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S pectacular Ski-in / Ski-out Estates... located on Vail Mountain

Regardless of the season, there is no better place to be than on Vail Mountain. Whether you desire to ski straight to your deck or step out your back door to hike miles of unspoiled terrain, Vail is your retreat for all seasons. For 30 years, Ron Byrne & Associates has represented Vail’s finest properties. We invite you to contact us for premium ski-in/ ski-out opportunities.

486 Forest Road Four bedrooms, five baths, positioned directly on Born Free Run

463 Beaver Dam Road Legendary estate located on Born Free Run


446 Forest Road Vail’s newest premier ski-in/ski-out residence Over 10,000 SF now under construction

285 Bridge Street Vail, Colorado 81657 970/476.1987 www.ronbyrne.com


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Cottonwood Dreams ~ Bill Anton

36x54, oil

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enjoy the subtle touches of home bringing mountain luxury to new heights with us

The Park Hyatt Beaver Creek Resort and Spa has everything you need for a mountain getaway with style. Offering well appointed deluxe hotel rooms and suites The Hyatt Beaver Creek Resort and Spa is its your withPark hypo-allergenic options, Allegria Spa with home away from home, with something for everyone. signature healing water sanctuary and 8100 Mountain Enjoy in our farm-to-table Bar & Colorado’s Grill servingfresh localflavors farm-to-table culinary delights. 8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill overlooking the of All located in the heart of the village at the base Rocky Mountains or simply pamper yourself in the Beaver Creek Mountain, with a high-speed gondola healing of Allegria Spa’syou water out yourwaters back door. So perfect, willsanctuary. want to extend your stay. For reservations, please call 970 -949-1234 or visit parkhyattbeavercreek.com For reservations, please call 970 -949-1234 or visit parkhyattbeavercreek.com 50 West Thomas Place, P.O. Box 1595 Beaver Colorado 81620 50 WestCreek, Thomas Place, P.O. Box 1595 Beaver Creek, Colorado 81620


94

tak e it outside From a fully equipped kitchen to a comfortably designed lounge with a view, what was once a patio is now an essential part of the mountain lifestyle. By Brenda Himelfarb 68

fashion meets function Keep up with the weather’s wide temperature swings without sacrificing stylishness with these high country go-to ensembles. By Shauna Farnell 77

sunshine and good times 68

With so many ways to enjoy the wild and wonderful Rockies, it’s even better if you have a bit of self-indulgence at the end. By Traci J. Macnamara 86

peach drea ms Palisade peaches aren’t as well known as their Southern cousins because they stick close to home. Tree-ripened and in limited supply, Colorado’s delicious stone fruit delights. By Caramie Schnell 94

77

just breathe

86

102

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Almost every fine hotel in the Valley has its own spa, but don’t confuse them with one another. From facilities based on ancient Roman traditions to the soothing ambiance of a grotto, each one is different. By Vail Luxury Staff 102


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fido as a fashion statement The golden retriever is no longer the mandatory canine of Vail. By Shauna Farnell 34

10 from the editor 12 contributors 112 parting shot the vault

WATCHES Five first-class watches for the man who truly appreciates quality. By Stephen Kasica 17

comforta bly creati v e This Bachelor Gulch home is a family estate worthy of the screen. 37

sunglasses Eye protection is nothing new to the human race — it’s just more stylish now. By Brenda Himelfarb 20

measuring up for success The Women’s Foundation of Colorado’s research-based actions have local and statewide effects. By Rosanna Turner 40

picnics Gourmet picnics come together easily with a little insider knowledge. By Wren Wertin 22

cockta ils w ith conscience These four distillers create exceptional products using eco-friendly practices. By Krista Driscoll 47

cachet

captured moments The art of the family photo is one worth preserving. By Stephen Kasica 25 a season of festi va ls Vail’s three most-established summertime events have numbers on their side. By Rosanna Turner 30

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25

Fancy Faces Summer’s party — and fundraising — season has officially begun. 50 daybook

30

47

ca lendar Must see. Must hear. Must go. Must do. 55


Taylor, Dill & Company Real Estate

vail Golf course 1119 Ptarmigan Road Main House – 5 Bedroom Guest House w/ caretaker unit – 4 Bedroom $19,500,000

Bachelor Gulch 228 Tall Timber Road 6 Bed/ 7.5 Bath $7,300,000

970.390.7018

cordillera divide 350 Little Andorra 6 Bed/ 8 Bath $2,800,000

JoniTaylorRealEstate.com

Barney@JoniTaylorRealEstate.com

Bachelor Gulch condo Bearpaw D-5 4 Bed/ 4.5 Bath $2,500,000

970.390.1402

Joni@JoniTaylorRealEstate.com


Editor’s Letter

WICKED DIVAS

J. Alfred Prufrock wasn’t the first man to contemplate the almost unbearable authenticity of peaches, but ever since he dared to eat one, the luscious summer fruit has become synonymous with abundant, outrageous, intoxicating life. When a peach is perfectly, plumply ripe, there is nothing so-so or noncommittal about the experience. Either it will own the three to five minutes it takes you to devour it, juices flowing, or you didn’t eat it. ¶ Caramie Schnell’s story on the stone fruit explores Colorado’s most famous crop and what makes it so good (p.94). Compared with the ubiquitous harvests of California and the Southern comfort of Georgia, the Centennial State’s peaches don’t get the kind of national attention one might expect. But there is something in the combination of the loamy, sandy soil of Western Colorado, and the way the trees are forced to adapt to chilly nights and searing days. As pinot noir farmers have known for centuries, if the fruit has to work a little, it ends up tasting both better and more interesting. And yes, that’s a life lesson. ¶ But it’s also an analogy for our little slice of Rocky Mountain heaven here in the Vail Valley. In the land of pronounced seasons, alpine vistas and high altitude, life can be a little more demanding than it is, say, in the tropics. It’s not simply a case of poking your head out the window and deciding what to wear for the day — you have to consider what might be rolling in beyond the surrounding peaks and plan accordingly (p.77). And though we spend so much of our time outdoors, to create an outside living space requires some thought about what happens when the sun drops and the evening turns chilly (p.68). We are enthusiastic fans of the local spa scene (p.102), but spa indulgences are even better after we’ve “earned” them with a hike, bike ride or other mountain adventure (86). Expend a little effort, and the Rockies — or at least the luxury culture of Vail — will give back. ¶ With three major festivals (p.30), an ambitious entertainment lineup (p.55), beautiful photo ops (p.25) and some remarkable shopping (p.17), life in Vail is as exciting as it is beautiful this summer.

VIOLINIST JOSHUA BELL

SILVER NIGHTS AT DONOVAN

CONDUCTOR BRAMWELL TOVEY

VAIL MUSIC FESTIVAL SEASON 25 JUNE 25 - AUGUST 4

25TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATIONS GERSHWIN EVENING CIRQUE DE LA SYMPHONIE

UNDER THE SILVERY MOON GALA

Cheers,

Wren Wertin editor

high country, high st y le

Valaria Resort Shirt and Justine Pant by Etro, Chara Sandal by Brunello Cucinelli, Deco Diamond Watch by Michele, all available at Gorsuch Limited in Vail.

Photo Courtesy of Gorsuch

vailmusic.org 10

VAIL LUXURY G S U M M E R 2 012


Experience the Music C e l e b r at e t h e t r a d i t i o n b e lU X e . l i V e b r aV o.

PHOTO BY ZACHMAHONE.COM

Season 25 June 25 - August 4 Dallas Symphony Orchestra The Philadelphia Orchestra New York Philharmonic Big Music for Little Bands

VAIL MUSIC FESTIVAL

Buy tickets | vailmusic.org | 877.812.5700 | free l awn seats for children 15 and under


Contributors Stephen Kasica is finishing his degree at the University of Colorado in Boulder. He doesn’t just write about photography, he’s also a photographer. He says, “It’s easy for people to do it themselves today since everyone and their grandmother owns an SLR. But a professional’s skills go beyond what they can do with the camera.” Mary Kelley Zeleskey enjoys writing about music, food and outdoor adventures. She believes in supporting the local community, and loves to shop at the farmers markets, as well as discover local artists. Her dream is to travel around the world, explore different cultures and then write about her experiences. As a Colorado native, Caramie Schnell always knew Palisade peaches were to be cherished. And since her Grandma Betty faithfully canned cases and cases of the juicy gems each summer, she savored the fruit even as snow covered the mountains. But it wasn’t until researching her story “Peach Dreams” that she understood what makes them taste so dang good.

When she’s not finding ways to make drinking cocktails part of her work day, Krista Driscoll writes a weekly beer column for the Vail Daily Weekly and spends her days off rafting local rivers, hiking with the dog, reading books about the outdoors and planning her next adventure.

Traci J. Macnamara is a writer and literary adventurer.  Her passion for books and remote landscapes has led her to explore historic huts in Antarctica, to climb to the summit of France’s Mont Blanc and to backpack and climb in Southeastern Utah’s desert canyons.  Macnamara lives in Avon and is the Survival Skills Topic Guide for About.com.  Photo editor Dominique Taylor has always had a hard time sitting still, so traveling wide and far to find stories to photograph suits her just fine. Whether it is telling video stories in New York City or shooting dog portraits down by the river, Dominique has an eye for adventures and her camera ready to shoot them.

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Brenda Himelfarb is a freelance writer whose work has appeared in many magazines and newspapers. She has a natural curiosity and has been chided by her husband for “sounding like she’s interviewing someone” upon their first meeting. Writing about the history of sunglasses was right up her alley.

Lauren Glendenning is the Vail Daily’s assistant managing editor. Some of her greatest loves in life are traveling and eating — doing both is when she’s happiest. Throw in a spa day, and all is right with the world. She grew up in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and has since lived in New York City, Boulder and Washington, D.C. She has called Vail home since 2007. Shauna Farnell once had a house cat with a furball problem that was eventually (not by choice) shaved to resemble a lion. She has a tendency to haul herself up mountains with extra fervor every time she consumes too many tropical drinks, but is always sure to carry a happy hour ensemble in her bike pack in the summer ... just in case.

Rosanna Turner is a freelance writer who is at the Vail Daily office more than some full-time employees. She laughs like nobody else. When she’s not a lady of luxury, she enjoys reading, hiking, playing the ukulele and drinking margaritas.


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W

“Vail became what I never had before - a home. It's my home, the only home I ever had. — Sheika Gramshammer

“I don't feel that I gave up anything moving to Vail. ere was nothing difficult at all about it; it was an adventure. I thought it was wonderful, and I never thought of leaving.” — Christie (Blanche Hauserman) Hill

“If Vail was a family, then the Copper Bar was its — Diana Donovan living room.”

Publisher

Cathy Ethington cethington@vaildaily.com Editor

Wren Wertin wren@vaildaily.com Creative & Design Direction

Ali & Aaron creative sayhowdy@aliandaaron.com Photo Editor

Dominique Taylor dtaylor@vaildaily.com Contributors

Kristin Anderson Krista Driscoll Shauna Farnell Lauren Glendenning Brenda Himelfarb Stephen Kasica Ross Leonhart Traci J. Macnamara Claudia Nelson Caramie Schnell Rosanna Turner Mary Kelley Zeleskey Marketing Director

mark bricklin mbricklin@vaildaily.com Account Managers

Carole Bukovich cbukovich@vaildaily.com

Patrick Connolly pconnolly@vaildaily.com

Austin Maring amaring@vaildaily.com

Beth McKenzie bmckenzie@vaildaily.com

Heidi Schmitt hschmitt@vaildaily.com

Kip Tingle ktingle@vaildaily.com Circulation Manager

Jared Staber jstaber@vaildaily.com Chief Financial Officer

is is a delightful book of stories told by the women who left the lives they knew and moved to Vail before it was on the map.

r

Available now The Bookworm in Edwards bookwormofedwards.com and at the Vail and Minturn Farmers’ Markets in the Vail Daily booth.

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VAIL LUXURY G S U M M E R 2 012

Don Rogers drogers@vaildaily.com Printing & Prepress American Web, INC. Denver, Colorado USA 303.321.2422 The Vail Daily is a wholly owned subsidiary of Colorado Mountain News Media 200 Lindbergh Drive | P.O. Box 1500 Gypsum, Colorado 81637 p. 970.328.6333 f. 970.328.6409 Copyright ©2012 Colorado Mountain News Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited.


T he r e a r e m a n y g r e at a r e a s in t he Va il Va l l e y.

A few ideas...

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While I always have a lot of balls in the air, my time is mostly spent helping great people like you with some expert real estate advice on areas, properties, schools, organizations and MORE….let me give you my guided tour! LIZ LEEDS…OTHERS FOLLOW! Slifer, Smith & Frampton/Lionshead Office 970-331-1806 - lleeds@slifer.net

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Peace, Back by popular demand


Glasses: rose-colored and otherwise 20 // Treats for a basket case 22

T H I N G S

Time to tell S

hirts and

shoes might reveal a man’s personal style, but the watch on his wrist gets at the heart of the matter. As one of the most acceptable forms of jewelry for men, they do a lot more than simply tell the time — they tell a bit about the man. From sleek beauties to painstakingly handcrafted creations, watches can be a secret handshake amongst those who recognize quality.

P H OTO C O U R T E S Y O F Pate k P h i l i ppe

O F

V A L U E

G

O B J E C T S

O F

D E S I R E

The Boss P a t e k P h i l i pp e A n n ua l Ca lenda r AUT O M ATI C W HITE G O LD

No watch is finer or more precise than Patek Philippe. The company’s movement standards make the Swiss standard look almost sloppy. This model features automatic movement composed of more than 355 parts powering its annual calendar and moonphase complications. The 18-karat white gold case crowns an 18-karat white gold “wave” bracelet, while a sapphire crystal protects the face. Only 1,000 Patek watches are crafted each year, and only 15 percent are shipped to U.S. shores. Patek Philippe is available at Betteridge, where the case is built into the counter of a fully stocked bar.

S U M M E R 2 012 G VAIL LUXURY

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b y Stephen k a sic a

w atches

The Entrepreneur The Ca rl F. B u c h e r e r Pa t r av i T r av eltec GMT

International Water Co. Portuguese Automatic Steel

Ernst Benz Chronolunar

Nixon Magnacon

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Since 1888, Carl Friedrich Bucherer has been making unique timepieces deep in the heart of Switzerland. The Patravi follows its own independent aesthetic, and on the wrist it’s an eye-catcher. Its body carries a clean, simplistic ornamentation that shows its sophistication through intricacy. Within the fluted and protected stainless steel crown, two concentric time-zone rings enclose the hour and minute hands, which dance above the small seconds hand and the chronograph. Unlike diving watches or sports watches, Carl F. Bucherer follows his own path by not sacrificing functionality for style. J. Scott Jewelers carries Carl F. Bucherer watches.

The Up and Comer International Wa t c h C o . Portuguese AUT O M ATI C STEEL

IWC creates watches suitable for those ambitious 30-somethings looking to impress, but not intimidate, their senior partners sporting a Patek. The eye-drawing 40.9mm face commands respect, but its slim design and low profile does it with its indoor voice. And forgoing a showy bracelet band for a black alligator strap means you can wear it with your suit in the office or in your V-neck with the bros.

The Carl F. Bucherer Patravi Traveltec GMT

This model is equipped with a mechanical automatic movement with 44-hour power reserve, and a chronograph to time your ascent up the corporate ladder. IWC is also sold at Betteridge.

The Weekender Ernst Benz Chronoluna r

As an aviator, Ernst Benz designed his watches to invoke the style of aircraft instruments. And the hands of the clock even resemble the propellers of a WWII fighter plane. This model features domed sapphire glass, and an exhibition back reveals the guts of the machine running like clockwork. Besides looking great, the gauges of the Chronolunar will be easy to read when flying down the highway to the lake

house. Ernst Benz can be purchased at Avalon.

The Player N i x o n M a g n a co n SS w i t h b l a c k a n d go l d d e t a i l

The 15-year-old American accessories company, Nixon, is growing up. The surf, skate and snow company recently redesigned its logo into a strong, crisp typeface and branched into the luxury watch market with a new line of watches called “Elite.” This timepiece with black and gold detail features a Swiss-made chronograph like your dad’s Audemars Piguet, but comes from a company that caters to action sports and hosts an annual surf challenge in Spain. Nixon watches can be found at Avalon and Billabong.

P H OTO S C O U R T E S Y O F watch m a n ufacturers


sunglasses

I

t’s always sunglass

season in the mountains. Sunny, snowy, winter, summer — they are, simply, essential. And it’s fitting, especially in Vail, since one of the earliest types of eye protection originated in the Rockies. In prehistoric days the Inuits, a group of people living in the Canadian Rockies, created the first version of sunglasses. They wore a sort of goggle carved from wood or antlers that had a slit in the center of what now is called a lens. This allowed only a small amount of light through to help eliminate glare. Anybody with eyes and some sunshine had an incentive to figure out a protective system — and many did. Emperor Nero supposedly watched gladiatorial combat through polished, lightemerald-green gems way back in 55 AD. Perhaps, though, the original sunglass trendsetters were Chinese judges in13th century China who began wearing thin, hazy, flatglass quartz panes in order to hide their expressions. The first known painting in which eyeglasses were shown dates from 1352 when artist Tommaso de Modena did a series of frescoes in which monks were shown reading manuscripts. One brother holds a magnifying glass; another has glasses perched on his nose. In 1752 an English optician and scientific instrument maker, James Ayscough, introduced “spectacles “ with double-hinged sidepieces. He recommended that lenses be tinted blue or green to treat

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SHINE ON ME Though they seem a relatively modern fashion item, sunglasses have been evolving for thousands of years.


b y b r e n da h i m e l fa r b

some vision problems. These spectacles, with the tinted lenses, are believed to be the precursors to sunglasses. Over the years, the development of glasses continued. Keeping glasses on the face or propped on the nose led to many experiments. Initially, frames were made of leather with metal and bone used

for the nosepiece. Sidepieces were sometimes made of silk strips of ribbon that looped around the ears. The Chinese did away with the loops and added ceramic weights to the end of the ribbons to keep the glasses in place. Finally, in 1730, ophthalmologist Edward Scarlett conceived ridged sidepieces with spiral endings called finials that, essentially, rested on top of the ears. By the 20th century, sunglasses were everywhere. But it was in 1929, when

Sam Foster began selling his protective sunglasses at Woolworth stores on the boardwalk at Atlantic City, New Jersey, that sunglasses became part of the fashion scene. In fact, years later, his company’s ad campaign, “Who’s Behind Those Foster Grants,” featured numerous celebrities including Woody Allen, O.J. Simpson and Cindy Crawford.. In 1936 Bausch & Lomb developed, under the now-iconic Ray-Ban name, Aviators, with their characteristic green tint. They were initially produced to protect the eyes of pilots at high altitude. It was Edwin Land, however, whose polarizing photography technology used by Bausch & Lomb to produce glasses that would significantly reduce glare, who saved the day. Soon Aviators went on sale to the general public. In 1952 Ray-Ban released the Wayfarer, which was considered to be a revolutionary pair of glasses due to its trapezoidal design and plastic frames. And in the 1980s “shutter shades,” designed by Alain Mikli, a

French designer of highend handmade glasses highlighting unique colors and shapes, gained fame after being featured in music videos by Simple Minds and Animation. In 2007 Kanye West wore shutter shades in his music video, “Stronger.” These days, people all over the world wear sunglasses. They’re part of a wardrobe like a pair of shoes or a purse. And each country has its own slang for them. In the United States they’re shades, while the Brits prefer cheaters or maddogers — which refers to any traditionally masculine design. The Aussies use the terms spekkies or sunnies, and in India, they call darkcolored lenses glares and light-colored ones coolers. When it comes to being a sunglasses fashionista this year, anything goes, be it Aviators, Ray-Bans, oversized-bug-eyes, hornrimmed cat-eye glasses, vintage or this year’s trendy, colorful frames — inexpensive or out-of-sight expensive. It doesn’t matter. Just don’t leave home without them.

SHOP SUNGLASSES Eye Pieces of Vail

One Track Mind

Christy Sports

970.476.1947 ( Vail )

970.754.5420 ( Beaver Creek )

970.476.2244 ( Vail )

970.926.1756 ( Edwards )

970.476.1397 ( Lionshead )

970.949.0241 ( Avon )

( C LO C K W I S E F R O M TO P ) p h otos co u rtes y of cele b e y es .com / R AY- B A N / v intag efas h ionlo u n g e.com / R AY- B A N

S U M M E R 2 012 G VAIL LUXURY

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by Wren wertin

D e l e c ta b l e s

BREAKING BREAD IN THE GREAT OUTDOORS From a simple sandwich to a full-blown meal, picnics are a summertime must.

L a Bottega sa ndw iches

This Italian restaurant is famous for its fully American sandwiches. The cheesesteaks (chicken or beef) are fully customizable with grilled onions, mushrooms and peppers, and the TED (Thanksgiving Every Day) is carb-heavy with turkey, cranberry sauce and stuffing piled on a soft roll. They come in three sizes, and the largest can easily feed a foursome if you’ve got some accoutrements. L a rkspu r chick ens

Call ahead by a few hours and order one of their roasted Rosie chickens. Served with some veggie sides (the mashed potatoes are dreamy, but the garlicky green beans will likely blow you away), it’s a satisfying way to go. Make sure you get some of pastry chef Mark Metzger’s cookies, too. B e av e r C r e e k grab-and-go

uring the mountains’

Fa r mers m a r k et f rui t

brief but intensely wonderful summer, life should be lived outside. Whether you’re lollygagging on the lawn at the Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater, listening to orchestras and watching dance troupes, or you’re traipsing down the trail to find the perfect shaded vista, a little sustenance is always welcome. But leave the energy bars at home. There’s a reason Vail’s got a highly educated restaurant-industry population: We love to eat well. Here are some local picnic picks for truly alfresco dining.

The farmers markets in Vail, Minturn and Edwards are the epitome of grab-and-go dining. Famous for its stone fruit, Colorado revels in cherries, nectarines and peaches all summer long. There is no shame in grabbing a bag of tree-ripened fruit and calling it good.

D

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Columbine Ba k ery baguettes

Avon’s oldest bakery has the handsdown best baguettes in town. Buy a couple to make your own sandwich, or opt for the single-serving sandwiches they keep in the deli

case alongside fresh pastries. Simply made with ham, salami or turkey, Swiss cheese and a pickle spear, the individually wrapped torpedoes travel well and are not hurt by being smashed in a backpack. e at! goodies

Edwards cheese mecca eat! goes through hundreds of pounds of artisan and exotic cheese every week. Each bit is sliced to order, and you can try before you buy. Goat, cow, sheep — it’s all there. And don’t forget the prosciutto, dried strawberries, Marcona almonds and other little tidbits stashed here and there throughout the store.

Whether you want to take a hike up to Beaver Lake or a Villageto-Village excursion, it’s easy to make it simple in Beaver Creek. The Park Hyatt Beaver Creek’s Café has a picnic menu full of to-go sandwiches, salads and other goodies. The Flying Pig BBQ and Sandwich Shop has an extensive menu of hot and cold options, all named for Colorado Fourteeners. We like the Mount Massive. The Blu e Pl ate h u m m u s a n d p i ta

Chef-owner Adam Roustom, of The Blue Plate, makes the best hummus in town, which is only enhanced by his made-to-order pita. Embellished with banana peppers, roasted red peppers and his addictive pickled onions, get a side of stuffed grape leaves for a fresh and delicious lunch, snack or appetizer.


Festive Facts 30 // Strength in numbers 42 // Conscientious toasting 47

captured Moments Commemorating a special occasion — or simply a moment in time — is much easier with a professional behind the lens.

P H OTO by pr e s to n u t l e y

ART & PHOTOGR APHY

I N S I D E R ACC E S S TO T H E PEO PL E, PL AC E S & PE R K S T H AT M A K E VA I L E X T R AO R D I N A RY

I

t sounds like a set-up

for a joke: Three energetic kids, two parents and a frisky, three-legged dog show up for their first family photo. The punch line? It worked — thanks to photographer Wendy Griffith. Portraiture isn’t simply about

finding a background, arranging people and dialing in the aperture and depth of field. There is often an element of cat herding to the proceedings. As the Lovato family discovered in the above scenario, it helps to have a seasoned

S U M M E R 2 012 G VAIL LUXURY

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PEOPLE & PL ACES

Some tried-and-true photo locales in the Vail Valley: The old barn next to Mirabelle at the base of Beaver Creek. ‘The Point,’ on the south side of Wildridge.

professional behind the lens. Most cameras these days have a pretty good fully automated setting that deals with shutter speed, focus and depth of field. But only someone who makes a living by shooting photos

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VAIL LUXURY G S U M M E R 2 012

can make a toddler sit still, look into the lens and smile. the human element. Griffith has mastered both aspects of portraiture: the technical and the human.

When it comes to gaining the attention of dogs and small children, she has more tricks up her sleeve than a magician. At one point, she told the younger two Lovato children that there was a lizard

Piney Lake and the surrounding forest. The top of Vail Mountain. Anywhere along Gore Creek in Vail. Big Horn in East Vail.


b y Stephen K a sic a

in her camera, to which they both snapped their heads at Griffith and peered into the lens for a glimpse. The relationship of trust between the photographer and the subject is what makes a

great portrait. Someone with a cellphone camera and a strong rapport could take a better picture than someone shooting on the most expensive camera in the world and no chemistry with the subject, Griffith says. Another local photographer, Rex Keep, put it this way: “People don’t care how much you know, until they know how much you care.” Keep has been shooting in the Vail Valley for 36 years. Before he commits to taking a client’s portrait, he meets with the subject multiple times before taking a single

F ro m l e ft: P H OTO s by pr e s to n u t l e y & w e n dy gr i ff i th

shot. If he and the subject do not jive, he will recommend them to another photographer. He has learned that without that relationship between the subject and the photographer, a good portrait won’t happen. Preston Utley has been shooting weddings for 10 years, and he came to it from a background in photojournalism and art school. What that means is he’s a master of storytelling. “I really enjoy shooting weddings,” Utley says. “I get to spend the day with people — get to know them, hear

their story, tell their story.” He recalls a wedding he shot last year, when the groom’s son was in his grandmother’s arms and they were intently interacting with each other. Utley caught it with his camera. “If that were me in that picture, I’d be so excited,” he says. “It’s a family heirloom.” Utley finds it easier to photograph a couple or a group than just a single person. “I want people to focus on themselves or focus on each other,” he explains. “I don’t overdirect. I just want people to be themselves. Any time you have more

S U M M E R 2 012 G VAIL LUXURY

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PEOPLE & PL ACES

than one person, they can interact with each other. That’s a more genuine and spontaneous situation than everybody wearing blue jeans smiling at the camera.” Instead, he prefers a situation that’s more natural. “I want people to look back at the photo and feel that that’s who they are.” location, location. Second only to the relationship between subject and photographer is location. Nothing invokes a flashback of junior high photo day, with cookiecutter results, like a photo in front of the canvas backdrop in an indoor studio. Luckily, there are miles of pristine countryside in the Vail Valley from which to choose. Where to shoot depends on the time of the day and the season and is a variable that a professional is keenly aware of at all times. In early June, Griffith shot the Lavatos by the banks of the Eagle River around the fairgrounds in Eagle. The family arrived at sunset, when the afternoon light softened through the cottonwood trees onto the grassy meadow by the river’s bank. This is one of Griffith’s favorite places to take clients. But portraits do not have to be confined to the edge of the river. Several times, Keep has been the wedding photographer for parties who departed

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the ceremony by whitewater raft. Sometimes, the proceedings have Keep jumping in the raft with the bride and groom; other times, he’s driving down the river to the rapids where the water churns white. It is one of the venues where his experience shooting skiracing aids his portraiture. One of Keep’s favorite locations is Piney Lake in winter. With its white, wild desolation, the area is blanketed in

snow and the lake completely freezes over. “When it is a full moon, it just glistens like a diamond,” Keep says. Utley has a slightly different take on the set-up. “A lot of people are overly concerned with backgrounds — sometimes the best background is no background,” he says. “Sometimes I try to blur out the background as much as possible.” That enables him to focus on the relationship between the subjects. But that’s not to say he’s not interested in the scenery — he’s driven all over the county and hiked countless miles of trails in search of the perfect spot.

Yet when he turns his lens on people with the hope of commemorating an occasion — a relationship, a vacation, a moment — what’s going on in the background is less important than the chemistry between the subjects. And what if a person is not photogenic? “There is no such thing,” he says, laughing. “Some people are more comfortable in front of the camera than others, but everybody has a good side, a good angle.” And he, like Griffith, Keep and other photographers well-versed in their art, knows how to find it.

Preston Utley preston@prestonutley.com | prestonutley.com | 720.280.4797 Wendy Griffith wgphoto@vail.net | wendygriffith.com | 970.328.7399 Rex Keep rex@vail.net | 970.321.9022

P H OTO s by w e n dy gr i ff i th


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fes tival s & e vents

1,808

miles must be traveled by group Wil Campa y su Gran Union to get from Cuba to the festival.

200

keys, pedals and drawbars on the Hammond B-3 organ.

12

weeks of festivities, making it the longest festival in Vail.

07

decades “living legend” 91-year-old Dave Brubeck has been performing.

15

individual musical styles are encompassed by the term “jazz.”

03

multi-media tribute shows: “Dave Brubeck,”  “Dizzy Gillespie,” and “Ray Brown,” combining live performance, narrative and classic video.

June 24 – September 3 //

vail jazz festival vailjazz.org

It’s impossible to say “jazz” without one’s lips forming into a smile. Try it. The word rolls off one’s tongue like lively musical notes. The trill of the trumpet, the purr of the piano, the beat of the bass, the soul of the trombone: All come together to create a melting pot of music. Jazz is like gumbo — the longer it stews, the better it gets. After 18 years, the Vail Jazz Festival is still hot and not ready to stop simmering anytime soon.

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P H OTO C O U R T E S Y O F byro n str i p l i n g .co m


bravo vail valley music festival

fes tival s & e vents

75

years since George Gershwin’s death. He will be honored in a concert version of “Porgy and Bess.”

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visiting soloist and chamber musicians throughout the summer.

04

pianists playing on one piano during “4x4 — A Two Piano Extravaganza Redux.”

$3.5

million dollars: cost of Joshua Bell’s violin. Bell will be performing at the festival for the first time.

02

art forms, classical music and acrobatics, combine during the “Cirque de la Symphonie” performance.

01

June 25 – August 4 //

vailmusicfestival.org

The Bravo Vail Valley Music Festival offers “what no other festival does,” says Meredith Richards, director of marketing and public relations. Only at the festival can one hear three of the world’s best — the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, The Philadelphia Orchestra and the New York Philharmonic — all in the same place. After 25 years, Bravo is an essential part of the local landscape, and the epitome of summertime in Vail. photography by zach mahone

director, John Giovando, in all of the festival’s 25 years, who will retire after this season.

P H OTO by z ach m a ho n e.co m

S U M M E R 2 012 G VAIL LUXURY

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fes tival s & e vents

vail international dance festival 1936

was the first year Betty Ford studied under famed Martha Graham, whose dance company will make its festival debut this year.

12

years old when they began dancing together, World Cup Latin Champions Delyan Terziev and Boriana Deltcheva still partner.

07

choreographers on one stage for NOW, an evening of premieres.

03

nights, three different programs for New York City Ballet MOVES.

04

countries represented on International Evenings. (Japan, Brazil, England and the U.S.)

zero

musical notes in Jerome Robbins’ MOVES piece, performed by a touring company of select dancers from the New York City Ballet.

July 29 – August 11 //

vaildance.org

At the Vail International Dance Festival , there is no single must-see performance. Every spin, twirl, and lift is captivating, every dancer moves in a different way. “These are the best of the best in the world, and every piece catches your attention,” said Julie Kapala, marketing manager of the Vail Valley Foundation. From twists of the tango to pirouettes on pointed toes, this year’s festival promises to bring audiences to their own feet every time.

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P H OTO C O U R T E S Y O F the va i l va l l ey fou n dat i o n


Fido as Fashion Statement They used to be mutts, but now they’re ‘designer dogs.’ Dog-friendly Vail is crazy about canines of all shapes and sizes.

I

t’s true that a dog

is man’s (or woman’s) best friend — and there is no shortage of them in the Vail Valley. You see them everywhere: farmers markets, hiking, swimming in the creek and, yes, sometimes biking — owner in tow. What’s more, these days, dogs have cred. And dog owners are willing and ready

people and pets

valle y livi n g

to show their stylin’ pets for all the world to see. “I have a tremendous amount of people who are getting cross breeds with poodles,” explains Carolyn Stratton, of Doggie Style Pet Grooming. “Labradoodles, Berneoodles, giant Schnausers crossed with poodles. Twenty years ago, this would be a mutt, but now people

are paying thousands of dollars for these dogs.” Stratton prefers the term “designer dog” rather than “exotic breeds” and says that she sees trends in pedigrees pass through her establishment the same way one sees skinny jeans come in and out of style. The intention of mixing breeds such as Labradors and Bernese mountain dogs with poodles is to pair the notoriously warm and intelligent demeanors of the Labs and Berneses with the hypoallergenic appeal of the poodle, producing a pet that doesn’t shed. “I have never had a doodle that’s been bad,” Stratton says. “They are high-maintenance when it comes to hair; otherwise, they are great — great personalities.”

above Hula Koch, an unusually large Pomeranian, takes in the views at the dog park in Edwards. opposite Fletcher Dill, a Goldendoodle, poses next to the Eagle River before jumping in for a swim.

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The doodles, while not shedding on the couch, will shed within their own coats, causing serious matting trouble for the diligent owner who doesn’t brush thoroughly and frequently. Unusual breeds aren’t the only way people show off with their dogs. One of Stratton’s regular summer clients is Buddy the Lion — a golden retriever whose owner has

Twenty years ago, this would be a mutt, but now people are paying thousands of dollars for these dogs. him shorn to look precisely like a mighty jungle cat, complete with a flowing mane and shaved tail with a fluffy tip. Hair of the Mountain Dog’s Amy Church also has taken some strange requests for fur-dos. “I’ve had a couple of clients request nail polish,” Church says, recalling the hot-pink flair that adorned the claws of a Daschund and a golden retriever she groomed. “I had a poodle whose owner wanted to carve a skull for Halloween onto his butt. There was a lady with a long-haired German shepherd with a mohawk request. He looked like a super tough guy.” Let’s be honest: Some dog owners simply love the attention their canines elicit, and the dogs usually love it, too. When it comes down to it,

P H OTO s by D o m i n i q u e tay lo r


b y S h a u n a Fa r n e l l

— LET’S GO OUT — while some places are off limits for furry visitors, for the most part you’ll find that many people in Vail love dogs as much as their own children. The valley is rich with dog-friendly hotels, restaurants, hiking trails and even doggie daycare. Here are some suggestions for the best places to take your canine:

HIKING In Minturn, try Meadow Mountain or Grouse Creek. Both are gradual climbs with dogs allowed off-leash under voice command, and while Meadow Mountain is largely open grasslands perfect for Fido to frolic, Grouse Creek is cooler. Most of the trail is in the forest, featuring several water crossings for drinking and dunking paws. Dogs must be leashed to hike on Vail Mountain, but if his or her tongue is hanging low at the top — or yours is — the gondola ride is free and four-legged hikers are allowed on the way down.

ROMPING If yours is a social beast, the Vail Valley is home to three off-leash dog parks — Bighorn Park in East Vail, Stephens Park in West Vail and Freedom Park in Edwards. All have large fields of green for ball games and sniffing extravaganzas, but none of them are fenced, so make sure your puppy doesn’t run away.

RESTAURANT HANGOUTS People aren’t the only ones who like to hang out on patios on a sunny day. Dog-friendly porches include Bart & Yetis, the Bully Ranch, Blue Moose Pizza, La Bottega, Up the Creek, Old Forge Pizza and The Gashouse.

HOTELS Several hotels in the area are dog-friendly with a pet deposit, but Antlers at Vail keeps a large bowl of dog biscuits in the lobby. The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch has its own sunrise and sunset hikes led by the hotel’s own canine mascots (Bachelor and Miner). The hotel restaurant also makes gourmet dog biscuits, and dog-friendly rooms come with cushy canine beds, fancy food and water dishes — and the spa even offers in-room doggie massages. regardless of whether a person puts bows on their poodle so it matches their bridal gown or a bandana on the neck of their golden retriever to hold its doggie toys while it hikes, dog owners revere their pets like they would their own flesh and blood.

“In our town, some people like to have a different kind of dog — it’s a fashion statement,” Stratton says. “Still, this day and age, pets are our children, way more than they used to be.” Next on the “designer doggie” list? How ’bout a Great Chihuahua?

GROOMING For an authority on hand-stripping (pulling out dead hair for a long-lasting, thinner and sleeker coat, particularly on terriers), Hair of the Mountain Dog in Edwards is the way to go. For transforming your mutt into a safari beast or custom-designing any other fancy do, hit Doggie Style, also in Edwards. For a more straightforward groom without frills (ponytails, not pigtails), Vail Doggie Daycare and Spa is your best bet.

S U M M E R 2 012 G VAIL LUXURY

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Complete Your Home Vision 970.926.8185 | www.insideoutfurnishings.net Located across from Larkburger in Edwards 36

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COMFORTABLY CREATIVE This mountain retreat for a well-known actor and producer is filled with reclaimed (and re-imagined) artifacts.

DESIGN & DECOR

HOMEFRONT

The spiral stairwell snakes through all three floors.

P H OTO S C O U R T E S Y o f j oni tay lor re a l estate

S U M M E R 2 012 G VAIL LUXURY

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HOMEFRONT

— DETAILS —

O

ne of several homes

belonging to a well known television, movie and Broadway star, this Bachelor Gulch home sits on a spacious lot surrounded by trees. Commanding mountain views from an oversized deck, the six-bedroom extravagance has vaulted ceilings, stone fireplaces and a wine cellar with accompanying tasting room. Designed for large groups and families, there are even nanny quarters.

228 Tall Timber Road Bachelor Gulch listed by Barney Dill, Joni Taylor Real Estate More info at jonitaylorrealestate.com

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Vaulted ceilings give a spacious feel to the kitchen and great room.

(01) The house was featured in Architectural Digest and other design magazines. (02) The pine floors were reclaimed from the Sears Tower in Chicago. (03) The spiral staircase, which penetrates all three floors, is made of wood reclaimed from a Chicago firehouse dating back to the mid-1800s. (04) To the north, residents get a bird’s-eye view of Mountain Star. (05) The lower level has a ski room complete with steam room, shower and bathroom. (06) Worth Interiors designed and commissioned numerous pieces specifically for the property. (07) Two episodes of a nationallytelevised reality show were filmed here. (08) The artwork ranges from classic 1840s to contemporary art. (09) The interior design is a mix of Asian, Middle Eastern, Western and contemporary design. (10) There are numerous large and vibrant trees in the living and dining rooms.

P H OTO S C O U R T E S Y o f j oni tay lor re a l estate


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by ROSA N NA TUR NER

Measuring up for success Vail Valley Committee of The Women’s Foundation of Colorado helps women and girls achieve self-sufficiency.

E

agle County’s male-

to-female ratio has long been a running joke in the Vail Valley. In reality, women make up 46.2 percent of the local population, according to census data from 2009. This means that programs and nonprofits that focus on the female gender have a wide-ranging impact on the community as a whole — women aren’t a fringe group.

C o mm u n i t y L e a d e r s

PEOPLE & PL ACES

Created in 1987, The Women’s Foundation of Colorado has been working for 25 years to improve the lives of women and girls across the state. Pam Smith is on the Board of Trustees of The Women’s Foundation and is actively involved in the local Vail Valley Committee of the organization. Smith thinks that the best thing about The Women’s Foundation is its commitment

to research-based action. “What attracted me most to this Foundation was that everything they do flows from research,” Smith says. “That’s so important. You can throw money at problems until you’re blue in the face, but unless you understand the problems it’s difficult to create effective solutions.” And what are the problems? “Last year, 5,750 girls dropped of out of high school in Colorado,” Smith explains. “Girls who drop out have a harder time finding employment than boys; their jobs generally provide lower earnings; they have poorer health and they often need to rely on public support programs for their family’s basic needs.” The average annual income for women in Eagle County without a high school diploma is $12,110. A high school grad-

above Deanna Robinson, author of “Succeeding in Spite of Everything!,”   discusses life goals and how to reach them with Girl PowHer member Rita Guitierrez.

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uate can more than double her annual earning potential. According to the 2011 Colorado Self-Sufficiency Standard Update commissioned by the Colorado Fiscal Policy Institute, a single mother supporting one pre-schooler needs an income of $54,994 to be considered “self-sufficient” in Eagle County. Approximately 35 percent of single moms on state work supports are high school dropouts. It is estimated that each dropout costs the U.S. $200,000 in their lifetime. The Foundation is focused on creating programs that not only help women and girls individually, but also improve the status of women in Colorado. “We’re going for systemic change,” Smith says. “We work to remove barriers that prevent women and girls from becoming self-sufficient.” Smith says that due to the high cost of living, many women in the Valley struggle to support themselves. “With the average wage in the Valley far below the wage necessary to achieve economic self-sufficiency, this is an issue that reaches beyond just impacting women. We are all familiar with many of our residents holding multiple jobs in order to make ends meet,” remarks Lisa Pease, a Women’s Foundation Trustee since 2007 and Vail Valley resident. In 2008, The Women’s Foundation commissioned a study by Columbia University which then identified the “cliff effect” — when benefits end abruptly without a sliding scale to phase out the benefit. Women who were receiving some type of federal or state support (such as food stamps

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or child care) were actually turning down raises and promotions because “at a certain income level they would lose all their benefits,” Pease says. Pease refers to this as “falling off the cliff,” in that a small increase in wages leads to the support being terminated, leaving the woman in a worse financial condition than before the increase, thereby inhibiting the woman’s efforts to become self-sufficient. As a result of this study, the Foundation created a variety of initiatives to tackle the problem, including supporting the successful passage of Senate Bill 22 during the 2012 state legislative session. The bipartisan legislation allows up to 10 county governments to extend the eligibility period for the Colorado Child Care Assistance Program within their county from six months to two years to mitigate the cliff effect. The pilot program allows children to remain in important early childcare, gives parents the ability to work and advance their careers, and provides employers with stable workers. Parents receiving extended assistance must pay an increasing portion of the childcare costs over the two-year period. Thinking globally,. acting locally.. Funds raised from the group’s annual luncheon support the statewide efforts of The Foundation as well as Eagle County nonprofit organizations serving women and girls. “Last year, our Vail Valley Committee granted

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above Rita Guitierrez, Nayeli Garcia and Coco Andrade participated in Girl PowHer , a program funded in part by a grant from The Women’s Foundation of Colorado — Vail Valley Committee.

funds to Eagle County organizations with programs that focused on the economic self-sufficiency of women and girls,” Deb Luginbuhl says. The 2012 grants were awarded to local programs that focus on the girls’ dropout rate as well as the contributing factors that keep them from graduating high school or continuing their education. “It’s exciting to see the positive outcome of the programs

You can throw money at problems until you’re blue in the face, but unless you understand the problem it’s difficult to create effective solutions.”

that receive the grants. Lives are changed,” Luginbuhl says. At Red Canyon High School, support from the Foundation allows girls to participate in an internship program where they learn about different careers and are mentored by successful women. Based in Eagle County, one of The Red Ribbon Project’s goals is to prevent HIV, STIs and pregnancy in teenage girls through education and outreach. The Girl PowHER Summer Program is run by the Vail Valley Foundation’s Youth Foundation. Studies show that 70 percent of youth who play sports quit by the age of 12. Girl PowHER aims to reverse this trend for middle and high school girls by engaging them in physical and recreational activities. “As a long-time partner with The Women’s Foundation, VVF’s Youth Foundation has been able to increase mentor-

ship opportunities, enhance academic support and increase fitness among girls most at-risk for dropping out of high school,” says Susie Davis, VVF’s Youth Foundation Vice President of Education. “Not only does their financial support have an immense impact on our community, but the research and advocacy throughout our state directly benefits our community.” Research also shows that girls’ interest in science starts to drop starting in the third grade. The Walking Mountains Science Center attempts to foster a passion for science in third to fifth grade girls with their Girls in Science program. Careers in science are one promising path to self-sufficiency. The Bright Future Foundation aims to break the cycle of domestic violence that affects women in Eagle County. The Women’s Foundation helps in part to fund the “Light

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PEOPLE & PL ACES

of Hope Self Sufficiency Initiative,” in which those who have gone through the women’s shelter learn how to make and sell oil candles. “If it weren’t for funding from the Women’s Foundation, we might not be able to offer this,” says Sheri Mintz, Executive Director of the Bright Future Foundation. “Women report that they feel supported and stronger when they come through the ‘Light of Hope’ program. We feel that it’s helping the women to maintain steady employment.” ‘you can’t be what.. you can’t see’. In addition to helping to fund organizations, The Women’s Foundation also raises awareness about

important issues affecting women and girls today. The theme for this year’s annual Vail Valley Luncheon is A Place at the Table: Gender Bias in the Media (You Can’t Be What You Can’t See!). Keynote speaker will be Jennifer Siebel Newsom, writer and director of “MissRepresentation,” a documentary film which looks at the ways in which the media negatively depicts women and how this affects their ability to become leaders. The organizers of the luncheon selected Newsom to be the keynote speaker because, in addition to making the film, she also created MissRepresentation.org, a call-to-action campaign that seeks to challenge the media’s narrow view of women and girls. “Young girls who hear all those comments about

above Mentor and volunteer Dr. Tina Fleishman and participant

Mirella Tellez share stories at a PowHER Up For Success event.

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their looks, and so few about their capacity to lead, are handicapped with the notion that their value lies in their beauty,” Newsom says. “We have so few women and such limited diversity in our media leadership…We know that 3 percent of the positions of

The progress of women doesn’t benefit females alone.

clout, of the decision-makers, are women. (This) means that 97 percent of what you watch, read and hear comes from the male perspective.” According to Newsom, without positive images of women in media, it is harder for young girls to believe that they have the power to become leaders. Exciting future. This message aligns with the Women’s Foundation’s goal to not only enable women to become self-sufficient but also be at the forefront of changes in our state and community. The more women gain positions of power, the more they will be able to give back and help other women and girls in return. Having lived all over the world, Smith thinks that the citizens of Eagle County are exceptional in their commitment to charity. “This is one of the most philanthropic, collaborative communities that I’ve ever lived in,” Smith says. “There

does not seem to be this competition between nonprofits for donors. Nonprofits look for ways to work together for the betterment of the community and the people in it.” Since coming to the Vail Valley in 2006 Smith has already seen the fruits of the Foundation’s labor. When she attended a Girl PowHER mentoring program this June, she could see changes in the high school girls from the previous year. “The girls are more engaged,” Smith says. “Now they know that somebody cares about them. They’ve been exposed to different role models. They’re looking towards the future and are excited about it.” The progress of women doesn’t benefit females alone. Families, businesses, and the community at large all reap rewards when women are healthier and more financially secure. Since its founding 25 years ago, The Women’s Foundation has granted nearly $10 million to research, advocacy and direct service programs for women and girls around the state. With all the ways they’ve helped local women and girls, it’s hard to imagine a time before The Women’s Foundation existed. “We’re so appreciative,” Mintz says. “They’re such a strong voice in our community surrounding women and girls. We feel fortunate to partner with them.” For more information on The Women’s Foundation of Colorado please visit www.wfco.org or email WFCOVailValley@gmail.com

P h oto by j u s t i n m c c a r t y


18TH ANNUAL

Vail Jazz Festival

40 JAZZ PERFORMANCES ~ 100+ HEADLINERS

CURTIS STIGERS & DALLAS SYMPHONY

JULY 2 Ford Amphitheater, Joint Production With Bravo!

THE TIMES OF DAVE BRUBECK

DAILY, 10AM TO 8PM An Exhibit On Display at Vail Visitor Center

JAZZ AFTER— ORCHESTRA JAZZ JAMS Great Room at Larkspur

JUNE 30 DALLAS JAM JULY 11 PHILLY JAM JULY 25 NEW YORK JAM JAZZ @ VAIL FARMERS’ MARKET

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VISIT VAILJAZZ.ORG CALL 888-VAIL JAM

Thursdays 6-8pm Free Concert With Optional Reserved Seating For $20 or Jazz Pass For $99

LABOR DAY WEEKEND PARTY

AUG. 30–SEPT. 3 Over 30 Hours Of Jazz The Finest Jazz Party on the Planet


b y k r i s ta d r i s c o l l

COCKTAILS WITH CONSCIENCE Passionate Colorado craft distillers combine peerless quality with green practices — Seek out SUSTAINABLE SPIRITS the next time you pony up.

The Peak Spirits crew looks at grapes.

P H OTO s C O U R T E S Y O F pe a k s p i r i t s

W i n e & Sp i r i t s

P EO P L E & P L ACES

E

nvironmental buzz

words are all the rage — sustainable, eco-friendly, organic, “green” — but how do you separate the marketing fluff from the real deal? These four Colorado distilleries have taken pains to grow their businesses in ways that are good to the Earth, and the result is high-quality products that even Mother Nature can be proud of.

start with the source. Quality hooch comes from quality ingredients. That’s why Peak Spirits in Hotchkiss uses only U.S. Department of Agriculture-certified organic and biodynamic ingredients, says Lance Hanson, owner and distiller. “It starts with the farming, with how the ingredients are grown,” Hanson

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P EO P L E & P L ACES

says. “Our home base is the Jack Rabbit Hill farm, which my wife and I also own.” The farm is a 70-acre property, with 20 acres in vineyard and a 12-acre hop yard. Biodynamic farming is held to a more rigorous standard than organic farming, and Jack Rabbit Hill is one of only two biodynamic farms in Colorado. “The hallmark feature of biodynamic farming is its emphasis on really reducing off-farm inputs, so trying to farm in a way that is totally closed loop, self-sustaining,” Hanson says. “So you don’t need to bring in materials from off the farm. The fertility that

you need to keep your plants or your soils comes from manure from your livestock, rather than trucking in manure or fancy fish fertilizer or kelp.” Hanson says that in today’s market, the most important thing is product quality, flavor and taste profile. “We’re not saying to the market, ‘Buy us because we’re organic, sustainable, green,’” Hanson says. “There are a lot of companies out there waving that banner that are attempting to lead with it in their value proposition, but at the end of the day, from a quality product standpoint, taste profile is the most important consideration.” If someone is going to spend a little more money for a product, they better be able to taste

Colorado Gold in Cedaredge.

Heather Beam, of Syntax Spirits.

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the difference, Hanson says, so Peak Spirits leads with that. “Our search for quality begins in the ground,” he says. “And I think the market is waking up to this.” stay close to home. Distilling is a manufacturing process: raw materials in; finished products and waste out. And the best way to reduce carbon footprint is to reduce the amount of fuel used to get those raw materials from their source to the distillery’s door. That’s why sourcing ingredients locally is a production pillar at Syntax Spirits in Greeley. “Literally, we get (our grain) from the elevator three blocks away, minimizing our carbon footprint and transportation,” says Heather Bean, Syntax owner and distiller. Bean says Syntax gets its flavoring ingredients — as much as humanly possible — from Colorado. The end result is a product that smacks of Colorado. “It makes our product unique; it tastes like something that comes from Colorado — we have that uniqueness on our side,” Bean says. “We have a higher-quality product from using the local stuff.” The distillery also encourages recycling, offering customers a discount for bringing in their used Syntax bottles, which are washed, relabeled and reused. Spent grain is given to a farmer down the road for cattle feed, thus minimizing the waste stream, and Bean says the distillery also has taken care to minimize its energy use. “We’ve designed our production process so that we only need to distill twice to make a nice product,” Bean says.

Harvest time at Jack Rabbit Hill can appear deceptively serene.

be water wise. Distilling requires a lot of water, and that water cycles through a range of temperatures. The brains at Peach Street Distillers in Palisade figured out a way for the water to work for them. “One thing that you have when you’re distilling is a lot of hot water coming off your condensing column, and … sometimes we’re running that still 24/7,” says Davy Lindig, distiller at Peach Street. “The water comes off at 150 degrees.” Peach Street is in the process of expanding its tasting room and adding on to the building. “So what we’ve done is we’ve run lines through the concrete and we’re going to run cooling water through the concrete to heat that space,”

b otto m L eft: P hoto by J i m ry d b o m


trash bag, and that’s mostly people’s personal lunches.” Colorado Gold tries to make the smallest footprint possible, Almy says, and it succeeds by using a closedloop production system. “We don’t want anything to get dumped down the drain, thrown in the trash,” he says. “We recycle our water through the mash runs. Otherwise, we’d be dumping about 400 gallons of water down the drain. We try to sustain ourselves. We’re taking stuff in; we’re sending the same stuff out. We’re not creating waste here.” Local ingredients play a role at Colorado Gold, too. “We definitely have strong ties with our community,” Almy says. “All of our grain is locally sourced; the farthest thing we get is our malted barley from down near Alamosa. We try to support as many local farmers as we can.” Being a “green” company shouldn’t be a marketing ploy, Almy says. “On our website, we don’t mention anything about our eco footprint because that’s just a selling gimmick,” Almy says. Lance and Anna “If you truly believe Hanson at the in sustainability, you Peak Spirits still. don’t have to tell everybody you’re susreduce the. tainable. We do tours and peowaste stream. ple see for themselves — you guys don’t have a trash can here. Minimizing waste is “We’re a sustainable compaparamount at Colorado Gold ny, but we’re not going to rub Distillery in Cedaredge. it in your face — la de da, we “We actually do not have a trashcan here,” says Mike Almy, don’t throw mash in the trash. We market a good product, distiller at Colorado Gold. “All and we do that by making our of our trash from a week’s closed-loop system here.” worth of work can fit into one “I’ll play around with a coffee liqueur, so I’ll get espresso from Traders Coffee, a local coffee shop,” Lindig says. “I did a chili vodka last year when the chilies were ripe. We roast them and I soaked them in vodka. Our gin is made with local hand-picked juniper berries. It’s kind of our thing, using local stuff.” Lindig says the freshness factor makes it worthwhile to grab up produce that grows close to home. “You want the fruit that is so ripe and the sugar content so high — that day to put them on yeast,” he says. That freshness yields the best flavor and sugar content. “I’ve tried distilling apricots off the tree that were still green, and I had to dump it; it was awful,” Lindig says. “The best way to do it is from the backyard.”

We’re not saying to the market, ‘Buy us because we’re organic, sustainable, green.’ At the end of the day, from a quality product standpoint, taste profile is the most important consideration.

Lindig says. “So we’re saving some energy and fuel.” The plan is innovative, but it’s just one measure the distillery is taking to reduce its environmental impact. Peach Street also uses local ingredients in its products. “The peaches come from here,” Lindig says. “We went through 30,000 tons of peaches last year and the same amount probably in pears. The plums and the apricots are hit or miss around here, so some years we can’t get them. If we can’t get it, we’re not making it.” Lindig says that if for some reason the peach crop completely fails, or the pear crop fails, the distiller won’t be making brandy. Sourcing locally also extends to experimenting with new products.

P H OTO s C O U R T E S Y O F C olor a d o G ol d D i s t i llery & pe a k s p i r i t s

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S O C I A L S TAT U S

Clockwise FROM ABOVE: Jeannie Hauff and Susan Chipman. Markey Butler and Lindy Owens. Tranae Fifield and John Critchfield. Kimberly Rowand, Kaylee Brennand and Rob “Captain Jack Sparrow” Levine. Val Haley, Fletcher Macneill and Sally Clair. Renee Okubo, Carol Mullikin.

Treasure Hunt & Dinner ome Care & Hospice of the Valley’s second annual Treasure Hunt and Dinner fundraising event coincided with the first day of summer. Pirate garb was all the rage, and participants hunted various “islands” for treasure. After much feasting and merriment — a lot of yo-ho-ho — the event was declared a success.

H

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P H OTO S by R ya n S c h m i dt


VILAR PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 15 TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON

2012–2013 Classical Series Ailey II

Friday, Nov. 9, 2012

RiverNorth Dance Chicago

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Bill T Jones/ Arnie Zane Dance Company Friday, March 15, 2013

TICKETS ON SALE S U M M E R 2 0 1 2

Photo courtesy of Bill T. Jones/ Arnie Zane Dance Company

VILARPAC.ORG | 888.920.ARTS (2787)

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S O C I A L S TAT U S

Vail LUXURY Magazine Cocktail Open House V

ail Luxury Magazine ushered in summer with a

tasting of the Jack Daniel’s family of fine whiskeys. The Cocktail Open House at The Fitz Lounge at Manor Vail included whiskey tastings, educational information and a sneak peak of pineapple-infused vodka from Little Black Dress. Special thanks to Brown Forman and The Fitz at Manor Vail for co-sponsoring this event, as well as Alpine Ice for the beautiful ice sculpture.  

Clockwise FROM left: Representatives from the Jack Daniels family of fine whiskeys, Manor Vail and the Vail Daily hobnob over the whiskey-tasting table. Cathy Ethington, Kristi McCoy, Don Rogers and Nicole Whitaker. Alithea Doyle and Wren Wertin. Tami Cox and Cara Connolly.

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P H OTO S by Broo k e H e ath e r


Scott A. Small, MD

After graduating from NYU with a B.A. in experimental psychology, Dr. Small b MD/PhD program at Columbia University in Eric Kandel’s laboratory. Discove he enjoyed patient care more than he anticipated, he decided to focus exclusive medical training. After completing a medical internship at UCLA, a neurology r and chief residency at Columbia, and a fellowship with Richard Mayeux, D ‘returned’ to research. Informed by his prior experience studying neuronal ph and pathophysiology he began a research program at Columbia dedicated to inve intractable disorders of the brain. Taking a decidedly top-down approach, he o brain imaging tools designed to pinpoint brain dysfunction in human patients an models of disease. More recently, Dr. Small has combined brain imaging w expression technologies to uncover novel molecular defects underlying Alz disease and aging. Dr. Small is the recipient of numerous awards, including th Scholar Award in Aging Research from the American Federation on Ag McKnight Neuroscience of Brain Disorders Award, the Derek Denny-Brow Neurological Scholar Award from the American Neurological Association, Lamport Award for Excellence in Clinical Science Research from Columbia Uni

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june

29 –

september

30, 2012 MUST SEE // MUST HEAR // MUST GO // MUST DO

AUG

05 DIANA KRALL Sexy, sultry Diana Krall helped take jazz back into the mainstream when she brought her sleepy eyes and unmistakable voice to the genre 15 years ago. Her latest album, “Quiet Nights,” has a Brazilian sensibility. “It’s not coy. It’s not ‘peel me a grape,’ little-girl stuff,” she says. “I feel this album’s very womanly — like you’re lying next to your lover in bed whispering this in their ear.” The August concert at the Vilar Performing Arts Center is an encore performance.

P H OTO by r o b e r t m a x w e l l , c o u r t e s y o f s ho r e f i r e m e d i a .c o m

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june JUN 29-JUL 1 VAIL ARTS FESTIVAL A colorful art festival exhibiting more than 70 artists from around the country. Also includes street entertainers, live performances and great food. Free. Lionshead. JUN 30 THE DALLAS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Bravo A Salute to George Gershwin. Ford Amphitheater, Vail. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUN 30 SATURDAY AFTERNOON FAMILY FUN CLUB An afternoon of free activities including face-painting, Vail Fire Department Family Safety Zone, obstacle course, hula hoop zone, Kid’s Science Discovery Zone and more. Lionshead. vail.com

july JUL 1 VAIL Farmers MARKET & ART SHOW Local produce, fresh baked goods, clothing, jewelry and artwork. 10:15 J UL a.m.-3:30 p.m. vailfarmersmarket.com JUL 1 Creedence Clearwater ReviSITED The FOURTH ANNUAL STAR rhythm section DANCING GALA of Creedence The Vail Valley’s response to “Dancing with Clearwater Revival the Stars” showcases local dance “stars” performs. VPAC Summer Concert who have committed to training with a Series. Vilar Center. professional dancer in order to entertain — Beaver Creek. 8 and ultimately raise money for Vail Valley p.m. vilarpac.org Foundation’s Youth Foundation. The event is JUL 2 Dallas Symphony held in a transformed hanger at the airport, Orchestra, where attendees are treated to a five-course Bravo Works dinner, entertainment and a live auction that by Bach and focuses on experiential items. Bruckner. Keyboard Concerto in F minor. Symphony No. 8 in C minor Ford Amphitheater. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 3 The Westin Riverfront Resort & Spa Salute to the USA With the concert and activities starting

23

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Though confirmed for publication, listed events, dates and times are subject to change. Please contact the presenting organizations to confirm details.


at 5, the Colorado Rockies largest fireworks display will kick-off at 9:45 at Nottingham Lake. Avon. 5 p.m. JUL 3 Martin Sexton Hot Summer Nights. Ford Amphitheater. 6:30 p.m. vvf.org JUL 4 Vail America Days Celebrate 4th of July with the Vail parade, family activities, free concerts, entertainment and fireworks. vail.com JUL 4 Dallas Symphony Orchestra, Bravo Vail Valley Music Festival and Vail Valley Foundation Patriotic Concert. Ford Amphitheater. 2 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 5 Will Hodge, Showdown Town Free concert series. Eagle Town Park, Eagle. 6:30 p.m. vvf.org JUL 5 Darius Rucker Concert An outdoor concert at the Ford Amphitheater. 6 p.m. vail.com JUL 5 Beaver Creek Rodeo at Traer Creek Bronc riding, calf scramble, mutton bustin’, bull riding and more. Chapel Square. Gates at 5 p.m., starts at 6 p.m. beavercreek.com JUL 6 The Philadelphia Orchestra, Bravo Violin Concerto in D major. Symphony No. 4 in E minor. Ford Amphitheater. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 6&7 Culinary Demonstration Series Chefs from local restaurants give free culinary demonstrations. Beaver Creek Plaza, Beaver Creek. 5 p.m. JUL 7 MINTURN MARKET The original summer market with art, crafts, food and produce. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Minturn. minturnmarket.com JUL 7 The Philadelphia Orchestra, Bravo Works by Rachmaninoff and Tchaikovsky. Ford Amphitheater. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 7 SATURDAY AFTERNOON FAMILY FUN CLUB An afternoon of free activities including face-painting, Vail Fire Department Family Safety Zone, obstacle course, hula hoop zone, Kid’s Science Discovery Zone and more. Lionshead. vail.com JUL 8 VAIL Farmers MARKET & ART SHOW Local produce, fresh baked goods, clothing, jewelry and artwork. 10:15 a.m.-3:30 p.m. vailfarmersmarket.com

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JUL 8 The Philadelphia Orchestra. Bravo Cirque de la Symphonie, a combination of circus arts and symphonic music. Ford Amphitheater. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 9 Members of The Philadelphia Orchestra, Bravo Works by Mendelssohn and Brahms. Vilar Performing Arts Center, Beaver Creek. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 10 Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band VPAC Summer Concert Series. Vilar Center. Beaver Creek. 8 p.m. vilarpac.org JUL 10 Hot Summer Nights Free concert. Ford Amphitheater, Vail. 6:30 p.m. JUL 10 Colorado Glacial History Tour Tours of the area’s beautiful glacial valleys on a loop through Minturn, Leadville, Copper Mountain and Frisco. Departure from Vail Mountain School. 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. JUL 11 The Dukes of September Rhythm Revue Michael McDonald, Donald Fagen & Boz Scaggs. VPAC Summer Concert Series. Vilar Center. Beaver Creek. 8 p.m. vilarpac.org JUL 11 The Philadelphia Orchestra. Bravo Includes music of Broadway, pop and more. Ford Amphitheater. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival JUL 12 Grant Farm, Showdown Town Free concert series. Eagle Town Park, Eagle. 6:30 p.m. vvf.org JUL 12 Beaver Creek Rodeo at Traer Creek Bronc riding, calf scramble, mutton bustin’, bull riding and more. Chapel Square. Gates at 5 p.m., starts at 6 p.m. beavercreek.com JUL 12 National Repertory Orchestra. Bravo Free Family Youth Concert with works by Bach. 11 a.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 12 Nanci Griffith VPAC Summer Concert Series. Vilar Center. Beaver Creek. 8 p.m. vilarpac.org JUL 13 The Philadelphia Orchestra, Bravo Works by Elgar and Shostakovich. Ford Amphitheater, Vail. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 13&14 Culinary Demonstration Series Chefs from local restaurants give free culinary demonstrations. Beaver Creek Plaza, Beaver Creek. 5 p.m.

Though confirmed for publication, listed events, dates and times are subject to change. Please contact the presenting organizations to confirm details.


JUL

05 DARIUS RUCKER Known as the front man for Hootie and the Blowfish, Darius Rucker has turned his efforts to country music in earnest. His immensely singable songs have lively hooks and lots of energy. He plays a “Rock the Research” concert, and all proceeds go to the Steadman Philippon Research Institute.

P H OTO C O UR T ESY O F DARIUSRUC K ER .C O M

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JUL 14 The Family Stone VPAC Summer Concert Series. Vilar Center. Beaver Creek. 8 p.m. vilarpac.org JUL 14 MINTURN MARKET The original summer market with art, crafts, food and produce. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Minturn. minturnmarket.com JUL 14 SATURDAY AFTERNOON FAMILY FUN CLUB An afternoon of free activities including face-painting, Vail Fire Department Family Safety Zone, obstacle course, hula hoop zone, Kid’s Science Discovery Zone and more. Lionshead. vail.com JUL 14 The Philadelphia Orchestra, Bravo Works by Mendelssohn and Dvorak. Ford Amphitheater, Vail. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 15 Celebration of Life Luncheon Featuring Giuliana and Bill Rancic to benefit the Vail Breast Cancer Awareness Group. Vail Marriott Mountain Resort & Spa. Silent auction from 11 a.m. to noon. The Rancic’s keynote address kicks off at noon. Vail. vailbreastcancerawareness.org JUL 15 VAIL Farmers MARKET & ART SHOW Local produce, fresh baked goods, clothing, jewelry and artwork. 10:15 a.m.-3:30 p.m. vailfarmersmarket.com JUL 16 Tiempo Libre, bravo Vilar Performing Arts Center, Beaver Creek. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 17 Dirty Dozen Brass Band Hot Summer Nights Free concert series. Ford Amphitheater. 6:30 p.m. vvf.org JUL 17 Soiree, Bravo Anne-Marie McDermott, piano. Sherry and Jim Smith Residence, Arrowhead. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 18 Jasper String Quarter, Bravo Free & Easy. Gypsum Town Hall, Gypsum. 5:30 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 19 Muskeeter Gripweed, Showdown Town Free concert series. Eagle Town Park, Eagle. 6:30 p.m. vvf.org JUL 19 Triple Crown Leadership, Bravo Bob and Gregg Vanourek speaking locally. Free. Donovan Pavilion, Vail. 6 p.m. JUL 19 Beaver Creek Rodeo at Traer Creek Bronc riding, calf scramble, mutton bustin’, bull riding and more. Chapel Square. Gates at 5 p.m., starts at 6 p.m. beavercreek.com

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BEGINNING

AUG

30 VAIL JAZZ FESTIVAL With various concert series throughout JUL 19 moe VPAC Underground Sound Concert Series Beaver Creek. 8 p.m. vilarpac.org JUL 20 New York Philharmonic, Bravo Works by De Falla, Saint-saens and Brahms. Ford Amphitheater, Vail. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 20&21 Culinary Demonstration Series Chefs from local restaurants give free culinary demonstrations. Beaver Creek Plaza, Beaver Creek. 5 p.m. JUL 20&21 Gypsum Daze Festival Two days full of down-home fun including: a youth talent show, craft and food vendors, live entertainment all day long. 7:30 p.m. townofgypsum.com JUL 20-22 Rocky Mountain Antiques Festival An entire weekend filled with rare and interesting antiques from some of the finest antique vendors around the country. beavercreek.com JUL 21 MINTURN MARKET The original summer market with art, crafts,

the season — Jazz @ the Market, Jazz @ Vail Square and other events — the Vail Jazz Festival culminates in a Labor Day Weekend Party. With late-night jam sessions, tributes to Dizzy Gillespie, Dave Brubeck and Dave Brown, a session dedicated to the history of the trombone as well as the traditional Sundaymorning gospel session — it’s four days of jazz madness.

food and produce. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Minturn. minturnmarket.com JUL 21 SATURDAY AFTERNOON FAMILY FUN CLUB An afternoon of free activities including face-painting, Vail Fire Department Family Safety Zone, obstacle course, hula hoop zone, Kid’s Science Discovery Zone and more. Lionshead. vail.com

Though confirmed for publication, listed events, dates and times are subject to change. Please contact the presenting organizations to confirm details.


JUL 21 New York Philharmonic, Bravo Works by Tchaikovsky including Piano Concerto No. 2 and excerpts from Swan Lake. Ford Amphitheater, Vail. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 22 VAIL Farmers MARKET & ART SHOW Local produce, fresh baked goods, clothing, jewelry and artwork. 10:15 a.m.-3:30 p.m. vailfarmersmarket.com JUL 22 New York Philharmonic: An American Songbook, Bravo Works by Copland, Bernstein and Gershwin. Ford Amphitheater, Vail. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 23 4th Annual Star Dancing Gala The Youth Foundation. 6 p.m. stardancinggala.com JUL 23 Jasper String Quarter: Free & Easy, Bravo Works by Schulhoff, Smetana, Borodin and Haydn. Cordillera Lodge & Spa. 5:30 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 24 Hot Summer Nights of Dance Ford Amphitheater. 6:30 p.m. vvf.org JUL 24 Soiree: An Evening with Yefim Bronfman and AnneMarie McDermott Sandi and Greg Walton Residence. Arrowhead. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 25 Al Green Vilar Performing Arts Center. Beaver Creek. 8 p.m. vilarpac.org JUL 25 New York Philharmonic, Bravo Works by Respighi, Vivaldi and Tchaikovsky. Ford Amphitheater, Vail. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 26 Uncle Lucius, Showdown Town Free concert series. Eagle Town Park, Eagle. 6:30 p.m. vvf.org JUL 26 New York Philharmonic, Bravo Works by Neilsen and Brahms. Ford Amphitheater, Vail. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 27 New York Philharmonic and Colorado Symphony Orchestra Chorus, Bravo Works by Stravinsky and Mozart. Ford Amphitheater. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 27&28 Culinary Demonstration Series Chefs from local restaurants give free culinary demonstrations. Beaver Creek Plaza, Beaver Creek. 5 p.m. JUL 28 MINTURN MARKET The original summer market with art, crafts, food and produce. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Minturn. minturnmarket.com

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VAIL’S HOME TO CrEATIVE CuISInE And CrAFT BEEr

JUL 28 SATURDAY AFTERNOON FAMILY FUN CLUB An afternoon of free activities including face-painting, Vail Fire Department Family Safety Zone, obstacle course, hula hoop zone, Kid’s Science Discovery Zone and more. Lionshead. vail.com JUL 29 VAIL Farmers MARKET & ART SHOW Local produce, fresh baked goods, clothing, jewelry and artwork. 10:15 a.m.3:30 p.m. vailfarmersmarket.com JUL 29 Big Music for Little Bands, Bravo Works by Mendelssohn and Brahms. Concert Hall, Vail Mountain School, Vail. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 29-31 New York City Ballet MOVES Vail International Dance Festival. Sunday and Monday at the Ford Amphitheater for Opening Night and Program II. Tuesday night, Vilar Performing Arts Center hosts UpClose: Stravinsky by Balanchine. 7:30 p.m. vaildance.org JUL 30 Calder Quarter Carol and Pat Welsh Residence, Spraddle Creek, Vail. 6 p.m. Free & Easy: Jasper String Quarter. Brush Creek Pavilion, Eagle Ranch, Eagle. 7:30 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org JUL 31 Silver Oak Series, Bravo Works by Cosma, Couperin, Evans, Scriabin, Korngold, Feldman, Scarlatti, Crumb and Debussy. 6 p.m. Donovan Pavilion, Vail. Wine and Conversation with Performers and Composers. 7 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org

august

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AUG 1 K.D. Lang and the Siss Boom Bang VPAC Summer Concert Series. Vilar Center. Beaver Creek. 8 p.m. vilarpac.org AUG 2 Silver Oak Series, BRAVO Donovan Pavilion, Vail. 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org AUG 2 Beaver Creek Rodeo at Traer Creek Bronc riding, calf scramble, mutton bustin’, bull riding and more. Chapel Square. Gates at 5 p.m., starts at 6 p.m. beavercreek.com AUG 2 Markus James Trio with Mamadou Sidibe, Showdown Town Free concert series. Eagle Town Park, Eagle. 6:30 p.m. vvf.org

Though confirmed for publication, listed events, dates and times are subject to change. Please contact the presenting organizations to confirm details.


BEGINNING

JUL

29 VAIL INTERNATIONAL DANCE FESTIVAL Artistic Director Damian Woetzel is back with another stellar lineup for the Vail International Dance Festival. Woetzel likes to bring in a variety of dancers and partner them with people they’ve never danced with before. New York City Ballet MOVES touring company returns for a second year, as does Dance TV, Dancing in the Streets and other now-signature events.

P H OTO by E r i n B a i a no, C O UR T ESY o f VAIL I N T ER N AT I O N AL DA N CE FES T I VAL

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AUGUST 3 The Women’s Foundation of Colorado Luncheon A Place at the Table: Gender Bias in the Media. Speaker Jennifer Siebel Newsom. Vail Marriott Mountain Resort & Spa. Gallery of Sponsors from 10:30 a.m. to noon with the luncheon to follow. wfco.org AUG 3&4 International Evenings of Dance I and II Vail International Dance Festival. Ford Amphitheater. 7:30 p.m. vaildance.org AUG 3-5 Culinary Demonstration Series Chefs from local restaurants give free culinary demonstrations. Beaver Creek Plaza, Beaver Creek. 5 p.m. AUG 4 A Two-Piano Extravaganza Vilar Performing Arts Center, Beaver Creek. 6 p.m. vailmusicfestival.org AUG 4 MINTURN MARKET The original summer market with art, crafts, food and produce. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Minturn. minturnmarket.com AUG 4 SATURDAY AFTERNOON FAMILY FUN CLUB An afternoon of free activities including face-painting, Vail Fire Department Family Safety Zone, obstacle course, hula hoop zone, Kid’s Science Discovery Zone and more. Lionshead. vail.com AUG 5 VAIL Farmers MARKET & ART SHOW Local produce, fresh baked goods, clothing, jewelry and artwork. 10:15 a.m.-3:30 p.m. vailfarmersmarket.com AUG 5 Diana Krall VPAC Summer Concert Series. Vilar Center. Beaver Creek. 8 p.m. vilarpac.org AUG 6 NOW PremierEs Hosted by Damian Woetzel Vail International Dance Festival. Ford Amphitheater. 7:30 p.m. vaildance.org AUG 7 Dance for $20.12 Vail International Dance Festival. Ford Amphitheater. 7:30 p.m. vaildance.org AUG 9 The Congress, Showdown Town Free concert series. Eagle Town Park, Eagle. 6:30 p.m. vvf.org AUG 9 Beaver Creek Rodeo at Traer Creek Bronc riding, calf scramble, mutton bustin’, bull riding and more. Chapel Square. Gates at 5 p.m.,

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BEGINNING

JUN

25 Bravo VAIL VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL Vail has become used to the ambitious Bravo concert series. With not one but three world-renowned orchestras, audiences can sit in reserved seating or picnic on the amphitheater lawn and listen to the music of the New York Philharmonic, The Philadelphia Orchestra and the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. Celebrating its 25th anniversary, the festival’s lineup for 2012 does the milestone justice.

starts at 6 p.m. beavercreek.com AUG 9 Martha Graham Dance Company Vail International Dance Festival. Ford Amphitheater. 7:30 p.m. vaildance.org

AUG 10 Ballroom Spectacular Vail International Dance Festival. Ford Amphitheater. 7:30 p.m. vaildance.org AUG 10&11 Culinary Demonstration Series Chefs from local restaurants give free culinary demonstrations. Beaver Creek Plaza, Beaver Creek. 5 p.m. AUGUST 10-12 American Crown Circus Includes high flying flyers, gravity-defying wire walkers, spine chilling motorcycle heroics and more. 5 p.m. show and 7 p.m. show. avon.com AUG 11 MINTURN MARKET The original summer market with art, crafts, food and produce. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Minturn. minturnmarket.com AUG 11 SATURDAY AFTERNOON FAMILY FUN CLUB An afternoon of

Though confirmed for publication, listed events, dates and times are subject to change. Please contact the presenting organizations to confirm details.


free activities including face-painting, Vail Fire Department Family Safety Zone, obstacle course, hula hoop zone, Kid’s Science Discovery Zone and more. Lionshead. vail.com AUG 11 Dance TV Vail International Dance Festival. Ford Amphitheater. 7:30 p.m. vaildance.org AUG 12 VAIL Farmers MARKET & ART SHOW Local produce, fresh baked goods, clothing, jewelry and artwork. 10:15 a.m.-3:30 p.m. vailfarmersmarket.com AUG 13&14 Dreams: A Door to Imagination and Creativity with Victoria Rabinowe Artist Lecture: 6 p.m. Artist Workshop: 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. vail.com AUG 14 Charli2na Hot Summer Nights Free Concert Series. Ford Amphitheater. 6:30 p.m. vvf.org AUG 16 Beaver Creek Rodeo at Traer Creek Bronc riding, calf scramble, mutton bustin’, bull riding and more. Chapel Square. Gates at 5 p.m., starts at 6 p.m. beavercreek.com AUG 17-19 Vail Soul Music Festival “The Ultimate Soul Experience.” vailsoulmusicfest.com AUG 17&18 Culinary Demonstration Series Chefs from local restaurants give free culinary demonstrations. Beaver Creek Plaza, Beaver Creek. 5 p.m. AUGUST 18&19 Red Cliff Studio Art Tour Tour the studios of local artists who work in ceramic, paint, printmaking and more. AUG 19 VAIL Farmers MARKET & ART SHOW Local produce, fresh baked goods, clothing, jewelry and artwork. 10:15 a.m.-3:30 p.m. vailfarmersmarket.com AUG 21 Kyle Hollingsworth Hot Summer Nights Free Concert Series. Ford Amphitheater. 6:30 p.m. vvf.org AUG 24&25 Culinary Demonstration Series Chefs from local restaurants give free culinary demonstrations. Beaver Creek Plaza, Beaver Creek. 5 p.m. AUG 26 VAIL Farmers MARKET & ART SHOW Local produce, fresh baked goods, clothing, jewelry and artwork. 10:15 a.m.3:30 p.m. vailfarmersmarket.com

JOIN US FOR DRINKS AND APPETIZERS ON OUR SUNNY DECK... GAME CREEK RESTAURANT

Hike, horseback ride, or take the shuttle from Eagle’s Nest at the top of the gondola – join us for drinks and appetizers on our sunny deck, or enjoy our seasonal 3-course dinner. Featuring $5 drink and appetizer specials 5:30–7pm and Sunday brunch!

Open Thursday – Saturday, 5:30 – 8:30pm, and Sunday 11 – 2pm. Reservations for dinner and brunch recommended. Please call (970) 754-4275. vail.com

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UP PICK ONE EO, D AT BC RO W D ARDS DILLON,E RKETS, & VAIL MA IND G YETI’S R INK! R D ! OR EAT BEGINNING

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06 AUG 27 The Neolithic Revolution and the Roots of Modern Civilization What We Can Learn from the Mesa Verde Region with Mark Varien. Free. 6 p.m. AUG 30-SEP 3 18th Annual Labor Day Jazz Party Vail Marriott Mountain Resort & Spa. Tickets available for purchase. Prices vary. vailjazz.org

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From sushi to Mediterranean to Colorado seasonal cuisine, there’s a lot to try. Beaver Creek chefs teach a brief cooking lesson while answering questions, giving advice and preparing a tasty treat for attendees.

september SEP 1 MINTURN MARKET The original summer market with art, crafts, food and produce. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Minturn. minturnmarket.com SEP 1&2 Beaver Creek Oktoberfest The annual Beaver Creek Oktoberfest returns with music and beer. beavercreek.com SEP 1&2 Culinary Demonstration

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Series Chefs from local restaurants give free culinary demonstrations. Beaver Creek Plaza, Beaver Creek. 5 p.m. SEP 1-3 Gourmet on Gore An open-air gourmet food and wine festival along Gore Creek Drive and Bridge Street. Vail Village. gourmetongore.com SEP 2 VAIL Farmers MARKET & ART SHOW Local produce, fresh

Though confirmed for publication, listed events, dates and times are subject to change. Please contact the presenting organizations to confirm details.


baked goods, clothing, jewelry and artwork. 10:15 a.m.-3:30 p.m. vailfarmersmarket.com SEP 7-9 Vail Oktoberfest in Lionshead Full enjoyment of beer, brats, Bavarian music and dancing, traditional fare, and yodeling. vail.com SEP 8 Culinary Demonstration Series Chefs from local restaurants give free culinary demonstrations. Beaver Creek Plaza, Beaver Creek. 5 p.m. SEP 8 MINTURN MARKET The original summer market with art, crafts, food and produce. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Minturn. minturnmarket.com SEP 9 VAIL Farmers MARKET & ART SHOW Local produce, fresh baked goods, clothing, jewelry and artwork. 10:15 a.m.-3:30 p.m. vailfarmersmarket.com SEP 13-16 Women’s Empowerment Weekend This workshop gives women the opportunity to nourish mind, body and spirit by connecting to the natural world. Vail Racquet Club Mountain Resort. womenempower.com SEP 14&15 Culinary Demonstration Series Chefs from local restaurants give free culinary demonstrations. Beaver Creek Plaza, Beaver Creek. 5 p.m. SEP 14-16 Vail Oktoberfest in Vail Village Full enjoyment of beer, brats, Bavarian music and dancing, traditional fare, and yodeling. vail.com SEPTEMBER 20-23 Season of Song Forums, discussions & demonstrations pertaining to songwriting. Vail Cascade Resort. seasonofsong.com SEPTEMBER 21 Eagle Valley Land Trust: The Evergreen Ball Goes Into the Wild with Jungle Jack Hannah Vilar Performing Arts Center. Beaver Creek. evlt.org SEPTEMBER 21-23 The America Cup International Fly Fishing Tournament, Lake Nottingham Supports go to Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing. Vail. theamericacup.com SEPTEMBER 30 Tour of Vail & USA Crits Cycling Final Features criterium riders and offers venues, teams and riders the ability to excel in a unique discipline of cycling. Vail Village. usacrits.com

DINING DINING WITH WITH ALTITUDE. ALTITUDE. BISTRO FOURTEEN BISTRO FOURTEEN AT THE TOP OF EAGLE BAHN GONDOLA AT THE TOP OF EAGLE BAHN GONDOLA Serving casual, family friendly fare at 10,350 ft!

OPEN FOR LUNCH Friday – Sunday, 11:00am – 4:00pm OPEN FORcasual, DINNER Thursday – Saturday, – 8:30pm Serving family friendly fare at4:00 10,350 ft! BAR OPEN daily beginning at 11:00am OPEN FOR LUNCH Friday – Sunday, 11:00am – 4:00pm For more information, call– (970) 754-4530 OPEN FOR DINNER Thursday – Saturday, 4:00 8:30pm BAR OPEN daily beginning at 11:00am vail.com

For more moreinformation, information,call call(970) (970)SKI VAIL (754 8245) 754-4530 vail.com

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take it By Brenda Himelfarb

The outdoor lifestyle isn’t limited to hiking and golfing. Come home, pour a glass of wine and sink into your favorite couch in your outdoor living space. P h oto c o u r t e s y B e r g lu n d a r c h i t e c t s

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Call it what you will:

A gazebo. Pavilion. Pergola. Grotto. Backyard. It’s all the same — a cozy, welcoming area in which to entertain or, perhaps, just sit alone and enjoy the beautiful surroundings. In essence, it’s your personal space — to share or not to share, depending upon your mood.

hese days, people are bringing the indoors out by creating outdoor rooms. Yet the “rooms” aren’t necessarily enclosed. Most have no more than one stationary wall. Some are almost full kitchens, with built-in barbecues and refrigerators. Others might have simply a fireplace or fire pit. Through thoughtful planning and imagination, all of them provide a graceful transition from indoor living to the outdoors. And the Vail Valley’s magnificent summers allow homeowners to create inviting spaces — some of which can even be enjoyed on a mild winter’s day. “The top request we get, when designing a

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new home, is to integrate outdoor living into the design,” says Hans Berglund, of Berglund Architects. “People are looking for a combination outdoor room and then some patio space. “We get the same request when doing a remodel, particularly in the old homes where, initially, there wasn’t any particular outdoor or covered space.” Kyle Webb, of KH Webb Architects of Vail, agrees. “It’s becoming the norm to have an outdoor space,” he says. “It becomes another ‘room’ in which to entertain in the summer.”


The top request we get, when designing a new home, is to integrate outdoor living into the design. People are looking for a combination outdoor room and then some patio space.

The most successful outdoor spaces are covered, for sun protection, and have a heating system for the chilly nights.

P h oto c o u r t e s y B e r g lu n d a r c h i t e c t s

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The best outdoor living spaces provide a graceful transition from the indoors to the natural world.

Be experimental with your light sources. Don’t be afraid to add new elements.

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Of course, there are many things to consider that help to make the outdoor space an extension of the home itself. It’s not just about a wall here, a fireplace there. “Because the sun is so hot here, having a covered outdoor space is really important,” says Berglund. “People need a place to get out of the sun. And also, because it gets cool at night, we often integrate infrared heaters and conceal them in the ceiling. We also incorporate a lot of outdoor fireplaces into our designs. A little warmth is a focal point.” Recently, Berglund added a screened sleeping porch to a client’s master bedroom. It is equipped with electrical that was rated for the outdoors and a stone floor, with a drain, that is lightly sloped to accommodate any water. As well, Berglund designed a big roof overhang and ran a continuous, linear drain on the outside of the room. Christian Avignon, of Avignon Stone & Outdoor Living, works closely with architects and homeowners. “We work side by side with the designers, before we begin our stonework,” Avignon says. “We’ve built a lot of spas, barbecues, fireplaces and even pizza ovens outside. Of course, there are a lot of technical pieces that have to come together before we begin our work.” At its most basic, an outdoor kitchen can be lit by torches, with food cooked on a portable grill. Most permanent installations are equipped with built-in grills, perhaps a wood-fired

oven, a refrigerator and electrical and gas hookups. Webb used granite and stainless-steel cabinets in one outdoor space. Currently he’s working on another that combines sandstone countertops, stone walls and stainlesssteel cabinets. Except for the grill, everything is going to be concealed. Like Avignon, landscape designer Maria Meilinger, president of Van Grow Landscaping, meets with the architect before her job begins. “I have to first walk the property, and check out the exposure and soil where the project will be built, explains Meilinger. “The soil is the foundation, and then you build your way up. “For instance, you should have your vegetables and herbs for cooking in your kitchen area. Your water is very important. What is the access? That is the reason I have to be involved in the beginning — in case something has to be moved during construction.” To really make your alfresco eating space stand out, keep in mind these pointers from the experts: To begin, find a focal point. This is the most important tip of all. Be experimental with your light sources. Don’t be afraid to add new elements to get the right glow for different times of the evening, perhaps vintage lights or a chandelier. But don’t go overboard to take away from the feeling of being outdoors. At the same time, have enough light so people can see one another across the table. Set up a water line —

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2 3

Before you begin, think about how you would like to use the space.

Create a focal point.

A fire-pit adds instant warmth — even when it’s not lit.

Creating your own space

4 5

Mix and match outdoor and indoor furniture. Check out garage sales and consignment stores.

Add a touch of whimsy with such things as festive string lights, tiki torches or box Asian-inspired lanterns. Consider solar lawn lights.

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Add a water element — a pond, waterfall, fountain.

Use what nature gave you.

Use what you already have; pull out that old table from the basement.

Use leftover bricks, stones or wood from other projects. Shop for “personal” accents inside your home — and place them outside.

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even if it’s just for cold water — to rinse off dishes. You can even set it up so the runoff drains into your plants. Include electronics for sound systems and for those addicted to mobile devices. Use outdoor fabrics that are solution-dyed acrylic, that will stand up to whatever out-of the-blue-Colorado-weather comes its way. Create outdoor “ceilings” with a covered trellis, a tent of material or an umbrella to help block out sun and our afternoon summer rains. Use furniture that is

water resistant. Wrought iron and teak and wicker look-alikes will last for many years. As for your kitchen set-up, having a trolley comes in very handy, as your outdoor room setting will probably be some distance from your indoor kitchen. Keep a collection of pitchers, carafes and trays around. And don’t forget the ice chest, which these days comes in a myriad of spectacular summer colors. When it comes to flower arrangements, your garden is your best form of décor say the experts. However, if your garden is not yet

matured — a plant from a local nursery will suffice. Most important, your outdoor space should be uplifting. Pick a spot and make it memorable. And if your garden is newly planted, use hefty pots and planters to add warmth. According to Meilinger, things grow very slowly here. “When you first plant a garden, you have to figure out where you want to be in three years,” she says. “I feel that after four years, the garden should take care of itself. You have good soil, you hardly have any weeds anymore, your perennials are established, and your

shrubs are doing great. “All you have to do is a minimum of soil amendment, some mulch here and there, cultivation and fertilization. The space should be where wildlife and people feel comfortable.” And, in the end, that’s exactly what your entire space should be about: being comfortable and inviting — even for the deer or marmot that might pop in every once in awhile.

Outdoor spaces should be as comfortable as those found inside. Don’t forget fresh flowers and other decorative touches.

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MOSCHINO CHEAP & CHIC

Solaris 970.479.0050

In the Sonnenalp Resort 970.476.1667


STYLE that starts outdoors and heads straight to dinner By Shauna Farnell

It doesn’t take LONG for dayS to roll into nightS in Vail, and sometimes going home or back to the hotel to change out of your hiking boots and into your dinner attire just doesn’t happen. Luckily there are plenty of garments that are comfortable and functional for playing outside that can convert into something passably elegant for an evening at a Bravo concert or a nice dinner.

PHOTO COURTESY OF GORSUCH LTD.

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( this page, from l-r ) Quinn Dress in Beluga Burst with Veeda Wrap by Prana, Metamorphose Dress by Horny Toad, available at Bag & Pack in Avon/Vail and Ptarmigan Sports in Edwards; ( previous page ) Calista Tunic, Bikini Top and Bottom by Letarte, Annabella Sandal by Brunello Cucinelli, available at Gorsuch Limited.

aybe men can get away with wearing khaki shorts all day and night, but most women — even the outdoorsy types, like to doll up. While a skirt or dress might not be your first thought for appropriate hiking attire, they are actually the trend these days … even among professional trail runners. Several outdoor brands make stretchy, breathable skirts and dresses explicitly for this purpose, allowing

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you freedom of movement. Bonus: you’re the best dressed woman on the trail and at the restaurant.

DRESSES || Lolë makes above-the-knee dresses with crossed back straps in a variety of colorful prints that are adorable for dining as well as for a day hike or walk around town. They’re made of stretchy polyester and lyrcra, and can easily be folded into a backpack

or purse for a quick change. Several shops in the valley carry Lolë, including Ptarmigan Sports in Edwards, Bag and Pack in Avon and Vail and SkiHaus in Vail Village. Horny Toad makes an incredibly light linen dress that can be easily slipped into later in the day, and Prana dresses — the No. 1 best seller at the Bag and Pack in Vail last summer — are are a soft, wrinkle-proof whisper against

the skin. Made from recycled polyester and spandex, they are perfect for playing. Prana makes a lightweight cardigan out of the same material that fits elegantly over the dress. “We get a lot of people on the way to the concerts,” says Bag & Pack Vail’s Michael Hand. “The women especially want to dress up a little bit and these were the go-to for almost everyone who came in last summer.”

( THIS SPREAD, FROM L-R ) PHOTOS COURTESY OF PR ANA / HORNY TOAD / GORSUCH LTD.


Valaria Resort Shirt and Justine Pant by Etro, Chara Sandal by Brunello Cucinelli, Deco Diamond Watch by Michele, available at Gorsuch Limited, gorsuch.com.

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Mary Todd Jacket by Parajumpers, Lori Henley, Mary Todd Short in Nectar, Mary Paisley Scarf by Etro, CSX 36 Day Watch in White by Michele, Amie Sandal by Brunello Cucinelli, available at Gorsuch Limited, gorsuch.com.

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( from l-r ) Mandala Capris in Mission Olive by Patagonia, Superstar Cycling Skirt in Black Spyro by Pearl Izumi, Kamala Skirt in Moroccan Stars by Patagonia, Flyaway II Button-Down Shirt by Lucy, available at Bag & Pack in Avon/Vail and Ptarmigan Sports in Edwards.

TOPS || Just about every

SKIRTS & CAPRIS || The

outdoor brand makes strappy tank tops that easily pair with a running skirt or capris and sandals to make for a cute evening outfit following a day in the sun. But for something a little warmer and more formal, Lucy’s Flyaway II button-down is the one item that Everson claims Ptarmigan simply “can’t keep in stock.” Lolë’s Essential Cardigan — wrinklefree — is another option for an elegant cover-up when the cool night air sets in.

beauty of a skirt or dress is that if you feel so inclined, you can wear a pair of small spandex shorts or tight boy briefs under it to prevent chafing and they provide more flexibility than heavy hiking shorts. There are a number of skirts out there that have the liners built right in. “A lot of women like the skirt because you feel girlier and more feminine. Plus, they have hidden side zippers and pockets to carry things,” Everson says. Patagonia’s Kamala skirt doubles into a dress or halter

top and Arc’teryx and Moving Comfort make simple, short, comfortable spandex running skirts. Everson says Ptarmigan’s big seller for hiking and golf capris are the Walkabouts by Lucy, form-fitting and quick-drying with an inside drawstring and flex fabric.

SKORTS || One of the most useful innovations in cycling attire in recent years, the skort is the No. 1 convertible item. As far as skirts go, ventilation might be nice while walking or hiking, but pedaling is

( THIS SPREAD, FROM L-R ) PHOTOS COURTESY OF GORSUCH LTD. / PATAGONIA / PEARL IZUMI / PATAGONIA / LUCY

a different story. For those unversed, a cycling skort consists of a pair of tight, shorter lycra shorts with a mini-skirt, made of a range of different fabrics, from stretchy spandex to cotton to polyester. A number of popular brands have jumped onto the skort bandwagon, including SheBeest, Terry, Canari, Specialized and Pearl Izumi. Local skort sellers include Vail Bike Tech, SkiHaus, Moontime Cyclery, the Kind Cyclist, Ptarmigan Sports, and Vail/Beaver Creek Sports.

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t’s amazing what a simple scarf or a nice watch can do to fancy up an outfit. The aforementioned stretchy dresses and cardigans can look outright Red Carpet-worthy if doctored up with a light linen neck scarf and a pair of heels. ¶ Messy hair can be hard to maintain from a day of playing, but a hat can look completely intentional and dressy for both men and women. Skihaus in Vail sells Wallaroo, made of straw and natural fibers. They come in both floppy and stiff brims, and deliver stylish sun protection. ¶ Bag & Pack sells Bertucci watches, originally designed for the Italian army. Made with unique cloth and woven bands, the faces are scratch-proof and classy. ¶ The active life isn’t always conducive to chunky necklaces, no matter how beautiful. Consider wearing something smaller and more sedate, or tucking a bigger “Wow” piece away in a bag or pouch to put on later. Karats in Vail has some unique and sexy jewelry, as does Betteridge, J. Cotter and Squash Blossom.

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( THIS PAGE, FROM L-R ) PHOTOS COURTESY OF WALLAROO / LOLE / BERTUCCI WATCHES / K AR ATS


( from l-r ) Zong X Eco-Tread in Black by Chaco, Sierra Strappy Wedges by Toms, Mush Mandalyn Wedge II in Liberty Black and Silver by Teva, Sonja Dress in Orchid Burst with Mindy Sunhat in Espresso by Prana, available at Bag & Pack in Avon/Vail and Ptarmigan Sports in Edwards.

SHOES || While a pair of Italian designer sandals might not last long on the trek up Vail Mountain, there are some women’s strappy outdoor sandals designed explicitly for wandering all day in the outdoors — even splashing through creeks — that also don’t look the least bit out of place on your feet under the bar stool. Teva and Chaco are at the forefront of functional sandals and are broken in

from the first time you wear them. While many are chunky with thick soles and straps, perfect for solid support for a day of light hiking, some are made more with fashion in mind — sporting a delicate strap design comfortable for a day of meandering (though maybe not uphill) but also lunch at a golf club. “Teva has a whole line that’s all about bringing together style and performance,” says

( THIS PAGE, FROM L-R ) PHOTOS COURTESY OF CHACO / TOM’S / TEVA / PR ANA

Jaime Eschette of Teva. “Even women’s sandals with thin straps are stable and made for performance.” Some of Teva’s line — the Mush models in particular — feature a stylish wedge while Chaco’s EcoTreads sport the trendy gladiator look. Ptarmigan Sports sells a number of durable sandals and also lightweight flats — like Toms, made of soft canvas and with a pair for everyone in the family that are easily

carried in a pack or purse. For every pair purchased, Toms donates a pair to a person in need in a developing country. “The Toms — you don’t want to hike in them, but they weigh nothing and travel well,” says Ptarmigan’s Kelcey Everson.” They make wedges, slide-on styles, men’s women’s and kids.’ The kids’ shoes are so darn cute …”

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( from l-r ) Short-Sleeved Beast Apollo Crewe by Icebreaker, Long-Sleeved All Stone Shirt in Alpha Green and Roving Zip-Off Pants in Rockwall by Patagonia, Acto MX Hoody in Cardinal Red by Arc’teryx, available at Bag & Pack in Avon/Vail and Ptarmigan Sports in Edwards.

et’s face it, men can get away with a lot less effort to look somewhat dressy and there are plenty of products out there to allow them to do almost nothing between their day and night wardrobe switch.

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SHIRTS || “Most of the brands we carry work well for daytime/nighttime versatility,” says Bag & Pack Avon’s Collin O’Brien. “Almost all of the button-down shirts

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have wicking fabric and UPF protection. And when it gets cooler, Arc’Teryx’s Acto jacket is a very versatile piece. You can use it for everything from hiking to technical climbing. It’s my go-to…I also wear it out to dinner.” Both O’Brien and Everson say their long-sleeve Icebreaker shirts are extremely popular among their male clientele. Made from 100-percent Merino wool, they are warm and thin, wrinkle-free and

some can even be mistaken for dressy sweaters, with V-necks and light patterns. The short and long-sleeve button-downs that are both light and comfortable for hiking and golfing can then be worn out to dinner — or even under a sports jacket for a more suave look. They come in every plain, plaid and printed style imaginable. Royal Robbins, Patagonia and Kuhl brands all specialize in the BBQ button-downs.

PANTS || Designed for flyfishing, hiking and exploring, one of the most functional convertible outdoor items on the market are the zipoff pants. Kuhl, Mountain Hardwear and Patagonia make zip-offs with fast-drying, lightweight material and a host of cargo and stash pockets. Doubling as comfortable play shorts by day, when the sun sets they can easily be mistaken for a pair of Dockers or regular dress pants.

( F R O M L- R ) P H OTO S C O U R T E S Y O F I C E B R E A K E R , PATAG O N I A , A N D A R C ’ T E R Y X


Surrounded by the White River National Forest, the Vail Valley affords many opportunities to enjoy the great outdoors. Hiking on Beaver Creek is the best of both worlds: natural beauty that’s never far from the comforts of a resort.


&

Sunshine Good Times Spa pampering, fine dining and wine-fueled stargazing make perfect companions for Rocky Mountain adventures By Traci Macnamara // Photography by Dominique Taylor

C

ame for winter, stayed for summer. It’s a common

tale in the Vail Valley. Known around the globe as a ski resort, summertime used to be an under-the-radar secret many locals kept to themselves. Not anymore, though. With produce-driven restaurants, high-end shopping and a substantial festival scene, this corner of the Rockies is a favored luxury vacation destination. But it’s still got its adventurous, play-outside roots. From hiking and biking to fly fishing or even hot air ballooning — a good, sometimes gritty, outdoor adventure makes the spa (and the photo album) that much more enjoyable.

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CYCLE AND SPA Since its debut, The Sebastian has set out to mine untapped potential in the Vail resort scene, and it does just that by offering guests adventurous outdoor opportunities wrapped into a boutique hotel and spa experience. With a full-time adventure concierge on staff in the winter and a year-round base camp located a stone’s throw away from Vail’s Vista Bahn ski lift, guests can just as easily step into heated ski boots in the winter as they can pedal away on a bike in the summer. The Sebastian took its place in the heart of Vail Village in January of 2011, and since then, it has become well known for its artsy atmosphere, fresh feel and modern sensibility. Within The Sebastian exist several smaller entities: Frost, The Sebastian’s hip cocktail bar; Block 16, its Napa-inspired restaurant; and Bloom Spa, which offers a wide range of traditional and decadent services for both men and women. The theme that connects each of The Sebastian’s unique components is outstanding customer service. The Sebastian staff demonstrates this value at a gold-standard level by striving to craft a tailored experience for each person who walks through the door.

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Jacob Bangston, for example, answers the phone “Sebastian Base Camp” from his off-site location near the Vista Bahn ski lift in the summer, and the enthusiasm in his voice doesn’t conceal the fact that he enjoys working with bikes or that he’s ready to equip any caller with the perfect fit. It’s Jacob’s job at The Sebastian Base Camp to set up people with a bike that matches their style, perhaps a cruisy road bike for meandering along Gore Creek, or one with a featherweight frame for climbing up Vail Pass, or a high-end mountain bike for tackling challenging terrain on Vail Mountain. Whether guests work up a sweat on a paved path or come down the mountain with mud splattered all over their faces, they can experience the same reward upon return: The Sebastian’s Bloom Spa. Of course, Bloom Spa offers the usual massages and facials and mani-pedis, but its Luxuriate Packages combine the best of the best. One of the Luxuriate Packages, called the Epic, begins with a deep muscle massage to alleviate tension, followed by a deluxe scalp treatment, and ends with a therapeutic pedicure to top it all off, leaving your feet ready for more pedaling.


THE SKY’S THE LIMIT If hiking, biking, and horseback riding are like appetizers leading up to your bigger outdoor adventures, here are a few more options to satisfy your appetite for summer fun.

HOT AIR BALLOONING Camelot Balloons camelotballoons.com 800.785.4743

LLAMA TREKKING Paragon Guides paragonguides.com 970.926.5299

See the Rocky Mountains as you’ve never seen them before, floating above Colorado’s high country in a hot air balloon.

Hike with professional guides and llamas that can carry the extra bottle of wine or bar of chocolate you can’t fit in your pack.

RAFT TRIPS & JEEP TOURS Timberline Tours timberlinetours.com 970.390.4481 Sit back and enjoy the ride on a raft or in a jeep with guides who know the area’s history, flora and fauna. Ask for pre-arranged gourmet snacks, including cheese and wine, for a true gourmand’s adventure.

P H OTO: th i n k s to c k .c o m

CATTLE ROUND UP Triple G Outfitters at 4 Eagle Ranch TripleG.net 970.926.1234 Giddy-up. Experience the Old West and be a city slicker on Triple G’s daily cattle roundups at 4 Eagle Ranch.

PARAGLIDING Vail Valley Paragliding vailvalleyparagliding.com 970.845.7321 Get a bird’s-eye view of the Vail Valley on a tandem paragliding flight and have an experience you’ll never forget. Cameras welcome, but don’t drop them.

FLY FISHING Gore Greek Fly Fisherman gorecreekflyfisherman.com 970.476.3296 Go on a guided fishing trip or participate in free casting clinics at locations in Vail, Avon and Bachelor Gulch.

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Hiking and biking make the treat at the end that much better. Take advantage of the alfresco options and order a little something, such as crab cakes and sangria at the Beaver Creek Chophouse.


HIKE AND DINE For those who prefer to adventure on foot, Beaver Creek’s hiking center offers organized, scheduled hikes every day of the week, and its professional guides also lead private, customized trips. If you’re the type of hiker who likes to have a clear goal or final destination in mind, plenty of inspiring options exist. Whether you’d like to reach the top of one of Colorado’s 14,000-foot peaks or hike from Beaver Creek over to Wolfgang Puck’s Spago restaurant at The Ritz-Carlton in Bachelor Gulch, the hiking center can help you get there. Embracing Beaver Creek resort’s “Not Exactly Roughing It” tagline, the Beaver Creek hiking center is prepared to equip guests with what they need to have a comfortable outdoor experience. All hikes and tours include transportation, a professional guide, demo equipment (including backpacks, boots and poles), rain gear, snacks and water. Beyond that, the hiking center can also accommodate a variety of special requests, such as providing picnic lunches or additional outdoor equipment. For those who want a more decadent treat at trail’s end, head back into the village and relax on the deck of one of the many restaurants located there. The Beaver Creek Chophouse has a prime location at the base of the mountain, with patio seating, mountain views and a lawn that affords bocce and other games; try some sangria and a crab cake. Even though the hiking center is located in Beaver Creek Village, its excursions extend on foot from Beaver Creek Mountain to the Eagles Nest, Holy Cross and Collegiate Peaks Wilderness areas. And some exciting hike-and-dine events this summer allow hikers to combine their love for

the outdoors with a love of food, friends and philanthropy. On July 8, the Vail Valley Foundation kicks off its inaugural Trek to Table event, which benefits the art, athletic and educational missions of the Vail Valley Foundation. Hikers will work up an appetite on a nine-mile hike on Arrowhead and Beaver Creek Mountains, following routes of varying difficulty. Along the way, they’ll have the opportunity to snack and dine at prestigious private-cabin restaurants, including Broken Arrow Restaurant for breakfast, Zach’s Cabin for refreshments, Beano’s Cabin for lunch, and Allie’s Cabin for an après-hike snack. Those who enjoy this event will want to mark their calendars for the fourth annual Hike, Wine, & Dine event in Beaver Creek on September 23, which benefits Jack’s Place, a cancer caring house, and the Shaw Regional Cancer Center. This hike of less than five miles begins at Beaver Creek’s Centennial Lift (after mimosas and coffee at the Park Hyatt in Beaver Creek) and allows hikers to taste-test foods from some favorite local restaurants along the way, including Splendido at the Chateau, Grouse Mountain Grill, The Dusty Boot, and The Osprey. The hike finishes on the Chophouse lawn, with music, crab cakes and dessert from Rimini. With the help of the Beaver Creek hiking center, you can plan your own itinerary any day of the week from Beaver Creek village to fine-dining endpoints in the nearby Bachelor Gulch or Arrowhead communities. And with the Beaver Creek Dial-A-Ride on-call shuttle service for Beaver Creek property owners and guests, you’ll always have a way to get safely back to your starting point.

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RELAX AND RIDE Finally, if you’re all hiked and biked out, the nearby Bearcat Stables can guide you on a horseback ride through wideopen meadows full of wildflowers this summer, where you’re likely to encounter calving elk in the early season or see the first aspen leaves turn gold in the fall. All horseback rides at Bearcat Stables depart from the Bearden Homestead on Squaw Creek Road near Edwards. For those who have limited time or are horseback novices, one-hour beginner rides are available; but for those who want an advanced, backcountry experience, Bearcat Stables offers several overnight and multi-day horseback trips, including a four-day guided Vail-to-Aspen hut trip. Nights on the trip are spent in 10th Mountain Division huts and private guest ranches, which offer nearly all of the comforts of home in the middle of the wilderness. And if you’d like more than the comforts that even your own home can provide, the Lodge and Spa at Cordillera is only a seven-minute shuttle ride away from Bearcat Stables. So when you step off of a horse feeling dusty or sore, you can step right into a facility that has a 20,000-square-foot spa, daily yoga classes and a heated outdoor pool, all tucked into one of the most

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spectacular Rocky Mountain vistas you can imagine. The Lodge and Spa at Cordillera stands out from a relaxation perspective because it’s more secluded than other accommodations situated on the valley floor. It’s perched on a mountaintop that overlooks the Vail Valley and Sawatch Range and is surrounded by panoramic mountain views. The location gives the place the feel of a retreat, even though it’s only 10 miles away from Beaver Creek and 15 miles from Vail Village. A fire pit burns at night on the deck of the Lodge and Spa at Cordillera’s outdoor pool, where you can relax and enjoy complimentary s’mores with your friends. The patio juts out into its surroundings, and stars shine brightly in the clear Colorado night sky. From this vantage point, it’s possible to soak up some long overdue stress relief, and at the same time, dream up your next great adventure. For more information: The Sebastian, 970.477.8000, thesebastianvail.com; Beaver Creek Hiking Center, 970.754.5373, beavercreek.com/the-mountain/hiking-summer.aspx; Bearcat Stables, 970.926.1578, bearcatstables.com; The Lodge & Spa at Cordillera, 970.926.2200, cordilleralodge.com


ATRUE WESTERN EXPERIENCE     

PRCA Pro Rodeo Live Music Carnival Rides Games & Contests Public Exhibits

eaglecounty.us/fairrodeo


Palisade peaches are one of Colorado’s premier summer ingredients, which is why local chefs look forward to paying homage to the juicy gems

Dre By Caramie Schnell

Peach


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Cocktail courtesy of vin48, Avon

Palisade Rye Smash The lush mint growing in the herb garden in front of vin48 in Avon inspired Greg Eynon to create this cocktail. “I was thinking about what I would like to drink sitting on our patio on a warm summer night looking up at the mountains,” says Eynon, co-owner of vin48. 2 slices Palisade peach 3 sprigs mint 1 slice raw ginger 1½ ounces Michter’s rye whiskey ½ ounce sherry Ginger beer Soda water Muddle peach, mint and ginger in shaker with all ingredients except ginger beer and soda. Double strain into ice-filled Collins glass. Fill with equal parts ginger beer and soda water. Garnish with fresh mint.

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First Course courtesy of Sweet Basil, Vail

Grilled Palisade peaches with local baby lettuce, Maytag blue cheese “snow,” cracked cashews and herb-infused port-wine vinaigrette Grilling the Palisade peaches for this salad takes out some of the fruit’s inherent sweetness, says Executive Chef Paul Anders. “It adds this little smoky, charred element that’s unexpected and gives it a different element of depth,” he says. the lettuce Figure 1 to 1 ½ ounces of greens per person. Use locally grown lettuce; we like sturdy ones such as baby green and red romaine, tango, lola rosa, deer tongue, red oak, etc. the peaches Split 4 to 6 large peaches in half, and remove the pit. Very lightly toss the peaches in vegetable oil to prevent sticking. Grill the peaches flesh side down over a

very hot grill until they are well charred. Transfer to a bowl, and allow the peaches to cool and continue cooking. Once they are cool, cut the peaches into thick wedges or large chunks to be tossed with the salad. Some liquid will come out of the peaches; allow them to soak in that juice until you are ready to use them. This may be done a day ahead of time. the blue cheese snow Wrap 2 ounces firm blue cheese, such as Maytag, in plastic wrap very tightly, and place in the freezer and allow the cheese to get completely frozen; it’s best to do this the day before. Using a microplane, grate the frozen cheese over each salad to form a pile of “snow.” the cashews Toss a ¼ pound of raw cashews in walnut or vegetable oil, and place on a sheet pan. Salt the nuts very well, and toast in a 350-degree oven until they are very well browned and fragrant. Make sure to rotate the pan and recipe continued on next page

f r o m l e f t: P H OTO s by d o m i n i q u e tay lo r & c o u r t e s y o f s w e e t b a s i l

from the second the farmers markets set up shop in towns up and down our valley, fruit growers are peppered with questions about when the Colorado orchard queens will arrive. For some fruit fanatics, summer is about the search for the perfect peach. And according to fifth-generation farmer Dennis Clark, of Clark Family Farms, you shouldn’t have to think too hard. “The perfect peach is the last one you ate,” he says. Like his children, Clark can’t — or won’t — name a favorite. “I just can’t do it. ... They all taste different and all have a little different flavor,” says Clark, who has been eating peaches his whole life. His family has grown peaches in Palisade going on 115 years now. He sells fruit to a few restaurants in Eagle County and, for the past seven years, brings his justpicked produce to local farmers markets in Eagle, Edwards and Vail each week during the summer. On his 100 acres of orchards, Clark grows other stone fruits — cherries, apricots, plums and pears — but it’s the peaches that reign supreme. A queen fit for a queen, seeing as Palisade peaches have been shipped to England’s royal family on special occasions, such as when the Broncos played the 49ers in London in 2010, Clark says. The history of the juicy gems dates back more than a century. The first peach trees were planted on Colorado’s Western Slope in 1883, and the first Palisade Peach Festival was held in 1895. William Jennings Bryan might have been the guest speaker that first year, but it was the peaches that stole the show. Handed out for free to some 10,000 people in attendance, the peaches were hailed as “big and fair and fat.” S U M M E R 2 012 G VAIL LUXURY

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So what makes them such? “I would say it’s our altitude, our fresh Colorado water, and we’re in the high desert, so our hot days and cool nights have a lot to do with it,” Clark says. “Nestled in a great little valley here, around the foothills, it’s just premium area to grow Colorado fruit.” While the terroir — literally, the dirt — is mostly sandy loam soil, rich in minerals and with good drainage, it’s that microclimate that Clark and other farmers like to talk about when you ask them why their peaches taste so darn good. The Western Slope’s hot summer days intensify the peach sugars and the flavors. Paired with the cool, dry nights, it’s the perfect growing environment for fruit trees. Sure, you’ve probably heard about Georgia peaches or even New Jersey peaches. And, of course, California ships the most peaches in the entire country, but as with most things, there’s the issue of quality versus quantity. “Our claim to fame is Palisade grows the world’s best-tasting peach,” Clark says. Even in the early 1900s, Palisade peaches were shipped to New York City and other farflung locales and “were known to be the finest in the world,” he says. His customers agree. Last summer, Clark came home from a long, sweaty day in the orchards to a message on his answering machine. “I had a phone call last year, right as we were into first peaches, from two women who’d never had a Palisade peach,” Clark says. “It was extreme jubilation. Screaming into the phone, they said they’d never eaten anything better. They were headed to Denver, but they were turning around to come back and buy some more. That makes the end of a long, hot day a lot more enjoyable; it puts a smile on your face.”

Love at first peach Paul Anders, the executive chef at Sweet Basil in Vail, still remembers the first Palisade peach he ate. Anders and his wife moved from Southern California to Colorado — initially to Denver — a dozen years ago, and they’d just crossed the ColoradoUtah border when they stopped to fill up the gas tank in Fruita, near Palisade. “We saw a farm stand on a corner and went over to get some fruit,” Anders says. “I didn’t know anything about Palisade peaches then. I was literally driving a U-Haul trailer and bit into a peach; it was one of those amazing experiences where the juice ran straight down my arm and was flying everywhere. I inhaled the thing. It was so good, so juicy, and it blew me away. Before I moved here, in a million years I would never have thought there’d be great peaches in Colorado. It’s one of those unique, unexpected Colorado things.” Zino Executive Chef Nick Haley grew up eating Canadian peaches. He’d bake peach rhubarb pies with his grandmother and remembers the sweet-and-sour flavors that got his tastebuds dancing. For the past six years, he’s been cooking with Palisade peaches, which he thinks are made superior by one key thing. “Having the opportunity to get peaches that are ripened on the tree, rather than ripened unnaturally, you get a whole other product,” Haley says. “You get a good consistency of juiciness and texture, and you don’t ever get that mealy effect. The people out here know what they’re doing and always pick them ripe.” This summer, Haley is slicing the peaches very thin and layering them on a white pizza with prosciutto, gorgonzola, fresh sage and aged balsamic. And

It was extreme jubilation. Screaming into the phone, they said they’d never eaten anything better. They were headed to Denver, but they were turning around to come back and buy some more.”

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the nuts several times while they are toasting. Allow the nuts to cool down. Once they are cool, roughly chop the cashews into smaller “cracked” pieces. The Vinaigrette 3 cloves garlic, smashed 2 large shallots, roughly chopped ½ stalk celery, roughly chopped ¼ of carrot, rough chopped 1 ½ teaspoons black peppercorns ¾ teaspoon coriander ¼ teaspoon fennel seed ¼ teaspoon juniper berry ¾ teaspoon pink peppercorns 1 bay leaf ¼ cup parsley ¾ cup port 1 cup red wine Reduce by two thirds on the stove. Strain and cool; set aside. ½ cups red wine vinegar 2 shallots, brunoise ¾ teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon honey ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil ¾ cup blend oil Blend the port/red wine reduction with the above six ingredients, and season with salt and pepper, as needed. If you prefer it to be a little sweeter, add more honey as desired. the presentation Place the lettuces in a large mixing bowl. Toss lightly with ¼ of a red onion, julienned fine, the peaches, about ¾ to 1 ounce of the dressing per salad/ person, sea salt and cracked black pepper. Place the salad in the center of a chilled salad plate. Top with the cracked cashews, and grate a large pile of the blue cheese snow over the salad. _ serves 8

P H OTO c o u r t e s y o f s w e e t b a s i l . B ot to m ph oto by j u s t i n M c c a r t y


Peach varieties Early varieties (peaking July 20 - Aug. 10) Red Haven, Flavor Crest, Flaming Fury and Garnet Beauties. Mid-summer (Aug. 10 - Aug. 25) Red Globe, Sun Crest, Crest Haven, Topaz, Rosa and Blushing Star. late summer (Aug. 25 - Sept. 10) Elberta, Redskin and Hale. The late-fall crop (Available through Oct. 15) O’Henry, Ryan Sun, Autumn Flame and September Sun.

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lightly grilled Palisade peaches will serve as the crown atop Zino’s housemade fettuccine with slow-cooked pork ragu. Growing up outside of Buffalo, N.Y., Allana Smith, the director of operations at Larkspur, grew up eating New York state peaches year-round — fresh in the summer and the ones her grandmother canned all winter. She encountered Palisade peaches for the first time after taking a position as a pastry chef at Larkspur in 1999. “The furthest west I’d come before that was Chicago. Good peaches, to me, came from the South: Georgia peaches,” Smith says. “The farmers came around with Palisade peaches, and I remember being shocked. They were bigger and juicer and even sweeter. They look like they’re on steroids, probably because the farmers are pruning the trees more.” That, and not growing so many that quality is lost, she says. “They need the product that’s practically going to glow at the market,” she says. “And that’s beautiful, big, fat, juicy, sweet peaches.”

Pig and peach

Even in the early 1900s, Palisade peaches were shipped to New York City and other far-flung locales, and were known to be the finest in the world.

This summer, Larkspur will showcase grilled Palisade peach slices next to another beloved ingredient: Jamón ibérico, a thinly sliced, cured ham from Spain that oftentimes sells for close to $100 per pound, mostly because it’s quite hard to get. It was banned in the United States by the Food & Drug Administration and only started to be imported in 2007. “There’s nothing you can get that’s like it,” says Larkspur Chef-Owner Thomas Salamunovich. “It is that ingredient — so elite, so rustic, so incredibly expensive.” Because of the pig’s higher fat content — the black-hooved animals eat a diet rich in acorns — the meat can cure longer. It’s aged at minimum for 12 months and sometimes as long as four years. In the 100

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end, the fat has a sweet flavor that, when paired with the salt quality of the meat, is “ridiculously sublime,” Salamunovich says. Larkspur will serve lightly caramelized peach slices with ultra-thin ribbons of ham and some other Spanish accoutrements: Marcona almonds, small peppers stuffed with housemade requesón cheese (a soft Spanish cheese similar to ricotta), crispy croutons and a drizzle of olive oil. A spritz of viognier, a Spanish white wine that complements peach flavors, completes the experience. “That will engulf the guest in the mist, and it becomes this whole sensory experience,” Salamunovich says. “They’ll have that moment where their eyes roll up into their head, their shoulders raise and they inhale. It’s that moment where food has gone from the brain to the heart, and to me, that’s the best experience of all.” The adjectives used to describe Palisade peaches vary as much as the ways chefs use the sweet stone fruits in kitchens across the valley. But when it comes to Colorado’s orchard queen, the truly perfect peach is the last one you devoured. So go on, it’s time to begin the quest.

Entree courtesy of Zino Ristorante, Edwards

Fettuccine with slowcooked pork ragu, San Marzano tomatoes, grilled Palisade peaches and shaved parmigiano

Ragu 1 pound ground pork butt 3 to 4 peaches ½ cup diced onions 4 cloves chopped garlic 4 cups diced San Marzano tomatoes 2 cups red wine 3 sprigs thyme 1 sprig rosemary 3 bay leaves 1 cup milk ½ cup Parmesan reggiano 1 cup stock (vegetable, chicken or beef) Salt and pepper Pasta 1 pound durum flour 3 whole eggs 3 egg yolks Dice onions, chop garlic, and set them aside. Take a large pot and place on high heat, and add a small amount of oil. Once the pot starts to smoke, add pork, and brown for 5 minutes.

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Dessert courtesy of Larkspur, Vail

Palisade peaches and cream cannoli

Add diced garlic and onions, and saute. While sauteeing the garlic and onions, tie your thyme, rosemary and bay leaf together, and then add to the pot. Add red wine; when reduced by half, add your diced San Marzano tomatoes. Cook for 30 minutes on low. Add stock and milk, and return to heat for 30 minutes. Add salt and pepper. Top the dish with peaches that have been grilled, de-skinned and diced. Make the pasta Heap the flour, and make a well in it. Break the eggs into the well. Beat eggs with a fork. Stir into the flour from the bottom of the well with the fork until the dough in the center is smooth or shiny. With your hands, gradually incorporate the flour from the outside of the well toward the center, kneading gently until the mass of dough comes together. Knead the dough until it is smooth. Depending on the humidity and the size of the eggs, you may need to add or take out flour. If the dough is sticky or extremely pliable, knead more flour into it. Divide the dough into three portions, cover with plastic wrap or an overturned bowl, and allow to rest for at least 30 minutes. Roll the dough out very thin on a lightly floured surface, one portion at a time. Cook pasta for 3 to 4 minutes in salted water. Drain pasta, and toss with pork ragu. Finish with fresh diced peaches and shaved Parmesan reggiano.

Mark Metzger, Larkspur’s executive pastry chef, may have grown up eating New Jersey peaches, but the New York transplant says he now prefers Palisade peaches because of the fruit’s “perfect balance of acid and sugar.” “I love them,” he says. “I get excited about them every summer.” Likewise, Metzger also grew up eating cannolis, a pastry dessert that originated in Sicily. “It’s just one of those nostalgic desserts I grew up on,” he says. “Everyone served them — all the Italian delis had them in the windows. And you can find them here and there in Colorado, but they’re never what they should be.”

Cannoli shells 4 cups sifted all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons sugar ¼ teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons butter, softened 2 egg yolks ¾ cup white wine 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 egg mixed with 2 tablespoons water for egg wash Oil for frying 6 cannoli forms 3-inch round pastry cutter 1 pastry bag fitted with a mid-sized round pastry tip Preheat 4 cups of oil for frying to 350 degrees. The oil must be deep enough to completely submerge the cannoli form and shells. Mix flour, sugar and salt in a large bowl. Add egg yolks; stir with a fork. Stir in wine and vanilla, 1 tablespoon at a time, with a fork

until dough clings together. Form a ball with the dough, and let stand for 60 minutes covered in plastic wrap. Roll dough almost paper thin on a well-floured surface. Using a 3-inch ring cutter, cut dough into circles, form the dough around metal cannoli forms, and seal the overlap with the egg wash. Fry the shells on the forms at 350 degrees until golden, about 3 to 4 minutes. Allow the shell to cool on a dry towel, and remove from the form. Fry the shell without the form again for 1 minute. Remove the shell from the oil, and drain on a towel. Allow the shells to cool completely. Filling 2 cups ricotta impastata (or low-moisture ricotta strained in cheesecloth) 1 cup mascarpone cheese 4 ounces sugar ¼ teaspoon ground clove 1 tablespoon vanilla extract Zest of one lime 2 Palisade peaches, peeled and diced 4 ounces heavy cream In mixing bowl, add first six ingredients and mix until just combined. Add diced peaches, and mix until distributed through the cream. Scrape the sides of the bowl. Finish with the heavy cream, and mix until combined. Place the filling in a pastry bag fitted with a medium round pastry tip. Pipe the filling into the cannoli shell from both sides to fill the tube, and serve. _ Yields 12 S U M M E R 2 012 G VAIL LUXURY

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just breathe Sit back, relax, and enjoy some pampering // By Vail Luxury Staff


Sonnenalp Spa

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Sometimes the best thing to do is absolutely nothing. And if that “nothing� includes lying back and submitting yourself to the capable hands of a massage therapist or esthetician, then things get even better. In the Vail Valley, we ask a lot of our bodies: hiking, biking, golfing, rafting. But we also know how to take care of them. The local spa scene is rich and diverse, with services that aim to make you look and feel healthy, happy and lucky.

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Spa Anjali

The Westin Riverfront Resort and Spa, Avon

Nobody paid much attention to the Eagle River running through Avon until The Westin built its resort using it, and Beaver Creek, as the backdrop. That mountain vision isn’t simply a view — it’s an essential theme for the entire property. At Spa Anjali, on the pool level, they’ve organized their services to be a selection of three mountain experiences: The Rocky Mountain Journey calls on Native American tradition, all based on products native to the area; the Alpen Journey focuses on rich European remedies such as mud, flower essence, aromatherapy and water therapies; and the Himalayan Journey is rooted in Ayurvedic practices which tailors treatments based on an individual’s Dosha, or constitution. Though the exotic is always seductive — a rhythmic Abhyanga oil massage, followed by an Indian head massage, certainly makes an impression — it’s lovely to sink into an experience that is a jubilant expression of the here and now. And there’s no better way than with the Ponderosa Pine Therapy treatment. “It’s wonderful after a hike or skiing,” explains Erin Sehnal, spa director. “It alleviates tension and stress.” Though it has components of massage, it’s considered a body treatment. Guests are ushered into a massage room complete with candles and a musky, herbal scent. Taylre Derby, or any of the spa’s welltrained therapists, will place a heated poultice against your skin. The poultice is filled with Ponderosa pine, aimed at reducing inflammation; sage, which is good for clearing the energy; and lavender, a soothing and calming herb. It’s a little sack, almost like an enormous teabag, and the therapist first heats and then works it into an area for a while. After the muscle has been warmed, she’ll then dig in with her hands and work on stretching it out. It’s the sort of experience where

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you know you’re getting some real work done. Afterwards, you won’t want to shower despite the faint sheen of oil on your skin, because the scent is intoxicating. It’s not one of perfume but something more essential than that. And your body will feel completely loose. For those wanting a facial, Amy Young and her team of estheticians have many different options. In keeping with the mountain journeys, there’s an Ayurvedic Facial that works for all skin types. But even the basic Spa Anjali Facial is customized for each guest. Before any treatment, make sure you arrive with plenty of time to utilize the amenities, which include a beautiful saline outdoor pool and infinity hot tubs. And relax, knowing that the spa is “green,” and is the first LEEDS-certified spa in the Valley. It was also named the No. 4 resort spa in North America by Conde Nast Traveler. —Wren Wertin

Sonnenalp Spa

Sonnenalp Resort, Vail Village

Filled with sunshine and a peaceful ambiance, the Sonnenalp Spa is the kind of place you can go after a hard day (or in the middle of one) to feel good about yourself, your fellow humans, and the world you live in. “I want our guests to have a transformational experience,” says John Breslin, spa director. “I want them to walk over the threshold into my spa, and then float out.” Somehow he gets away with saying things like this, probably because he means them. His staff gets to the heart of authentic customer service: They like people and are glad to be there. With an oxygen bar, wet lounges, outdoor whirlpools, steam room and sauna, it’s easy to get lost in relaxation. The Sonnenalp has all the traditional spa offerings — fa-

cials, massage, body scrubs — but, in what has become a competitive industry, it’s not just the service that distinguishes this spa. Breslin is passionate about maintaining a balance between internal and external health. As the body’s largest organ, the skin oftentimes is the messenger of what’s going on inside. And so many of the spa’s treatments are conducive to helping the body heal itself. Acutonics (treatments using tuning forks on acupuncture points to help balance the body internally), Rejuvalight (a light that helps with collagen and elastin production) and Facial Soundscapes (sound and vibration therapy that’s integrated within a facial) are all worth investigating. But it’s the HydraFacial that you’ll want to start with. Plan on getting addicted to it. The HydraFacial uses a fancy machine that delivers a painless, results-driven facial through a wand fitted with a vortex brush. It feels a little like a fingernail moving over the skin as it first cleanses, then exfoliates. But it’s the one-two punch of extractions and a nearly simultaneous infusion of moisturizing serums that really distinguishes the process. The wand easily sucks out any congestion, and then replaces it with true hydration that penetrates the dermis layer. It’s good for helping with pore size, reducing capillaries and sunspots, as well as evening skin tone and texture. For delivering such ambitious results, it’s amazingly gentle. The skin feels plump and hydrated — and you’ll glow. “We recommend it on your wedding day, before your photos,” Breslin says. “That’s how gentle it is.” —Wren Wertin

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Four Seasons Spa Four Seasons, vail

The Four Seasons brand is synonymous with luxury, which is why it’s no surprise that the Four Seasons Vail has a spa that transcends even the highest of expectations. It’s the Four Seasons, and it’s in Vail — need I say more? The spa treatments at the Four Seasons Vail cater to the surrounding environment. Skin treatments are custom-designed to focus on skin hydration because of the dry Rocky Mountain climate. Massages cater to active residents and visitors whose worked muscles need soothing. Even the heated pool is treated with saline, which is better for the skin. If you’re a traditionalist and always go for a Swedish massage, step out of your comfort zone and go for the Vail River Stone massage, which uses warmed river stones and evergreen-infused oil. Unlike deep-tissue massages that can border on painful, this massage is pure pleasure — yet it still

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accomplishes tension release in both the muscles and the mind. At points throughout the treatment, it’s hard to tell whether the therapist is using her hands or the stones — they have a surprising resemblance to a human touch. The spa also offers a special skier’s massage featuring sports therapy techniques, a high-altitude adjustment massage that focuses on easing high altitude symptoms, as well as therapeutic, Swedish, maternity and reflexology massages. The mountain lifestyle is incorporated throughout each treatment, and nowhere is it more soothing than in the Four Seasons Ginseng facial. If your skin feels even slightly rough or in need of some love, this is the facial that will restore it back to life. The esthetician begins by cleansing the skin, and follows with exfoliation, steam, massage, extractions and a cool, purifying ginseng mask. This facial removes

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all of the dead, dry skin and replaces it with a healthy glow — it is a must for anyone in need of a quality facial. Other facials include the Mountain Man, designed for active men, High-Altitude Repair, Alpine Quench and Oxygen Rejuvenation, to name a few. When your treatments are over, be sure to save enough time to enjoy the sanctuary featuring a beautiful whirlpool, modern sauna and eucalyptus steam room — the pampering doesn’t have to end when the treatments are over. —Lauren glendenning

The Spa at Arrabelle Arrabelle at Vail Square, Lionshead

A spa that will do whatever it takes to help its customers relax is a fine spa indeed, and the Arrabelle spa is certainly that. During one visit a spa attendant delivered a recent bride and her friends a bottle of champagne from the hotel’s restaurant — something that wasn’t offered on the menu, but proof that going above and beyond for spa guests is no problem. The gesture was appreciated, especially because once you’re in the spa and enjoying the whirlpool — or sim-

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ply melting into the lounge chairs next to it — you can’t be bothered to get up to fetch a glass of champagne. The Arrabelle spa is all about pampering. The minute you step out of your clothes and into a plush RockResorts robe, the tantalizing experience begins. The spa, which has a separate entrance from the hotel, features 11 treatment rooms, which includes two facial rooms, six massage rooms, a Swiss shower room and a couple’s suite with a private soaking tub. Opened in 2008, the 10,000-square-foot Arrabelle spa is modern and new, featuring a rustic décor with rich textures and beautiful woods. What all of that accomplishes is a welcoming, cozy and inviting feeling, as if you’re the only person there that day. The spa somehow manages to feel this way even as you see other guests float by in their robes — it’s as if they’re not even there. Let the indulgence continue with one of the spa’s signature treatments, the Vin Chaud (hot wine) Indulgence, a 105-minute full body treatment of pure joy. The treatment begins with body cream and hydrating oil, followed by a full-body “vino-therapy massage,” which is rich in antioxidant wine extracts and aromas such as mango, holly, cherry and cinnamon. Then, a mini-facial completes the experi-


ence, followed by a glass of wine, of course. Other body treatments include the Alpine Glow, which focuses on hydration and tension relief, and the Sports Enthusiast Body Recovery, for those looking for relief from muscle stress and soreness after skiing, hiking, biking or any other mountain activity that can take its physical toll. The Arrabelle’s facial treatments offer nourishment to the skin, leaving it glowing and radiant. The signature facial, the Antioxidant Glow, uses an exfoliating mask, antioxidant age-repair serums and moisturizers. This is a facial for those looking for pure relaxation combined with skin rejuvenation. The Arrabelle offers stone massages, prenatal treatments and even a couple’s escape for side-by-side bliss. —Lauren glendenning

The Spa at Vail Mountain Lodge Vail Mountain Lodge, Vail Village

Case in point is the Thai Herbal Poultice Therapy, where steamed herbal poultices filled with fragrant ginger, lime and turmeric are pressed and rhythmically rolled into the muscles. Followed by a deep massage, the treatment melts away any soreness, stiffness or inflammation. If you’re looking for results you can see as well as feel then try the Radiant Vitality facial, a medical-grade Diamondtome microdermabrasion treatment with ultrasound serum penetration. This facial manages to feel luxurious and relaxing despite its harsh terminology. “The skin is refreshed and polished,” says Sally Peterson, an esthetician who has worked at the spa for nearly a quarter of a century now. “Their skin looks like a pearl. All that dead skin is taken off, and beautiful products are infused with the ultrasound. Their skin is beautiful, alive and refreshed.” While the facemask works its wonders, there’s a hand, arm and foot massage during the treatment, which ends with a neck, shoulder, scalp and face massage. No wonder your whole body feels pampered afterward. —caramie schnell

The Spa at Vail Mountain Lodge is cozy and quiet, nearly oozing with relaxation. Curl up in the sunny solarium room stocked with magazines, books, snacks (including fresh fruit and homemade energy bars from Terra Bistro) and hot tea before your treatment. Gaze through the floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking Gore Creek and prepare to visit your happy place. Lisa DeKoster, the longtime spa director of The Spa at Vail Mountain Lodge, takes the approach that every treatment offered is not only relaxing, but also holistic and therapeutic, contributing to the overall health of the client. That’s also the frame of reference the spa’s main product line, Dr. Hauschka, subscribes to as well: Each ingredient — most of which are organically grown or wild-harvested — serves a specific purpose.

P H OTO s c o u r t e s y o f f o u r s e a s o n s , T h e s pa at Va i l M o u n ta i n Lo d g e & th e s pa at a r r a b e l l e

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Allegria Spa

Park Hyatt, Beaver Creek

When you walk into Allegria Spa in the Park Hyatt, it’s easy to tell that some sort of serene and beautiful experience awaits — you just don’t know what. Change into a swimsuit or robe, walk through the doors and enter the Aqua Sanitas Water Sanctuary, based on early Roman spa traditions. It begins with a co-ed mineral pool — warm soaking temperature, conducive to sitting back and relaxing for as long as you like. From there, head into the men’s or women’s sides where you’ll find a caldarium pool, rain showers, scented sauna and a heated lounge. Outside are six outdoor Jacuzzis that sit on Beaver Creek Mountain, as well as a pool with an extensive patio area. Instead of making a spa day one about solitude, Allegria’s extensive common areas and three couple’s treatment rooms make it something you can share. “Allegria is rooted in the products and experiences of Colorado,” says Gaye Steinke, the spa’s general manager. “Having said that, there are similarities to

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the mountainous regions of Europe, such as the Alps. The aromatherapy component is a European tradition. Scented oils can be invigorating, and more uplifting.” The spa’s signature scent is ginger peach, a nod to Colorado’s famous peaches. And the Ginger Peach Cure is a full-scale experience. Peach scents are combined with ground ginger, orange peel, raw sugar and jojoba oil, followed by a Swiss shower, which has 12 shower nozzles. Of course, it’s followed by a full-body massage, which deeply hydrates the newly buffed skin. Allegria offers wonderful facials, thanks in part to lead esthetician Victoria Mastrogiovanni’s extensive experience. Just as botanists can tell what’s going on inside a flower by looking at it, Mastrogiovanni knows what’s happening inside a person. She reads skin, and can respond accordingly. Whether you need to soothe and pamper it or opt for something more specific and goal oriented, she will know. One of the most popular treatments is the Oxygen Facial, available as a 30-minute boost or a 75-minute extravaganza. “The Intraceuticals system uses oxygen as a carrier for their antioxidant serum, through a hand-held device attached to an oxygen concentrator, that diffuses a cocktail of vitamins plus green tea and a low molecular weight Hyaluronic Acid (a humectant) to ‘plump’ up fine lines, firm and refresh the skin,” says Mastrogiovanni. Oxygen boosts can be combined with other treatments such as microdermabrasion, skin peels, laser and cosmetic injections. It’s a great option before special events — and many celebrities agree. —Wren wertin


RockResorts Spa The Lodge at Vail, Vail Village

Coffee is good for more than your early morning wake-me-up. At the RockResorts Spa at The Lodge at Vail, the organic coffee body scrub includes a rub down with a scrub made with the prized beans, sea kelp and pumice to exfoliate your skin. The treatment invigorates your body, and might even help unsightly cellulite, given the anti-cellulitic properties both coffee and sea kelp have naturally. The scent of coffee, vanilla and a touch of citrusy grapefruit envelops the room during this popular treatment. The scrub is made by Uspa, an Australian company that makes holistic products using therapeutic plant extracts. After the skin-tingling scrub down, rinse off in a warm bath in the large stone tub a few feet away before climbing back on the table. Uspa also makes the sweetsmelling tangerine and rose dry oil (a combination of macadamia nut, camellia and jojoba oils and tangerine and rose essential oils) the therapist applies next.

P H OTO s c o u r t e s y o f Ro c k R e s o r t s Spa & A l l e g r i a Spa

If you’re craving a good massage, opt to let longtime therapist and spa employee Sunny Koch work her muscle-melting magic. Her hands know how to make the experience as relaxing as it is therapeutic (that is to say, knot-busting). After your treatment, enjoy a different sort of sensory bliss — that of cold coconut sorbet on your tongue. Along with the customary glass of water, therapists also greet you with a cool washcloth and a scoop of the creamy, sweet treat, which you can enjoy in front of the fireplace in the co-ed lounge. The spa, which has been open for four years now, is intimate despite its large size — 7,725 square feet (including the fitness complex and movement studio) and 11 treatment rooms, including the couple’s massage room where a large stone soaking tub, big enough for a soak for two, is stationed in front of a cozy gas fireplace. Art lovers will appreciate the well-culled selection of sculptures, paintings and mixed media pieces scattered throughout the spa. And be sure and arrive early, or stay late, to soak in the whirlpool or relax in the steam room or sauna. —Caramie schnell

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Bird’s-eye view Chefs prepare one of many courses for an Outstanding in the Field dinner at Copper Bar Ranch in Edwards. The culinary adventure featured fruits, vegetables, lamb and beef from the Vail Valley. Photography by Dominique Taylor

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