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Cosplay... The Future of Fashion! By Leah Parker cfi@msudenver.edu

A horde of zombies, coralled by Umbrella Corperation guards, mobbed through hotel hallways while Darth Vader and a fleet of stormtroopers observed in amusement. Galaxyfest III was abuzz with costumes in science fiction and fantasy fandoms, a form of fashion otherwise known as cosplay. Short for “costume play,” people dress up as their favorite pop culture characters—often spending hours and big bucks to hand sew their costumes. We spoke to three cosplay professionals who have taken this to the next level: Meevers Desu Cosplay

Meevers Desu Cosplay was first exposed to cosplay in 2007, when friends invited her to a local convention, and became hooked. She started out by hand sewing old clothes together then bought her first sewing machine a few years later. “Regardless if it is from a movie, videogame, anime, or novel,” Meevers Desu said. “Cosplay is a form of expression of portraying your favorite character in real life by making the outfit from scratch or buying bits and pieces to put together.”

Check out more of AZ Powergirl’s work at azpowergirl.com.

Brandon Dougherty with Rottenworld Makeup

Dressed as Pyramid Head, a monster from Silent Hill 2, Brandon Dougherty balanced on stilts, his massive frame parting a path through the crowds and sending others scurrying in the opposite direction. Brandon began practicing horror style makeup at age 8. He expanded into other fields of makeup, including being a horror, grunge, and alternative specialist within the haunted house industry.

“It was an easy transition,” Brandon said. “From horror fan and haunted house development into cosplay. Cosplay is about bringing fantasy to life. It’s more than fashion. For some, it’s a way of life.” View Brandon Dougherty’s rottenworldmakeup.com.

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According to Meevers Desu, the cosplay industry has grown exponentially fast. What once was an underground culture has gained mainstream recognition, as evidenced by the steampunk coutures that have hit the New York runways in the early 2010s. “It’s about being creative and having fun,” Meevers Desu said. “You look at the art then ask others for advice on how to make it and watch online tutorials.” View more of Meevers Desu Cosplay at facebook.com/MeeversCosplay. AZ Powergirl (aka Cara Nicole)

With over 24,000 Facebook likes, AZ Powergirl is well-established in the professional cosplay scene, flying from Arizona to conventions across the nation. According to AZ Powergirl, she cosplayed for eight months before she knew what it was. “I found an ad on Craigslist for Justice League Members,” AZ Powergirl said. “My cosplay was well received and I won geek prom queen, and just kept moving up.”

prints, books, and calendars.

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As well as selling autographed photo of her cosplay, AZ Powergirl turned her art into a fulltime business by selling art

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With your contribution, an artist or musician will be able to participate in CREATE MSU Denver Virtual Incubator and receive customized one-on-one business advising for one year. Check out our website to learn how your $720 donation will only cost $267 after all the deductions you receive by helping us. www.createmsudenver. com/content/friends/adopt_ an_artist

It’s because of you that an artist or musician will turn their business into a work of art.

March 2014 | ColoradoMusicBuzz.com | CREATEmsudenver.com

Colorado Music Buzz Magazine March 2014  

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