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K N I G H T S O F C O LU MBUS

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A BROTHER K NIGHT CAN CHOOSE NO BETTER COMPANY FOR THE PROTECTION OF HIS FAMILY. I N CHOOSING K NIGHTS OF C OLUMBUS I NSURANCE , HE IS MAKING A COMMITMENT TO HIS FAMILY ’ S FUTURE ; HE IS MAKING A COMMITMENT TO ETHICAL INVESTMENT AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE ; AND HE IS MAKING A COMMITMENT THAT BENEFITS HIS C HURCH AND COMMUNITY. — SUPREME K NIGHT C ARL A. A NDERSON

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K N I G H T S O F C O LU M BU S AUGUST 2017 ♦ VoLUme 97 ♦ NUmber 8

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F E AT U R E S

10 Honoring Our Legacy, Serving Our Mission K of C members are transforming properties formerly used by their councils into opportunities to strengthen Catholic parishes. BY JOSEPH O’BRIEN

15 ‘A Peaceful and Confident Voice’ Cardinal Lubomyr Husar, who invited the Order to his homeland, is remembered as a spiritual giant of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church. BY JOHN BURGER

20 The Personality of Father McGivney A contemporary remembers the founder of the Knights of Columbus as a humble and warm-hearted priest. BY FATHER JOSEPH G. DALEY

24 Not Your Average Joe Long Island’s newest council is named after a young man known for his love of life and love of Christ. BY LENA PENNINO-SMITH

Painting by Zbigniew Gierczak, 2017 / courtesy of the Diocese of Kaišiadorys, Lithuania

A 2017 painting depicts Blessed Teofilius Matulionis of Lithuania wearing his episcopal cassock under a prisoner’s uniform. The martyred bishop, who spent many years in prisons, was beatified in Vilnius June 25 (see page 5).

D E PA RT M E N T S 3

Building a better world

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The work of the Church and of the Knights is inspired by Pope Francis’ call to become missionary disciples. BY SUPREME KNIGHT CARL A. ANDERSON

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State Deputies Meeting Highlights Key Priorities for Fraternal Year • Supreme Officers Address Historic Convocation of Catholic Leaders • Pope Francis Welcomes Pro Football Hall of Famers, Supreme Knight • John Paul II Institute Graduates ‘Formed to Build Up the Family’

Learning the faith, living the faith The scourge of pornography prevents the true happiness that comes with integrity and sacrificial love. BY SUPREME CHAPLAIN ARCHBISHOP WILLIAM E. LORI

PLUS: Catholic Man of the Month

Knights of Columbus News

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Christians at Risk

23 Fathers for Good August is a special time to remember the life and legacy of the Order’s founder and to pray for his intercession. BY BRIAN CAULFIELD

28 State Deputies 2017-2018 31 Knights in Action

Maryland Knights take initiative to raise awareness and support for persecuted Christians. BY WILLIAM R. NEWBROUGH

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E D I TO R I A L

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Our Spiritual Fathers

PUBLISHER Knights of Columbus ________

promoting peace. To assist with this important work, the cardinal in 2005 urged the Knights of Columbus to expand to Ukraine. At the 131st Supreme Convention, hosted in San Antonio in 2013, the supreme knight announced that Knights of Columbus councils were chartered in both Ukraine and Lithuania. This past June, following Cardinal Husar’s death May 31, many Knights in Ukraine walked in a massive procession through Lviv and attended the cardinal’s funeral Mass in Kyiv. Similarly, many Knights in Lithuania were directly involved with the beatification of Blessed Teofilius, assisting in various ways to prepare for and celebrate the historic event. Although the Order was not present in either country until recently, the Knights there view Blessed Teofilius and Cardinal Husar as spiritual fathers who inspire their charitable service. Like the Order’s founder, Venerable Michael McGivney (see page 20), Blessed Teofilius and Cardinal Husar faithfully served their flocks, recognizing their needs during challenging times. Following these models of faith, the mission of Knights today is to attend to the current needs of the Church. For example, we have been called to support our brothers and sisters in Christ who are persecuted for their faith (see page 9). And those of us who enjoy religious freedom are obliged to exercise this liberty in our own homes, parishes and communities, as we grow in faith and build up the Church.♦ ALTON J. PELOWSKI EDITOR

K of C Resource: A Model for Our Times FATHER MICHAEL J. MCGIVNEY’S heroic witness to the Gospel, particularly on behalf of families, youth and those in most need, continues to inspire large numbers of people who seek his intercession. The booklet A Model for Our Times: The Heroic Virtue of Father Michael J. McGivney (#5044), available from the Order’s Supply Department, provides a vivid account of his life of charity and why the Vatican has declared him “venerable,” a step toward sainthood.♦ 2 ♦ COLUMBIA ♦

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SUPREME OFFICERS Carl A. Anderson SUPREME KNIGHT Most Rev. William E. Lori, S.T.D. SUPREME CHAPLAIN Patrick E. Kelly DEPUTY SUPREME KNIGHT Michael J. O’Connor SUPREME SECRETARY Ronald F. Schwarz SUPREME TREASURER John A. Marrella SUPREME ADVOCATE ________ EDITORIAL Alton J. Pelowski EDITOR Andrew J. Matt MANAGING EDITOR Anna M. Bninski ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Venerable Michael McGivney (1852-90) Apostle to the Young, Protector of Christian Family Life and Founder of the Knights of Columbus, Intercede for Us. ________ HOW TO REACH US MAIL COLUMBIA 1 Columbus Plaza New Haven, CT 06510-3326 ADDRESS CHANGES 203-752-4210, option #3 addresschange@kofc.org PRAYER CARDS & SUPPLIES 203-752-4214 COLUMBIA INQUIRIES 203-752-4398 FAX 203-752-4109 K OF C CUSTOMER SERVICE 1-800-380-9995 E-MAIL columbia@kofc.org INTERNET kofc.org/columbia ________ Membership in the Knights of Columbus is open to men 18 years of age or older who are practical (that is, practicing) Catholics in union with the Holy See. This means that an applicant or member accepts the teaching authority of the Catholic Church on matters of faith and morals, aspires to live in accord with the precepts of the Catholic Church, and is in good standing in the Catholic Church.

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Copyright © 2017 All rights reserved ________ ON THE COVER A 2016 painting by North Carolina artist Chas Fagan depicts the Order’s founder, Father Michael J. McGivney.

COVER: Painting by Chas Fagan / Photo by Tom Serafin

ON JUNE 25, a hero of the faith was beatified in Vilnius, Lithuania. Archbishop Teofilius Matulionis (see page 5), spent his 62 years of priesthood fearlessly defending the Catholic Church against those wishing to destroy it. From the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917 to the Nazi occupation of Lithuania during World War II to many years under Soviet rule, he continued ministering to the faithful and boldly protested the seizure and destruction of church property. Archbishop Teofilius was sent to multiple prisons and labor camps, where he was treated brutally, but his spirit could not be broken. The authorities feared him more than he feared them. According to one story, the archbishop, who was 84 at the time, responded to a rumor that he was to be arrested yet again. He said, “If I were passing by some bushes, and someone suddenly jumped in front of me and said, ‘Boo,’ I might be frightened. But I’m not at all scared that they can arrest and imprison me.” It was around this time that a young man named Lubomyr Husar, who had been forced to flee from Ukraine with his parents during World War II, was ordained a Ukrainian Greek Catholic priest in Connecticut (see page 15). It would still be more than three decades, however, before the Soviet regime crumbled and the Catholic Church regained its rights in places like Ukraine and Lithuania. In 1993, Bishop Husar — later Cardinal Husar and head of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church worldwide — returned to his homeland, where he played a critical role rebuilding the Church and


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Going to the Peripheries The work of the Church and of the Knights is inspired by Pope Francis’ call to become missionary disciples by Supreme Knight Carl A. Anderson LAST MONTH, I had the privilege of addressing the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops-sponsored Convocation of Catholic Leaders meeting in Orlando, Fla., on the topic of “The Joy of the Gospel in America.” Archbishop José Gomez of Los Angeles and I gave keynote presentations to the thousands of Catholic leaders that had assembled on the topic of “Going to the Peripheries.” Earlier that same day, our supreme chaplain, Archbishop William Lori, led a eucharistic procession and benediction for the convocation participants and then concluded the day by celebrating a special Fortnight for Freedom Mass. The convocation, inspired by the apostolic exhortation of Pope Francis titled Evangelii Gaudium (The Joy of the Gospel), was a historic opportunity initiated by our bishops to respond to the pope’s call for “a new chapter of evangelization” in our country. I began my address by noting that this year I had the opportunity to spend Holy Week in South Korea. During that time, I was privileged to meet a great missionary — Maryknoll Father Gerard Hammond, a priest and a Knight of Columbus who has traveled into North Korea more than 50 times, most recently to treat desperately ill North Koreans who have no other hope of medical assistance. I asked him why he spends so much of his life traveling and living under such dangerous and harsh conditions. His answer was simple: “Where there is great suffering, Jesus is there, and where Jesus is we must be also.”

This brother Knight reminds all of us that through the Incarnation the Lord has united himself forever with suffering humanity — not as an abstraction but with each suffering person throughout history. I told those assembled in Orlando that Jesus is already at the peripheries. The question for us is whether he will be there alone or if his disciples will accompany him. At the Knights of Columbus, we are committed to going beyond our own comfort zone and beyond our own nation to reach those peripheries. For example, we help AIDS orphans in Uganda, homeless and displaced civilians in Ukraine, persecuted Christians in Egypt, survivors of genocide in Iraq, child refugees from North Korea, typhoon survivors in the Philippines, flood victims in Mexico and people with physical disabilities in Vietnam, Cuba and Haiti. As Catholics, we profess a universal Church. As missionary disciples, we must make our universal Church increasingly present at the peripheries as the process of globalization accelerates. And as Knights of Columbus, we answer this call. Quoting Blessed Paul VI, Pope Francis observed that today “people prefer to listen to witnesses: they ‘thirst for authenticity’ and ‘call for evangelizers to speak of a God whom they themselves know’” (Evangelii Gaudium, 150). This means that the most difficult challenge many of us face may not be in reaching out to peripheries around the world; the most difficult challenge may be in reaching out to our own neighbor.

Those closest to us are precisely the ones who discern most clearly the authenticity of our witness. This is why the work of our local councils in parishes and communities throughout our jurisdictions is so important. In Evangelii Gaudium, Pope Francis calls Catholics to be “an evangelizing community [that] is filled with joy” (24), a community that is “permanently in a state of mission” (25), a community that practices a “fraternal communion and missionary fruitfulness” (89). He urges Catholics to “live in fraternity” (91) and to share “a fraternal love capable of seeing the sacred grandeur of our neighbor, of finding God in every human being” (92). He then writes: “I especially ask Christians in communities throughout the world to offer a radiant and attractive witness of fraternal communion. Let everyone admire how you care for one another, and how you encourage and accompany one another” (99). This is a particular responsibility for every Knights of Columbus council throughout the world. Evangelii Gaudium is a special roadmap for the Knights of Columbus. I urge every brother Knight and every council to take up its great mission. In this way, we can make an indispensable contribution to the new evangelization. Vivat Jesus!

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Blessed Are the Pure of Heart The scourge of pornography prevents the true happiness that comes with integrity and sacrificial love by Supreme Chaplain Archbishop William E. Lori IN 2015, THE BISHOPS of the conscientious parents find it very diffiUnited States issued a letter titled cult to shield their children from this Create in Me a Clean Heart. The title menace and its harmful effects. For very is drawn from the profound and pen- many people, viewing these degrading itential Psalm 51, which pleads, “A images is habit-forming, even addictive. relationship with him and with one anclean heart create in me, O God; Although it is sometimes promoted other. Sin marred the image of God in renew within me a steadfast spirit” as an aid to marital intimacy, pornog- us and wounded our relationship with (Ps 51:12). The letter is a call to raphy undermines the mutual trust of God and one another. The Father sent Catholics to seek interior purity, the spouses and destroys the virtuous love us his only-begotten Son to become free and single-hearted love that the which should be at the heart of family one of us, to assume our humanity and Lord wills for his disciples. It also warns life. As the U.S. bishops noted in Cre- repair our wounded dignity, and to call us about one of the greatest threats to ate in Me a Clean Heart, “Everyone is us anew to a life of fidelity and love. In this purity and discipleship — human flesh, Jesus gave his own namely, pornography. “gift of self ” and taught us to Unfortunately, pornography emulate his self-giving love. As Sexually explicit and often is pervasive and deeply rooted the U.S. bishops wrote, “The violent images, from which the in our society. It is readily availhuman body speaks a language able on the internet, television of gift and communion and has pornography business profits, and elsewhere. Sexually explicit great dignity. It should be and often violent images, from treated with greatest respect. As distort how we relate to others. which the pornography busipersons, we are meant to be ness profits, distort how we loved, not used.” think of and relate to others. Pornog- vulnerable to pornography. Many good raphy relentlessly signals that it is ac- people struggle with this habit, includ- CHASTITY AND FREEDOM ceptable to regard other people as ing faithful Catholics, married and sin- God wills a life of happiness and joy for objects for one’s pleasure and even that gle people, fathers and mothers, and so us, not degradation. In the Beatitudes sexual violence is acceptable. on.” This struggle is often dealt with in and throughout the Gospels, Jesus Some people seek to normalize Catholic men’s gatherings, in the con- teaches us that the pure of heart are pornography use, claiming that it does- fessional and in other pastoral settings. blessed — that is to say, they are happy n’t hurt anyone, and portray its oppoWe need to focus on the holiness because their lives are in sync with nents as backwards and out-of-step and goodness that God desires for our God’s generous love and his plan of with the times. However, far from lives, on the ways in which pornogra- mercy and redemption. Those who are being victimless, pornography is deeply phy undermines both our happiness pure of heart can relate to God and to harmful. and holiness, and on the remedies that others openly and lovingly, whereas imare available. purity leads one to see others as objects THE LANGUAGE OF THE BODY God created humanity in his image to be used for pleasure or profit. Jesus Pornography use has reached epidemic and thus endowed each person with teaches us that those who regard others levels. Tragically, many young people, inherent dignity (cf. Gen 1:27). In- with lust have already committed adulstill in their formative years, are exposed deed, he created us to reflect his own tery in their hearts (cf. Mt 5:28). Furto pornographic images. Today, even goodness and self-giving love in our thermore, the New Testament writers 4 ♦ COLUMBIA ♦

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are unanimous in teaching that those who engage in various acts of impurity have no place in the kingdom of God. We are called to freedom and holiness through the virtue of chastity — a mastery of self and one’s desires that enables a person to love others as the Lord has first loved us. The truth of the Gospel is expressed in the Church’s teaching that sexual love is meant for marriage alone. Using pornography (even in marriage) and producing or selling it constitutes a serious sin against chastity and human dignity. And, to be clear, the

H O LY FAT H E R ’ S P R AY E R I N T E N T I O N

POPE FRANCIS: CNS photo/Alessandro Bianchi, Reuters — BLESSED TEOFILIUS: Photo courtesy of the Diocese of Kaišiadorys, Lithuania

Offered in Solidarity with Pope Francis ARTISTS: That artists of our time, through their ingenuity, may help everyone discover the beauty of creation.

use of pornography often leads to other sexual sins. What remedies exist to this pervasive challenge to human dignity and holiness? First, let us remember that the Lord came to call sinners and that he wants nothing more than our salvation. True to the Lord’s mission, the Church must be, as Pope Francis famously said, “a field hospital” where wounds are healed. For this reason, the Church reaches out to all those ensnared by pornography, first and foremost through the sacrament of reconciliation. The sin of pornography

and all related sins should be confessed with honesty and trust in God’s mercy. The Church also seeks to strengthen marriages and to help parents form their children with integrity and love. It offers resources, counseling and other support for those struggling to lead lives of chastity. In our charity, fraternity and unity, let us pray for one another and seek to strengthen one another in virtue and discipleship, so that we may follow the Lord wholeheartedly and give generously of ourselves with freedom and integrity.♦

C AT H O L I C M A N O F T H E M O N T H

Blessed Teofilius Matulionis (1873-1962) THE SECOND of three sons, Teofilius Matulionis was born into a farming family in Kudoriškis, Lithuania, June 22, 1873. After high school, he entered the Catholic seminary in St. Petersburg, Russia, but left a year later, unsure if he could live up to the calling. After working as a teacher, he returned, and he was ordained a priest in 1900. Following parish assignments in Latvia, in 1910 Father Matulionis was transferred to St. Petersburg, where he witnessed the 1917 Bolshevik revolution. For refusing to sign a 1923 law ordering the confiscation of all Church property, he spent two years in Moscow prisons. Secretly ordained a bishop in 1929, he was arrested later that year and sentenced to 10 years at the Solovki prison camp, a Soviet gulag near the Arctic circle. When it was discovered that he celebrated clandestine Masses and distributed the Eucharist, he was sent to Leningrad, where he endured a year of solitary confinement. Hard labor in icy forests and malnourishment then ravaged his health. Released in a 1933 prisoner exchange, Bishop Matulionis went to Rome and

met Pope Pius XI, who said, “You are a martyr; you must bless me first!” Appointed bishop of Kaišiadorys, Lithuania, in 1943, he fearlessly protested the closure of churches and restrictions on religious rights during the Nazi and Soviet occupations. In 1946, he was arrested and served a seven-year term in communist prisons. In 1957, he was exiled from his diocese to Šeduva. In 1962, Pope John XXIII made him an archbishop and invited him to the Second Vatican Council. Months later, he was injected with a lethal “sedative” during a search of his home by Soviet authorities. He died three days later, on Aug. 20, 1962. Bishop Teofilius Matulionis was beatified in Vilnius June 25, 2017.♦

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State Deputies Meeting Highlights Key Priorities for Fraternal Year

FRATERNAL LEADERS representing the Order’s 75 jurisdictions gathered for the annual Organizational Meeting of Knights of Columbus State Deputies in New Haven, Conn., June 8-11. The event featured addresses on the charitable work of the Order, various workshops, fraternal activities and daily Mass. Prior to the opening business session June 9, the state deputies and their wives gathered at St. Mary’s Church, the birthplace of the Order, for a votive Mass of the Sacred Heart celebrated by Supreme Chaplain Archbishop William E. Lori of Baltimore and the installation of new officers. In his keynote address June 9, Supreme Knight Carl A. Anderson began by reading the message of Pope Francis to last year’s Supreme Convention in Toronto. Calling it “our mission statement for the fraternal year,” the supreme knight outlined a number of priorities for the coming year. He urged building greater awareness of the Knights of Columbus Christian Refugee Relief Fund, particularly at the local level, and cited the U.S. House of Representatives’ recent passing of H.R. 390 as a move in the right direction to assist those targeted for genocide. “But more needs to be done,” Anderson told the state deputies, underscoring the courageous witness of persecuted Christians who are “crying out for solidarity.” “If an organization that calls themselves Knights is not the organization that is going to stand with them, then who can they expect to support them? They need help from us, and I ask you make that a top priority.” Much of the meeting focused on the Order’s Building the Domestic Church While Strengthening Our Parish initiative. “Just as our efforts to provide assistance to the Christians in the Middle East will help relieve their sufferings, in our work strengthening the domestic church we are going to save countless families from suffering,” the supreme knight said. 6 ♦ COLUMBIA ♦

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“This initiative will build stronger families and, in turn, stronger parishes.” In addition, the supreme knight discussed the Order’s Ultrasound Initiative, which has funded more than 800 machines to date. “We estimate that each of these machines saves four babies a week — that’s 200 babies a year,” he said, announcing a goal of placing 1,000 ultrasound machines in pro-life pregnancy centers. “We are going to save hundreds of thousands of children through this initiative.’” Along with these priorities, the supreme knight emphasized the critical importance of growing the membership of the Knights of Columbus. He also announced the results of the Knights of Columbus Annual Survey of Fraternal Activity. “We reached new heights in 2016,” he said. Knights gave $177,500,673 in charitable donations — over $2 million more than the previous year. Knights also volunteered 75,112,694 hours in charitable service, an increase of 73 million hours. During their time in New Haven, the state deputies had the opportunity to learn about the services and resources available through various departments of the Supreme Council headquarters, to review jurisdiction action plans, and to visit the Knights of Columbus Museum. Celebrating the meeting’s concluding Mass on Trinity Sunday, June 11, Archbishop Lori asked the state deputies to consider how the Holy Trinity is reflected in their work and identity as Knights. Charity, the Order’s first principle, is rooted in the love at the heart of the Trinity, Archbishop Lori explained, as are the principles of unity and fraternity. “The more we enter into the love of the Trinity, the better equipped we are to love others as Christ loves them,” he said.♦

Photo by Tom Serafin

Supreme Knight Carl A. Anderson addresses state deputies during their annual organizational meeting in New Haven, Conn.


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CNS photos/Bob Roller

Supreme Officers Address Historic Convocation of Catholic Leaders KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS representatives joined some 3,500 delegates to the “Convocation of Catholic Leaders: The Joy of the Gospel in America” in Orlando, Fla., July 1-4. An initiative of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, the unprecedented event convened Church leaders — including clergy, religious and laity from more than 80 percent of the nation’s dioceses — to discuss strategies regarding the Church’s mission and evangelization. The Knights of Columbus was the premier sponsor of this gathering inspired by Pope Francis’ apostolic exhortation Evangelii Gaudium. Supreme Knight Carl A. Anderson delivered a keynote address on “Going to the Peripheries” during the plenary session July 3. Referencing the synod of bishops on the new evangelization in 2012, in which he participated as an auditor, the supreme knight said, “There is a fundamental connection between family life and parish life. Both the family and the parish must become what they are: places for ‘a true encounter and relationship with Jesus Christ.’” The supreme knight also noted that “the sense of missionary discipleship that Pope Francis is calling us to — a discipleship of fraternal communion and fraternal love — is a radical repudiation of the extreme individualism that some today champion. It cannot be realized without our renewed commitment to community.” On the same day, the supreme knight also participated in a breakout session on persecuted Christians titled “Missionary Disciples in Solidarity With the Suffering Church.” Deputy Supreme Knight Patrick E. Kelly participated in a breakout session on the “Church’s Relationship with the State” July 2, which examined the role of the Church in public life. “Catholics need to educate themselves about the great value of reli-

Supreme Chaplain Archbishop William E. Lori of Baltimore carries a monstrance under a canopy as he leads a eucharistic procession July 3 during the “Convocation of Catholic Leaders: The Joy of the Gospel in America” in Orlando, Fla. Leaders from dioceses and various Catholic organizations gathered for the convocation July 1-4. • Supreme Knight Carl A. Anderson delivers a keynote address at the convocation July 3. gious freedom and understand the ways that it is threatened,” he said. “In order to be missionary disciples, they need to be able to speak the truths of their faith and live it out in their lives.” The deputy supreme knight also discussed the Order’s Building the Domestic Church While Strengthening Our Parish initiative during a July 3 panel on “Amoris Laetitia: Families as Principal Agents of the New Evangelization.” “The parish is ‘a family of families,’ and the parish and the family will rise and fall together,” Kelly said. “The Knights of Columbus recognizes that we have a responsibility to form men as husbands and fathers, so that they will create strong families. The key to the spiritual life of children is the in-

volvement of fathers, who need to have an active faith.” Supreme Chaplain Archbishop William E. Lori of Baltimore led a eucharistic procession and benediction at the convocation, and he celebrated a Mass concluding the Fortnight for Freedom July 3. “In this moment of eucharistic worship, when we give thanks for the God-given gift of religious freedom, let us ask the Lord to restore in us this gift and help us to use it well and wisely,” Archbishop Lori said in his homily. He concluded by affirming that “in the end, nothing will ever be more important than evangelizing, teaching, bearing witness and fulfilling our mission in love — come rain or come shine!”♦

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Pope Francis Welcomes Pro Football Hall of Famers, Supreme Knight POPE FRANCIS received in private audience a delegation from the Pro Football Hall of Fame June 21. Following an introduction by Supreme Knight Carl A. Anderson, the Holy Father gave a brief address. “Teamwork, fair play and the pursuit of personal excellence are the values — in the religious sense, we can say virtues — that have guided your own commitment on the field,” Pope Francis said. “They are the values that help build a culture of encounter, in which we anticipate and meet the needs of our brothers and sisters and combat the exaggerated individualism, indifference and injustice that hold us back from living as one human family.” The delegation included Pro Football Hall of Fame “Gold Jacket” members Chris Doleman, Floyd Little, Ronnie Lott, Jerry Jones, Curtis Martin, Franco Harris and Jim Taylor. When introducing them to the pope, Supreme Knight Anderson stated, “It has been said that American football is ‘a metaphor for the American experience.’ If this is so, then Vince Lombardi, one of America’s greatest coaches and a Knight of

Supreme Knight Carl A. Anderson introduces members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame to Pope Francis June 21. The Knights of Columbus regularly teams up with professional athletes and sports-related organizations. Columbus, best captured this spirit when he said of one of his championship teams, ‘They didn’t do it for individual glory. They did it because they loved one another.’” The supreme knight went on to express his gratitude to Pope Francis “for reminding all athletes of their responsibility as role models toward children and youth and of the need for solidar-

ity with those ‘at the edges of society’ — especially those who are challenged by poverty or disability.” Addressing the players, the Holy Father thanked the supreme knight “for his gracious words of introduction, which stressed the traditional values of sportsmanship that you seek to embody on the field and in your own lives, your families and your communities.”♦

ON MAY 9, Bishop James D. Conley of Lincoln, Neb., celebrated the 2017 graduation Mass for the Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family in Washington, D.C. During his homily, he told graduates, “You are formed to be missionaries of truth, and mediators of mercy, to broken families and to a broken culture. ... You are formed to build up the family, and thus the future of humanity. God is calling you to courage, conviction and greatness.” Supreme Knight Carl A. Anderson, who serves as the institute’s vice president, also addressed the graduates in remarks following the Mass, which took place at the Saint John Paul II National Shrine. The Knights of Columbus has assisted the Washington session of the John Paul II Institute, now operating from McGivney Hall at The Catholic University of America, since its founding in 1988.♦ 8 ♦ COLUMBIA ♦

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Bishop James D. Conley of Lincoln, Neb., congratulates Michael Boland, a 2017 graduate of the Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family, while Supreme Knight Carl A. Anderson looks on. Also pictured is Father Antonio Lopez, who serves as provost and dean.

TOP: Photo by L’Osservatore Romano — BOTTOM: Photo by John Whitman

John Paul II Institute Graduates ‘Formed to Build Up the Family’


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C H R I S T I A N S AT R I S K

Fostering Greater Solidarity Maryland Knights take initiative to raise awareness and support for persecuted Christians by William R. Newbrough

Photo by Afif Amireh

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s a Knight of Columbus, I am continually amazed at the capacity of the Order to respond effectively to those in need. I see this especially in the Knights’ aid to persecuted communities through the Christian Refugee Relief Fund, which has already provided millions of dollars in humanitarian assistance to Christians and other religious minorities targeted for genocide. In addition to the work of the Supreme Council and the tireless advocacy of Supreme Knight Carl Anderson on behalf of Christians in the Middle East, there is much that we can do at the council, district and assembly level. Often, an effective response can begin with a single Knight. Frank Carroll, who joined St. Joseph Manyanet Council 5567 in Wheaton, Md., in 2012, happens to be a direct descendent of Charles Carroll — the only Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence and a great defender of religious liberty. In 2013, at Frank’s recommendation, our council began sponsoring the education of a Christian child through the Holy Land Christian Ecumenical Foundation. HCEF was founded by Rateb Rabie, a Palestinian Christian and a member of Rock Creek Council 2797 in Bethesda, who has dedicated his life to supporting the continued presence of Christians in the Holy Land. A year after the K of C Christian Refugee Relief Fund was launched in 2014, the Supreme Council partnered with HCEF for the Solidarity Cross program. As chairman of the HCEF committee at the Shrine of St. Jude in Rockville, Frank was especially enthusiastic about this effort, which commissioned more than 100,000 olivewood crosses from Christian artisans in the Bethlehem area. Councils like ours began distributing the crosses, and proceeds from donations went to support the Christian Refugee Relief Fund. In the spring of 2015, Council 5567 also sponsored a resolution at the Maryland State Convention, challenging each council in the jurisdiction to respond in some meaningful way to the genocidal persecution of Christians in the Middle East.

Numerous projects followed in support. In November 2015, for example, St. Elizabeth Council 12796 in Rockville hosted a prayer vigil and Mass, after which I gave a brief presentation on the Order’s efforts to support suffering Christians. The event provided the opportunity to pray and raise awareness, and a collection was taken up for the Christian Refugee Relief Fund, yielding more than $3,000. A similar prayer vigil, hosted by Council 5567 in May 2016, raised more than $3,500. Over the past two years, councils across Maryland District #18 have collected donations for Solidarity Crosses at parish picnics, prayer vigils and after Masses. One recent event at St. Catherine Labouré Parish in Wheaton netted $1,600 in donations. At each event, Knights have distributed Columbia articles detailing relief efforts, information from the christiansatrisk.org website, and related resources. In early 2017, following three years of successful efforts to support suffering Christians, the five councils of our district established the Christian Solidarity Action Committee. CSAC now operates under the state council to raise awareness and promote effective action that fosters greater solidarity with the persecuted Church. The committee offers practical, effective support to districts, councils and assemblies hosting programs that benefit Christians in the Middle East. In April, CSAC presented a “kick off ” seminar hosted by Council 2797 in Bethesda. More than 70 Knights attended for a full report on the Order’s current efforts and presentations about ancient Christian communities. By acting on the grassroots level, we can make a real difference in the lives of our suffering brothers and sisters in Christ. May Our Lady guide and protect us in this worthy cause.♦ WILLIAM R. NEWBROUGH is a member of St. Joseph Manyanet Council 5567 in Wheaton, Md., and district warden of Maryland District #18.

SUPPORT THE KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS CHRISTIAN REFUGEE RELIEF FUND. VISIT CHRISTIANSATRISK . ORG

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Honoring Our Legacy, Serving Our

Mission

K of C members are transforming properties formerly used by their councils into opportunities to strengthen Catholic parishes by Joseph O’Brien

lively crowd of about 60 people gathered on a June evening in Madison, Wis. Members of Our Lady of the Lakes Council 4527 were hosting an annual “Volunteer Night” dinner at their parish to honor the many volunteers who have made the council’s success look easy. The event took place in what appeared to be a typical “K of C hall” — with lots of floor space, a bar, a kitchen and a staging area for presentations. But last year, the home corporation facility where Council 4527 met was donated to the parish, and the property now serves the council, parish and community more than ever. 10 ♦ C O L U M B I A ♦

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Photo by Meggan Haller/Keyhole Photo

Above (left to right): Sam Ridder, Mark Perano, Ted Mueller, Stephen Cancellare and John McGill of Pensacola (Fla.) Council 778 walk outside St. Paul Church in Pensacola. • Opposite page: The former home corporation facility or “clubhouse” used by Council 778 is pictured in 1934. “More money is now going into our council’s charity fund, because we don’t have to pay the bills on the building anymore,” explained Grand Knight Daniel Kelly. Historically, such buildings were a common component of Columbian life around the United States and Canada during much of the 20th century. With dramatic cultural and economic shifts, however, many members discovered

that maintaining these halls began to undercut their council’s primary mission. As a result, many councils have chosen to stop using home corporation buildings and become parish-based. Doing so has allowed them to reach new heights of service and to honor their charter members through a legacy of sizeable charitable contributions benefiting the Church and community. AUGUST 2017

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HALLS OF HISTORY Though K of C councils are prohibited from owning property, members began forming associations to build and maintain halls by the end of the 19th century. This was done through the establishment of independent legal entities known as home corporations. The need was social and sometimes even essential to the life of councils in North America, where the facilities served as bulwarks for a growing yet vulnerable Catholic population beleaguered by prejudice. Home corporations arose from the desire of Catholics, mostly immigrants entering the industrial milieu, for property and land they could call their own. Finding that home corporation buildings could serve as a “permanent home” for their councils, members often supported halls through the venue’s sale of food and alcohol, and through rental fees for wedding receptions and other functions. However, as times and sentiments changed, and Catholics became integrated into mainstream America, the cultural necessity of halls declined. By the late 1970s, the Supreme Council was encouraging councils to become more closely integrated with their local parishes. From economic challenges to the Church’s call for a new evangelization, additional circumstances have further accelerated the transition toward 12 ♦ C O L U M B I A ♦

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parish-based councils. When announcing the Orderwide Building the Domestic Church While Strengthening Our Parish initiative in November 2015, Supreme Knight Carl A. Anderson noted, “Because of the need to generate a constant stream of revenue just to maintain their buildings, many home corporations have been forced into the facilities rental business, in which they are now subject to market forces, government regulations and liability risks. Needless to say, this situation has diluted the mission integrity of the councils that use those buildings.” With such concerns in mind, councils such as Council 4527 in Madison have chosen to turn their focus to parish life. The spacious 9,500-square-foot hall that Council 4527 once called home now belongs to the Catholic Multicultural Center, an outreach ministry of Our Lady Queen of Peace Parish. According to William Thielmann, past grand knight and current financial secretary, the idea to donate the hall, valued at $700,000, to the CMC began with a lighthearted suggestion by Msgr. Ken Fiedler, pastor of Our Lady Queen of Peace. “Then, we found out he was only half-joking,” Thielmann said with a laugh. “After much negotiation and talking to council members and convincing people about the wisdom of such a decision, we voted that we would do it.”

Photo by Lauren Justice

Daniel Kelly (center), grand knight of Our Lady of the Lakes Council 4527 in Madison, Wis., shares a laugh with members Kevin Boening (left) and William Thielmann at the Catholic Multicultural Center building operated by Our Lady Queen of Peace Parish. Formerly part of a home corporation, council members donated the building to the parish last year.


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The CMC, a 1,000-strong Catholic volunteer organization, offers many services to those in need, including faith-based financial skill-building and job-training programs. In July 2016, the home corporation deeded the hall to the CMC, said Deputy Grand Knight James Costello, because the cost of maintaining the hall — an estimated $3,000 per month — was distracting the council, especially in its charitable work. “The money went to offset the expenses of the hall’s operation here,” Costello said of the council’s fundraising efforts. “As a result, the charities weren’t receiving the benefits to the degree that we wanted them to.” The new arrangement, worked out through council and parish lawyers, grants Council 4527 continued use of the hall at no charge and allows CMC activities to thrive. The CMC’s “Culinary Creations” catering program, for example, will put the hall’s professional-grade kitchen to good use and help train clients, including ex-convicts, for a possible career track. “It’s a win-win for everyone involved,” said CMC director Andy Russell. Msgr. Fiedler also sees the benefits to both the Knights and the parish. “Suddenly, the council has surfaced big time in the parish,” he said. “The young people of the parish see that the Knights’ mission is the same as the Church’s mission — to care for the poor and the needy. That’s attracting people, younger people especially.”

The Office of the Supreme Advocate has developed the Handbook for Councils Using Home Corporation Facilities to help councils using home corporation facilities discern whether and how to successfully move from a home corporation to a parish. Councils that choose to continue using home corporations are required by a Supreme Council resolution adopted in 2014 (No. 340) to enter into two agreements that serve to clarify the relationship between the council and corporation and establish a framework for a possible future return of the council to the parish. These agreements protect the council, its members and the Order from potential liabilities that may result from the home corporation’s operations. Questions about the agreements and related matters can be directed to council.handbook@kofc.org or (203) 752-4017. Additional information for councils using home corporation facilities can be found on the Officers’ Desk Reference. In addition, the investing team of Knights of Columbus Asset Advisors® is prepared to help councils invest in Catholic-compliant funds for the councils’ future charitable work. More information can be found at kofcassetadvisors.org.♦

A TRADITION OF CHARITY A thousand miles south, Pensacola (Fla.) Council 778 has experienced a similar resurgence after becoming parish-based. Though a home corporation had been part of its history since 1925, the 2008 economic crisis, combined with rising maintenance costs, caused the council to reconsider its commitment to using the property. By 2012, Council 778 had already relocated to St. Paul Parish in Pensacola, but the hall — and the growing accrual of bills attached to it — remained the home corporation’s problem. In 2014, the building was put on the market and fetched a price good enough to benefit the council, the parish and even the Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee. Members voted to give about a fourth of the proceeds to the diocese’s endowment fund to establish an annual grant in the council’s name for diocesan programs and ministries; another fourth was donated to St. Paul’s for necessary church repairs; and most of the remaining balance is invested with help from Knights of Columbus Asset Advisors. “The basic strategy,” said Past Grand Knight John Dickinson, “is that the principal will remain, and any interest we make — something around $15,000 annually — will go to charity.” Having served as president of the home corporation that oversaw the maintenance of the building, Dickinson did a lot of the heavy lifting for the transaction. He said that the toughest sell on the deal came from the older Knights who had countless memories of the old hall.

“The building was the place where they accomplished much of the Lord’s work; I explained to them that we were merely converting the resource to accomplish the Lord’s work in a different way,” Dickinson explained. “I let my older brother Knights know that I understood this sale to be a big step for them, but I needed their support. I also shared that we were putting a substantial portion of the funding from the sale of the building into the Diocesan Endowment Fund as a perpetual gift that would honor our past brother Knights who built the building. They appreciated the respect I gave them and the brother Knights of the past.” According to Father Doug Halsema, pastor of St. Paul and chaplain of Council 778, the council’s integration with the parish has been a windfall for the church and others. “The money is going toward a building the parish is renovating, which the Knights can use as a meeting room,” Father Halsema said. “Since being here in the parish for the last couple years, it seems to me they enjoy raising money for charitable causes. And they’re good at it, too.” The council has always done its duty in helping the parish, Father Halsema added, but now that duty seems suddenly doubled. “There’s a much more visible presence from the Knights,” he said. “And it’s been a good partnership — the Knights like to cook, and the parish likes to eat.”

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NORTHERN KNIGHTS More than a decade ago, Bristol (R.I.) Council 379 recognized that its meeting space — a converted Chinese restaurant — was dragging on the council’s ability to fulfill its mission and grow membership. Thanks in part to the proceeds from the sale of the hall, the council has disbursed more than $120,000 over the last 10 years in scholarships to Catholic school students around the state. Grand Knight Warren Rensehausen said the council has also seen a resurgence in membership during the same period. “Our numbers have since increased, and the scholarship program has increased,” he said. “We have a lot of younger brother Knights come in because of the scholarship program. It’s been great for the parish and the community as a whole.” The council increased its membership by 30 members in the last two years, Rensehausen reports — far exceeding the 12-member quota that the Supreme Council set for them. The council’s success, Rensehausen said, has also translated into greater enthusiasm for such activities as the Keep Christ in Christmas poster contest at the local Catholic school. “There were 94 entrants out of a school that has 125 students,” he said. “It’s going great. Part of that has to do with the fact that our faces are being seen more in the parish.” North of the border, too, councils have chosen to exchange halls for parish life. Some 30 years ago, the home corporation used by William E. Prentice Council 1429 in Sarnia, Ontario, sold its hall and, in conjunction with neighboring councils that emerged from Council 1429, members have donated $120,000 (Canadian) of the profits to Our Lady of Mercy Parish to renovate the parish’s own hall. They also gave smaller 14 ♦ C O L U M B I A ♦

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donations totaling $40,000 to other Sarnia parishes. According to Norman Monteiro, grand knight of Council 1429, the dispersal of the funds helped the men better understand who they are as Knights of Columbus. “The Knights are called to be men of faith in action first,” he said, “not merely men of property and money.” The sale of the hall has allowed members to focus their attention on other initiatives. Dave Pirt, financial secretary of Council 1429, said, “We’re doing a 12-hour, 185-mile bike-a-thon to raise money for the St. Joseph Hospice in Sarnia. But I have to say, the sale of the hall has helped lead to this ride — freeing us up for these sorts of activities.” Father Jim Higgins, who until recently served as pastor of Our Lady of Mercy and chaplain of Council 1429, recalled with gratitude the council’s willingness to help the parish with renovations — especially the new adoration chapel, which many faithful from the Sarnia area frequent on a regular basis. “The whole focus of the Knights of Columbus is to be of service to the parish, to support the work of the parish priest and to find opportunities of being able to better the standards of community life within the parish,” Father Higgins said. “I think the donation that Sarnia’s Knights made truly did that. It was a great sign to the community of the Knights’ willingness to participate in the goodness of the parish and promote a sense of well-being for both parish and council.”♦ JOSEPH O’BRIEN is a freelance writer who lives in Soldiers Grove, Wis. He is a member of St. James the Greater Council 12606 in Gays Mill.

Photo by Daniel McQuillan Photography

David Pirt (center), financial secretary of William E. Prentice Council 1429 in Sarnia, Ontario, stands outside of St. Joseph’s Hospice after participating in a council-sponsored bike-a-thon fundraiser June 17. He is joined by Father David Johnston, council chaplain; Joe Van Dinther; Rick Smith; and Grand Knight Norman Monteiro.


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‘A Peaceful and Confident Voice’ Cardinal Lubomyr Husar, who invited the Order to his homeland, is remembered as a spiritual giant of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church by John Burger

Knights of Columbus Multimedia Archives

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f St. John Paul II immediately comes to mind when speak- FROM EAST TO WEST AND BACK AGAIN ing of the fall of the Soviet Union, His Beatitude Cardinal Born Feb. 26, 1933, in Lviv, young Lubomyr Husar fled with Lubomyr Husar must be recognized as one of the key figures his family to Austria in 1944, ahead of the advancing Soviet army. who helped rebuild the spiritual and moral foundations of The family came to the United States in 1949, and Lubomyr atUkraine after the dissolution of the USSR. tended St. Basil’s Ukrainian Catholic Seminary in Stamford, Born in Ukraine in 1933, Husar left the land of his forefa- Conn. He later earned degrees from The Catholic University of thers during World War II, lived his formative years and the America in Washington, D.C., and Fordham University in New first part of his priesthood in the York City. He was ordained a West, and finally returned to priest March 30, 1958, and began Ukraine as a Catholic bishop deteaching at St. Basil’s. One of his termined to heal the wounds students was now-Msgr. John Terthat decades of communism inlecky, a pastor in the Ukrainian flicted on his land. He eventually Catholic Eparchy of Stamford and became the leader of the Ukraina member of St. Augustine Counian Greek Catholic Church and cil 41, also in Stamford. attained almost legendary status “Husar first and foremost was in his later years. a peaceful soul who had a sense Following Cardinal Husar’s of humor,” said Msgr. Terlecky, death May 31 at the age of 84, recalling that the cardinal “spoke Pope Francis sent a letter of conwith a soft and yet disciplined dolence to Cardinal Husar’s suctone” and gave “sermons that cessor, Major Archbishop stirred the soul.” Sviatoslav Shevchuk of Kyiv-HaMajor Archbishop Shevchuk lych. “I remember his tenacious likewise spoke about his predefaithfulness to Christ, despite the cessor as a man of peace and hardships and persecutions good humor in remarks to the against the Church,” the Holy media June 1. Father wrote. In a second letter, “Lubomyr lived in peace. He sent on the day of the cardinal’s loved peace, generously shared it funeral, June 5, the pope noted and, in a similar way, peacefully that Cardinal Husar restored to reposed in God,” he said. “I bethe Ukrainian Greek Catholic lieve everyone who communiCardinal Lubomyr Husar, then major archbishop of KyivChurch “the joy of her history, cated with him, especially in the Halych in Ukraine, prays during the opening Mass of the founded on faith through and last years of his life, saw that the 123rd Supreme Convention in Chicago Aug. 2, 2005. beyond any suffering.” beauty of holiness simply shone Many Knights of Columbus through him.” were present at a massive procesDuring the 1960s, Father sion in Lviv, Ukraine, June 3 and at the funeral in Kyiv, hon- Husar worked with youth at a Ukrainian summer resort and oring the man who initiated the Order’s expansion to Ukraine camp in upstate New York, where he was also a pastor. and who predicted that the Knights would play a vital role in Christine Melnyk of New Haven remembers him as a “great re-evangelizing the country. listener” and as someone “you were not afraid to talk to about AUGUST 2017

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any topic.” On a visit to the United States — decades later and blinded by macular degeneration — Cardinal Husar immediately recognized Melnyk by her voice. Father Husar left the United States in 1969 to pursue a doctorate in theology in Rome. He then entered the community of Studite monks and taught at the Pontifical Urbaniana University. The then-head of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, Cardinal Josyf Slipyj, was living in exile in Rome and feared that the episcopate of the Ukrainian Church might die out under Soviet oppression. To ensure apostolic succession, he 16 ♦ C O L U M B I A ♦

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secretly ordained Father Husar and two other priests as bishops in 1977, hoping for the day when the Church could once again practice openly in Ukraine. That day came in 1989, when the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church — outlawed since 1946 — was legalized in a newly independent Ukraine. Bishop Husar, who had served as archimandrite (abbot) since 1978, moved his entire monastery to Ukraine in 1993. He served as a chaplain at Holy Spirit Seminary in Lviv, and in 1996 he received the first of several diocesan leadership ap-


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Mourners accompany the body of Cardinal Lubomyr Husar in a procession through the streets of Lviv June 3 before his body was returned to Kyiv for the funeral Mass and burial June 5. Dozens of Knights of Columbus wearing yellow and white sashes took part in the procession.

CNS/Roman Baluk, Reuters

“He left his mark as a great shepherd who renewed the structures of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church and, at the same time, he tried to be close to the Latin Church,” Archbishop Mokrzycki said. “He always treated me personally with such great kindness and grace — like a father.”

pointments. In January 2001, Bishop Husar was elected major archbishop of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, and just one month later, Pope John Paul II named him a cardinal. In June of same year, Cardinal Husar welcomed the pope to Ukraine. It was the pontiff ’s first and only visit to the former Soviet republic. Archbishop Mieczysław Mokrzycki of Lviv, who served as John Paul II’s private secretary for the last decade of the pontiff ’s life, recalled Cardinal Husar’s fatherly role as an ecumenical leader.

A VOICE OF AUTHORITY In the words of Pope Francis, Cardinal Husar gathered the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church “from the catacombs” in a society deeply wounded by decades of communist oppression. The nation had roughly 300 Catholic priests at the time he returned — a mere tenth of the pre-Soviet number. As major archbishop of the largest of the Eastern Churches in communion with Rome, Cardinal Husar spoke out and wrote pastoral letters on a wide range of social, economic and political issues. He demanded that the government pay back wages, summoned politicians to stop election fraud, exhorted citizens to defend their dignity and voter rights, and invited Church leaders of different denominations to search for common ground. One of his major challenges was the perduring “psychological Soviet character” of Ukrainian society, said Msgr. Terlecky, who did missionary work in Ukraine in the early 1990s. “You have a Soviet society where everything is communal and yet you can’t get anything,” explained Msgr. Terlecky. “The biggest problems were those of individual corruption: people couldn’t buy things, but they sure learned how to get things under cover of darkness.” In the midst of that, he said, Cardinal Husar came in and spoke about moral issues. He brought “a democratic breeze to a country stricken by about 40 years of Soviet propaganda,” wrote Italian journalist Andrea Gagliarducci following the cardinal’s death. The cardinal had, by the end of his life, won deep respect from broad sectors of society, regardless of religious affiliation or political persuasion. “When Cardinal Husar spoke, he was able to speak with the authority of those who have experience in the world,” Gagliarducci observed. “Everyone recognized it, whether they were believers or non-believers, Catholics or Orthodox.” When addressing challenges in Ukraine, one place Cardinal Husar turned to for help was the international Catholic fraternity he had come to know in the United States. “He was aware of the Knights of Columbus when he was a priest in Stamford — of all of its good works in the United States,” said Archbishop Stefan Soroka of Philadelphia, metropolitan of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church in the United States. “He always admired how the Knights as a fraternal organization was able to get men involved in the AUGUST 2017

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Church and do charitable works.” Cardinal Husar attended the Order’s 123rd Supreme Convention in Chicago in August 2005 and gave the homily during a concelebrated Mass. “I have become very interested in transplanting the Order of Knights of Columbus, or at least your ideology, if I may call it such, to Ukraine,” Cardinal Husar said. “Ukraine has gone through a period of at least 70 years in which a communist regime has tried to create a new human being, to change the nature of man. So they have tried very hard to take away from the hearts of men their faith in God.” Communism, he added, left an atmosphere in which many people found it “very, very difficult” to live a Christian life outside of Sunday worship. According to Archbishop Soroka, who is a member of Bishop Stephen Soter Ortynsky Council 14088 in Philadelphia, Cardinal Husar had been talking about the idea of inviting the Knights to Ukraine even before attending the Supreme Convention. “He had a dream, a hope, and he was presented an opportunity to express it,” Archbishop Soroka said. “And it was embraced in the same way it was offered.”

decision to reject closer ties with the European Union evolved into what would become known as the “Revolution of Dignity.” The rallies were marred by clashes with police, resulting in at least 100 deaths and many injuries. Knights tended the wounded, provided food and warm clothes, interceded for those who were arrested, and assisted families of people who died. They also set up a prayer tent in the Maidan to offer spiritual support. Major Archbishop Shevchuk recalled the powerful effect that Cardinal Husar’s words of peace had at the time. “The words he spoke to the people gathered at the Maidan are still resounding in all of us,” he said. “Though we were fearful, he addressed all of us in his peaceful and confident voice, ‘Do not be afraid.’ His words were a kind of light.” The revolution succeeded in throwing off what was generally considered a corrupt government swayed by Moscow. Many challenges remain for Ukraine and for the Church, including an ongoing insurgency in the eastern region. Father Malchyn revealed that in a meeting at the cardinal’s residence in November 2016, Cardinal Husar gave the Knights a new challenge. “The Knights of Columbus have to work in eastern Ukraine in order to THE ORDER EXPANDS raise the level of spirituality of our peoTO UKRAINE ple there and to show them the real IS B EATITUDE In 2011, with his eyesight worsening, face of the Church — the Church as it Cardinal Husar retired. By then, howshould be — because unfortunately STRESSED THAT THE ever, the Knights of Columbus projthey didn’t have many good examples,” ect had advanced. The Supreme he told them. KNIGHTS SHOULD PROCouncil, with assistance from Knights A few months earlier, the Knights of in Poland, had laid the groundwork Columbus Board of Directors had desMOTE THE SPIRIT OF for expanding to Ukraine. Nearly 100 ignated Ukraine the Order’s newest BROTHERHOOD.” men joined the Knights there in exterritory, with nearly 600 members in emplification ceremonies in 2012 and 13 councils. 2013 — among them Major ArchTerritorial Deputy Bogdan Kovaliv, bishop Shevchuk and Archbishop who served as Council 15800’s first Mokrzycki, who have greatly encouraged the development grand knight, stated that the words the cardinal expressed of the Order in Ukraine. last fall made a particularly deep impression on the Knights According to Father Volodymyr Malchyn, Cardinal Husar’s who were present. English/Italian language secretary in his last years, the cardinal “His Beatitude stressed that the activity of the Knights said that “for many years it was an impression in Ukraine that should build trust among people and promote the spirit of the Church was standing on two pillars: women and priests. brotherhood,” Kovaliv said. “This is very important for Men who attended religious services didn’t have their proper Ukraine because one of the greatest consequences of the torole and didn’t know how to help the Church in specific ways, talitarian communist regime was fear — fear to trust each even though many of them wanted to help.” other and fear to exhibit leadership. The Knights, in performFather Malchyn, who now serves as vice chancellor of the ing good deeds, show an example, create an atmosphere of curia under Major Archbishop Shevchuk, became the first trust and personally guide other people.” chaplain of the first council established in Ukraine, St. And in so doing, they are inspired by Cardinal Husar, who Volodymyr Council 15800 in Kyiv. — in the words of his successor, Major Archbishop Shevchuk Along with the John Paul II Council 15801 in Lviv, the — “will forever remain the father and teacher whose wisdom new Knights served in very dramatic ways beginning in No- will accompany us our entire life.”♦ vember 2013. Five blocks from where Council 15800 was meeting, tens of thousands of people gathered in Kyiv’s JOHN BURGER is news editor of Aleteia.org and a member Maidan Nezalezhnosti (Independence Square). Their protests of Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky Council 16253 in New against corruption, human rights abuses and the government’s Haven, Conn.

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TOP: Photo by Ukrainian Independent News and Information Agency — BOTTOM: Photo by Yaroslav Pavliuk of St. Volodymyr Council 15800

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Cardinal Husar addresses hundreds of thousands of protesters gathered in Kyiv’s Independence Square Dec. 1, 2013. Holding the microphone is Arseniy Yatsenyuk, who became Ukraine’s prime minister several months later. • Members of St. Volodymyr Council 15800 stand with Major Archbishop Sviatoslav Shevchuk, successor of Cardinal Husar as head of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, at the Patriarchal Cathedral of the Resurrection of Christ in Kyiv in 2013.

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The Personality of

Father McGivney A contemporary remembers the founder of the Knights of Columbus as a humble and warm-hearted priest by Father Joseph G. Daley 20 ♦ C O L U M B I A ♦

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EDITOR’S NOTE: In commemoration of Father Michael J. McGivney’s birth (Aug. 12, 1852) and his death (Aug. 14, 1890), below is an abridged text of an article that appeared in the June 1900 edition of The Columbiad, the Order’s official publication before Columbia.

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n the annals of the priesthood of New England no name deserves brighter honor than that of Father Michael Joseph McGivney. His short life of 38 years, closing in the summer of 1890, was yet rich in every priestly virtue — the love for souls of the true alter Christus, the childlike piety of the Curé d’Ars, the zeal of Vincent de Paul for works of mercy, the unfatigued optimism of the associates of Ozanam — these traits, so precious in the sight of man and heaven, were clearly mirrored in the soul of that good, simple, honest priest of Connecticut. His special vocation was to develop Catholic manhood, to bind into one conspicuous solidarity all the elements that make for strength of character and so, indeed, to bring out that solidity of character — in other words, that Catholicity — prominently in its strength before the world. Thanks to his labors, the Society of the Knights of Columbus was organized in 1882. Its purpose was to create among Catholic laymen a confraternity which, while not being a religious society in the strict sense of the word, exacted from its members certain religious qualifications, that is to say, the open profession of the Catholic faith and filial submission to the Church in all matters of doctrine, discipline and morals. The effect of the Society of the Knights of Columbus has since that become extraordinary; the Catholic layman has been brought to realize the preciousness of his birthright as a son of the Church; and Catholic citizenship, so long decried, so long pointed out as a menace to the country’s institutions, has become indeed synonymous now with uprightness, piety, intelligence and social strength. The Knights of Columbus, by attracting to their ranks such

Opposite page: A photograph of Father Michael J. McGivney seated in a rectory setting circa 1880 is attributed the New Haven photography studio of John J. Tierney, a parishioner at St. Mary’s Church and a member of San Salvador Council 1. • The first page of the article titled “The Personality of Fr. McGivney” is seen above as it appeared in the June 1900 edition of The Columbiad.

integrity of moral principle, such elevation of mind and such loftiness of character, have dissipated the olden prejudices and caused the Catholic name to be everywhere honored. … The establishing of the Knights as a society was distinctively a priestly work. Their founder as a boy studied his classics under the Jesuit fathers at Montreal. Among them he imbibed so deep a spirit for erudition that he wished to become a Jesuit himself. His father, living at that time just outside the little city of Waterbury, a sturdy iron-molder by trade and in his leisure something of an agriculturalist, would not lend himself to encouraging in the son any such preference and when in due time solicited, absolutely refused to grant paternal sanction. A few years later, the young McGivney, having lost his father and endured for a while some dint of distress, was given an opportunity to enroll himself as a student at Baltimore among the Sulpicians of St. Mary’s. To them he unfolded his mind anew; and they, finding in him the ideal vocation, diverted him entirely from the thought of joining the Jesuits. The arena of stirring toilers rather than that of placid thinkers was the sphere best adapted to qualities and energies such as were his, they argued; and so, while praising scholarship as a possession of great value, they taught him to regard it as merely a subsidiary quality in a priest: — humanity, and not the humanities, should engage henceforth his most devoted study; sympathy for human woes was a property more intrinsic than knowledge: to store up knowledge was good, they admitted; but to save souls was incomparably better. …. Humanity — its woes; human souls — their rescuing: with topics like these so persistently upon his mind, he studied and prayed and meditated and took counsel: then he went straight to work. … I remember meeting with Father McGivney in New Haven in 1883, the year after the first incorporation of the Knights. He was then in the prime of his vigor, entrusted by a good but delicate pastor, Father Lawlor, with the management of St. Mary’s, a parish lying close under the towers of Yale College and at that time the most aristocratic parish in Connecticut. Father McGivney himself was anything but aristocratic; he was a man of extreme grace of manner in any society, but without any airs, without any “lugs,” if you will pardon the expression. I saw him but once and yet I remember his pale, beautiful face as if I saw it only yesterday; it was “a priest’s face,” and that explains everything. It was a face of wonderful AUGUST 2017

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repose; there was nothing harsh in that countenance, although Two members of the old guard have clung exclusively to there was everything that was strong; there was nothing sor- K of C affairs. These are Wm. M. Geary and Daniel Colwell. did, nothing mercenary, nothing of the politician, nothing of Mr. Geary, although well on in his 47th year, looks still the axe-grinder. Guile and ambition were as far from him as young and handsome, still possessing energies which give from heaven. To meet him was at once to trust him; children ample scope to a great ambition for business and splendid actually loved him; and the very old people of the neighbor- tact for management. Mr. Colwell is a busy man and in busihood, whom he hunted up and who got part of his time even ness hours cannot brook disturbance. But yet once in a while on busiest days, called him a positive saint and meant it. he does make an exception when a stranger from afar comes At the city jail the wardens still hand down anecdotes of in to bother him at his desk in the offices of the Board of Diwhat Father McGivney said and did during visits which he rectors of the Knights of Columbus. … From time to time, paid the prisoners. Elsewhere, too, incidents abound to his he dropped back into personal recollections, naming often, credit. A blind, aged man who used to live by charity, but who and yet always with a noticeable tenderness, that kind young was not a Catholic went every Sunday to Mass at St. Mary’s to priest of 20 years ago whose image was in both our minds hear “that voice.” Non-Catholics found in Father McGivney a and whose large portrait stood upon the desk in front of us soul of immense sympathy, which invited them strongly to- — Father McGivney, the warm-hearted priest of Christ’s ward investigating the religious truths his lips proclaimed. Church of Charity.… Among the conversions due to God’s grace in Father McRev. Richard Foley of Brooklyn, N.Y., who was a close Givney are two which to this day everyone still talk of at New seminary chum of Father McGivney, told me recently that Haven. One of these converts was the three points of character most David Buell, famous in his Yale days as noted in Father McGivney were his a musician and author of the opera sense of orderliness, his depth of piety, Penikeese — but now unknown to the and his fund of good humor. His taste ATHER MCGIVNEY world, though a member of the Society for order was indeed remarkable. Durof Jesus. The other notable convert was ing his stay at Baltimore, the SulpiWAS A MAN OF EXTREME Miss Harwood, daughter of Rev. Dr. cians would not be content with Harwood, the rector of the most disanyone else for the post of sacristan. GRACE OF MANNER tinguished Episcopalian congregation His good humor too was often apparIN ANY SOCIETY, BUT in the whole state, and a man of large ent; for everywhere that he is spoken scholarship and wealth. Miss Harof, his happy words, his genial utterWITHOUT ANY AIRS. wood’s conversion attracted notice by ances, weighing more than nuggets of reason of her distinction in the ranks gold, are still remembered, and still of society, the refinement of her home treasured up. His piety too has been and circle, and the great brilliancy of referred to. That piety crystallized itmind which she possessed, together with her superiority of self in his immense charity. education and extreme personal grace. The death of Miss HarIn the McGivney family, there were three sons, both of wood which came all too early was yet attended with every the brothers being much younger than himself: and if Father consolation our holy faith could bestow. McGivney could be said to have ever had one single worldly Father McGivney’s influence over men was something ex- ambition, it was to hope that his brothers might enjoy a traordinary. Young men particularly were attracted to him and good education. The dearest wish of his heart has since that hung upon his words with an eagerness which he himself time been realized; for all three sons of the family have alike often wondered at; hundreds petitioned for the light of his become priests, both of the others still surviving him. The counseling and sent others too, to share his advice. … elder of these is the Rev. Patrick J. McGivney of MiddleIt is a source of edification to note how these young men town, Conn., at the present time state chaplain of Connectiof the earliest councils have rounded out their mature careers. cut; the other is Rev. John McGivney of Bridgeport, a young Cornelius T. Driscoll is the present mayor of the city of New man of less than 30 years, well spoken of for his earnest yet Haven; Stephen Maher, M.D., having taken his degree at Ed- graceful preaching. inburgh, has now a large repute in medical circles; John J. Father McGivney the institutor of the Knights died as pasPhelan, living comfortably at Bridgeport, has seen himself tor of the parish of Thomaston, Conn., in August 1890. He elected Secretary of State in the Nutmeg Commonwealth, died without leaving any pecuniary debts; but he died also serving under Gov. Luzon Morris. John T. McPartland, who without owning a dollar: and the reason of it was that in his at one time seemed destined for the Church, has grown rich heart of charity he had given his last dollar away.♦ in business; and Edward Downes, a member of perhaps the oldest, richest, and most respected Catholic family of New FATHER JOSEPH G. DALEY (1866-1935) served as a priest Haven, who seemed once destined for politics, has come at of the Diocese of Springfield, Mass., and was the author of length to reveal a vocation for the Church. several books of fiction.

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FAT H E R S F O R G O O D

A Priest for the Family August is a special time to remember the life and legacy of the Order’s founder and to pray for his intercession by Brian Caulfield

Father Michael J. McGivney, 1880 / Charcoal drawing by John J. Tierney / Knights of Columbus Museum Collection

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ather Michael J. McGivney, the founder of the Knights of Columbus, was born Aug. 12, 1852, and died Aug. 14, 1890, two days after his 38th birthday. The week in which these dates fall each year is Knights of Columbus Family Week, a time when councils are encouraged to schedule family events. But you can call upon Father McGivney’s intercession whenever family issues arise and invoke him by his titles: Apostle to the Young and Protector of Christian Family Life. Father McGivney, whose cause for canonization remains open at the Vatican, was declared venerable in 2008. Knights and their families are urged to pray daily for his intercession in matters large and small, and to report any favors received. The Father Michael J. McGivney Guild investigates reports of possible miracles — extraordinary physical healings experienced after invoking Father McGivney’s aid. Inquiry into a reported miracle is a long and painstaking process, but we pray that one of these events will be accepted by the Vatican and open the way to his beatification. A second miracle would then be needed for canonization. In the meantime, all Knights should be encouraged by the great number of answered prayers reported by those who ask for Father McGivney’s intercession. These favors indicate that the Order’s founder is still at work in the lives of his Knights and their families, and among the Catholic faithful. In fact, they suggest that Father McGivney, from his place in eternity, is concerned about many of the same problems that he dealt with as a priest on earth. Most reported favors fall in four areas: Employment and finances. Just as his parishioners looked to Father McGivney for guidance at a time when the words “No Irish need apply” were often included in job postings, so today many pray to him when they are laid off or seeking a better job. For example, a grateful woman recently reported, “My husband persevered in prayer for Father McGivney to intercede for him to find a new job, and his prayers were answered.”

Substance abuse. In Father McGivney’s day, alcohol abuse afflicted the immigrant population, and he founded a parish “total abstinence” society. Many now ask for help with drug or alcohol abuse, including a relieved mother who called the guild to say that her adult son had entered a rehabilitation program after she prayed to Father McGivney. Family reconciliation. Divisions sometimes occurred within immigrant families struggling to make ends meet, and they are not uncommon today with the increase of divorce. A mother recently wrote that her two grown sons were on bad terms, but after she prayed for a week, their “relationship was good again. I know in my heart Father McGivney answered my prayer!” Return to the faith. Father McGivney founded the Order to keep men from joining antiCatholic secret societies that promised financial benefits. Today, many Catholics call upon him to help their fallenaway children. “I prayed to Father McGivney daily for 14 days that a family member would return to our Catholic faith,” one person reported. “After 30 years away, they have returned and now sit beside me every Sunday at Mass.” A mother wrote happily, “I prayed a novena regularly for six months to Venerable Father McGivney, imploring his help for my son and daughter-in-law to return to the Church. This month, they enrolled in their parish and are attending Mass. My prayers were answered!” As we celebrate the Order’s founder and Knights of Columbus Family Week, let us continue to pray for Father McGivney’s canonization and invoke his intercession as we face life’s many challenges. Venerable Michael McGivney, pray for us!♦ BRIAN CAULFIELD is vice postulator of the cause for canonization of Venerable Father Michael J. McGivney and editor of Fathers for Good, an initiative of the Knights of Columbus.

FIND ADDITIONAL ARTICLES AND RESOURCES FOR CATHOLIC MEN AND THEIR FAMILIES AT FATHERSFORGOOD. ORG .

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Not your average Joe Long Island’s newest council is named after a young man known for his love of life and love of Christ by Lena Pennino-Smith

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n a Sunday in late 2014, walking into Holy Name of Jesus Church in Woodbury, N.Y., Joseph (Joe) Reali, 25, approached a Knights of Columbus information table with great curiosity. His brother, Michael Reali Jr., wasn’t interested; he and Joe had both been told, “That’s for old guys.” As Mass began, Joe had a huge smile on his face. Finally, he couldn’t contain himself. “I signed up for the Knights!” he exclaimed. “Why did you do that?’ Michael asked. Still smiling, Joe replied, “I signed you up, too.” Though Joe had high hopes of taking his First Degree, he never did. He died unexpectedly on Jan. 16, 2015, due to an enlarged heart. But the legacy of this devout yet fun-loving young man lives on in the newest council on Long Island: Joseph Mario Reali Council 16261. A 2016 Star Council, it has attracted approximately 60 Knights since it was chartered two years ago. Many of the members knew and loved Joe, whose life continues to inspire their mission. Louis Onglengco, 23, recalled looking up to Joe, who trained him as an altar server and helped him on the football field when they were growing up. “I joined the Knights of Columbus to help the Church and because Joe Reali was a great role model to me,” Onglengco said. “I wanted to be just like him.” 24 ♦ C O L U M B I A ♦

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DISCIPLE OF CHRIST The font of holy water on the wall of the Reali home and the refrigerator covered with pictures of saints attest that Joe was raised in a pious Catholic family. The youngest of four children, Joe grew up praying the rosary with his parents and siblings every evening. Many nights in their shared bedroom, Michael would bump into his brother kneeling in prayer before an image of Our Lady of Guadalupe. Lisa and Michael Reali Sr. served their parish as extraordinary ministers of the Eucharist; their daughters Luciana and ToniMarie as cantor and lector, respectively; and Michael Jr. and Joe as altar servers. Joe later became a sacristan, trained altar servers and helped with the parish youth group. He also continued to serve at the altar for the Padre Pio Prayer Group, which attracts hundreds and meets monthly at Holy Name of Jesus Church. The Reali family was inspired to start the prayer group because of their personal connection to St. Padre Pio. Joe’s grandmother knew the Capuchin friar well from their shared Italian hometown, Pietrelcina, and other friars from Italy would even visit the family’s home on Long Island. Joe once wrote about his upbringing, “If anyone had doubts about Catholicism whom I met in my life, these events that took place in my childhood made me feel obligated to stand


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Photos courtesy of the Reali family

Joe Reali (1989-2015) is pictured with his family at St. Theresa Church in Trumbull, Conn., following the baptism of his niece (and goddaughter) on the feast of St. Padre Pio, Sept. 23, 2012. Standing far right is his brother, Michael, who is now grand knight of Joseph Mario Reali Council 16261. up for it, because I have no doubt in my mind that God and Jesus Christ do exist and are really present in the Mass.” Besides being a daily Communicant who loved the rosary, one way that Joe’s love for the faith showed itself was in his habit of bringing others to church. His longtime friend Anthony Pizzo recalled a time that Joe picked him up for Mass in a car filled with football teammates, some of whom were Jewish or Muslim. “Don’t worry about it. This is a good thing,” Joe said. Joe often took friends to attend Teen Bible Study and afterward treated everyone to ice cream or pizza. On at least one occasion, he stayed up with his friends all night and, before they could go to sleep, he made them come to Mass with him as the sun came up. “There was nothing hypocritical about Joseph,” recalled Msgr. Richard Bauhoff, pastor of Holy Name of Jesus Church. “It was natural to him, part of his daily living to be a disciple of Christ and live his life according to the Gospel. Joe’s piety and goodness were evident.”

“Joseph was a light in the world,” said his sister Luciana Corsello. “He received God’s love through the sacraments, especially confession and the Holy Eucharist, and radiated it to everyone he met.” Joe reminded Luciana of Blessed Pier Giorgio Frassati, a devout, athletic and charismatic young man who lived in Turin, Italy, in the early 20th century. When she first learned about Frassati, Luciana could not resist making a phone call even though she was on a silent retreat. “Joe,” she said, “I found your perfect saint!” FILLING THE PEWS While Joe was firmly rooted in his faith, he was also a regular guy who enjoyed hosting parties, going dancing with his friends or blasting music while canning tomatoes with the family. He had a playful side, with a fondness for pranks and fireworks. With good looks and a quick smile, Joe was popular with girls. He would tell his friends that it was because women AUGUST 2017

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want to be respected. “Treat every girl like your mother,” he would say and quickly add, “The Blessed Mother!” And Joe lived for playing football at Syosset High School and Long Island University Post. A 6-foot-tall wide receiver, he proudly painted crosses under his eyes in black before games. Joe brought a unique blend of ferocious athleticism and Christian goodwill onto the field. Once, when his team faced the opposition from Hempstead High School, aggression and tensions were high, and Joe volunteered to play defense. After Joe tackled a massive player who had a scholarship to Penn State, he instantly spun around to help the player up. “This big guy gives Joe a hug, and suddenly the whole tone of the game changed; that act of love changed everything,” recalled Michael Reali Sr. As much as Joe loved football, family came first. In 2009, his mother, Lisa, was diagnosed with colon cancer and could no longer care for her grandson while her daughter ToniMarie worked. Joe quit football at LIU Post and switched to night classes so that he could look after his young nephew. According to Toni-Marie, he didn’t treat this as a sacrifice but instead responded with characteristic joy and generosity 26 ♦ C O L U M B I A ♦

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of spirit. “When I see how others get inspired by him, I realize that the way he made me feel was the way he made others feel,” she said. Having been diagnosed years earlier with an enlarged heart condition, Joe died unexpectedly but peacefully in the family home at age 25. He was in the kitchen with his mother, who was making him a tuna sandwich, when suddenly Lisa heard the chairs rattle. “When I turned, I found him lying serenely on the floor with his eyes closed,” she recalled. Paramedics soon arrived in response to Lisa’s 911 call, but attempts to resuscitate Joe were unsuccessful. Michael Sr. remembered one day when he suggested to Joe that their church should be renovated with fewer pews because “the pews are never filled.” It was one of the only times that Joe appeared angry with him. “He said, ‘Dad, one day you will see this church filled.’” Michael recalled. “And I said, ‘Yeah, I’d like to see that.’” With tears in his eyes, Michael recounted that during Joe’s wake at the church and later at his funeral Mass, Holy Name

Photo by Branden J. Stanley/Spirit Juice Studios

Three of Joe Reali’s cousins — (left to right) Matthew Reali, Michaelangelo Reali and John Reali — are among the newest members of Joseph Mario Reali Council 16261 in Woodbury, N.Y.


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Photo courtesy of the Reali family

of Jesus Church was overflowing with people whose lives his son had touched. Altogether, some 3,000 people gathered, and many shared stories about how Joe had made them feel loved, helped them in a time of need, brought them to church or otherwise changed their lives for the better. One woman, for example, had driven hours from Pennsylvania to pay her respects, since Joe was responsible for talking her son, who had run away, into returning home. Bishop William F. Murphy, then-head of the Diocese of Rockville Centre, was present and compared Joe to St. Stanisław Kostka and St. Aloysius Gonzaga, two saints who died young but had a fervent devotion to the Eucharist and the Blessed Mother. A WARRIOR’S HEART More than two years after Joe’s death, his parents admit they are still mourning. “It’s never going to be easy,” Lisa said. Michael Sr. said, “It’s the little things that set you off — finding rosary beads in his work clothes or a cross in the truck he used to drive, or holy pictures all over the place.” Joe has been posthumously honored in many ways. For example, he received the Model of Faith Award at LIU Post’s Interfaith Center and is remembered in an Eagle Scout memorial garden at Holy Name of Jesus Church. It may seem unusual to name a Knights of Columbus council after a young man who was not even officially a member, since councils on Long Island are typically named after Our Lady or other saints. But when Council 16261 was formed in July 2015, Joe’s was the only name considered. “The first thing we talked about was what we wanted the name of the council to be — and the first words on everyone’s lips was ‘Joseph Mario Reali,’” said Past Grand Knight Bill Bonneville. “So many Knights knew about his devotion to our church, to Holy Name of Jesus, as well as his family’s devotion to the parish. It was significant to us that we move forward in his name.” In previous years, Holy Name of Jesus — a small parish — could not garner enough interest to start a council of its own. Following Joe’s death, however, parishioners were inspired when they heard that he had intended to join the Order. This continues to give the council momentum to attract members and raise money for charitable causes. In honor of Joe’s passion for bringing people — especially young people — to church, Council 16261 has already raised more than $15,000 toward the renovation and beautification of the church entranceway. Msgr. Bauhoff, who serves as the council’s chaplain, said they want the church to convey the same spirit of welcoming that Joe did. According to Anthony Pizzo, who is now a member of Council 16261, naming a Knights of Columbus council after his friend is a perfect tribute. “Joe had an inner desire to be a warrior, to fight for what he believed in,” Pizzo said. “Combine that with his love for his faith, and the idea of the Knights of Columbus — he was totally sold on it.”

Joe Reali is pictured in his football uniform at the C.W. Post Campus of Long Island University, where he played wide receiver.

For a short time, Joe had entered seminary, and his seminary essay included a favorite quote by football legend Vince Lombardi, who was himself a member of the Knights: “I firmly believe that any man’s finest hour, the greatest fulfillment of all he holds dear, is that moment when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle — victorious.” In many ways, this quote would come to define Joe’s life. Michael Sr. is now in charge of recruitment for Council 16261 and works to bring people back to church to fill those pews. And Michael Jr., who was reluctant to join the Knights two years ago, now serves the council as grand knight. He smiled, knowing that his brother somehow led him to the role. “He was always bringing people to church, carloads of kids,” Michael Jr. said. “That is the main purpose of the Knights — to grow the Catholic Church. So I feel like Joe is still with us, encouraging us in what we do.”♦ LENA PENNINO-SMITH writes from West Babylon, N.Y. AUGUST 2017

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TION S TATKEN IDGEHP T UST IIENS AC 2017-18

ALABAMA GRIFFIN H. SHREVES

ALASKA RONALD L. JONES

ALBERTA RON SCHUSTER

ARIZONA SEAN E. HALPAIN

ARKANSAS PHILIP A. SAVAGE

BRITISH COLUMBIA KOON MING LAU

CALIFORNIA ROMEO D. QUEVEDO

COLORADO JOHN J. DOHERTY

CONNECTICUT STEVEN J. BACON

DELAWARE JOHN M. BRENNER

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA AMADO C. ALVAREZ JR.

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC ROBERT H. CAMPUSANO PÉREZ

FLORIDA DONALD T. KAHRER

GEORGIA MARK D. CORRIGAN

GUAM BOBBY O. PELKEY

HAWAII THEODORE J. RHOADES III

IDAHO MICHAEL R. TOWNSEND

ILLINOIS THEODORE A. STITES JR.

INDIANA MARTIN F. McCOY JR.

IOWA ANTONIO BAÑUELOS

KANSAS VINCENT P. MELVIN III

KENTUCKY GABRIEL CABRAL

LOUISIANA JAMES F. RIENTE

LUZON NORTH JOSE C. REYES JR.

LUZON SOUTH RAMONCITO A. OCAMPO

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K N EI GD HETPSUITNI EAC TION S TAT S 2017-18

MAINE NORMAN A. GRAY

MANITOBA DANIEL P. SHEPHERD

MARYLAND STEPHEN M. COHEN

MASSACHUSETTS PAUL G. O’SULLIVAN

MEXICO CENTRAL FRANCISCO SÁENZ MUÑOZ

MEXICO NORTHEAST ALEXANDRO XAVIER ISAAC HUERTA

MEXICO NORTHWEST JUAN MANUEL ÁLVAREZ DEL CASTILLO

MEXICO SOUTH JESÚS ARMANDO BLAS MARTÍNEZ

MEXICO WEST LORENZO CERVANTES BARAJAS

MICHIGAN KENNETH B. UNTERBRINK

MINDANAO REYNALDO C. TRINIDAD

MINNESOTA ROBERT A. PENAS

MISSISSIPPI NOEL A. AUCOIN

MISSOURI JOSEPH M. ROSENTHAL

MONTANA RONALD M. KAZMIERCZAK

NEBRASKA LOUIS R. GASPER

NEVADA THOMAS J. THORN

NEW BRUNSWICK CHARLES E. LIRETTE

NEW HAMPSHIRE GLENN P. CAMLEY

NEW JERSEY ROBERT E. HATLER

NEW MEXICO PATRICK T. MASON

NEW YORK KENNETH F. LATHAM JR.

NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR BRIAN P. HURLEY

NORTH CAROLINA JOHN R. NUSSBAUM

NORTH DAKOTA LAWRENCE R. LEWANDOWSKI

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S TAT E D E P U T I E S 2017-18

NOVA SCOTIA CARL F. REID

OHIO KEVIN P. MILLER

OKLAHOMA JOHN T. PIERCE

ONTARIO DANIEL J. HEFFERNAN

OREGON FRANCIS R. MOHR

PENNSYLVANIA CHARLES J. VAGNARELLI

POLAND TOMASZ WAWRZKOWICZ

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND JAMES H. POIRIER

PUERTO RICO MIGUEL A. VIDAL LUGO

QUÉBEC DENIS LAPOINTE

RHODE ISLAND MICHAEL A. BENSON

SASKATCHEWAN BRIAN W. SCHATZ

SOUTH CAROLINA MICHAEL A. ALLEN

SOUTH DAKOTA PATRICK J. POWERS

TENNESSEE TRACY D. STALLER

TEXAS DOUGLAS E. OLDMIXON

UKRAINE BOGDAN I. KOVALIV

UTAH ANDREW H. AIRRIESS

VERMONT MICHAEL PATNODE

VIRGINIA STEPHEN J. KEHOE

VISAYAS ANTHONY P. NAZARIO

WASHINGTON ROBERT J. BAEMMERT

WEST VIRGINIA SCOTT K. NALE

WISCONSIN TIMOTHY J. GUSKI

WYOMING JAMES L. VENJOHN

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K N I G H T S I N AC T I O N

KNIGHTS

IN

ACTION

REPORTS FROM COUNCILS, ASSEMBLIES AND COLUMBIAN SQUIRES CIRCLES

Georgia State Knights of Columbus Military Chaplains Fund. Parishioners learned more about military ministry and responded generously, allowing the assembly to make a $10,000 donation after the drive. REFUGEE RELIEF

Msgr. George J. Breckel Council 4824 in Lewisburg, Pa., held a fund drive that raised $5,400 for the Order’s Christian Refugee Relief Fund. CRUISE NIGHT Mike Bardgett of Monsignor Thomas F. O’Reilly Council 1563 in Casper, Wyo., cleans a plaque dedicated to Father PierreJean De Smet at Independence Rock, a large granite outcrop along the Oregon Trail. The plaque was installed by the Knights of Columbus of Wyoming on July 4, 1930. Father De Smet was a Belgian Jesuit priest who evangelized among the indigenous peoples in the Midwestern and Western U.S. and Western Canada during the mid-1800s. Council 1563 has committed to maintaining the plaque.

LOAVES & FISHES

The councils of Ontario District 16 and Father James Assembly in Chatham teamed up with the St. Joseph’s Parish Catholic Women’s League to put on a “Loaves and Fishes” dinner and silent auction. The event raised $3,700 to support seminarians and vocations. PARISH ASSISTANCE

St. Joseph-Austintown (Ohio) Council 13977 collaborated with its parish to operate the Parish Bingo Kitchen on a weekly basis. The council provides all refreshments and labor needed for the event, the proceeds of which are split 50/50 with the parish, supporting its community events and other causes. From its portion of the profits, Council 13977 was able to provide $1,000

in financial assistance to a member recently ordained to the priesthood, as well as ongoing support to the St. Vincent de Paul Society and several parish ministries.

St. Mary Magdalen Council 5301 in Metairie, La., held a Cruise Night to benefit the family of Michael Louviere, a fallen officer of the Westwego Police Department. The event took place in the parking lots of St. Mary Magdalen Church and attracted more than 200 classic and custom automobiles. Council 5301 sold crawfish pasta, lasagna, minimuffulettas and soft drinks.

A woman tosses rose petals during the San Antonio Archdiocese-wide feast of Corpus Christi celebration and procession, organized and supported by Prince of Peace Council 7983 in San Antonio, Texas. The day of family, community, joy and beauty focused especially on adoration of the real presence of Jesus Christ in the most holy Eucharist as it processed through the streets of San Antonio.

Together with donations and a 50/50 raffle, the council raised more than $5,000 for the Westwego Police Benevolent Association’s Michael Louviere Fund.

CARE PACKAGES

St. Gabriel’s Council 11889 in Saddle River, N.J., sent more than 100 gift boxes to Marines stationed in the Middle East. The council has been sending support to troops annually for the past 12 years and received thanks from the U.S. Marine Corps for its ongoing generosity. CHAPLAIN COLLECTION

Father Charles J. Watters Assembly in Dunwoody, Ga., made posters of military chaplains serving in the field to go along with its parish fund drive for the

Members of Immacolata Council 13819 in Houma, La., work on a wheelchair ramp for a couple with disabilities. Working in conjunction with the local chapter of the Telecom Pioneers, the project planning took approximately three months and was completed in a day. The cost of materials was covered through the council's annual golf tournament, which funds all of their charitable giving each year.

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M AG A Z I N E N E W S

K OF C ITEMS OFFICIAL SUPPLIERS

Columbia Receives 20 Catholic Press Awards

IN THE UNITED STATES THE ENGLISH COMPANY INC. Official council and Fourth Degree equipment 1-800-444-5632 • www.kofcsupplies.com

A LOST BOY FINDS HOPE

LYNCH AND KELLY INC. Official council and Fourth Degree equipment and officer robes 1-888-548-3890 • www.lynchkelly.com

Colorado Knights help Sudanese refugees reunite, establish home in land of promise by Roxanne King

IN CANADA ROGER SAUVÉ INC. Official council and Fourth Degree equipment and officer robes 1-888-266-1211 • www.roger-sauve.com

J O I N T H E FAT H E R MCGIVNEY GUILD

n 1987, 12-year-old Daniel Maduok’s village in southern Sudan was attacked by Islamic militia who killed residents, burned homes and slaughtered cattle. In the chaos, Maduok fled for his life and began a 16-year odyssey as a “Lost Boy.” In 2003, after years in refugee camps in Ethiopia and Kenya, he immigrated to the United States and settled in Colorado. Daniel had found faith through the Catholic Church during his ordeal, and in Colorado he found brothers in the Knights of Columbus, joining St. Paul’s Council 11634 in Colorado Springs. He also found love when, in 2010, he wed a young Catholic woman from his Dinka tribe. A long-distance marriage ensued.

!

08/17

I

Please enroll me in the Father McGivney Guild:

Daniel Maduok, a former Lost Boy of Sudan, walks with his wife, Mary, and their two sons in Garden of the Gods Park in Colorado Springs, Colo. (Photo by Ryan Dearth)

 C OL U M B I A  AUGUST 2016

NAME

AUGUST 2016

Page 16

Above: First-place photo by Ryan Dearth • Left: The open-

ADDRESS A HOME OF

MERCY

CITY

AT WYD

STATE/PROVINCE

ing spread of “A Home of Mercy at WYD.”

The K of C-sponsored Mercy Centre was the premier English-language catechesis and festival site at World Youth Day

ZIP/POSTAL CODE Complete this coupon and mail to: The Father McGivney Guild, 1 Columbus Plaza, New Haven, CT 06510-3326 or enroll online at: www.fathermcgivney.org

OFFICIAL AUG. 1, 2017: To owners of Knights of Columbus insurance policies and persons responsible for payment of premiums on such policies: Notice is hereby given that in accordance with the provisions of Section 84 of the Laws of the Order, payment of insurance premiums due on a monthly basis to the Knights of Columbus by check made payable to Knights of Columbus and mailed to same at PO Box 1492, NEW HAVEN, CT 06506-1492, before the expiration of the grace period set forth in the policy. In Canada: Knights of Columbus, Place d’Armes Station, P.O. Box 220, Montreal, QC H2Y 3G7 ALL MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOS, ARTWORK, EDITORIAL MATTER, AND ADVERTISING INQUIRIES SHOULD BE MAILED TO: COLUMBIA, PO BOX 1670, NEW HAVEN, CT 06507-0901. REJECTED MATERIAL WILL BE RETURNED IF ACCOMPANIED BY A SELF-ADDRESSED ENVELOPE AND RETURN POSTAGE. PURCHASED MATERIAL WILL NOT BE RETURNED. OPINIONS BY WRITERS ARE THEIR OWN AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF THE KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS. SUBSCRIPTION RATES — IN THE U.S.: 1 YEAR, $6; 2 YEARS, $11; 3 YEARS, $15. FOR OTHER COUNTRIES ADD $2 PER YEAR. EXCEPT FOR CANADIAN SUBSCRIPTIONS, PAYMENT IN U.S. CURRENCY ONLY. SEND ORDERS AND CHECKS TO: ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT, PO BOX 1670, NEW HAVEN, CT 06507-0901.

COLUMBIA (ISSN 0010-1869/USPS #123-740) IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS, 1 COLUMBUS PLAZA, NEW HAVEN, CT 06510-3326. PHONE: 203-752-4000, www.kofc.org. PRODUCED IN USA. COPYRIGHT © 2017 BY KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART WITHOUT PERMISSION IS PROHIBITED. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT NEW HAVEN, CT AND ADDITIONAL MAILING OFFICES. POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO COLUMBIA, MEMBERSHIP DEPARTMENT, PO BOX 1670, NEW HAVEN, CT 06507-0901. CANADIAN POSTMASTER — PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 1473549. RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADIAN ADDRESSES TO: KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS, 50 MACINTOSH BOULEVARD, CONCORD, ONTARIO L4K 4P3 PHILIPPINES — FOR PHILIPPINES SECOND-CLASS MAIL AT THE MANILA CENTRAL POST OFFICE. SEND RETURN COPIES TO KCFAPI, FRATERNAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT, PO BOX 1511, MANILA.

32 ♦ C O L U M B I A ♦

 COLUMBIA 

AUGUST 2017

by Alton J. Pelowski

A

s reported in the September issue of Columbia, from July 26-31 the Knights of Columbus sponsored and ran the international site for English-speaking pilgrims attending World Youth Day 2016. With the help of partnering organizations, the Knights transformed Tauron Arena Kraków, one of the biggest entertainment and sports venues in Poland, into the “Mercy Centre,” welcoming more than 100,000 young pilgrims over six days. The most popular catechesis site in any language, the Mercy Centre held the largest WYD gatherings outside the mainstage papal events. And on the final day, the site hosted a meeting with Pope Francis and 12,000 WYD volunteers. The Order has played a significant role in World Youth Day celebrations since 1984, including the sponsorship of catechesis sites in Sydney (2008) and Madrid (2011), but the scope and reception of the Knights’ participation in Kraków was unprecedented. In addition to national gatherings, daily Mass and catechesis, Mercy Centre programming featured talks, performances, exhibits and countless opportunities for prayer and spiritual encounter. Of particular note were testimonies of persecuted Christians from the Middle East, the presence of the first-class relics of Poland’s most revered modern saints, and the Night of Mercy — an evening of eucharistic adoration, reflection and music. Although the arena had quickly filled to capacity with more than 18,000 people present for the Night of Mercy, the atmosphere was imbued with prayerful tranquility. Auxiliary Bishop Robert Barron of Los Angeles later reflected, “I had been asked to lead a eucharistic procession and benediction and to give a short reflection, but nothing prepared me for what I would see and feel. … I can’t remember another time in the last 30 years when I felt the presence of the Lord more vividly.” The photos in the pages that follow feature highlights of the Mercy Centre events. More photos, videos and information are available at wydenglishsite.org.

Columbia received 20 honors during the Catholic Press Association’s (CPA) annual awards banquet, held June 23 in Québec City. Through this awards program, the CPA recognizes the accomplishments and contributions made by Catholic newspapers, magazines, newsletters, online media and books. In its strongest showing to date, Columbia’s entries placed first in five categories, second in six categories and third in three categories, in addition to six honorable mentions. Collections of Columbia articles won first place among magazines for Best Coverage of Pro-Life Issues and Best Coverage of Religious Liberty Issues. The opening photo of “A Lost Boy Finds Hope” (August 2016) by Ryan Dearth was judged Best Single Photo: Color in all member categories; “Bishop of the Last Frontier” (March 2016), featuring photos by J.R. Ancheta, won Best Multiple Picture Package: Feature; and “A Home of Mercy at WYD” (November 2016) by Columbia editor Alton J. Pelowski received top honors for Best Photo Story: News. Second-place awards were received for Best Coverage of Mother Teresa’s Canonization, Best Essay Originating with a Magazine or Newsletter, Best Coverage of World Youth Day, Best Single Photo: Color and Best Coverage of the Year of Mercy. Columbia also won third place for Best Multiple Picture Package (News) and Best Multiple Picture Package (Year of Mercy) categories, as well as Best Review. To view all of the Columbia content that earned recognition from the CPA this year, please visit kofc.org/columbia.  C OL U M B I A  NOVEMBER 2016

Clockwise from top: The Mercy Centre at Tauron Arena Kraków is filled with World Youth Day pilgrims gathered for the Night of Mercy celebration July 27. • Pope Francis is welcomed to the arena by Supreme Chaplain Archbishop William E. Lori of Baltimore July 31. Also pictured is Auxiliary Bishop Damian Muskus, O.F.M., the coordinator-general of WYD Kraków (left) and Cardinal Stanisław Dziwisz, archbishop of Kraków. • Volunteers process into the arena July 26 carrying first-class relics of St. Maximilian Kolbe, St. Albert Chmielowski, Blessed Jerzy Popiełuszko, St. Faustina Kowalska and St. John Paul II. • Canadian pilgrims wave flags as they wait to enter the arena. NOVEMBER 2016

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K N I G H T S O F C O LU MBU S

Building a better world one council at a time Every day, Knights all over the world are given opportunities to make a difference — whether through community service, raising money or prayer. We celebrate each and every Knight for his strength, his compassion and his dedication to building a better world.

Kindergarten students display bags of school supplies that they received from Marbel Council 7658 in Koronadal City, Mindanao, Philippines. The council celebrated the feast of St. Anthony of Padua by supplying notebooks, pens, pencils, crayons, writing pads and coloring books — as well as a free lunch — for 200 students.

TO BE FEATURED HERE , SEND YOUR COUNCIL’ S “K NIGHTS IN A CTION ” PHOTO C OLUMBIA , 1 C OLUMBUS P LAZA , N EW H AVEN , CT 06510-3326 OR E - MAIL :

AS WELL AS ITS DESCRIPTION TO : KNIGHTSINACTION @ KOFC . ORG .

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PLEASE, DO ALL YOU CAN TO ENCOURAGE PRIESTLY AND RELIGIOUS VOCATIONS. YOUR PRAYERS AND SUPPORT MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

K E E P T H E FA I T H A L I V E

‘THE HOLY SPIRIT PUT THIS DESIRE IN MY SOUL.’

SISTER MARTHA PATRICIA MALACARA MARTÍNEZ Allied Discalced Carmelites of the Holy Trinity Denver, Colo.

Photo by Ryan Dearth

As an adolescent, I was fortunate enough to meet our order’s founder, Mother Martha María Ramírez Mora. She helped me see the Word of God as a living Word, addressed personally to me. I began to regularly read the Good News, pray the rosary, visit the Blessed Sacrament, receive daily Communion and practice acts of service. One day in the presence of the Holy Eucharist, I felt the desire to belong to Christ forever and to work only for him. Proper spiritual direction helped me to understand that the Holy Spirit had put this desire in the deepest part of my soul and that it was a treasure. I soon discovered that my heart’s desire was to become a Carmelite of the Holy Trinity. I give thanks to the Holy Trinity for creating me to be part of this religious family. I return God’s love by following the example of Holy Mary and our beloved founder. I pray for all those who have a religious vocation — may the Holy Spirit grant them the grace to discover it and to return love to God.

Columbia August 2017  

Columbia August 2017

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