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K N I G H T S O F C O LU M BU S

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K N I G H T S O F C O LU M BU S    ♦        ♦      

COLUMBIA F E AT U R E S

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The Fallen, the Faithful The stories of three Knights killed in action remind us to pray for and give thanks to those willing to pay freedom’s ultimate cost. BY JOSEPH O’BRIEN

12 Nebraska Strong Knights jumped into action in response to unprecedented flooding in the Cornhusker state. BY JOSEPH PAPPALARDO

18 Iron Sharpens Iron All-star recruiters reflect on effective ways to invite men to join the Knights of Columbus. BY COLUMBIA STAFF

22 Bustin’ Babe Goes Barnstorming The Knights helped popularize baseball with Babe Ruth’s national postseason tours. BY ANDREW FOWLER

Flags adorn the graves at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., on Memorial Day.

D E PA RT M E N T S 3

Building a better world The tragic fire at Notre-Dame Cathedral evokes both our history and our responsibility as Catholics. BY SUPREME KNIGHT CARL A. ANDERSON

    

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Learning the faith, living the faith The Blessed Virgin Mary, our mother and model, intercedes for and consoles the Church, the Body of Christ.

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Knights of Columbus News Supreme Knight Walks in NYC St. Patrick’s Day Parade • Order Commemorates Marian Anderson’s Landmark 1939 Concert • Knights in France Organize Spiritual Response to Church Attacks • Knights Welcome Recent Pro-Life Policy Decisions

17 Christians at Risk Knights of Columbus in Poland stand in solidarity with persecuted Christians in the Middle East.

26 Knights in Action

BY SUPREME CHAPLAIN ARCHBISHOP WILLIAM E. LORI

PLUS: Catholic Man of the Month

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The Spirit of Sacrifice COURAGE AND SELFLESSNESS can take many forms, but aside from martyrdom, perhaps never are they more vividly seen than during times of war. Last fall, the Order commemorated the centenary of the Armistice and the extraordinary service of Knights during World War I — including tens of thousands of military personnel, as well as priest chaplains and field secretaries known as “Caseys.� Nearly 1,700 Knights died in the Great War. A similar number were killed in World War II, and Knights have been among the casualties of subsequent wars as well. In view of Memorial Day, observed this year on May 27, this issue of Columbia features profiles of just a few of the exemplary Knights who have died serving their country in recent years (see page 8). The annual tradition of remembering the sacrifice of fallen soldiers and laying flowers or wreaths at their graves dates back to the Civil War. What began as Decoration Day gradually became known as Memorial Day; and after the United States entered World War I in 1917, the observance began to encompass all military conflicts. The Order took a leading role in honoring servicemen killed in action during the war. A contemporary history notes: “The Knights initiated their remarkable program of public religious celebrations with the observance of All Soul’s Day, in memory of the American dead, in the Cathedral of Notre-Dame, Paris, on November 1, 1917, when the prospect of victory was most remote.�

It continues: “It was only natural, with this event as a precedent, that Memorial Day, when it duly arrived, should find the Knights well prepared to foster its celebration. Throughout England and France and the Rhineland, and in Belgium and Italy at points where the Knights of Columbus operated, no American cemetery was unvisited by the Knights of Columbus workers, who laid their tributes of flowers and prayers on the graves of the fallen.â€? Over the past century, K of C councils and assemblies throughout the world have honored those who have made the ultimate sacrifice. Organizing or participating in memorial observances relates to patriotism, the principle of the Fourth Degree, but it also relates to the first principle of the Order — charity. Praying for the dead is a spiritual work of mercy, and the fidelity and selflessness modeled by so many of the fallen can also be a source of inspiration in our own lives. Most of us will never face the threat of enemy attacks nor of martyrdom, so it is tempting to become comfortable and to overlook Jesus’ new commandment: “As I have loved you, so you also should love one anotherâ€? (Jn 13:34). This kind of love — agape in Greek and caritas in Latin — is a radical, self-giving love, and a fruit of the Holy Spirit. This is what we mean when we profess charity as the first principle of the Knights. We may not be called to shed our blood, but we are all called to practice heroic love.♌ ALTON J. PELOWSKI EDITOR

Domestic Church Resource: Becoming a Real Man of God What does it mean to be a Catholic man today? In Becoming a Real Man of God, Father Roger Landry explains how true masculinity combines both strength and holiness. Made in the image of God, men are called to love and serve others like Christ. To order a copy of the booklet (#328), which is part of the Building the Domestic Church series, or to download it and other Catholic Information Service resources in PDF or audio format, visit kofc.org/cis. 2 ♌ COLUMBIA ♌

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COLUMBIA PUBLISHER Knights of Columbus ________ SUPREME OFFICERS Carl A. Anderson SUPREME KNIGHT Most Rev. William E. Lori, S.T.D. SUPREME CHAPLAIN Patrick E. Kelly DEPUTY SUPREME KNIGHT Michael J. O’Connor SUPREME SECRETARY Ronald F. Schwarz SUPREME TREASURER John A. Marrella SUPREME ADVOCATE ________ EDITORIAL Alton J. Pelowski EDITOR Andrew J. Matt MANAGING EDITOR Cecilia Hadley SENIOR EDITOR Margaret B. Kelly ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Venerable Michael McGivney (1852-90) Apostle to the Young, Protector of Christian Family Life and Founder of the Knights of Columbus, Intercede for Us.

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HOW TO REACH US MAIL COLUMBIA 1 Columbus Plaza New Haven, CT 06510-3326 ADDRESS CHANGES 203-752-4210, option #3 addresschange@kofc.org PRAYER CARDS & SUPPLIES 203-752-4214 COLUMBIA INQUIRIES 203-752-4398 FAX 203-752-4109 K OF C CUSTOMER SERVICE 1-800-380-9995 EMAIL columbia@kofc.org INTERNET kofc.org/columbia ________ Membership in the Knights of Columbus is open to men 18 years of age or older who are practical (that is, practicing) Catholics in union with the Holy See. This means that an applicant or member accepts the teaching authority of the Catholic Church on matters of faith and morals, aspires to live in accord with the precepts of the Catholic Church, and is in good standing in the Catholic Church.

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Copyright Š 2019 All rights reserved ________ ON THE COVER Baseball greats Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig stand together, wearing the uniforms of their rival teams during a barnstorming tour in 1927.

     

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BU I L D I N G A B E T T E R WO R L D

We Will Rebuild The tragic fire at Notre-Dame Cathedral evokes both our history and our responsibility as Catholics by Supreme Knight Carl A. Anderson I AM WRITING this column while a massive fire is still engulfing our beautiful Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris. I say “our” because this magnificent structure has been for centuries an artistic patrimony of humanity, a place of prayer for millions of Catholics in France and throughout the world — and, more recently, a special place for the Knights of Columbus. In May 2017, I joined a delegation of brother Knights from Paris to attend Mass at Notre-Dame Cathedral and to participate in a special exposition and veneration of the relic of the Crown of Thorns. Later that year, the Knights of Columbus was one of the major sponsors of a light show on the cathedral’s façade. Titled “Dame de Cœur” (Queen of Hearts), the light show depicted the history of the cathedral in commemoration of World War I. From the two-volume history The Knights of Columbus in Peace and War (1920), we read this: “In Paris on Good Friday 1919, the most impressive religious service held in the history of the American Expeditionary Forces in Europe took place when the Knights of Columbus … held a service there for the public adoration of the cross. Ten thousand Americans packed the great edifice; the Cardinal Archbishop of Paris, Mons. Amette, presided.” Much has been said about the significance of this tragic fire. It is difficult to grasp its significance for the French people and especially French Catholics. Perhaps “The Virgin at Noon,” a poem by Paul Claudel, can help us un-

derstand. It is noteworthy that Claudel’s conversion took place in Notre-Dame Cathedral during the singing of the Magnificat on Christmas Day 1886. “It is noon. The church is open. I must go in. Mother of our Lord, I have not come to pray. I have nothing to give and nothing to ask. I am here, my Lady, only to look at you. To look at you, to cry for joy, to know That I am your son and you are there. Only for one moment when everything stops. Noon! To be with you, Mary, in this place where you are. To say nothing, to look at your face. To let my heart sing in its own language. To say nothing, but simply to sing because my heart is too full… . Because you saved me, because you saved France. Because France too, like myself, was for you a thing to be considered. Because at that moment when everything collapsed, you intervened. Because you saved France once again. Because it is noon, because we are at this moment of today. Because you are there for always, simply because you are Mary, Simply because you exist. Mother of Our Lord, we give thanks to you.” When the president of France announced today that Notre-Dame Cathedral will be rebuilt, I thought of how the great Gothic cathedrals were

originally constructed. An account from 1144 states that the faithful were freely “harnessed to carts, laden with stones, timbers, corn and whatever might be needed for the work of building the cathedral, the towers of which rose like magic into the heavens… . Everywhere men humbled themselves, did penance, and forgave their enemies. Men and women could be seen dragging heavy loads through mire and marsh, praising in song the miracle which God was performing before their eyes.” Mindful of all the controversies consuming the Church in recent years, the image of this burning cathedral seemed in a way to symbolize the devastation so many Catholics have felt as our Church has been rocked by one crisis after another. Fires have destroyed great cathedrals before, and they have been rebuilt. So let us hope this will be true again. But not only this church. Let us resolve to patiently “rebuild” the Church, not with granite and mortar, but with living stones in the spirit of those earlier builders — with humility, penance and with gratitude for the miracle that God is still performing before our eyes. And let us do so with confidence in Mary, who “at that moment when everything collapsed” does not hesitate to intervene for us. Vivat Jesus!

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L E A R N I N G T H E FA I T H , L I V I N G T H E FA I T H

Mary, Mother of the Church The Blessed Virgin Mary, our mother and model, intercedes for and consoles the Church, the Body of Christ by Supreme Chaplain Archbishop William E. Lori INVALUABLE TO the Christian life is powerful intercession of Mary is palpable a warm and loving devotion to Mary, the in those encounters. Mother of God. I was blessed to grow up My love for the Blessed Mother likein a home where the rosary was prayed wise intensified when I visited the I never fail to pray for the cardinal, daily, even on the busiest and most diffi- Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe in whose example and memory continue cult days. There was always a statue of the Mexico City for the first time in 1990 to influence my life so deeply. Blessed Mother in our home and other and looked upon her miraculous image. During the month of May, we honor reminders of Mary’s love for us, her chil- The experience filled me with joy and Mary in a special way, and on June 10, dren. At school, May processions culmi- opened my eyes to Mary’s role in the the Monday after Pentecost, we will celnated in the crowning of a statue as we all evangelization of the world. ebrate her as the Mother of the Church. sang to Our Lady. Her virginity symbolizes the In time, I got into the habit of truth and purity of the Church’s praying a daily rosary, and as I teaching and the sacrifice that the meditated on the life of Jesus Church daily offers. Her motherWe must turn our gaze toward through the eyes of Mary, my vohood symbolizes the maternal Mary, asking her prayers that the care that the Church gives to us, cation came into sharper focus. In my final years at Mount St. her children, reborn by water and Church might be purified. Mary’s Seminary in Emmitsburg, the Holy Spirit. This love reaches Md., I often went to the beautius through many channels, not ful grotto up the mountain, a nathe least of which are the tional shrine dedicated to Our Lady of Inspired by these experiences, Marian Church’s ministries of healing and charLourdes. In the quiet of that grotto, my devotion has become an essential part of ity. And when members of the Knights love for Mary deepened as I prepared to my life. Like every good Knight of of Columbus live the principle of charserve the Church as a priest. Columbus, I carry a rosary in my pocket. ity, we help extend the loving care of the But it was not until I visited Lourdes, My father’s own K of C rosary also re- Church to the poor and the vulnerable. France, for the first time in the 1980s, mains in the little chapel in my resiThese days, though, it is the Church that I was overwhelmed with the healing dence. When the house is quiet at night, — sinful in her members — that needs power of the Blessed Mother’s interces- I often slip into the chapel and pray with healing. Sins against young people and sion. In that holy place, where Mary re- my dad’s rosary. As I do so, I think about the failure of Church leaders to respond vealed herself to St. Bernadette as the all the people I met during the day and continue to haunt and hobble the Body Immaculate Conception, I experienced the many people who asked me to pray of Christ. Many practical steps still need a wonderful healing, cleansing and re- for them. As the day comes to a close, to be taken to ensure that bishops and newal of body, mind and spirit. Over the nothing is more consoling than to spend other leaders are held accountable for their actions. But those steps alone, imyears, I have returned to Lourdes many a little time in conversation with Mary. I also look upon a beautiful statue of portant as they are, won’t fully heal the times, often with pilgrims, many of whom suffer from serious illnesses. I visit the Blessed Mother that I received from Church’s wounds. For that, we must with them before they go into the baths Cardinal James Hickey, my mentor and turn our gaze toward Mary, asking her and, when feasible, pray with them after friend, when I became a bishop many prayers that the Church might be purithey emerge. The purifying love and years ago. When I look upon that image, fied, cleansed, healed and renewed.♦ 4 ♦ COLUMBIA ♦

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SUPREME CHAPLAIN’S CHALLENGE

A monthly reflection and practical challenge from Supreme Chaplain Archbishop William E. Lori: “Jesus said, ‘My children, I will be with you only a little while longer. I give you a new commandment: love one another. As I have loved you, so you also should love one another’� (Gospel for May 19, Jn 13:34). We have heard this teaching of Jesus before, but do we personalize it and truly know it to be true? Each one of us is called to love in the most profound way — by caring about others’ eternal well-being. But Catholics in

H O LY FAT H E R ’ S P R AY E R I N T E N T I O N

America today are, sadly, not known for loving one another to the point that we risk sharing our faith with others. One recent poll found that only 6% of Catholics believe sharing their faith is a “high priority.â€? Jesus invites us to do more, and he does not call the equipped; he equips the called. Challenge by Supreme Chaplain Archbishop William E. Lori: This month, I challenge you to invite one person out for coffee, to your home or an event at your parish. Tell them what you enjoy about the Catholic faith. If they have been away from the Catholic Church, invite them back. If they are not Catholic, ask them if they would consider joining. Either way, be welcoming and nonjudgmental in your conversation.♌

C AT H O L I C M A N O F T H E M O N T H

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Father Pierre-Jean De Smet (1801-1873)

That the Church in Africa, through the commitment of its members, may be the seed of unity among her peoples and a sign of hope for this continent.

L I T U RG I C A L C A L E N DA R May 1 May 2

May 3 May 10 May 13 May 14 May 20 May 21

May 22 May 27

May 29 May 30 May 31

St. Joseph the Worker St. Athanasius, Bishop and Doctor of the Church Sts. Philip and James, Apostles St. Damien de Veuster, Priest Our Lady of Fatima St. Matthias, Apostle St. Bernardine of Siena, Priest St. Christopher Magallanes and Companions, Martyrs St. Rita of Cascia, Religious St. Augustine of Canterbury, Bishop St. Paul VI, Pope The Ascension of the Lord The Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

CHIEF SITTING BULL faced Jesuit Father Pierre-Jean De Smet, the only white man allowed to enter his camp of 5,000 Sioux warriors. He said, “I will listen to your good words, Black Robe.� Regarded by Native Americans as “the white man whose tongue does not lie,� the priest had arrived to negotiate a peace treaty between the U.S. government and the Lakota Sioux nation in 1868. It was signed later that year. De Smet was born and raised in Flanders, Belgium. At age 19, he was inspired by a missionary visiting from the United States. De Smet set sail the following year and joined the Jesuits in Baltimore. He was later ordained in St. Louis in 1827. After a decade of teaching and administrative duties, Father De Smet began his missionary work among Native Americans. He made many trips along the Missouri and Columbia Rivers and even farther afield; one grueling trek over the Canadian Rockies in snowshoes led him up the Saskatchewan River into present-day Alberta. His cheerful disposition, childlike trust in God and intrepid spirit

won him numerous friends, as well as converts, and made him a celebrated peacemaker among warring tribes. Father De Smet also traveled frequently to Europe to secure funds and recruits. In 1844, he enlisted six religious sisters and four priests to travel back with him around Cape Horn and up to Oregon. In all, he traversed over 180,000 miles, including 16 trans-Atlantic voyages. Beginning in 1851, the U.S. government repeatedly sought Father De Smet’s aid as a mediator with the Native Americans. He wrote, “My heart, I admit, is ever with the Indians.â€? Until his death in St. Louis on May 23, 1873, he tirelessly sought to build bonds of peace.♌

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K N I G H T S O F C O LU M BU S N E W S

Order Commemorates Marian Anderson’s Landmark 1939 Concert

Supreme Knight Carl Anderson walks with Retired Army Col. James Tierney (right) and other representatives of the Fighting 69th, leading the parade along New York City’s Fifth Avenue.

EIGHTY YEARS after Marian Anderson’s Easter Sunday concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, the Knights of Columbus honored the singer and her contributions to civil rights with two special events. Anderson performed at the Lincoln Memorial on April 9, 1939, after she was denied permission to sing at Washington’s Constitution Hall because she was African American. With help from First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, the renowned contralto drew an audience of 75,000 to the National Mall for the concert — a milestone for the civil rights movement. The New Haven Symphony Orchestra, with support from the Supreme Council, commemorated that day with a concert titled “To Thee We Singâ€? on April 4. Several days earlier, the Knights of Columbus Museum hosted a preview event for students, community leaders, and K of C employees. “Today we pause to remember the moral courage of an American hero, who greatly loved her country,â€? said Supreme Knight Carl Anderson, who served on the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights and the Vatican’s Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace. He is also a current member of the U.S. Catholic Bishops’ Ad Hoc Committee against Racism. Soprano Kristin Renee Young gave a preview of her performance with the New Haven Symphony Orchestra by singing several songs, and local leaders, including New Haven Mayor Toni Harp, delivered remarks.♌

SUPREME KNIGHT Carl Anderson walked with the 1st Battalion of the 69th Infantry Regiment of the New York Army National Guard — “the Irish Brigadeâ€? — during the New York City St. Patrick’s Day Parade on March 16. The “Fighting 69thâ€? leads the parade each year in recognition of the Irish Catholic heritage of the now diverse unit. Irish immigrants formed the brigade before the Civil War, and its members have also served in World War I, World War II, the Iraq War and the War in Afghanistan. Retired Army Col. James Tierney, the honorary colonel of the regiment and a Fourth Degree Knight, invited Supreme Knight Anderson to march with the battalion in honor of Joyce Kilmer. A well-known poet and a member of the Knights of Columbus, Kilmer was killed by a sniper’s bullet July 30, 1918, while serving with the unit in France. The crucifix that Kilmer was carrying when he died has been passed down by the brigade for more than a century. The battalion commander traditionally wears or carries Kilmer’s crucifix during the St. Patrick’s Day parade.♌

Kristin Renee Young, a lyric coloratura soprano, sings at the Knights of Columbus Museum in New Haven April 1. The event celebrated Marian Anderson’s 1939 concert at the Lincoln Memorial, seen in the background.

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Supreme Knight Walks in NYC St. Patrick’s Day Parade


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Knights in France Organize Spiritual Response to Church Attacks VANDALS AND ARSONISTS have desecrated numerous Catholic churches in France in recent months. Ten churches were targeted in just one week in early February, prompting French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe to condemn the attacks. More recently, the second largest church in Paris, St. Sulpice, was set ablaze by arsonists March 17. Other acts of vandalism have included smashed crosses and statues of Jesus and Mary, altar cloths set on fire, consecrated hosts strewn on the floor and more extreme acts of desecration. The first action of Knights of Columbus in France was to gather together in prayer and solidarity. “In front of these attacks against faith and sacred places, the first thing to do is pray and to tell the truth with a responsible voice, not with revenge but with dignity,â€? said Arnaud BouthĂŠon, a member of the Charles de Foucauld Council 16502 in Paris. Knights and chaplains in France organized special Masses in their parishes Feb. 19. Members were invited to pray for peace, forgiveness and hope, as well as for strength in the face of adversity. “As citizens and patriots, we will alert the public about this aggression and help our priests to protect church buildings,â€? BouthĂŠon said. “As Catholics, we also know that we

will find interior peace not in activism but in prayer.� The Catholic Church in France has experienced other violent attacks in recent years. Father Jacques Hamel, a priest in Saint-Étienne-du-Rouvray, was murdered while celebrating Mass in July 2016. Just days later, at the 134th Supreme Convention, Supreme Knight Carl Anderson announced that the first K of C councils in France had been chartered. The country now counts more than 320 Knights in 16 councils and 10 different dioceses.♌

     

Knights Welcome Recent Pro-Life Policy Decisions PRO-LIFE ADVOCATES WERE heartened this spring by a pair of U.S. government decisions that could help prevent abortions both abroad and at home. On March 26, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced new policies to supplement and strengthen the Mexico City Policy. First implemented in 1984 under President Ronald Reagan, and most recently reinstated in January 2017, the policy blocks federal funds to organizations that perform or promote abortions abroad. Pompeo also announced stronger enforcement of the Siljander Amendment, which prohibits U.S. aid going toward lobbying on either side of the abortion issue. “The Knights of Columbus applauds [these] measures,� Supreme Knight Carl Anderson said. “We steadfastly

oppose sending U.S. tax dollars to NGOs or any organizations that support ending lives through abortion.� On April 4, the Sixth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals upheld Kentucky’s Ultrasound Informed Consent Act, which requires abortion providers to perform ultrasounds and give women seeking abortion the opportunity to see the images. The legislation, passed in 2017, had been blocked by a lower

court, which ruled that its requirements violated doctors’ First Amendment rights. In his majority opinion, Circuit Judge John K. Bush wrote that the bill did not violate a doctor’s right to free speech because the information it required the doctor to disclose was “truthful, non-misleading, and relevant information aimed at informing a patient about her decision to abort unborn life.â€? The supreme knight praised the decision, noting, “[Ultrasound] technology can be credited for making a difference in the lives of thousands of women and their babies.â€? Since it was launched in January 2009, the Knights of Columbus Ultrasound Initiative has provided nearly 1,050 ultrasound machines to pro-life pregnancy centers.♌

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THE FALLEN, THE FAITHFUL The stories of three Knights killed in action remind us to pray for and give thanks to those willing to pay freedom’s ultimate cost by Joseph O’Brien

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rom the Great War to the Gulf War to ongoing conflicts in the Middle East, tens of thousands of Knights of Columbus have served during military conflicts. More than 3,300 of them made the ultimate sacrifice in World War I and World War II. These men embodied the principles of the Order: charity, unity, fraternity and — especially — patriotism. This Memorial Day, we honor three of the nearly 50 Knights who have died this century during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, as family members they left behind attest to their generosity, courage and faith-filled service. OUT IN FRONT From a young age, Peter Clore had a protective nature. He was the oldest of four children, and according to his parents, Clifford and Christine Clore of New Philadelphia, Ohio, he always wanted to lead the way. It was in this forward position that Clore lost his life. He was serving as a dog handler locating improvised explosive devices when his unit came under enemy fire in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. He was killed May 28, 2011, at age 23. “Peter knew he would be out front with the Marines — and once he became certified as a dog handler, he would be further out in front of the whole patrol,” his mother said. “But this is what he did throughout his life. Even when he served at the altar, he was frequently the server out front with the incense.” Clore also encouraged his siblings — George, Sarah and John — to take a leading role. “Peter always pushed me to serve at Mass,” George recalled. “He wanted to make sure I was serving so I could understand the Mass better.” Clore’s natural leadership developed as a Boy Scout, an active member of his parish, a Special Olympics volunteer and a Knight of Columbus. He joined New Philadelphia Council 2372 in early 2006, shortly after his 18th birthday. He then enrolled at the Pontifical College Josephinum in Columbus, Ohio, where he began studies for the priesthood. (He had first expressed a desire to become a priest after his first Communion.) In 2008, Clore decided to take a break from studies and enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps. Following the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti, his company was deployed to assist with humanitarian relief, and he intended to go back to help the Haitian people after his military service. 8 ♦ COLUMBIA ♦

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“He learned that helping others was important in life,” his father, Clifford, said. “When I was his Cubmaster, I would emphasize the duties of God, country, others and self. If you get the first three right, the fourth will take care of itself.” Whether in the seminary or in combat boots, Lance Cpl. Clore saw his Catholic faith as crucial to any mission. “His friends and fellow Marines have told us that he never forgot that his real strength was in God,” Clifford said. “He kept his Bible with him at all times and would read it whenever Marine Lance Cpl. possible. He would also hand Peter J. Clore out rosaries to his fellow Marines.” Dec. 21, 1987 – Their son’s faith, as well as May 28, 2011 their own, was a comfort to the Clores when they New Philadelphia (Ohio) learned of his death. Council 2372 “We found a lot of strength in our community and in our faith,” Christine Clore said. “We knew that Peter was doing what he wanted to do, and following what God asked him to do. That helped us to understand.” Within months, Council 2372 in New Philadelphia, where Clifford was serving as grand knight, was renamed for his son. Peter’s brother George also joined LCpl Peter Clore Council 2372 in 2014. By that time, the Clore family had adopted Peter’s dog, Duke, with the full blessings of the U.S. Marine Corps.

Opposite page: Christine and Clifford Clore, together with their son George, are pictured at their home with a photo of their son Marine Lance Cpl. Peter Clore, who was killed in Afghanistan in 2011.


    

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John and Lorie Goldsmith stand with a photo of their son, Wyatt A. Goldsmith, a Green Beret medic who was killed in Afghanistan in 2011. medic once again attended to an injured Afghan soldier. This time, he was mortally wounded by a rocket-propelled grenade. “Wyatt always said, ‘God loves medics,’� Lorie Goldsmith recalled. “I don’t think he had the same fear level that some people may have, at least at that moment when he died, because he was busy treating someone.� Wyatt had joined Colville (Wash.) Council 12273 in 2002, in the footsteps of his father, and he made sure to take the Knights’ most important weapon with him into battle; while still in training, he wrote his parents to ask them to send him a rosary. “He figured that as a Knight it was important that he have a rosary on him at all times,� said John Goldsmith, who now serves as grand knight of St. George Council 12560 in Post Falls, Idaho. “That rosary was on him when he was killed several years later.� The Goldsmiths want the world to remember their son as a good soldier and a good Catholic who was serving others up to the moment he died. “The best men in the military are men of faith,� Lorie said. “You have to be, to do the things they do and lead the people they lead. And Wyatt had that.� John added, “With our faith in the teachings of the Church, I’m confident that I’m going to see him again.�

      

EQUIPPED FOR SERVICE Basic training for Wyatt Goldsmith started long before he enlisted in the U.S. Army in 2004. Born in Redmond, Wash., Goldsmith excelled at skiing in high school and later joined the National Ski Patrol, learning the ins and outs (and ups and downs) of mountain rescue and first aid. The most important lesson he learned on the slopes, according to his parents, John and Lorie Goldsmith, was service to those in need. “When he got home at the end of the day after a patrol, we’d ask him how his Army Sgt. 1st Class day went,� his father reWyatt A. Goldsmith called. “When he got to treat someone who was inSept. 21, 1982 – jured that day, he got a light July 15, 2011 in his eyes. He always had Colville (Wash.) the personality of a rescuer Council 12273 and a caregiver.� Donning the Green Beret, Goldsmith served three tours as a Special Forces medic — once in Iraq and twice in Afghanistan. During a battle on his first Afghanistan tour, he rescued some wounded Afghan soldiers after being hit by enemy gunfire himself. He later received the Bronze Star Medal with Valor for his actions. Goldsmith recovered from his wounds and deployed to Afghanistan a second time. After enemy forces engaged his unit in Helmand Province on July 15, 2011, the 28-year-old


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REMEMBER THE FALLEN Staff Sgt. Gregory Wagner of Mitchell, S.D., would be nearly 50 years old today — but for his siblings (Wagner was the youngest of seven), he will always be remembered as a fun-loving, 30-something uncle to their children. “Greg was great with kids,� said his brother Kenny Wagner, a member of Maher Council 1079 in Mitchell. “He loved his nieces and nephews, and they had great fun with him being around.� Greg joined the Army National Guard right out of high school, and after the Sept. 11 attacks he wanted to help children who had no uncle to protect them. “When he saw all these young kids and babies being treated so poorly over there, Greg wanted to make a change,� Kenny said. “He thought he could make a difference.� Staff Sgt. Wagner’s mission in Iraq was training local police forces. He was killed in Baghdad while returning to base May 8, 2006, when his Humvee was hit by an explosive projectile. A member of Council 1079 since early 2001, Wagner had a concern for others that was rooted in his Catholic faith. “Greg knew that God was number one in his life,� Kenny said. According to his brothers, Greg convinced members of his unit in Iraq to recite the Irish blessing before and after each mission. “War is an ugly thing,� said Steve Wagner, a member of St. Michael Council 12617 in Sioux Falls, S.D. “But these men were asking for God’s guidance to go into their mission for the right reason.�

Today, Steve keeps his brother’s rosary with him at all times as a way to remember Greg and all the fallen in his prayers. “It’s a rosary with brown beads and with one Hail Mary bead missing — and I’m sure that’s because of its use by Greg,â€? said Steve. “It’s one of the most prized possessions I have.â€? While Kenny, Steve and the rest of the family miss their brother dearly, they are grateful that their hometown of Alexandria, S.D., has taken his service and sacrifice to heart. “After Greg was killed, it brought it home to the rest of the Alexandria,â€? Steve said. “When you go to a Memorial Day service there today, Army National Guard about 150 to 250 people Staff Sgt. Gregory A. come. Alexandria has only Wagner 700 people. It’s become an important holiday for the Nov. 26, 1970 – community.â€? May 8, 2006 Kenny hopes that more Maher Council 1079 Americans observe this day in Mitchell, S.D. in May with prayerful events, and not only picnics. “These men didn’t die just so we can have a day off,â€? he said. “They should be honored by prayers for the ultimate sacrifice they made.â€?♌ JOSEPH O’BRIEN is a freelance writer who lives in Soldiers Grove, Wis. He is a member of St. James the Greater Council 12606 in Gays Mill.

Kenny and Steve Wagner hold a photo of their youngest brother, Staff Sgt. Gregory A. Wagner, who was killed in Baghdad in 2006. M AY 2019

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Knights jumped into action in response to unprecedented flooding in the Cornhusker state by Joseph Pappalardo

John Gibney, a member of Philip Sheridan Council 1497 in Fremont, Neb., used his airboat to transport flood victims and emergency workers. (Photo by Geoff Johnson)

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Anthony McKinley, a member of Philip Sheridan Council 1497 in Fremont, Neb., stands in front of his home after flooding subsided in the Missouri River Valley.

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raffic was light on Highway 77 as John Gibney cruised through Fremont, Neb. There was still a risk, however, that his boat would hit one of the many obstacles hidden by floodwaters, which had turned the road into a lake; then, the firefighters he was ferrying would have needed rescuing themselves. “It was almost like an inland hurricane here,� recalled Gibney, a member of Philip Sheridan Council 1497 in Fremont, about 40 miles northwest of Omaha. “The further west you got, they were getting a snowstorm like crazy, and over here, we were getting rain.� The snow and rain inundated the Missouri River Valley, swelling Nebraska’s rivers. Beginning March 14, dikes broke as waterways rerouted themselves, while roads, bridges and even houses vanished beneath the rising floodwaters. Within a couple of days, the city of Fremont, population 26,500, was completely surrounded by water. Numerous other communities in Nebraska and nearby states, including Iowa, Missouri and Kansas, were also flooded, with the damage estimated in the billions. In the aftermath, many Knights, including Gibney and Anthony McKinley of Council 1497, volunteered wherever help was needed. While Gibney assisted first responders with his boat, McKinley was hard at work on land, believing his own home to be underwater. Other Nebraska Knights, meanwhile, were busy giving away tens of thousands of dollars in emergency supplies and aid. Knights throughout the region hosted fish fries and other community events to benefit those affected. “The donations from the Knights of Columbus have been a tremendous part of a national outpouring to help Nebraska,� affirmed Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts, a member of St. Margaret Mary Council 11800 in Omaha. THE IDES OF MARCH In 17 years, water had never breached John Gibney’s home in Fremont, where he lives with his wife, Stacy, and their young son. That was about to change. “The water started to rise, the ice started to break up, and the rivers started swelling in our area. It was quite epic,� recalled Gibney, 42. On March 15, after using sump pumps to save his furnace and appliances from the rising water in his basement, and then helping his neighbors do the same, Gibney called the local airboat association. He learned that local firefighters needed boats to rescue a group of 20 people stranded at Dove’s Cove, a lakefront neighborhood, after floodwaters swallowed up the highways. Gibney, a city utility worker, hopped in his 20-foot fishing barge and transported the firefighters to those in need. “Their homes were devastated,� he said. “We had to take one girl off the roof.� It was the first of dozens of boat trips Gibney made over the next several days, evacuating residents, transporting first responders and retrieving medications for displaced flood victims. When the authorities needed a boat, whether on the highway or in a waterlogged neighborhood, Gibney was their man. A fellow member of Council 1497, Anthony McKinley, 32,

Nebraska State Deputy Lou Gasper (left) stands with volunteer Linda Baumert and Rich Samuelson, a member of St. Thomas Aquinas Council 2736 in North Bend, Neb., during a fish fry for flood victims and volunteers. • A truck pulling a trailer with food and disaster relief supplies is pictured outside St. Charles Borromeo Church in North Bend, Neb. was also pitching in to help wherever he was needed — giving out food and water to first responders, filling sandbags together with other volunteers, and unloading trucks of aid supplies. On March 14, he had told his wife, Theresa, “You may want to pack a bag.â€? The next morning, she and their 1-yearold daughter, Abigail, were safe in Omaha, while McKinley stopped by a church to pray and then went to his job as a grain inspector. He didn’t stay long, excusing himself to check on the rising floodwaters. By the time he got home, a mandatory evacuation had been issued. Coworkers helped remove his family’s belongings, and they finished shortly before a dike broke not far from McKinley’s house — which for the next several days he believed was claimed by floodwater. “As far as I knew, my house was gone, and I just wanted to help save the community, save what houses we could,â€? he said. “I didn’t want anybody else to go through what I had already gone through.â€? For McKinley, the most difficult part was not being able to see his family. They were finally reunited March 19, when Highway 36 opened and Fremont ceased to be an island. M AY 2019

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ONE DAY AT A TIME The McKinleys’ home was largely spared by the floodwaters, which disabled their hot water and heat but never reached the first floor. Others were not so fortunate. Gov. Ricketts estimated that more than 2,000 homes and 340 businesses were damaged or destroyed by flooding in Nebraska, where most counties declared a state of emergency. In response, Knights have been working statewide to help victims. Forty-two Nebraska councils were directly affected by the flooding, while Knights throughout the state mobilized to raise money and collect supplies. Supreme Director Mike Conrad, State Deputy Lou Gasper and Immediate Past State Deputy Tony Hergott coordinated the efforts. “The people in Nebraska have been so good and so generous to us,� Conrad said of the donations that councils have received. “They recognize the Knights of Columbus as an organization they can trust.� K of C leaders distributed funds to people in need, including the four families who lost a loved one as a result of the disaster. They also handed out rosaries and prayed with flood victims. Many councils, including Council 1497 in Fremont, hosted fish fries and cookouts to bring people together and benefit those most affected. Among those pitching in were Gibney and McKinley, whose previous efforts exemplified the resolute spirit of the community.

Neither McKinley nor Gibney, though, has been a member of the Knights for very long. In fact, McKinley hasn’t been Catholic for long. The turning point of his conversion took place in a hospital chapel where he prayed for the healing of his then-newborn daughter, who was suffering from two collapsed lungs. When she was later baptized, he announced to his wife, who is Catholic, his desire to enter the Church. Within a few months, McKinley joined the Knights, and earlier this year, he received the Shining Armor Award for his exceptional commitment to council activities. “I try and give as much of my time as I can,â€? he said. As for Gibney, he joined the Order last October. Inspired by Council 1497’s walking rosary at his father’s funeral in July, he took a closer look at the Knights and was impressed by their local activities. “What they do for the community is phenomenal,â€? he said. Since becoming a member, Gibney added, he has made a conscious effort to pray more and faithfully reads a daily devotion book given to him by his wife. He said the reflection for March 18, the day the floodwaters began to recede, was particularly meaningful to him. Citing verses such as Ps 84:12 and Jer 17:7, the reflection was titled simply: “Trust me one day at a time.â€?♌ JOSEPH PAPPALARDO is a content producer for the Knights of Columbus Corporate Communications Department.

AFTER THE TWISTER ROB WILBURN was home praying as a tornado roared overhead March 3. His wife, Mary, was also praying, on retreat 18 miles away. “My concern was for her and to make sure that she got home safely,â€? said Wilburn, a member of Father Thomas Augustin Judge Council 13415 in Phenix City, Ala. Dozens of tornadoes were reported throughout the region that day, but the strongest devastated several rural communities in Lee County, northwest of Phenix City. The EF-4 tornado, with winds up to 200 mph, was a mile wide and covered more than 24 miles before it dissipated. It was the nation’s deadliest tornado in six years; 23 people were killed, more than twice the total number of tornado-related deaths in 2018. In the aftermath, Knights in Alabama responded swiftly to help with recovery efforts. Alabama State Deputy Jason Esteve contacted Wilburn, who serves as district deputy of the hardest hit area, telling him that the state council would assist with whatever the local Knights needed. Making use of his U.S. Army experience cleaning up after natural disasters, 16 ♌ C O L U M B I A ♌

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Debris litters a home in Beauregard, Ala., March 4, a day after an EF-4 tornado passed through the area. Wilburn began coordinating K of C distribution centers in Opelika and Smiths Station. Knights from Council 13415 and Auburn University Council 8696 were the first to respond to a call for volunteers to help remove debris from victims’ homes.

“You see acres of trees taken down, houses completely wiped out, while a house next door is still standing,� said Wilburn. “It’s eye-opening.� The K of C clean-up crew traveled to assist people in dire need. Their first stop was to help a man whose mobile home had been thrown 45 feet by the tornado. Thankfully, he was not inside at the time. “The home had been lifted off of its foundation, dropped, and lifted and dropped a second time,� explained Theodore Johnson, a member of Council 13415. Knights from other parts of Alabama also traveled to Lee County and joined in the recovery efforts. Assisted by Catholic school students, Church of the Holy Spirit Council 12150 in Montgomery prepared dinner for more than 100 first responders. Wilburn said that spirits were strong despite the immense damage. “People were happy to see us,� he said, “and they were more concerned about their neighbor than themselves.� — reported by Andrew Fowler, a content producer for the Knights of Columbus Corporate Communications Department.

    

Alabama Knights help victims of the deadliest U.S. tornado in six years


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C H R I S T I A N S AT R I S K

A Duty to Respond Knights of Columbus in Poland stand in solidarity with persecuted Christians in the Middle East

Polish Knights carry the pilgrim icon of Our Lady Help of Persecuted Christians. • Melkite Catholic Archbishop Jean-ClÊment Jeanbart of Aleppo delivers remarks during a recent visit to Kraków, which was organized by the Poland state council of the Knights of Columbus.

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or more than eight years, Christians in Syria have been caught in the midst of a civil war, and their future remains uncertain. Assistance from the Catholic Church in Aleppo, supported by the Knights of Columbus, has helped the vulnerable community survive. This was the message of Melkite Catholic Archbishop Jean-ClĂŠment Jeanbart of Aleppo during his recent visit to Poland. “In previous years, the focus was on stepping up emergency humanitarian relief and offering the bare necessities to ensure their survival,â€? Archbishop Jeanbart explained. “Since the liberation of Aleppo, our action has shifted toward helping recipients of our aid better prepare for the future.â€? He added: “You, my brother Knights, respond with great charity. You bring smiles to the faces of so many who thought that they would never have a reason to smile again.â€? Archbishop Jeanbart gave these remarks at a March 16 dinner in KrakĂłw, during a visit organized by Knights of Columbus in Poland to raise funds for suffering Christians in the Middle East. More than 100 people were present at the event, including Knights of Columbus leaders and their families, government officials, representatives of Aid to the Church in Need, professors from Jagiellonian University, and others. Dr. Zuzana Ulman, director of the Slovakia-based STEP-IN medical project in northern Iraq, also spoke about her team’s work serving Christians, Yazidis and others targeted for genocide by Islamic State militants. “When we first came to Iraq, people slept in parks, TO

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schools, churches, mosques,â€? she said. “There was chaos, but the situation became more organized thanks to the Church, which was supported by international organizations like the Knights of Columbus.â€? This work is vital, she added, because Christians are being driven out of the region just when their presence is most needed. “The Middle East is so wounded and divided,â€? Ulman said. “We Christians should be there, to be the first to bring reconciliation and forgiveness, binding the divided community so that it can continue to live.â€? During Archbishop Jeanbart’s visit, he met with Archbishop Marek JÄ™draszewski of KrakĂłw and celebrated Masses at the city’s three largest parishes. He also visited the St. John Paul II Shrine and the Divine Mercy Shrine, where he met with Our Lady of Mercy Sisters. Knights in Poland have been very responsive to the call for spiritual and material help in the Middle East. Two pilgrim icons of Our Lady Help of Persecuted Christians, the centerpiece of the current K of C Marian prayer program, have been enthusiastically welcomed by councils throughout the country. Polish Knights are currently raising funds to rebuild houses in the Nineveh Plains region of Iraq. “We Catholic men, together with our families, have this duty — to step into the breach, stand up for the Catholic Church in Poland and around the world, in defense of Christians,â€? said Poland State Deputy Tomasz Wawrzkowicz. “We have this duty and we will fulfill it.â€?♌

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IRON SHARPENS

IRON All-star recruiters reflect on effective ways to invite men to join the Knights of Columbus

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om Stelmar has truly left his mark on the Knights of Columbus. Over the past four decades, he has held numerous leadership positions at the local level, but his biggest legacy has been in recruiting 1,000 members to the Order — multiplying charity and helping to build up the Church. Stelmar started recruiting new members when he was appointed membership chairman of his first council in the early 1980s. “I had such a good time, I just stuck to it ever since,â€? he said. After reaching number 900 several years ago, 18 ♌ C O L U M B I A ♌

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he said, “I’ll be recruiting until the hammer drives the last nail in my coffin.� Last month, he reached another milestone, signing up his 1,000th member: Cesareo Rivera (pictured above) is now a fellow member of St. Michael the Archangel Council 11862 in Garland, Texas. Stelmar and other recruitment all-stars shared with us practical insights on why — and how — every Knight should work to grow the Order. Visit kofc.org/join.

      

by Columbia staff


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Tom Stelmar, 81, knows how to deliver a mission objective. He was a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Air Force and stationed at the Pentagon when he joined Springfield (Va.) Council 6153 in 1980. A year later, the council made him membership chairman — “and that’s when it all started,� he said. He was soon setting recruiting records, first for the council and then for the state of Virginia. He and his wife, Ellen, moved with their two children, Stacy and Thomas Jr., to Texas in 1983. Since then, Stelmar has helped to charter a number of new councils, including in Hispanic, Vietnamese and Korean communities, and has served as grand knight, district deputy and faithful navigator. He worked as a K of C field agent from 1990 to 2016 and is currently a member of St. Michael the Archangel Council 11862 in Garland, Texas.

      

RECRUITING STRATEGY I found out early that a lot of people had heard about the Knights, but they didn’t understand a lot. So I came up with a brief orientation program and invited prospective members to come. I would tell them about building fraternity and gathering for church, community and council activities, and an agent would talk about the insurance program. I would also tell them how they could get their families involved. In fact, I would invite them to bring their wives, and if they had some doubts, their wives usually could help convince them to join. If they liked what they heard, we had the paperwork right there ready for them to sign. ENGAGING MEMBERSHIP One of the biggest challenges is growth. It’s important that councils grow so that they can help more people. As they grow older, members have to be looking for younger guys to bring in. For the younger guys, especially those with young families, it’s always about the limited time they have. A lot of them work long hours, and then they have to come to degree ceremonies and other events. I tell them they can’t get involved with everything. Find something you like and work on that — and

if it’s a little too much, try something else, but do something. Stay active. Some guys come forward a lot on their own. Others are shy, but after they’ve been Knights for a few years and have been working with people, they become more involved with things going on in the church. And the priests are very happy with that, because it helps them a lot, too. BE PERSISTENT I have found that some of the best opportunities to recruit are at parish or community events, where all sorts of people are coming in, not only Knights.

On these occasions, I’ve met a lot of guys, and eventually I ask, “Are you a Knight of Columbus?� If the answer is no, I reply, “Would you like to be? Give me your name and phone number, and I’ll give you a call.� Don’t say, “Do you want to join?� and then walk away. Stay after ’em and be persistent. I’ve brought in high school students 18 years old and all the way up. One of the first guys I brought into the Order became a general in the Air Force. When men are going through the RCIA program, I plant a seed early and tell them that if they’d like to join, they can join as soon as they become Catholic. M AY 2019

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never seen me drink or do drugs because I’ve been sober. The Knights trained me to become a better Catholic man; a better husband and father; a better brother, and a better neighbor, too. As a member of the Knights of Columbus, you are an example for every man around you. Think about our families. As fathers, we educate our family with our actions. What are men doing out there if they’re not Knights? So, let’s bring more men into the Knights of Columbus. We are fishermen for God, like St. Peter. If you bring in one man to the Knights of Columbus, then he is going to bring his family with him, too. We’re called to bring those men and their families to God and the Church. It’s not just a project — it’s our mission.

SETTING AN EXAMPLE My wife is my angel; she prayed for me to come back to God, and he gave me the strength to change. I’ve changed a lot. I’ve been sober now for 26 years. My daughter is 26, and my son is 23. They’ve

FAITH-FILLED RECRUITING I tell men about how they can grow in their faith. That’s what we need — faith in action. I talk about Father McGivney and share booklets like Building the Domestic Church and Into the Breach.

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I never make them promises, but we need to state what is true. We’ve got the greatest organization of Catholic men in the whole world. We’ve got to go out there and say that. There’s a lot of potential here, especially for the Hispanic community. We can be more and more effective. I hope to start three more councils before the end of this fraternal year. WORKING WITH FAMILIES A lot of prospective recruits say, “You know what? I don’t have time.� But it doesn’t have to be time away from your family. You could have them help too. Here’s an example. One brother Knight came with his family to help sell hot dogs. We forgot signs, so I asked the little kids, “Hey, are you gonna help me?� “Yeah!� “Can you make this sign — hot dogs for $5?� And they did it! They were so happy and proud to help. And it was fun! Yeah, we’ve got to work with the family. And guess what? Their wives, they’re the ones who say, “Come on, husband, sign up.�

    

JosĂŠ “Ponaâ€? Magana, 49, remembers his grandmother in Guadalajara, Mexico, telling him stories about the Cristero War and the Caballeros de ColĂłn. But Magana, who grew up in Mexico and southern California, was not interested in becoming a Knight himself until a priest challenged him: “Are you serving this parish? Do you know that God brings you to his way so you can bring more men to his way?â€? Magana couldn’t sleep that night, thinking about this message. The very next week he joined Rancho Cucamonga Council 13403 in Alta Loma, Calif. Since then, he has recruited 88 members and helped establish two new councils. He serves as district deputy of District #101 in California and as state coordinator for Hispanic development.


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Maxime Salman, 30, was a Columbian Squire in his youth, but it wasn’t until someone at work asked him if he’d like to join the Order and presented him a membership form that he decided to become a Knight. A Maronite Catholic who grew up in Toronto, Salman is now working on a Ph.D. in geophysics at the University of Waterloo. Since joining the Order in 2017, he has recruited 26 members, including nine so far this year. He is currently grand knight of Father David Bauer Council 16859, a college council in Waterloo.

       

A DEEPER FAITH Being a Knight has really helped me understand and communicate my faith. It’s given me a sense of identity in the faith and has put my Catholicism in perspective. It’s not just about going to church; it is about knowing how to take things from the Bible or a homily and shaping that into real-world applications. That’s what really drove me more and more into the Knights of Columbus. I tell prospective members: This is an avenue for you to really take your faith to the next level. It’s not just a matter of going to church and praying, though that’s obviously an integral part of being a Catholic. The Knights of Columbus gives you an opportunity to really ask yourself what it means to be a Catholic man. ATTRACTING MEMBERS We’ve put on barbecues, had a pro-life dinner, and we raise money for the St. Vincent de Paul Society by manning a church parking lot during hockey games in Kitchener. Those kinds of events bring our members out. One of the bigger programs we’ve done recently was our “Rosary Factory� for the Catholic student community here in town. Last year, we participated in the Roses for Life program, which was well received in our parish community. When people see a bunch of guys are doing things for others wearing the same K of C shirts, that really inspires them to join. One thing I would encourage older Knights to do is to be more open to younger faces. We need to constantly

work together and be open to modernizing the way we do things. CULTIVATE MANHOOD People are really busy, and it’s tough to get them out to meetings and events. But we’ve still built our membership up to around 40 members. I’m a senator at the University of Waterloo; I’m doing my Ph.D.; I’m the GK of the council; I teach swing danc-

ing; and I run a piano program at the university. So when someone says, “I’m too busy for this,â€? I look at them and say, “Really? Are you sure? I’m pretty sure you have the time to cultivate your manhood.â€? This fraternal year, we have a council motto: “Iron sharpens ironâ€? (Prov 27:17). It’s geared toward holding guys accountable to one another. We try to get guys to really internalize that fraternal message.♌ M AY 2019

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BUSTIN’ BABE GOES BARNSTORMING

The Knights helped popularize baseball with Babe Ruth’s national postseason tours

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crowd of 2,500 people attended an exhibition game in Stockton, Calif., to watch two of baseball’s greatest legends square off Oct. 24, 1927. The following day, an article in the Stockton Record titled “Babe Wallops Circuit Blow Over Bulwarkâ€? began: “He kissed one towards the moon and it landed in the oak grove beyond the right field scoreboard.â€? Babe Ruth’s out-ofthe-park home run put on a show for the fans while helping his “Bustin’ Babesâ€? win 15-4 over Lou Gehrig’s “Larrupin’ Lous.â€? Just 16 days earlier, Ruth and Gehrig had led the 1927 New York Yankees — often cited as the greatest team in the history of major league baseball — to a World Series victory. Now, the duo was nearing the end of a three-week “barnstormingâ€? tour, playing exhibition games for charity in 21 cities from Providence, R.I., to Los Angeles. Long before any major league teams were based in Western states, barnstorming tours were the only opportunity many fans had to get a glimpse of professional ballplayers in action. The game in Stockton, like a number of others during Ruth’s barnstorming tours, was sponsored by the local Knights of Columbus. Both Ruth and his agent, Christy Walsh, who organized the tours, were members of the Order. (Ruth had joined Père Marquette Council 271 in South Boston in 1919, his last year playing for the Red Sox.) By sponsoring exhibition games, hosting the traveling stars and organizing other events during Babe’s tours, the Knights of Columbus played a role in popularizing professional baseball. 22 ♌ C O L U M B I A ♌

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THE SULTAN OF SWAT George Herman “Babeâ€? Ruth, known by many nicknames, was the most famous baseball player in the United States — though only seven of those states, plus Washington, D.C., had major league teams during his 22-season career. If you lived west of the Mississippi and couldn’t get to St. Louis, Chicago or farther east to see a game, your best option was to hope the Bambino came to you. Walsh’s scrapbooks, preserved at the National Baseball Hall of Fame, chronicle how Ruth embarked on postseason tours through the 1920s, appearing with vaudeville acts and playing exhibition games. In early 1922, the Knights of Columbus in Milwaukee hosted a banquet for Ruth and other guests. A contemporary account of the event notes that the Knights in the area were invited to hear Ruth “demonstrate his method of hitting ’em over the fence and ‌ relate some entertaining incidents in his baseball career.â€? Before the season began that year, Commissioner of Baseball Kenesaw Mountain Landis levied a suspension against Ruth and Yankee teammate Bob Meusel for violating a rule that prohibited World Series participants from barnstorming. Ruth was suspended until May 20, but was allowed to play in a preseason exhibition tour with the Yankees. On March 31, 1922, the team was in San Antonio

Babe Ruth poses with two young Brooklyn fans during his 1927 postseason barnstorming tour.

   

by Andrew Fowler


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to play the Brooklyn Dodgers. Prior to the Bambino’s first at-bat, “The Knights entered the grounds in mass formation and surrounded the plate,” before giving Ruth an engraved, sterling silver ball and bat. One newspaper noted that the bat was modeled after Ruth’s own, adding, “Babe declares he will keep it as long as he lives.” The Sultan of Swat then lived up to the expectations of his fans, hitting a home run over the right field fence — “the longest hit, according to local experts, that has been made in League Park.” Commissioner Landis soon relented on the ban against World Series players touring. In the years that followed, the Babe continued to barnstorm with the help and hospitality of his brother Knights, as noted by Jane Leavy in her book The Big Fella: Babe Ruth and the World He Created (2018). When Ruth arrived in town, local council officers were often on hand with the mayor to greet him. They sometimes escorted him from the train station to his hotel and presented him with K of C-branded flower wreaths. And a steady lineup of Knights of Columbus luncheons and dinners helped keep the “Colossus of Clout” colossal. The Knights underwrote a game in Los Angeles on Oct. 27, 1924, raising money for their charitable fund. In addition to Ruth, the game featured Meusel, Earl McNeely and others, attracting 7,000 fans. According to the Illustrated Daily News, the Babe failed to “knock a couple over Washington Park right-field fence” as he had hoped, but he still had four hits, including a 400foot double, and played a “corking good game around first base.” A STAR AMONG STARS Babe Ruth wasn’t the only baseball legend who was a member of the Knights of Columbus. Philadelphia Athletics manager Connie Mack and New York Giants manager John McGraw, both Knights, led their respective teams to multiple World Series championships. Other Hall of Fame Knights include Johnny Evers, Hughie Jennings, Ed Walsh and Jim O’Rourke. But the Great Bambino was the biggest star of them all, and the popularity of his postseason barnstorming reached its peak in 1927, when he was joined by Lou Gehrig for the 21-city tour. They were fresh off their now-legendary season in which the Yankees won 110 games and swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in the World Series. Ruth had hit 60 home runs, a single-season record that would stand until 1961. Gehrig was the league’s most valuable player, leading in doubles (52) and RBIs (173). Christy Walsh knew he could turn to K of C councils when planning the most significant barnstorming tour to date. He sold the tour as a “rivalry between Babe and 24 ♦ C O L U M B I A ♦

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Gehrig,” adding it was “just as intense as the rivalry of the Yanks and Pittsburgh in the recent World Series.” A number of councils hosted discussions with Ruth and Gehrig, and in Denver, Knights welcomed them with a “huge horseshoe floral offering” in front of “the largest crowd ever assembled at Merchants Park,” according to The Denver Post. Knights in California sponsored several exhibition games, including those in Sacramento and Stockton. Before the latter game, which benefited a K of C Christmas charity fund, an announcement was published in a local newspaper: “The game will not start until 3:30 p.m. This will permit all youngsters who wish to see the game to reach the ball park after school.” Ruth always made time for children on his tours, frequently visiting them in orphanages and hospitals. Contemporary newspaper accounts note, for example, that he once visited with more than 1,000 children at a K of C New Year’s party outside Chicago and handed out baseballs to kids at a Knights event in San Francisco in 1927. During the 1927 barnstorming tour, Ruth and Gehrig visited Boys Town orphanage in Omaha, founded a decade earlier by Father Edward Flanagan. According to an April 1928 Columbia article, “Babe talked to the boys on the value of his training in a similar institution when he was a boy.” Ruth had spent much of his youth at St. Mary’s Industrial School for Boys in Baltimore, under the guidance of Xaverian Brother Matthias Boutilier. When some people accused Babe of visiting children solely for publicity, he began asking sportswriters not to mention his visits. In a series for The Saturday Evening Post titled “My Hits – and My Errors,” he later wrote, “I reached the point where I got as much a kick out my association with [kids] as they received from their meetings with me.” Altogether, the Bustin’ Babes and Larrupin’ Lous had played in front of more than 220,000 people during the 1927 tour, which finished in Los Angeles. Walsh’s K of C council then hosted Ruth and Gehrig in what it called the “Biggest Athletic Event of the Year” Nov. 1, right as postseason barnstorming had to end because of league rules. Following the 1928 season and another World Series championship, Ruth and Gehrig paired up again for another tour. The West Coast would not get a major league team until 1958, when the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants relocated to Los Angeles and San Francisco, respectively. Many of the most ardent fans remembered how, when they were still youngsters, Babe Ruth’s barnstorming tours helped to grow the national pastime. ANDREW FOWLER is a content producer with the Knights of Columbus Corporate Communications Department.


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Above: Lou Gehrig and Babe Ruth visit Father Edward J. Flanagan, founder of Boys Town, and young residents of the Nebraska school in 1927. Right: This advertisement for the Stockton K of C charity game in October 1927 reads: “Watch the Mighty Babe and his rival friend, Lou Gehrig, play baseball as it should be played. ‌ and as you sit watching them, you are putting money — needed money — into the Christmas Charity Fund of the Knights of Columbus.â€?

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KNI GHTS IN ACTION

REPORTS FROM COUNCILS, ASSEMBLIES AND COLUMBIAN SQUIRES CIRCLES

FAITH HONORING MARTYRS

Bishop Bryan Bayda (left) of the Ukrainian Catholic Eparchy of Saskatoon, state chaplain of Saskatechewan, and Father Edward Gibney, associate state chaplain and past state deputy, prepare to celebrate the Divine Liturgy in the home of Nickolas Boyko (seated) in Meadow Lake. Boyko, a member of the Knights of Columbus since 1965, was celebrating his 99th birthday. After the liturgy, the group shared dinner and birthday cake and reminisced about Boyko’s many years in the Order.

PARISH RENOVATION

Joseph C. Zajicek Council 6625 in Maryville, Ill., presented a $300,000 donation, proceeds from the sale of the hall where the council previously met, to Mother of Perpetual Help Catholic Church to refurbish the parish center. The building’s lighting, flooring, ceiling and insulated walls will be renovated, and new handicap-accessible restrooms installed. STEPPING UP TO SERVE

At the request of their pastor, members of Father Anthony Montesinos Council 5086 in Myrtle Beach, S.C., have been altar servers 26 ♦ C O L U M B I A ♦

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during Saturday evening Masses at St. Andrew’s Catholic Church. Father Roger Morgan asked the council for help because younger altar servers are often not available for those Masses. Some 15 Knights have served, each wearing a cassock and surplice bearing the K of C emblem. TRUCKLOADS OF CHARITY

Most Blessed Sacrament Council 10455 of Baton Rouge, La., collected more than two truckloads of gifts for seminarians from parishioners of Most Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church. Churchgoers were asked to drop off toiletries, school

San José de Zapotlán Council 3338 in Ciudad Guzmán, Jalisco, Mexico, made its third annual pilgrimage transporting a silver reliquary bearing the relics of 25 Mexican martyrs, including St. Rodrigo Aguilar Alemán. A member of Council 3338, Father Aguilar was martyred in 1927 and canonized in 2000. Local communities welcomed the pilgrims and offered testimonies of favors received through St. Rodrigo Aguilar Alemán’s intercession.

supplies and snacks at the church entrance as a gesture of appreciation for the priests-in-training. The supplies were distributed to Notre Dame Seminary in New Orleans and St. Joseph Abbey and Seminary College in St. Benedict. SETTING STATIONS

Members of St. Matthew’s Council 13012 in Topeka, Kan., worked with community volunteers to install Stations of the Cross on the grounds of St. Matthew’s Catholic Church. The 14 stations provide an opportunity for devotion to the parish, including the children of St. Matthew Catholic School.

A member of Santa María Reina del Rosario Council 14951 in Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz, Mexico, demonstrates how to make a palm cross. With San Juan Bosco Circle 5813, also of Coatzacoalcos, the council provided the crosses for Palm Sunday Mass at their parish.


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K N I G H T S I N AC T I O N

FAMILY CHILDLIKE FAITH

St. Theresa the Little Flower Council 16005 in Ottawa, Ontario, presented certificates to each boy and girl who took part in a children’s liturgy at St. Theresa’s Catholic Church, in an effort to encourage their involvement in the parish. HOLY FAMILY ON TOUR

District #114 in Québec hosted a traveling image of the Holy Family, which visited St. Antoine de Padoue Parish in Perkins, and district members handed out prayer pamphlets to attendees.

Members of Ascension Bastrop (Texas) Council 14943 stand with the Ladies of Charity Bastrop, a Catholic charity organization, in front of the home they built and furnished for needy families. They built the house in cooperation with Bastrop SAFE Emergency Family Shelter, an initiative of churches and local businesses to provide temporary housing for the homeless.

Members of Banal na Sakramento Council 8753 in Quezon City, Luzon South, join in a family rosary, an ongoing devotion to promote unity among the faithful in the community.

PASTORAL CARE FOR KIDS

HELP FOR WIDOWS AND ORPHANS

Most Holy Trinity Council 5774 in Balic-Balic, Manila, teamed up with the local Holy Name Society for the parish’s annual Children’s Day, during which volunteers provided food, drink, entertainment and toys to some 200 youngsters. The children’s parents belong to a parish group that educates local communities about social services, worship and spiritual formation.

Following the sudden death of a member of St. Rose of Lima Council 13244 in Toronto, the council organized a parish event in support of his widow and young children. Some 130 people attended the gathering, at which the council solicited donations, raising more than $2,700 for the family and also collecting a number of gifts. WIDOW GIVING BACK

Miami (Fla.) Council 1726 sponsored the fifth annual Catholic Relief Services Helping Hands event with staff and students at Christopher Columbus High School, a Catholic boys school in Miami. Members donated funds and joined more than 200 students from Columbus High and neighboring schools, to package some 32,000 meals for shipment to Burkina Faso in West Africa.

EASTER GIVING

St. Joseph’s Assembly 3357 in Alpine, Texas, presented a Fourth Degree chalice to the family of late member Javier Cardona at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Fort Davis. Cardona’s widow then gave the chalice to Father Edilberto “Beto” Lopez, pastor of St. Joseph and a member of Franklin Mountain Council 12160 in El Paso, for use during Mass.

Msgr. Clement H. Kern Council 8284 in Canton, Mich., made a $500 donation to Mom Prom, an organization started at the council’s parish, St. Thomas a’Becket Catholic Church. Mom Prom is a ladies night out, inviting women to wear old prom gowns or bridesmaid dresses and raise money for charity.

Bishop Kenny Council 1951 in Jacksonville, Fla., teamed up with Assumption Catholic Church’s Women’s Club and other local groups to give an Easter basket to every child in foster care in the area. Council 1951 donated space to the local foster care agency for the project, and members helped unload, sort and count the 1,900 baskets.

BENEVOLENT BOYS

MOM PROM

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K N I G H T S I N AC T I O N

COMMUNITY SAFE AT HOME

Members of St. Mary’s Landover Hills Council 10046 in Hyattsville, Md., helped build a safety railing at the home of a Knight returning home from a rehabilitation center. The patient is at risk of future injuries and could not be released until the railings were installed, so his fellow Knights pitched in to donate materials and labor. )+,&/,('%/(./+%./".$%/+,&/-',/"--&/..)*/-$/*#.,*(-,/-$/!)/-)& -!,#("/ /(,/+"+#./+/ ). +)./+,&/*.) ./&(,,.)/+%/+,/*'/ .&,.*&+/$(*'/$)/-!% *(&./*#.,*(-,/-$/!)/-)&/+%'-"(#/#'--"/)-#..&*/.,.$(%.&/+,/+))+/-$/#'+)(%(.*/(, #"!&(,/%'.//-$// (*+*%.)/."(.$/!,&/+/*.(,+)(+,/*! -)%/$!,&/+%'-"(#/'('/*#'--" *#'-"+)*'( */+,&/%'./-!%'/ )-)+*/-$/*#.,*(-,/-$/!)/-)&/+)(*'

GROUNDSKEEPERS

Members of St. Matthew Council 14360 in Norwalk, Conn., spruced up the grounds at Notre Dame Health and Rehabilitation Center, a convalescent home sponsored by the Sisters of St. Thomas of Villanova. For several years, the Knights have assisted the center with various outdoor projects, including adding fresh mulch to shrub areas and spreading topsoil and seed along recently installed walkways. COMMUNITY CARE

Members of San Pedro Apóstol Council 13206 in Naguabo, Puerto Rico, collaborated with San Pedro Apóstol Catholic Church parishioners to deliver food, personal items and clothing to elderly residents at community care centers. 28 ♌ C O L U M B I A ♌

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DINE & DRAW FOR DOLLARS

St. Charles Catholic School accepted a gift of $10,000 from Captain Miles Macdonell Assembly 370 in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The Knights raised the sum at “Dinner and Draw,� an evening of dining and amateur art. MERCY IN ACTION

Bishop Gallagher Council 2569 in Royal Oak, Mich., participated in the third annual “Mercy in Action Day,� a service project for the community organized by Catholic Charities of Southeast Michigan. Council members and spouses raked leaves, trimmed trees, and assembled new beds at Sanctum House, a safe home for survivors of human trafficking.

RELIEF IN PARADISE

Members of St. Clare Roseville Council 12887 in Roseville, Calif., worked with other parish ministries to assemble backpacks filled with supplies for some 150 victims of the Paradise Camp Fire. The council and its partners also delivered clothing, food and children’s gifts to about 20 local schools, churches and group homes for distribution to those in need.

SLICE OF SERVICE

Members of Msgr. John F. Callahan Council 3600 in West Hartford, Conn., joined with Boy Scout Troop 44, Cub Scout Pack 161, and other volunteers to assemble sandwiches for the House of Bread, a soup kitchen and social services nonprofit. The crew made more than 960 sandwiches in less than two hours, setting a new record for their bimonthly event.

KEEPING THE LIGHTS ON

In response to a request by their former chaplain who had recently returned to his native India, Mamaroneck (N.Y.) Council 2247 donated $1,375 for solar lights at his new parish school in the state of Gujarat. The project enables children to gather after sundown.

Matt Adams (left) and Rajib Rahman, members of St. Mary of Huntley Council 11666, in Huntley, Ill., grill burgers and hot dogs at a parish picnic co-hosted by the council and St. Mary’s Church. More than 750 parishioners enjoyed a barbecue, games and music.


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K N I G H T S I N AC T I O N TOUCHDOWN FUNDRAISER

Since 1999, members of Father Gilbert Carlton Council 9360 in Janesville, Wis., and their families have worked as ushers, ticket-takers and press box security at University of Wisconsin football games in Madison, contributing earnings to the council treasury. In 2018, the stadium workers earned approximately $6,000 to fund seminarians, support the local pregnancy hotline, purchase Bibles for religious education and Catholic school students and contribute to other council programs. ABOVE AND BEYOND

Members of Mary Queen Council 8494 served a steak and chicken dinner to more than 100 guests of Mary Queen Catholic Parish in Friendswood, Texas. The council also distributed more than $20,000 in proceeds from several fish frys to the parish and various organizations, including a local food pantry and Special Friends, Inc., an agency that provides programs for people with intellectual and physical disabilities.

Members of St. Mark’s Council 12360 in El Paso, Texas, are all smiles at the beginning of a day whipping up funnel cakes at the St. Mark Catholic Church Annual Bazaar. The free event, in which the council and other parishioners raised $2,300 for St. Mark’s numerous charities, included food, family events and live music.

CREATURE COMFORTS

Members of several councils of Florida District #11 volunteered at Dream Night at the Jacksonville Zoo. The free annual event welcomes children with special health care needs and their families to the zoo for fun activities.

Members of Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe Council 16378 in Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico, accompany Bishop Eugenio Lira Rugarcía of Matamoros on a charitable mission to the most vulnerable fishing communities in the diocese. The Knights donated 10,000 pesos in goods and distributed blankets and packages of food.

Update on Amended Bylaws

DELEGATES to the 136th Supreme Convention in Baltimore approved several amendments to the Order’s bylaws. They are summarized here: Section 119 was repealed, as these procedures no longer serve a useful purpose.

Paragraph 1 of Section 124 was amended to read: Each subordinate council shall hold at least two regular meetings each month, one of which is an officer’s business meeting open to all members, and one shall be designated as a regular membership meeting.

Section 125 was amended to read: The following shall form a part of the order of business and procedure at regular membership meetings of every subordinate council: 1. Call to Order. 2. Warden’s Report on Membership Card. 3. Prayer. 4. Pledge of Allegiance to Flag or some other suitable patriotic display of loyalty. 5. Opening Ode.* 6. Roll Call of Officers.

7. Chaplain’s Message. 8. Reading of Minutes of Previous Meeting(s)*. 9. Grand Knight’s Report. 10. Report of Standing Committees Including but not limited to:* a. Admissions Committees, Reading of Applications, and Balloting of Membership b. Board of Trustees Report 11. Report of Special Committees. 12. Initiations. 13. Unfinished Business. 14. New Business.* (When elections are in order, this is the first item under New Business.) 15. Insurance Agent’s Report. (If present) 16. District Deputy’s Report. (If present) 17. Good of the Order. 18. Chaplain’s Summation. 19. Closing Prayer.

*Parts of the order of business marked with an asterisk may be omitted. At regular membership meetings, minutes of all meetings to and including the last regular membership meeting shall be read if not previously published.

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K N I G H T S I N AC T I O N

LIFE WORTHY CAMPERS

St. John Vianney Council 7525 in South Burlington, Vt., donated $41,000 to Camp Ta-Kum-Ta in South Hero. The camp serves kids who are fighting or have recently fought cancer. St. John Vianney Council has given significant funds to the camp each year for more than three decades. HEART OF THE MATTER

Thomas Baltz, a member of Our Lady of the Sea Council 7272 in Gulf Breeze, Fla., marches with three of his eight children at the Emerald Coast Walk for Life 2019 in Pensacola. Led by Bishop William A. Wack of the Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee, Knights peacefully gathered with parishioners from St. Anne and Our Lady of Assumption Catholic churches.

CORPOREAL CARE

Father Robert Foster Jubilee Council 12687 in Elm Creek, Neb., held a benefit dinner at the Family Center in Overton for member Garrett Scholz, who needed chemotherapy treatments and a bone marrow transplant. Sixty Knights prepared and served a meal for more than 300 guests. Thanks to contributions from attendees and other donors, the event brought in some $8,500, to which the council added nearly $1,500. SPECIAL PICNIC

Members of Father Howard J. Lesch Council 7667 and Christ Our Redeemer Council 13527, both in 30 ♦ C O L U M B I A ♦

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Niceville, Fla., drove more than 100 miles to serve a barbecue picnic lunch to residents and staff of the Sunland Center in Marianna. For 30 years, the councils have provided an annual meal at the center, which serves individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Florida Agency for Persons with Disabilities named the Knights of Columbus its 2018 Volunteer Association of the Year. BABY SANCTUARY

Hicksville (Ohio) Council 10043 and the Hicksville Knights of Columbus Foundation donated $10,000 to install Ohio’s first Safe Haven Baby Box at Com-

Members of St. Joseph of Monroe County Council 5009 in Woodsfield, Ohio, installed a pro-life roadside sign in Monroe County with the message “Abortion Stops a Beating Heart.”

munity Memorial Hospital. Safe Haven boxes provide a way for mothers to legally place their newborn babies for adoption, triggering an immediate call to 911 and notification to the hospital emergency room while keeping the child safe. LOANS FOR LIVING

Our Lady of Batavia Council 11728 in Batavia, N.J., donated two knee scooters to Independent Living of the Genesee Region, an organization that works to enhance quality of life for individuals with disabilities. The charity specializes in free medical equipment loans to clients recovering from surgery.

Jake Dalton of St. Rose Council 6386 in Short Hills, N.J., takes part in a fund drive for people with mental or physical disabilities, held over three weekends at nine local merchants. The fundraiser’s proceeds of more than $9,300 supported The Arc of Essex County, Inroads to Opportunities, Camp Fatima and Holy Cross Center of Learning.


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K N I G H T S I N AC T I O N

PATRIOTISM DON’T SWEAT IT

For more than 20 years, St. Joseph Council 7528 in Federal Way, Wash., has supported the military. For its “Sweats for Vets” initiative, the council holds regular Labor Day breakfasts to fund donations of new sweatpants to veterans at the Washington State Soldiers Home. Each year, the council also provides Christmas stockings — knitted by wives of members and stuffed with donated gift cards — to Heartbeat Serving Wounded Warriors, an organization serving injured veterans and their families in Washington.

Members of Marikina Valley Council 6178 in Luzon South gather in Kawit, Cavite, at the tomb of General Emilio Aguinaldo, the first president of the Philippines. Grand Knight Delfin Salvador led members of Council 6178 on a patriotic tour to the tomb.

MILITARY BALL

San Damiano Assembly 3192 in Lakewood Ranch, Fla., hosted a military patriotic ball to honor veterans and current service members, particularly U.S. military chaplains. The guest of honor, Msgr. Joseph A. Ferraro, was ordained in 1967 and had a long and distinguished career as a chaplain, including service in Vietnam, Japan, Italy and many parts of the United States. Two hundred guests gathered to celebrate and thank Msgr. Ferraro and others for their service. SCHOLARSHIPS FOR VETS

John Brady (left), grand knight of Nativity Council 2976 in Laurel Springs, N.J., presents an award for police officer of the year to Sgt. Andrew Tweedley of the Lindenwold Police Department at a borough council meeting.

Father Patrick Power Council 4588 in Livermore, Calif., awarded $500 scholarships to veterans Destiny Goddu (Marines), Thomas Gaffney (Navy) and Hewey Burnett (Air Force) at Las Positas Community College. The Knights established the scholarships in 2013 in

honor of Fourth Degree member U.S. Marines Lance Cpl. Ken Logsdon. HONORING A REFORMER

San Mateo (Luzon South) Assembly 3726 raised 65,000 Philippine pesos (approximately $1,200 U.S. dollars) to fund a patriotic monument to Dr. José P. Rizal at Rizal Park on the 122nd anniversary of his death. Dr. Rizal was a Filipino nationalist who advocated for peaceful reform of Spanish colonial rule of his country. FOR THE FALLEN

Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen Assembly 1845 in Spanaway, Wash., has committed to the ongoing restoration and maintenance of a memorial for four Lakewood police officers who were murdered in 2009. A dozen members of Assembly 1845 spent four days on the site weeding, trimming bushes, spreading gravel on the walking path and pressure-washing the

concrete surfaces in time for this year’s memorial ceremony, in which a Fourth Degree Color Corps participated. PLANTING THE FLAG

Holy Apostles College and Seminary Council 15991 in Cromwell, Conn., coordinated fundraising efforts by various Connecticut councils and the Catholic War Veterans to move the Holy Apostles Seminary flagpole to a more accessible location. The council also raised funds for a matching flagpole to fly the flag of Vatican City next to Old Glory.

kofc.org exclusive See more “Knights in Action” reports and photos at www.kofc.org/ knightsinaction

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VALUATION EXHIBIT OF

P RO M OT I O NA L & G I F T I T E M S

THE KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS

In compliance with the requirements of the laws of the various states, we publish below a Valuation Exhibit of the Knights of Columbus as of Dec. 31, 2018. The law requires that this publication shall be made of the results of the valuation with explanation as filed with the insurance departments.

ASSETS — Actual and Contingent 1. Admitted Assets of the General Account Fund, item 26, page 2 of Annual Statement: $25,428,134,591

LIABILITIES — Actual and Contingent 2. Old System Reserve — including additional reserve: $ 2,950 3. New System Reserve — including D.I. and Dis. W. (net of reins): $ 14,429,366,803 4. Reserve for accident and health certificates: $ 585,358,963 5. Total per item 1 and 2, page 3 of Annual Statement: $ 15,014,728,716 6. Deduct liens and interest thereon, not included in Admitted Assets, and not in excess of required reserves on the corresponding individual certificates: None 7. Balance — Item 5 less item 6 above: $ 15,014,728,716 8. Liabilities of the General Account Fund, except reserve (items 3 to 22 incl. page 3 of Annual Statement): $ 8,269,278,407 9. Liabilities — Actual and Contingent — sum of items 7 and 8 above: $23,284,007,123 10. Ratio percent of Dec. 31, 2018 — 109.21% Assets — Actual and Dec. 31, 2017 — 109.36% Contingent (Item 1) Dec. 31, 2016 — 108.98% to liabilities — Actual Dec. 31, 2015 — 109.03% and Contingent (Item 9) Dec. 31, 2014 — 109.70%

EXPLANATION The above valuation indicates that, on a basis of the A.E., A.M. (5), 1941 C.S.O., 1958 C.S.O., 1980 C.S.O., 2001 C.S.O., 2017 C.S.O., 1937 S.A., 1971 Individual Annuity Table, Annuity 2000 Table, 2012 IAR – S G2 table and 1983 “a” Tables of Mortality with interest at 9%, 8.75%, 8%, 7%, 6%, 5%, 4.5%, 4%, 3.75%, 3.5%, 3%, 2.5%, the future assessments of the society, at the net rate now being collected, together with the now invested assets of the General Account Fund are sufficient to meet all certificates as they mature by their terms, with a margin of safety of $2,144,127,468 (or 9.21%) over the above statutory standards. STATE OF: Connecticut COUNTY OF: New Haven The officers of this reporting entity, being duly sworn, each depose and say that they are the described officers of the said reporting entity, and that on the reporting period stated above, all of the herein described assets were the absolute property of the said reporting entity, free and clear from any liens or claims thereon, except as herein stated, and that this statement, together with related exhibits, schedules and explanations therein contained, annexed or referred to, is a full and true statement of all the assets and liabilities and of the condition and affairs of the said reporting entity as of the reporting period stated above, and of its income and deductions therefrom for the period ended, and have been completed in accordance with the NAIC annual statement instructions and accounting practices and procedure manual except to the extent that: (1) state law may differ; or, (2) that state rules or regulations require differences in reporting not related to accounting practices and procedures, according to the best of their information, knowledge and belief, respectively. Furthermore, the scope of this attestation by the described officers also includes the related corresponding electronic filing with the NAIC, when required, that is an exact copy (except for formatting differences due to electronic filing) of the enclosed statement. The electronic filing may be requested by various regulators in lieu of or in addition to the enclosed statement. Subscribed and sworn to before me this 19th day of February 2019. JINA JO HANSEN, Notary Public

Light Jacket This 100% polyester navy jacket merges wind- and water-resistance with a soft touch. An unlined shell, embroidered with either the full-color emblem of the Order or Fourth Degree emblem on the left chest, is easy to wear over base or thermal layers. It has elastic binding at the cuffs and hem and two open front pockets. S, M, L, XL: $28 each 2XL: $30 each 3XL: $31 each

Barbecue Apron and Mitt Set Perfect for a backyard barbecue or council cookout, this red and black apron has plenty of pockets, including an insulated beverage holder, and features an attached retractable bottle opener. The front of the apron is imprinted with the emblem of the Order and the slogan It always tastes right when it’s served by a Knight. Made of 600 Denier polyester, it measures 32” x 24”. A black padded oven mitt is also included. $23 each

CARL A. ANDERSON, President MICHAEL J. O’CONNOR., Secretary RONALD F. SCHWARZ, Treasurer SEAL

OFFICIAL MAY 1, 2019: To owners of Knights of Columbus insurance policies and persons responsible for payment of premiums on such policies: Notice is hereby given that in accordance with the provisions of Section 84 of the Laws of the Order, payment of insurance premiums due on a monthly basis to the Knights of Columbus by check made payable to Knights of Columbus and mailed to same at PO Box 371492, Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7492, before the expiration of the grace period set forth in the policy. In Canada: Knights of Columbus, Place d’Armes Station, P.O. Box 220, Montreal, QC H2Y 3G7 ALL MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOS, ARTWORK, EDITORIAL MATTER, AND ADVERTISING INQUIRIES SHOULD BE MAILED TO: COLUMBIA, PO BOX 1670, NEW HAVEN, CT 06507-0901. REJECTED MATERIAL WILL BE RETURNED IF ACCOMPANIED BY A SELF-ADDRESSED ENVELOPE AND RETURN POSTAGE. PURCHASED MATERIAL WILL NOT BE RETURNED. OPINIONS BY WRITERS ARE THEIR OWN AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF THE KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS. SUBSCRIPTION RATES — IN THE U.S.: 1 YEAR, $6; 2 YEARS, $11; 3 YEARS, $15. FOR OTHER COUNTRIES ADD $2 PER YEAR. EXCEPT FOR CANADIAN SUBSCRIPTIONS, PAYMENT IN U.S. CURRENCY ONLY. SEND ORDERS AND CHECKS TO: ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT, PO BOX 1670, NEW HAVEN, CT 06507-0901. COLUMBIA (ISSN 0010-1869/USPS #123-740) IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS, 1 COLUMBUS PLAZA, NEW HAVEN, CT 06510-3326. PHONE: 203-752-4000, www.kofc.org. PRODUCED IN USA. COPYRIGHT © 2015 BY KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART WITHOUT PERMISSION IS PROHIBITED. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT NEW HAVEN, CT AND ADDITIONAL MAILING OFFICES. POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO COLUMBIA, MEMBERSHIP DEPARTMENT, PO BOX 1670, NEW HAVEN, CT 06507-0901. CANADIAN POSTMASTER — PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 1473549. RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADIAN ADDRESSES TO: KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS, 50 MACINTOSH BOULEVARD, CONCORD, ONTARIO L4K 4P3 PHILIPPINES — FOR PHILIPPINES SECOND-CLASS MAIL AT THE MANILA CENTRAL POST OFFICE. SEND RETURN COPIES TO KCFAPI, FRATERNAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT, PO BOX 1511, MANILA.

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M AY 2019

Collegiate Athletic T-Shirt This gray T-shirt has a classic collegiate look with Knights of Columbus est. 1882 printed on the front and an emblem of the Order in navy on the back. It is made of 90% cotton and 10% polyester. S, M, L, XL: $18 each 2XL: $20 each, 3XL: $21 each 4XL: $22 each

Order these and other items online at:

knightsgear.com Questions? 1-855-GEAR-KOC (855-432-7562) Additional shipping costs apply to all orders. Please call before mailing in an order.


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K N I G H T S O F C O LU M BU S

Knights of Charity

      

Every day, Knights all over the world are given opportunities to make a difference — whether through community service, raising money or prayer. We celebrate each and every Knight for his strength, his compassion and his dedication to building a better world.

A Lenten parish mission featuring an image of Our Lady Help of Persecuted Christians — the centerpiece of the current K of C Marian Prayer Program — brought together Ukrainian and Melkite Catholic communities at the Dormition of the Most Holy Mother of God Ukrainian Catholic Church in Edmonton, Alberta. Father Ephrem Kardouh (far left), pastor of St. Basil’s Melkite Greek Catholic Church in Calgary, preached the mission, and Bishop David Motiuk (center) of the Ukrainian Catholic Eparchy of Edmonton recited an Akathist hymn — a traditional Eastern prayer — for the protection of persecuted Christians throughout the world.

TO BE FEATURED HERE , SEND YOUR COUNCIL’ S “K NIGHTS IN A CTION � PHOTO AS WELL AS ITS DESCRIPTION TO : C OLUMBIA , 1 C OLUMBUS P LAZA , N EW H AVEN , CT 06510-3326 OR EMAIL : KNIGHTSINACTION @ KOFC . ORG .

M AY 2019

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PLEASE, DO ALL YOU CAN TO ENCOURAGE PRIESTLY AND RELIGIOUS VOCATIONS. YOUR PRAYERS AND SUPPORT MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

K E E P T H E FA I T H A L I V E

‘I FELT A DEEP PEACE THAT I COULD NOT EXPLAIN.’

FATHER NICHOLAS ADAM Diocese of Jackson Monsignor John J. Burns Council 802 Meridian, Miss. FATHER CHRIS LEMIEUX Director, Office of Vocations, Archdiocese of Toronto Toronto Council 1388

      

After graduating from college, I moved to Mississippi to begin a career as a sports journalist. I then got involved in my local parish, where I was asked to join the Knights of Columbus. I was blown away by the dedication of these men to their faith and the Church, and it made me think about what really matters in life. One day at Mass, I felt a deep peace that I could not explain and a powerful call to bring others to Christ and the Church. Nurtured by the encouragement of a good pastor and by the example of faithful parishioners, I entered the seminary in the Diocese of Jackson. The Catholic population is very small here, and my brother Knights remain a vital source of support and strength. We are all called to holiness, and when that holiness is lived out, vocations result. Now I am dedicated to helping other young people listen to God’s voice. If we are faithful, the Lord will bring forth fruit in his Church.

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