other design professions.

IN201, IN202 INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO II

IN230, IN231 ADVANCED STRUCTURAL DRAWING Investigates perspective drawing as it applies to the field. Emphasizes the appropriate communication of an idea through the use of freehand sketch development, underlay construction, and refined detail drawing. Builds on the drawing skills learned in foundation year and develops skills in communicative drawing for studio projects.

Introduces the concepts of interior design, including information-gathering and problem-solving techniques, space planning, color, arrangement, sketching, floor plans, elevations, and presentation skills. Includes residential studio projects, written reports, field trips, guest speakers, and discussions. Uses principles from a variety of foundation coursework and prepares students for more advanced studio projects.

IN301, IN302 INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO III

IN217 INTRODUCTION TO INTERIOR COMPUTERAIDED DESIGN

IN312 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE FOR INTERIOR DESIGNERS

Presents 2D computer-aided design as a tool for developing technical and design drawings as currently used in the profession. These techniques are the basis for communicating design throughout the industry. Exercises emphasize understanding the commands and techniques used to create basic drawings. Draws heavily on skills learned in foundation-level drawing courses.

IN218 INTRODUCTION TO INTERIOR COMPUTERAIDED DESIGN Explores software used to develop architectural and interior drawings. Exercises include cover sheet creation, drawing floor plans and elevations, lettering, printing, and CAD drawing commands. Incorporates skills from foundation computer and drawing classes and prepares students to produce professional drawings for studio projects.

IN219, IN220 INTERIOR DESIGN MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY Introduces the application and definition of architectural and interior materials, such as textiles, wall coverings, flooring, and ceiling materials, as well as installation methods and maintenance. Includes information on construction, lighting, acoustics, codes, standards, and barrier-free issues. Involves lectures, field trips, testing, and modeling. Develops students’ ability to understand and use fundamental building tpracticesin their own work

IN220A LABORATORY Continues intense investigation of a broad spectrum of materials, applications, and exploration of modeling techniques. Individual project assignments investigate materials and products used in the industry. Techniques explored include but are not limited to industry interface, hand models, and hands-on assembly of systems, testing, and applications. Prepares students for effective use of materials in studio projects.

Presents projects in the areas of healthcare, hospitality, and multipurpose facility design. Focuses on developing design processes that involve physical, social, and psychological factors, with concern for the aesthetic and functional qualities of the built environment specific to each area of study.

Teaches professional aspects of the industry, including organizational structure, contractual relationships, estimating, marketing, and client relations. Explains project phasing through preparation of professional documents, and includes discussion of ethics and conflict resolution. Addresses writing and research skills and prepares students for work in the industry.

IN 313 CODES AND SPECIFICATIONS Introduces ICC codes and specifications for residential and commercial projects. Examines formats and the integration of these two areas of expertise. Explains how various requirements and concepts work together to create safety. Requires project-related exercises and overall understanding of regulations. Optimally taken junior year in preparation for advanced studio work.

IN315 LIGHTING DESIGN Studies natural and artificial lighting effects in the human environment. Presents principles of the physical and psychological aspects of lighting. Discusses lighting design theory and visual elements, as applied to the built environment. Builds upon sophomore-level interior design skills to develop students’ ability to effectively use lighting in a space.

IN316 KITCHEN AND BATH DESIGN Introduces this specialized field using the guidelines required by the National Kitchen and Bath Association. Explores the structural, mechanical, and building criteria specific to the industry. Field trips and class lectures stress exposure to real-world issues such as problem solving, estimating, project management, and professionalism. Serves as a prerequisite for the national qualifying exam for kitchen and bath design.


Interior Design Faculty IN318 ADVANCED CADD Continues the investigation of computer-aided drafting using AutoCAD. Teaches advanced principles and methods of digital drafting techniques as a method of communicating design requirements. Prepares students to produce professionalquality orthographic drawings in the classroom and on the job.

IN330 PRESENTATION TECHNIQUES Explores contemporary techniques in interior drawing and illustration through the use of a wide range of media. Pen, pencil, pastels, and color markers contribute to the investigation, exploration, and practice of developing a high level of drawing and communicative skill. Incorporates drawing, design, and compositional skills in the pursuit of drawings appropriate for projects and portfolios.

IN401, IN402 INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO IV Advanced projects in the areas of retail, restaurant, and healthcare design. Focuses upon developing an appropriate design process that involves physical, social, and psychological factors, with concern for the aesthetic qualities of the built environment specific to each area of study. Culminates in a senior thesis project and presentation. Prepares students for professional employment in the field.

CCAD’s faculty consists of more than 200 practicing artists, designers and scholars with broad teaching experience and appropriate degrees in art, design, and liberal arts. CCAD’s student-to-faculty ratio is 12:1. Full-time Interior Design faculty and their credentials are listed below; for biographical information on all faculty (full-time, part-time, adjunct, and emeritus), visit ccad.edu/programs-of-study/faculty-bios.

ALLISON, MARTHA Associate Professor, Chair, Interior Design; BS in Interior Design, Ohio University, 1976; MS in Administration, Central Michigan University, 1995

DEVORE, KELLY Instructor, Advertising & Graphic Design and Interior

Design; Bachelor of Architecture, Iowa State University, 2006; MFA in Design Research and Development, Ohio State University, 2012

ELBERT, STEVEN Assistant Professor, Interior Design; BS in Chemistry and German Literature, University of Florida; Master of Architecture, North Carolina State University; AIA, NCARB

IN409 RETAIL DESIGN Presents advanced projects incorporating the design of retail spaces that resolve the physical, social, and psychological factors inherent to the particular design situation. Projects vary each semester and require students to exercise the proper design methods to generate the most appropriate solution. Uses the collection of skills from sophomore-level coursework to produce portfolio-quality designs.

IN480 INTERIOR DESIGN PORTFOLIO Focuses on the design and creation of a portfolio for interviewing purposes. Presents issues concerning appropriate presentation methods, page design, resume writing, interviewing techniques, and professional expectations. Includes lectures, field trips, individual critiques, and at-large discussions, with a finished portfolio required at the end. Employs all previously taught skills and techniques in a capstone experience.

IN485 INTERIOR DESIGN INTERNSHIP Provides apprentice-like experience with professional partners.

INID344 COMPUTER MODELING: FORMZ Introduces techniques and procedures used in 3D computer modeling, rendering, and presentation. Focuses on the application and integration of computer modeling within the design process. Students develop models from original control drawings, plans and elevations, existing products, and conceptual designs.

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Photography SHOOT. In today’s image-driven environment, photography is one of the most expansive fields in art. CCAD Photography majors explore the vast possibilities of image making in courses designed to strengthen their technique, their knowledge of the photographic arts, and their ability to speak about their work. And when it comes to photo careers after school, our graduates are able to do a lot more than take pictures. There’s lighting, styling, retouching, editing, designing, illustrating, documenting, manipulating, processing, assisting, teaching, and more—in both the commercial and the fine arts worlds. PH@ccad.edu ccad.edu/majors/photography

70 CCAD Photography


Course Requirements This chart reflects Fall 2013 requirements and is subject to change.

FOUNDATION YEAR REQUIREMENTS:

FOURTH-YEAR REQUIREMENTS:

FS091X FS010X FS020X FS030X FS1057 FS1058 FS1139 FS1140 FS127 FS128 LA190 LA132–133

PH PH4151 PH4712

New Student Seminar Photoshop Fundamentals Illustrator Fundamentals InDesign Fundamentals Design: Projects and Strategies Design: Contemporary Practice Painting and Color Theory: Research and Practice Painting and Color Theory: Applied Concepts Drawing I: Drawing Fundamentals Drawing II: Figure and Anatomy Writing and the Arts Art, Design, and Culture I–II

SECOND-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: PH2012 PH2034 CA2011 CA2311 CA2312

Basic Photography I Photography II Design for Media Visual Narrative and Storyboard Video I

THIRD-YEAR REQUIREMENTS: PH3034 PH3056 PH3071 PH3401 PH372X

Studio Photography Photo III Media Arts Seminar Digital Imaging Student Progress Assessment

Advanced Photography (2 courses) Photography Projects Media Arts Portfolio

ART/DESIGN ELECTIVES REQUIRED: 6 courses (only can transfer in 12 credits)

LIBERAL ARTS REQUIREMENTS: LA LA LA LA LA250 LA337 LA351/354 LA293X

Advanced Writing/Literature (1 course) Literature (2 courses) Sciences (1 course) Social Sciences (1 course) Introduction to Philosophy History of Photography Philosophy of Visual Art or Philosophy of Media (1 course) Student Progress Assessment

Choose 1 course from: LA321–322 History of Cinema LA329 History of Documentary Cinema LAPH4341 Issues in Contemporary Photography

LIBERAL ARTS ELECTIVES REQUIRED: 2 courses

Choose 1 course from: PH2156 Material Studies PH3112 Photosensitive Materials

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Course Descriptions PH2012 PHOTOGRAPHY I Deals with basic technical and aesthetic issues of photographic technologies. Introduces the fundamentals of camera vision, darkroom practices, and creative problem solving through film and digital photography. Through lecture, lab, and private and group critiques, students learn how to use photographic media as powerful communication and artistic tools.

PH2034 PHOTOGRAPHY II Focuses on the ways technology influences and is adapted by artists. Addresses the aesthetic potential of the computer and camera, sometimes integrating the two mediums. Assignments explore the development of imagery using both technologies. Both technical and conceptual ideas are examined through demonstrations, discussions, and historical material.

PH2156 MATERIAL STUDIES Explores the use of photography and new media in sculptural and installation works. Centers on the individual student’s discovery of the interrelation of material and image. Students experiment with and learn the process and aesthetics of cross-disciplinary expression, with a strong emphasis on conceptual understanding. Skills presented are applicable to all majors.

PH3034 STUDIO PHOTOGRAPHY Introduces studio practices, lighting techniques, and the use of large-format cameras and incandescent and strobographic lighting equipment. Illustrates technical and design issues through the study of recent commercial images in media. Seeks to produce professional commercial photographers who can bring both technical expertise and creative photographic solutions to clients’ projects.

PH3056 PHOTOGRAPHY III Examines techniques and tools used by photographers to achieve their goals. Students study the Zone System, with an emphasis on previsualization, calibration of equipment, exposure, and printing techniques. Students gain technical knowledge for making strong conceptual images both commercially and artistically.

PH3071 MEDIA ARTS SEMINAR Presents issues of contemporary imaging and new media for discussion. Pays particular attention to current ideas in visual grammar and literacy. Assists junior-level students in analyzing media and verbalizing criticism in preparation for senior thesis and portfolio coursework.

PH3112 PHOTOSENSITIVE MATERIALS Presents different photographic processes for experimentation. Students create pinhole cameras and explore liquid light, cyanotype, and platinum processes. Stresses the idea that creation of art with photography comes about through thinking, not through the photographic process itself. Builds upon previous photo coursework and assists students in building a portfolio of unique work.

PH3401 DIGITAL IMAGING Introduces digital photography and emphasizes quality output. Presents and explains a variety of input options and image editing applications. Stresses creative use of this technology. Seeks not only to explain these photographic technologies but to integrate them seamlessly into students’ overall understanding of photographic media. Uses skills developed in previous photo coursework.

PH4031 STUDIO PHOTOGRAPHY: FASHION Introduces contemporary fashion photography practices. Students work in a studio with models and stylists, learning the elements of design and techniques needed to work successfully in the industry. Includes visits by professionals and field trips. Students are expected to understand the issues of lighting and exposure faced in a typical fashion shoot. Results in a portfolio of well-designed fashion photographs.

PH4041 STUDIO PHOTOGRAPHY: ARCHITECTURE An advanced studio course dedicated to the study of architectural photography. Applies large-format principles to the investigation of interior and exterior lighting as it concerns architecture.

PH4051 STILL LIFE PHOTOGRAPHY An advanced studio course devoted to still life photography. Uses large-format cameras. Discusses lighting, camera, and studio techniques.

PH4112 PHOTOSENSITIVE MATERIALS Gives students the freedom to develop their own syllabus and to expand on the concepts introduced in junior-level coursework. Students can experiment with photographic processes, including Van Dyke Brown, tintype, and gum bichromate. Assists students in expanding their skills and developing a uniquecreative voice.

PH4151 PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECTS Provides senior students the ability to produce larger bodies of work within a critical structure provided by faculty and fellow students.

PH4301 ADVANCED DIGITAL IMAGING Continues the investigations begun in Digital Imaging. Students develop larger projects, placing particular emphasis on control, calibration, and large-scale output. Includes some introduction to motion graphics.

PH4311 PHOTO ILLUSTRATION Explores creative solutions to real-life imaging problems for publications. Encourages students to create unique, interesting, and inventive images for specific articles and other materials. Structured to reflect as closely as possible the environment of the working professional photo illustrator. Students are given written articles, recordings, or feature concepts, and are expected to develop professional-quality illustration.


Photography Faculty PH4355 PHOTO WORKSHOP Presents rotating photographic topics such as portrait, landscape, and documentary photography, as determined by instructors. Content varies each term.

PH441 PHOTO DOCUMENTATION Introduces the techniques of photographically documenting both 2D and 3D artwork. Emphasizes the production of superior images for use in portfolios. Covers digital scanning and image preparation for web publication. Skills and tools presented are applicable to any student interested in producing strong, high-quality images for their portfolio, regardless of major.

PH4712 MEDIA ARTS PORTFOLIO Focuses on the production of quality reels and photographic portfolios, with an emphasis on personal career development, self-promotion, and packaging.

CCAD’s faculty consists of more than 200practicing artists, designers and scholars with broad teaching experience and appropriate degrees in art, design, and liberal arts. CCAD’s student-to-faculty ratio is 12:1. Full-time Photography faculty and their credentials are listed below; for biographical information on all faculty (full-time, part-time, adjunct, and emeritus), visit ccad.edu/programs-of-study/faculty-bios.

BENINE, SHANNON Assistant Professor, Photography; BFA in

Photography, BA in Interdisciplinary Visual Arts, Minor in Art History, University of Washington, 2003; MFA in Photography, University of Illinois at Chicago, 2007

FERGUS-JEAN, JOHN Professor, Photography and Graduate Studies; BA in Political Science, Indiana University, 1975; MFA in Photography, Rochester Institute of Technology

HAYAKAWA, HIROSHI Associate Professor, Photography and Graduate Studies; BA in French Literature, Keio University, 1987; BFA in Photography, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1995; MFA in Photography, Cranbrook Academy of Arts, 1997

HOFFELT, HELEN Professor, Photography; BFA in Photography, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1982; MFA in Photography, State University of New York at Buffalo, 1991

SNYDER, DUNCAN Professor, Photography and Graduate Studies,

Chair, Photography; BFA in Photography, Columbus College of Art & Design, 1988; MFA in Photography, Maryland Institute, College of Art, 1991

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Minors

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CCAD Minors


Art History

Copywriting

All students at CCAD, regardless of major, are required to take a total of 4 courses in the history of art and design. If courses are chosen carefully, an Art History minor can be earned by taking only two extra classes, for a total of 6 Art History courses.

Students interested in writing and advertising can earn a minor in Copywriting by taking 6 courses in English, as specified below.

REQUIRED COURSES:

LA190 Writing and the Arts LA488 Copywriting for New Media LA492 Copywriting LA493 Advanced Copywriting

LA132–133

Art, Design, and Culture I–II

Choose 4 courses from: LA321–322 History of Cinema LA329 History of Documentary Cinema LA330 Medieval Art LA331 Renaissance Art LA332 Baroque Art LA333 Romanticism in Art LA334 Impressionism and Post-Impressionism LA335 Early Modern Art LA336 Late Modern Art LA337 History of Photography LA338 Topics in Animated Film LA339 Northern Renaissance Art LA431 Art of Africa LA432 African American Art LA433 Studies in Modern Art LA435 Studies in Art History LA436 Art of China, Korea, and Tibet LA437 Art of Japan LA438 Greek and Roman Art LA439 Contemporary Art LA440 American Art Or other Art History courses

Art Therapy Professional art therapists utilize the arts for health, healing, and diagnostic purposes. Students may minor in Art Therapy by taking one art therapy course and 5 courses of social sciences for a total of 6 courses. (Note that all students, regardless of major, are already required to take six hours of social sciences, so earning a minor in Art Therapy would require only four additional courses.)

REQUIRED COURSES: LA270 LA280 LA370 LA372 LA373

Introduction to Psychology Introduction to Art Therapy Theories of Personality Psychology of Development Abnormal Psychology

Choose 1 course from: LA274 Cultural Anthropology LA275 Introduction to Sociology LA371 Social Psychology LA376 Social Problems in Modern Society LA377 Psychology of Creativity

REQUIRED COURSES:

Choose 1 course from: LA390 Readings in American Literature LA391 Readings in English Literature LA394 Readings in World Literature LA395 Film and Literature LA421 Mythology LA496 Contemporary Literature LA498 Literary Studies LA499 Criticism of Literature and Art Choose 1 course from: LA390 Readings in American Literature LA391 Readings in English Literature LA394 Readings in World Literature LA395 Film and Literature LA421 Mythology LA422 Writing Creative Nonfiction LA424 Advanced Creative Writing Workshop LA490A Writing Fiction LA490B Writing Poetry LA491 Screenwriting LA494 Speech LA496 Contemporary Literature LA497 Writing for Design Professionals LA498 Literary Studies LA499 Criticism of Literature and Art

Creative Writing Minoring in Creative Writing allows students to expand their literary strengths in diverse directions. Six courses are required, as specified below.

REQUIRED COURSE: LA190

Writing and the Arts

Choose 1 course from: LA390 Readings in American Literature LA391 Readings in English Literature LA394 Readings in World Literature LA395 Film and Literature LA421 Mythology LA496 Contemporary Literature LA498 Literary Studies LA499 Criticism of Literature and Art


Choose 4 courses from: LA422 Writing Creative Nonfiction LA424 Advanced Creative Writing Workshop LA490A Writing Fiction LA490B Writing Poetry LA491 Screenwriting LA492 Copywriting LA497 Writing for Design Professionals LA4 Writing

Design History Students may earn a Design History minor by taking 6 courses in the history of art and design, as specified below.

REQUIRED COURSES: LA132–133

Art, Design, and Culture I–II

Choose 3 courses from: LA230 History of Design 2D LA231 History of Design 3D LAFA4791 History of Ceramics LA Advanced Art History

Fashion Design A minor in Fashion Design allows students to enhance and broaden their portfolio work, gain insight into the fashion industry, and enhance their marketable skills. Students may earn a Fashion Design minor by taking a total of 6 fashion design courses, as specified below.

REQUIRED COURSES: FD203–204 FD2534 FD2556 FD3534

Fashion Illustration Pattern Construction Techniques Advanced Pattern

Choose 4 courses from: FD225 Textiles for Fashion Designers FD2589 Surface Design FD305 Fashion Design Illustration: Male/Child FD340 Draping FD355 Specialty Construction FD356 Tailoring

Fine Arts Fine Arts study beyond foundation classes can strengthen expressive and technical skills and enhance work in any other major area. Students may earn a Fine Arts minor by taking a total of 6 fine arts courses, as specified below. Many of these courses can be used towards art elective requirements in other majors.

REQUIRED COURSES: FA275 FA370 FA FA

Studio Professions Junior Fine Arts Seminar Figure Drawing or Painting (1 course) Intermediate Sculpture (1 course)

Choose 2 courses from: FA Intermediate Ceramics FA Intermediate Glassblowing FA Intermediate Printmaking FA Intermediate Watercolor FA Intermediate Welding FA Advanced Drawing FA Advanced Painting FA Advanced Papermaking FA Advanced Sculpture Choose 1 advanced course from: FA Ceramics FA Drawing FA Glassblowing FA Painting FA Papermaking FA Printmaking FA Sculpture FA Watercolor FA Welding

Literature Earning a minor in Literature bolsters students’ understanding of the highest achievements in the literary arts. Six courses are required, as specified below. Required courses: LA190 Writing & the Arts Choose five courses from: LA390 Readings in American Literature LA391 Readings in English Literature LA394 Readings in World Literature LA395 Film and Literature LA421 Mythology LA496 Contemporary Literature LA498 Literary Studies LA499 Criticism of Literature and Art LA461 Independent Study in Liberal Arts

Media Arts The Media Arts minor allows students in all majors to learn cutting-edge technology by taking a total of 6 courses in Media Arts, as specified below. Many of these courses can be used towards art elective requirements in other majors.

REQUIRED COURSES: CA2311 PH2012

Visual Narrative and Storyboard Photography I

Choose 4 courses from: 2000–4000-level Media Arts (AN/CA/PH) courses

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Master of Fine Arts

80 CCAD Master of Fine Arts


CCAD awards a two-year graduate degree, the Master of Fine Arts in Visual Arts: New Projects. The project-based, multidisciplinary curriculum is designed to develop not just artistic skills, but also skills in planning, communications, and leadership. Two courses form the backbone of the program: Studio Projects (which becomes Thesis Projects during the second year) and the Graduate Seminar. These two courses­­­—the first, individual work with a faculty mentor, and the second, a group critique with peers—are required for all four semesters. The basic core is supplemented by Theory and Criticism, Digital Culture, and Professional Practices courses. A required off-campus experience can be completed at any point during the program, but typically occurs in the summer between the first and second years of study. The second year of the program is primarily focused on the development and completion of a thesis project, paper, and documentation. MFA candidates who take an elective Teaching Methods course and complete either two internships or one internship and one semester of adjunct teaching on campus can earn a concurrent Certificate in College Art Instruction. For complete details, visit ccad.edu/programs/mfa. To apply, or for more information, contact the Graduate Admissions Office at 614.222.4020 or mfa@ccad.edu.


Beyond the Classroom

82 CCAD Beyond the Classroom


Honors Program

Visiting Artists

The CCAD Honors Program centers around seminar courses offered each semester and the creation of individualized learning contracts, culminating in a thesis/capstone project. Program activities are designed to assist students in integrating various community and academic projects with their individual creative interests within the CCAD curriculum. Benefits include honors designation on transcripts, recognition at commencement, and the opportunity to propose and implement projects that move students toward their personal, academic, and career goals. To find out more, contact the Director of Advising in One-Stop Student Services.

CCAD’s Visiting Artist program brings practicing artists and other creative professionals to campus, encouraging students to meet diverse creative people, hear their success stories, and benefit from their close attention in classroom discussions, studio visits, and critiques. The program also allows visiting professionals to see the college and observe the potential of our students firsthand. Visit ccad.edu/event/calendar to see the current schedule.

Off-Campus Study CCAD offers many opportunities to study at diverse institutions, both in the U.S. and abroad. Students can develop cultural awareness and experience unique artistic growth through the Study Abroad, International Exchange, AICAD Mobility, New York Arts, and New York Studio Residency programs. Program lengths range from a few weeks to a full semester, and locations include Chile, Ireland, Scotland, France, Italy, China, and England. Visit ccad.edu/programs-of-study/special-programs to find out more.

The Packard Library Located in the lower level of the Canzani Center, CCAD’s Packard Library is centralized gathering place for students, faculty and staff—whether for study, discussion, drawing, or just enjoying the view of the courtyard. The library offers a collection of books, periodicals, picture files, electronic resources, slides, CDs, digital images, DVDs/VHS tapes, and more. Through the OPAL and OhioLINK consortiums, CCAD students have access to 48 million unique titles, varied electronic research databases, and a growing collection of e-books, which can be accessed via the library’s webpage at ccad.edu. There are Macintosh and PC computers with internet access, office productivity, and design applications. The Macintosh workstations are equipped with scanners and Wacom tablets. Black-and-white and color copying and printing options are available. Additional resources include a group study room; Wi-Fi access throughout the library; a viewing room with A/V equipment; light tables; and skeletons, skulls, and manikins to help students develop their drawing skills.

Exhibitions CCAD’s primary public exhibitions space is the Canzani Center Gallery, which hosts curated exhibitions of contemporary work in art and design and CCAD faculty and student exhibitions. In addition, the college has four thesis galleries that house senior thesis exhibitions during fall and spring semesters. For a current exhibitions schedule, visit the calendar on ccad.edu. On-campus exhibitions are a great opportunity for students to see work by wellknown contemporary artists and get a sense of the larger art world. In addition, artists often produce works on site for the exhibitions, giving students the chance to meet and even work with visiting artists from all over the world.

Advising The mission of advising is to help students feel a part of the college academic community; develop sound academic and career goals; and, most importantly, be successful learners. Advisors seek to encourage self-reliance by helping students make informed and responsible decisions, set realistic goals, and develop thinking, learning, and life management skills to meet present and future needs. Advisors include faculty and staff members.

Career Services The Office of Career Services helps students plan for and secure their future careers. Through specialized workshops, events, and other professional development programs, whether working with students individually or as part of a group: Career Services helps all students develop personalized career goals and strategies. Students, alumni, and employers are invited to utilize the Career Services jobs board at ccadcareers.com to post and locate internships, as well as part-time, freelance, and full-time jobs. In addition, Career Services hosts hundreds of companies on campus each year, giving CCAD students direct contact with future employers. At the annual Internship Fair each fall, companies meet with students to discuss their organizations and industries, review portfolios, and talk about internship opportunities. During the annual Directions Career Fair in the spring, graduating seniors set up tables with samples of their work, portfolios, and presentation materials for employers to view as they recruit for full-time positions. Recruitment visits are arranged throughout the year. Workshops and individual assistance with resume and cover-letter writing, job-search strategies, interviewing techniques, self-assessment, and other topics of significance to career planning are also ongoing.


Intercollegiate Cross-Registration Full-time students at CCAD can enroll in courses not offered at CCAD through a program offered by the Higher Education Council of Columbus (HECC), a consortium of colleges and universities in central Ohio. HECC participant colleges include:

»» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »»

Capital University Central Ohio Technical College Columbus State Community College DeVry Institute of Technology Franklin University Mt. Carmel College of Nursing Ohio Dominican University Ohio State University Otterbein College Pontifical College Josephinum

For information on this program, contact One-Stop Student Services at 614.222.3295.

Disability Services Disability Services coordinates accommodations and support services to ensure equal access to students with documented disabilities, including learning disabilities, deafness/hearing impairments, blindness/low vision, psychiatric disorders, Attention Deficit Disorders (AD/ADHD), mobility limitations, and medical disabilities. For more information, visit ccad.edu/college-services/ learning-support-services/disability-support.

Learning Support Services Learning Support Services assists students in becoming effective and selfdetermined learners and enhancing their abilities to communicate, problemsolve, and apply their creative skills. Services and resources include:

»» The Learning Support Center , a quiet study space and repository for study skills information

»» The Learning Support Center computer lab, equipped with software to assist

students who have trouble with reading, are auditory learners, or are not fluent in English »» Monthly workshops to address time management, note-taking, organization, planning, and study skill issues »» Writing coaches and creative coaches who are available for one-onone appointments Students may also meet individually with professional Learning Support Services staff to discuss academic challenges and co-create plans for improvement.

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Campus 1. THE JOSEPH V. CANZANI CENTER holds the President’s office,

as well as offices for the VPs for Academic Affairs, Advancement, and Student Affairs; the Admissions, Advancement, and Continuing & Professional Studies teams; Information Technology; and the Packard Library. There are also the main campus auditorium, the Canzani Center Gallery (CCAD’s main public exhibitions space), a senior thesis exhibition gallery (the Acock Gallery), the boardroom, and a multipurpose room.

2. THE CRANE CENTER for Design’s ground floor is home to Student

Affairs, including Student Life, the Learning Resource Center, Counseling Services, and One-Stop Student Services (comprised of Advising, the Registrar, Financial Aid, and the Bursar). Also on the ground level is a game room. On the upper floors are faculty offices, Interior Design and Advertising & Graphic Design classrooms, and computer labs geared toward CAD work.

3. THE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING houses the Business Office, Human Resources, Security, Facilities, and the mailroom. There are also several student work areas.

4. THE SCHOTTENSTEIN RESIDENCE HALL is dorm-style suites for freshmen.

5. KINNEY HALL houses Liberal Arts and Media Arts faculty offices,

classrooms, studios, and labs, including electronic publishing labs. Also in Kinney are the IT Help Desk; the woodshop; glass-blowing, ceramics, and industrial design studios; a printmaking lab; computer labs; and the CCAD Supply Store.

6. BATTELLE HALL contains dimensional studies, which include

sculpture, jewelry, and metal and welding shops, as well as faculty offices.

7. THE VISITING ARTIST RESIDENCE consists of two apartments used to house visiting artists, lecturers, and faculty.

8. DESIGN STUDIOS ON BROAD is the home of the CCAD

MindMarket. It also holds a senior thesis exhibition hall, an alumni gallery, faculty offices, the Career Service office, and the Fashion Design, Foundation Studies, and MFA programs.

9. GRANT LAB contains Foundation Studies classrooms. 10. DESIGN SQUARE APARTMENTS provide apartment-style living for mainly upperclass students.

11. STUDIO HALL used to be the home of the Fashion Design program, which is now in Design Studios on Broad.

12. STUDIO HALL ANNEX 13. CIRCLE HALL houses faculty offices and the Illustration department, including computer labs, a 3D illustration lab, and a papermaking studio.

14. THE AMELITA MIROLO FINE ARTS BUILDING houses

painting and drawing classrooms; individual studio spaces for fine arts seniors; and the Beaton Gallery.


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Administration Mission Statement

Administration

Columbus College of Art & Design prepares tomorrow’s creative leaders for professional careers. With a history of commitment to fundamentals and quality, CCAD advances a distinct, challenging, and inclusive learning culture that supports individual development in art, design, and the humanities.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

CCAD complies with all local, state, and federal laws concerning civil and human rights. Educational programs, admissions, housing, and employment practices are free of any discrimination based on race, gender, color, religion, sexual orientation, national origin, veteran status, handicap, or age.

Robert P. Restrepo Jr., chair James E. Kunk, vice chair Michael J. Fiorile, immediate past chair Jerry O. Allen, treasurer Patricia R. Hatler, secretary Mitch Acock Jeni Britton Bauer John C. Beeler Beverly Bethge Mark Corna Lynnda Maria Davis Fran Horowitz R. Andrew Johnson John S. Kobacker Eileen A. Mallesch Kelly Mooney Jane Ramsey Michael W. Rayden Lee Szykowny, M.D. Edward J. Yen

Weapons Policy

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION

Accreditation and Affiliations CCAD is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) and The Higher Learning Commission (HLC) of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The Interior Design program is accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA). CCAD is affiliated with many academic organizations, including the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design (AICAD), the National Association of Foreign Student Affairs, and the New Media Consortium, which has designated the college a New Media Center.

Nondiscrimination Statement

Unless specifically authorized by the college or otherwise authorized by law, pursuant to the Ohio Revised Code, no student, employee or other persons having business with the college shall knowingly possess, have under the person’s control, convey or attempt to convey a deadly handgun or dangerous ordnance, including firearms, explosives, knives, BB guns, paintball guns, martial arts weapons, antiques, or other weapons of any kind, onto CCAD property, including but not limited to CCAD-owned or -leased buildings and parking lots. Nor shall an individual possess a replica of such items that could be reasonably mistaken for any item listed above, except for faculty using replicas in classroom settings in the course of instruction. Violations of this policy will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including suspension or termination of employment or educational standing with the college and referral to authorities for prosecution.

NOTE:

This catalog does not constitute a contract. The information contained herein including course offerings and descriptions is subject to change and CCAD reserves all rights to modify as needed.

President: Dennison W. Griffith

Senior Vice President and Chief Fiscal Officer: Jeffrey A. Fisher Vice President for Academic Affairs: Kevin J. Conlon Vice President for Enrollment Management & Communications: Jonathan W. Lindsay Vice President for Advancement: Laurie Beth Sweeney Vice President for Student Affairs: Dwayne Todd Chief Information Officer: Jeffrey Brotherton


Contact Admissions

Student Affairs

Tel 877.997.CCAD (toll-free from within U.S.) Tel 614.222.3261 Fax 614.232.8344 admissions@ccad.edu

Tel 614.222.4044 Fax 614.222.4034

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADMISSIONS & ADVISING Tel 614.222.3265 Fax 614.232.8344 internationalinfo@ccad.edu

GRADUATE ADMISSIONS Tel 614.222.4020 mfa@ccad.edu

One-Stop Student Services Tel 614.222.3295 Fax 614.222.4034

ADVISING advising@ccad.edu

BURSAR

CAREER SERVICES Tel 614.222.4044 careers@ccad.edu

COUNSELING & WELLNESS SERVICES Tel 614.222.4000 counseling@ccad.edu

ORIENTATION Tel 614.222.6191 orientation@ccad.edu

RESIDENCE LIFE Tel 614.222.3294 housing@ccad.edu

STUDENT ACTIVITIES Tel 614.222.4044 getinvolved@ccad.edu

bursar@ccad.edu

DISABILITY SERVICES Tel 614.222.4004 learningsupport@ccad.edu

FINANCIAL AID financialaid@ccad.edu

REGISTRAR registrar@ccad.edu

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60 Cleveland Avenue Columbus, OH 43215 614.224.9101 www.ccad.edu


2013 Course Catalog