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King Soopers in line for overhaul City OKs incentives; final call will be made by corporate By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@ourcoloradonews. com Littleton City Council is prepared to give King Soopers $500,000 in incentives to turn the store at Littleton Boulevard and Broadway into the twin of its newly remodeled Englewood location. “I do believe this could be the beginning of that gateway I keep talking about,” said Councilor Jerry Valdes, who represents that

area of the city. City Manager Michael Penny explained that King Soopers’ corporate representatives considered expanding into the old Walgreens space or even relocating entirely as other cities try to woo them away. But their preferred option is to completely scrape the entire building and build a new one that will result in a store that’s about 22,000 square feet bigger. “This is an economically distressed area,” noted Penny. “For the most part, we are not seeing

dollars reinvested in this area. … It is our hope that this is the first domino to fall.” On Sept. 17, council unanimously approved a resolution to waive $500,000 in building permits and use taxes for the project, which is expected to start in January and take about a year if King Soopers officials approve it. That means a loss of sales-tax revenue for the city that year, which Penny said averages about $250,000 a year for Soopers continues on Page 29

Littleton City Council is prepared to offer King Soopers $500,000 in incentives to remodel its store at Broadway and Littleton Boulevard. Photo by Jennifer Smith

Decades of change Four former city managers, who still live in area, share 50-plus years of history By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@ourcoloradonews.com

Something to CHEER about

Arapahoe High School cheerleaders lead the young mini cheers in the halftime performance at the Sept. 16 football game at Littleton Public Schools Stadium. About 125 4- to 14-year-old girls attended the one-day mini cheer training to take part in the performance.

PHOTO BY TOM MUNDS

Just as the river and the railroad run through Littleton, so they run through the lives of the four men who charted the city’s course for more than a halfcentury. “Those projects went through all of us,” said Andy McMinimee, Littleton’s city manager from 1987 through 1999. McMinimee joined Jim Woods (1999-2011), Gale Christy (1972-1987) and Larry Borger (1968-1971) at Jose’s Managers continues on Page 27

Dear readers: Join us for an Independent adventure Newspaper is your hometown companion By Jerry Healey

jhealey@ourcoloradonews.com In addition to celebrating our 125th Anniversary this week, we are also doing our annual circulation drive and this issue has been sent to every house and business in the City of Littleton. Our readers will tell you that reading the Independent every week is an enjoyable experience. It is packed full of news about your community, Littleton. The number one reason people move to Littleton is that special sense of community, and the Littleton Independent POSTAL ADDRESS

is at the very core of what makes Littleton special. The Independent dates back to 1888, and the Littleton Museum still has a copy of that very special inaugural edition. Along the way, the Independent has documented our city’s major events, accomplishments, turmoil, births, deaths, graduations, sporting accomplishments and cultural activities. A community is only complete when it has a good hometown publication like the Independent. Read it cover to cover and I can guarantee you that life in Littleton will be more complete as a result of being an educated voter, being in the know about events happening in the area and staying up on what your friends and neighbors are doing.

We only have our circulation drive once per year and it is happening now. It is when we offer our buy one, get one free special. Purchase one year’s subscription at $20 and get a second year free. A reader told us last week that we under-value our publication and that she would pay much more for it. After all, home delivery to your mailbox, Healey with this special price, is 19 cents per week, when the price of mailing a first-class letter is 46 cents. We do this so that price is not a factor. We want everyone to be able to afford to read our

paper. We want everyone to be informed and enjoy this experience. And we want Littleton to continue to be a special place, and that requires an informed community. There is a sticker on the front page. Pull it off and please subscribe now. Or, put it on your fridge or some other place to remind you. Or call 303-566-4100 or go to www.ourcoloradonews.com and click on the “subscribe” link at top right. We need and appreciate our subscribers and I invite all non-subscribers to join our family of readers. Kind Regards, Jerry Healey Publisher/Owner

LITTLETON INDEPENDENT (ISSN 1058-7837) (USPS 315-780) OFFICE: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 PHONE: 303-566-4100 A legal newspaper of general circulation in Englewood, Colorado, the Littleton Independent is published weekly on Thursday by Colorado Community Media. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO AND ADDITIONAL MAILING OFFICES. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 DEADLINES: Display advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Legal advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Classified advertising: Mon. 12 p.m.

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2 The Independent

September 26, 2013

GLYI marching into the future

This edition of the Independent is different. Sure, it has the news, features, sports and opinion articles you’ve come to expect. But this week, we’re marking the 125th anniversary of the Independent’s partnership with our readers. So while you can still read about what the city council and the local high school sports teams are doing, you will also see stories that explain how we — the newspaper and the community — got here. The Independent’s story virtually parallels Littleton’s, and a celebration of 125 years of the paper would be incomplete without input from the community it serves. As you turn the pages of this edition, you will find a recurring theme: “In their words.” This is a way of allowing our readers to help tell our story — just as we have helped tell theirs over the years. When you see a box like this at either side of a page, you will find remembrances by readers of what the Independent has meant to them. We hope you will have similar memories and share them with us. No need to wait for a special anniversary. You will also find memories presented in a more traditional way: as told to one of our reporters. We’ve interviewed many of Littleton’s movers and shakers and news makers, past and present, for this issue. These stories are not pushing aside the news — literally, what’s new — this week. They are living beside it. In Littleton, the past, present and future are never far apart. — Chris Rotar, editor

Youth initiative looking to become self-sufficient By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@ourcoloradonews.com City Manager Michael Penny reassured the Greater Littleton Youth Initiative on Sept. 13 that the city wouldn’t cut off its funding this year, while encouraging the board to continue exploring ways to become self-sufficient. “You live in this box of this money,” he said, saying the group shouldn’t be limited to the $100,000 annual bequest. It was the first meeting without Kay Wilmesher, a city employee who has served as GLYI’s director. She was moved out of the city’s community-development department last year and into the city manager’s office. While GLYI will still be her baby, she has a new charge to create a GLYI-like program focusing on the community’s seniors. The baby boom generation is getting older, and boomers’ “demand for resources is expected to increase exponentially,” Wilmesher wrote in an email to Colorado Community Media. “In 2003, one in eight residents in the Denver metro area were age 60 or older; by 2030 that number is predicted to be one in four. Between 2010 and 2015, the Denver metro area is expecting a 30 percent increase in this population. The city of Littleton wants to be prepared for this population change by examining existing resources and determining what may be needed in future. Although the focus of my job has now shifted to this senior work, I am still available to provide support to the GLYI in a limited capacity.” In the meantime, GLYI’s new executive board is ramping up efforts to become independent and hired the Implementation Group to analyze its situation. “We wanted to find out whether it’s

‘It’s not just about Johnny and what’s wrong with Johnny and fixing Johnny, it’s working with the whole family.’ Christine Carter, Arapahoe/Douglas Mental Health Network making any difference, or does it just make us feel good,” said Christine Carter of Arapahoe/Douglas Mental Health Network. “We know that short-term, good things happen. But we don’t know as much about what happens long-term, specifically in Littleton.” So they also called in Philanthropy Expert, a national consulting firm, to take a look at GLYI’s sustainability. “Usually when I get called in, it’s because something stopped and there’s a crisis,” said Mike Brewer. “You guys are doing it perfectly, assuming that the city’s largesse will not continue in perpetuity.” He’s advising GLYI to file as an official 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, which would allow the group to hire its own administrator and manage its own funds. Up to this point, the group has been run under the auspices of the Denver Foundation, a charitable organization created through gifts from people who care about a particular geographic area. “Anyone can contribute any amount of money to a community foundation, which invests these gifts for growth and income,” reads its website. “A community foundation then uses that income to make grants that strengthen their community. Community foundations operate in perpetuity, meaning that gifts made to them will continue to grow and provide resources for their own community forever.” Jim Woods is the outreach coordinator for Littleton Public Schools, a former Littleton city manager and a founding

member of GLYI. He explained that in the beginning, the group had a very specific goal that the city’s grant covered. John Brackney, president of the South Metro Denver Chamber of Commerce, remembers how the community came together in those early days after the Columbine tragedy, full of passion and sorrow and ready to set aside differences. “Even though it’s human nature to blame, we decided not to point the finger at anybody,” he said when the group first started looking at new options last year. Out of those first meetings grew a scientifically based process to identify programs that are verified to be successful in keeping kids safe. Known as “blueprint” programs, they include suicide prevention, early childhood education, nursing services, truancy prevention and more. Estimates suggest that such programs provide a good return on investment. Functional Family Therapy, for example, can save a community nearly $12 for every $1 spent. “It’s not just about Johnny and what’s wrong with Johnny and fixing Johnny, it’s working with the whole family,” said Carter. For the last year, the group has worked toward electing a governing board, looking for grants, updating its bylaws, talking to the city of Centennial about participating, and increasing its visibility. “We need to show people who may want to contribute financially that we are good stewards of their money,” said Carter.

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We publish: Adams County Sentinel, Arvada Press, Castle Rock News Press, Centennial Citizen, Douglas County News Press, Elbert County News, Englewood Herald, Foothills Transcript, Golden Transcript, Highlands Ranch Herald, Lakewood Sentinel, Littleton Independent, Lone Tree Voice, North JeffCo Westsider, Northglenn-Thornton Sentinel, Parker Chronicle, Pikes Peak Courier View, South Platte Independent, Teller County Extra, Tribune Extra, Tri-Lakes Tribune, Westminster Window, and Wheat Ridge Transcript.


The Independent 3

September 26, 2013

Greg Bohlen was a member of the Littleton Police Department SWAT team on the day of the Columbine tragedy, and he was one of the first officers on the scene. Photo by Jennifer Smith

Former LPD officer remembers dark day A then-Littleton SWAT member gives rare interview on Columbine By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@ourcoloradonews.com Greg Bohlen was directing traffic on April 20, 1999, when he got the news that changed the world. “Shots fired at Columbine High School.” Back then, he was Cpl. Bohlen of the Littleton Police Department. Today, he’s Chief Bohlen at the Colorado School of Mines. But so much else has changed. “I’d be silly to say it didn’t change me,” he said. “I don’t think it had a negative impact upon me. It changed me as a tactical officer, as far as what we do. My lesson learned, I think, is that we did a lot of good things. I wish we could have done a lot more. But I was proud that we took care of each other. I don’t talk about it a lot, but it doesn’t bother me to talk about it. … I don’t want to be that guy where people go, `Oh, that’s the guy that doesn’t talk about Columbine,’ but I also don’t want to be `that Columbine guy.’ I’ve never wanted to be that guy, but internally, I’m proud of it.” At a burly 6-foot-2, Bohlen is more grizzly bear than teddy bear. He gets a gleam in his eye when he Tasers his policeacademy students at Arapahoe Community College (with their permission, of course), and laughs at them all the way through pepper-spray day. But his eyes light up when he talks about his kids and his wife, Pam, and they soften as he recalls holding the body of Columbine student Rachel Scott, dead on arrival.

‘My lesson learned, I think, is that we did a lot of good things. I wish we could have done a lot more.’ Greg Bohlen `Bedlam’ at scene

The day of the Columbine shootings started inauspiciously, when a truck took out a pole at Santa Fe Drive and Prince Street. Bohlen was directing traffic at the scene with fellow officers when the calls started coming in. It took them just a few minutes to get to the school. “But it was already just bedlam,” recalls Bohlen. “A lot of people were standing around waiting to be told what to do, and I was putting my SWAT gear on. But every agency was doing what they were supposed to do. For me, the biggest piece of the communication problem was people not talking to each other.” Because Littleton SWAT officers carry all their gear all the time, Bohlen was able to suit up right away. “Then I look up and see Littleton Fire Rescue coming really slowly down Pierce Street, and the back doors are open,” he said. “I see paramedics I know, and they’re walking next to the Bohlen continues on Page 4

• “Congratulations on serving the community for 125 years. Our family has lived in the Littleton area since 1972. We raised our family here and now our grandchildren are following in their parents’ footsteps in attending Littleton Public Schools. The arrival of the Littleton Independent was a reason for a cup of tea and a fun read about friends and events. Through the years Alison Lusk’s column was the first thing I would read followed by Houstoun Waring’s obituaries. I have saved many of Alison’s articles and while looking through them found a favorite that is especially topical now. It was entitled `A Community Is About Human Connections’ and featured a fundraiser Jose and Phyllis Trujillo were holding for their niece. As only Alison could, she described the outpouring of community support and the special feeling of a place like Jose’s where ‘everybody knows your name.’ Since the Trujillos are closing Jose’s and taking a long due retirement at the end of September, the article was very poignant.” — Jean Johannisson • “As I went through my mother’s belongings, I came across an old manila envelope. It was tattered and stained, but its contents were filled with such wonderful treasures! So much of my family’s history was tucked inside that envelope. It was a wealth of articles carefully clipped from the pages of the Littleton Independent. The articles were fragile and yellowed, as the years had taken a toll on them. Some of the articles went back eighty years to the 1930s, and told of events in the lives of my mother’s siblings. It was as though my aunts and uncles came to life as I read about their parties, school dances, clubs and high school graduations. Their marriages, births, and later their deaths told stories, too … Yes, the Littleton Independent and that tattered manila envelope held many family memories and helped fill some of the holes in my family history.” — Shirley Terry


4 The Independent

September 26, 2013

Langton likes school news Bohlen Continued from Page 3

By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com Karla Langton managed Community Relations for the Littleton Public Schools for 20 years and had many contacts with the Littleton Independent during that period. She and her husband Larry and two sons moved to Littleton from Wichita, Kan., in 1979 when he started a teaching job at Metropolitan State College. An English major, Langton started teaching English in high school and middle school and had previous business experience elsewhere. She found that Littleton Public Schools needed a person with a combination of English and business relations experience to handle community relations, and it was a good fit. She issued “Bold Briefs” after each school board meeting and regular information packets with news specific to individual schools. “We did our best to try to get people to understand who we were — to be transparent — with board mem-

‘We did our best to try to get people to understand who we were — to be transparent — with board members’ photographs, etc.’ Karla Langton

bers’ photographs, etc.,” she remembers. Now, a great deal of the information is online. She did little workshops at each school on working with the press and felt it was a good partnership. For a number of years, she worked with the Independent editor — primarily with Jeremy Bangs — to publish a quarterly report on the school district, mailed to households in the district. Dan Nanney shot many of the photos used in these publications, including one she brought to the interview of an elegantly costumed Arapaho Wind River chief and his little granddaughter who came for an annual ceremony at Arapahoe High School. (A print of it hangs in the boardroom today.) These detailed publications, published four times a year, included a curriculum guide for each elementary and middle school and in this case, an introduction to a new language arts curriculum. She recalls hours spent at the Independent’s office, correcting hard copies of each proof page — sometimes until 10 p.m. She worked with the PTO President’s Council monthly, spending the last halfhour on “issues”; started the senior volunteer “tax rebate” volunteer program and met monthly with the VIPS, Volunteers in Public Service coordinator. “Education remains big in Littleton,” she said. Profiles of candidates are important with an election pending. She appreciates the Independent’s coverage of the city and county news, as well as the school district. “Of course, I would always like to see more school news. It’s a big deal to get your name in the paper.”

vehicle. They were all solemn. I look in the back of the rescue unit, and there’s these two boys basically stacked on top of each other. Just from the looks on the paramedics’ faces, not so much what they said, I could tell they’d been through quite an ordeal in that short period of time. That’s when I knew this wasn’t just kids screwing around. It really brought to light the seriousness of what was going on.” He and fellow SWAT Officer Chet Neal were assigned to a lead team, along with officers from Denver and Jefferson County, to recover three students lying near the southwest corner of the school. Recall the image of the SWAT team on the lime-green fire truck: Bohlen was the one in full gear with the longer rifle.

Unspoken agreement

“Chet and I spoke and said, `We’ve got to stay together, buddy.’ The plan was to go to the south parking lot. I didn’t know any of the other guys, but some of it was kind of unspoken. We were going to go down there and get those kids.” But on the way, they were diverted to a different location. Neal and some of the others on the ad-hoc team saw an open door and slipped inside the building — contrary to popular reports that no officers entered until it was too late, notes Bohlen. “So suddenly, we’re a smaller team,” he said. “We see a kid banging on the window, and we tell him to come out the door. I couldn’t even tell you what he looked like now. But we got him out.” When they reached the downed students, Bohlen covered other officers as they ran to get Richard Castaldo. “I go to look at the kid, and he’s been riddled with bullets,” recalls Bohlen. “It’s hard to accept that people are shooting each other in a school. We tell them we’ve got one victim out, but he’s immobile. They sent a deputy car. I tried to pick him up by myself, but I couldn’t. Another guy helped, and we got him to the car.” Castaldo survived. Next they brought Scott to him. Bohlen knew she was dead, and laid her on the ground. The team set to work evacuating a flood of kids from the building. When Bohlen returned to a covering position by the fire truck, he looked up to find the rest of the officers gone. “I had to leave Rachel and Daniel Rohrbough,” he said, obviously pained.

Mutual support

He made his way back to the tactical command post in front of the school. “They wanted me to stay and debrief, but I asked my sergeant, `Where’s our guys?’ He said, `They’re in there.’ And I said, `Then that’s where I’m going.” And he didn’t argue with me. “Being back with my team really gave me a sense of comfort. We just fed off each other. We were just doing what we do. We wanted to find those kids and stop them. We knew about Dave Sanders, we just couldn’t find him for a number of reasons, like communication and misinformation. I found a baseball in the hallway, and I picked it up. It reminded me these were just kids. I kept it in my SWAT bag until I left SWAT.” They made their way through the school, clearing areas and “bucket brigading” kids to safety. They smashed in doors with fire extinguishers and tried to follow the trail of ammunition shells to the killers. “Every room took on its own personality,” he remembers — in some, terrified kids were hiding in closets or the doors were barricaded with desks; in a few, police were welcomed with cheers. “I saw inside the library, but I didn’t go in,” he said. “They had us stand down. We were fatigued, but we didn’t

realize it. The retreat from the school was pretty slow for us. We dragged our feet because we thought there was more for us to do. I wanted to do more, we wanted to do more. We just stood there and kind of looked at each other. We were making sure we were OK. They eventually had to come get us and get us out of there.”

Worries about family

The rest of the day was spent debriefing, meeting with a mental-health professional, communing with colleagues and, finally, home. “I did worry about my family,” he said. “It’s difficult on Pam. But I’m so very, very lucky. We met when we were 15. She didn’t like what I did, but she accepted it. I was thinking, `My wife is going to see this on TV, and she is going to freak out.’ She knew I would be there, because she knows that is what I do. I would be there doing my job. … When I got home, there was my uniform shirt sitting there on the couch, all balled up. My wife had been cuddled up with it all day.” After it was all over, then-Chief Gary Maas awarded every LPD employee who worked that day a certificate of recognition. When Maas abruptly retired in 2006 after a rather scathing independent study suggested a change in leadership might be in order, Bruce Beckman, then a police commander and now a city councilor, took the helm. He awarded Bohlen and Neal each a Medal of Valor. In the meantime, it didn’t take long for the reporters to find them. “But (Cmdr.) Bill Black always said the best SWAT team is the team that goes and does its job unseen and unheard,” he recalls. “So we didn’t do interviews. They tried, they tried like crazy. … I still had to drive home that way. The media moved in and dug up the street, they had to put power in. I still had to drive by it and see it, but we never talked to them. They’d get our pager numbers, and they’d say, `This is so and so and I need to interview you.’ And we’d say no. And they’d say, `You don’t understand. I’m so and so.’ And I said, `I don’t care.’”

Telling Littleton’s story

It didn’t stop the media from talking about them, though. “It was frustrating to hear on talk radio, `It’s their job to get killed, not the students,’ ” he said. “There’s no constitutional requirement to die in the line of duty. We serve and protect, but if we don’t take care of each other, we can’t take care of you.” Bohlen has spoken to the Law Enforcement Network and other agencies about that day. “I think we have something to say, and we can talk to SWAT, and we can tell Littleton’s story,” he said. Some Littletonites bristle at the idea that the city is so identified with a tragedy that happened just outside its borders. But Bohlen points out that every day, first responders who were there still work here, still carry those memories, still live by the lessons learned in Columbine’s hallways where Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold killed 12 students, a teacher and themselves. “You could argue it wasn’t in Littleton, but you weren’t going to win that fight,” he said. “Eventually it came down to that it’s the Littleton community. … Our kids, there are things that they’re never going to know. You and I know what it’s like to live without cell phones and school shootings. The world’s changed. Columbine wasn’t the first time, but it had never been of that magnitude before, with bombs and napalm and propane tanks. And that two people could form a relationship and conspire for that long — it’s stunning.” One lesson Bohlen hopes the entire community learned is: “See something, say something.” “Don’t say, `I thought it was just a prank. I thought they were making a video.’ Well, who wouldn’t think that?” he said. “It’s really impossible to overreact now. People say, `We don’t want to bother you.’ Well, this is what we do.”


The Independent 5

September 26, 2013

Come on out and join the party Paper invites one and all as Independent marks 125th birthday Staff report The Littleton Independent is 125 years old! And to celebrate that special milestone we are hosting a free community Quasquicentennial Celebration at Hudson Gardens on Sept. 27 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. The family-friendly, non-alcoholic event includes a wonderful journey in music, soft drinks and cake. You can bring your own dinner or buy from a food truck near the entrance to the gardens at 6115 S. Santa Fe Drive. A free photo booth will give readers the opportunity to have their photos taken in the era of their choice. Another photo opportunity will allow you to take a picture as if it is on the front page of the paper. The evening will be a musical journey from the Independent’s first year of publication in 1888 to the modern era of today’s music. John Akal, leader of the 20-piece Ultraphonic Jazz Orchestra with lead singer Suzanne Morrison, will team up with Independent Publisher Jerry Healey weaving in music history and headlines of the day. The band will play through six eras of music: The Turn of the 20th Century, Prohibition, Swing, Latin Infusion, Rock

‘We also encourage families to bring blankets or chairs and enjoy an early fall evening under the stars.’ Jerry Healey, publisher and Modern. Before each era is played, Akal and Healey will tell short stories about the music scene of the time and what was happening in Littleton, derived from headlines and articles from the actual newspapers. “The Garden Canopy at Hudson Gardens makes the perfect venue as the show will go on rain or shine,” Healey said. “It is in a beautiful corner of the gardens, surrounded by flowers.” Chairs will be set up concert style in the tent but, Healey said, “we also encourage families to bring blankets or chairs and enjoy an early fall evening under the stars.” The Independent invites everyone to come on out and celebrate with us. And don’t forget your dancing shoes, Akal said, “because we plan on a highenergy show, playing some of your favorite songs.”

John Akal and the 20-piece Ultraphonic Jazz Orchestra have been performing together for more than a decade. Courtesy photo

Band adds special touch to party Vocalist Suzanne Morrison joins in performance with Ultraphonic Jazz Orchestra Staff report The Littleton Independent’s 125th birthday bash will feature the 20-piece Ultraphonic Jazz Orchestra with singer Suzanne Morrison. The Independent’s Quasquicentennial Celebration will start at 6 p.m. Sept. 27 at the Garden Canopy in Hudson Gardens. All are invited for dancing, food, drinks, cake and fun, and admission is free. John Akal’s Ultraphonic Jazz Orchestra, in its 12th full year, continues to perform new and exciting music, with contemporary big band charts added to its knockout repertoire of orchestrations for large jazz ensembles. The band, which has been featured on two recordings from KUVO 89.3 FM, performs live each month at the famous Little Bear Saloon in Evergreen. The Ultraphonic Jazz Orchestra has also performed at several renowned

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Morrison jazz festivals and concert venues — and played a joint concert with jazz legend Maynard Ferguson. Morrison, joining the band for the Independent’s party, is a top-notch classical, jazz, pop and opera vocalist. Her recorded work includes her debut album, “From Where You Are.”

It’s been About the Neighborhood for 125 years!


6 The Independent

Morrison

Cider fest SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 9 a.m. to Dusk

Grounds of Bear Creek Nursing Home Highway 8 & Summer Street Morrison, CO 80465

Ciderfest Art by Charissa Tetamore age 11

Food Vendors, Beer Garden, Horseshoe Tournament, Kids Activities, Live Music, Car Show, Cider Making Demonstrations Every Hour, Food and Lots More

Come to the “Nearest Faraway Place” and see how a small town has BIG FUN!

23

Community papers and websites.

,000 400 readers.

September 26, 2013

Police chief offers thoughts on 9/11 Stephens recalls lost first responders

‘As I look back on that day, I remember those

Editor’s note: This was Littleton Police Chief Doug Stephens’ first Patriot Day address to the city, having just come on board in June. These are his remarks in their entirety, made during the Patriot Day ceremony at Littleton Center on Sept. 11. Four hundred eleven. Four hundred eleven. On Sept. 10, 2001, I was a police sergeant working the swing shift in north Denver. On that night, I worked my routine shift; I don’t recall anything eventful happening. After work, I took my normal route home, I went through my regular nighttime routine and, like most nights, went to sleep without any cares or concerns in the world. The next morning, Sept. 11, I awoke to my phone ringing incessantly. With incredible annoyance, I dragged myself out of bed to yell at whoever was so rudely and selfishly calling at such an early hour. You see, I had worked the night before until 3 am. Whoever was calling obviously didn’t understand the sacrifice I had made by staying up so late during my routine shift. As I answered the phone with a gruff, “This better be important,” the caller, a family member, simply stated, “Turn on your TV.” In the fog of sleep deprivation and the sudden change to my normal morning routine, I wasn’t sure I understood. So I said, “Excuse me?” “Turn on your TV. Our country has been attacked.” Now, those words were anything but normal, routine or regular, and as I turned on my TV and those terrible images became visible, I remember thinking, like most Americans that morning, that there would be no more normal, routine or regular. Life had just changed for all of us. Nearly 3,000 Americans had just lost their lives in an

tremendous feelings of sadness, which were balanced by an incredible feeling of pride.’ Littleton Police Chief Doug Stephens unprovoked act of cowardice. But unlike most Americans, my next conscious thought turned to wondering how many police officers, firefighters and paramedics I just watched die as those towers came tumbling down. The answer, learned much later, was 411 … 411. Three hundred and forty firefighters, a chaplain and two paramedics from the FDNY. Eight emergency medical technicians from private services. Sixty police officers — 23 from NYPD and 37 from the Port Authority Police Department. Four hundred and eleven men and women sworn to protect. Four hundred and eleven fathers, sons, mothers, daughters, husbands, wives … people … heroes. All of whom did not hesitate to run into the danger zone, many numerous times, risking their lives to save others. Four hundred and eleven brave first responders who started their routine, normal, regular shift that fateful day not knowing it would be their last, but always knowing that time may come … knowing that their routine, their normal, their regular included tremendous risk and, as it did on that day, might result in the ultimate sacrifice. Four hundred eleven. As I look back on that day, I remember those tremendous feelings of sadness, which were balanced by an incredible feeling of pride. Pride? What was there to be proud of at such a low point, people may ask. That is a simple answer for any first re-

sponder. You see, everyone who wears a badge, takes an oath, lives to protect, to heal, to help, to run to danger when others run from it — we all pride ourselves on our willingness to run into those towers, to run into that burning building, to run into the school where shots are being fired, to run into situations we might not ever run out of. It’s what we believe, it’s what we do, it’s what we are. On that day, 411 of our brothers and sisters stepped up and did what we all would have done. What we all would do today, what we are all willing to do tomorrow. They served, they protected, they gave their lives. Today, Patriot Day, we remember. We remember the 3,000 who died. We remember the 411. We remember the sorrow, the pain, the pride. But today, we also celebrate. We celebrate our resilience, our ability to take a hit and come back stronger, more determined than ever to stand up, to face any challenge, to defend, to protect, to serve. While the 411 gave up their lives on Sept. 11, 2001, they live on today in each and every one of us. Today, Patriot Day, we celebrate their lives, their duty, their sacrifice. We honor their memory and stand here as their brothers and sisters not knowing what today’s routine, normal, regular shift might bring, but fully willing to face any challenge, to do our duty, to follow our calling. Thank you.

.com

Quality of Life Meets Economic Development…

Keep Littleton on The Right Track. Re-elect Bruce Stahlman.

Bruce Stahlman believes Littleton’s quality of life and the right economic development go hand in hand. These people agree: Elected Officials Frances Owens, Former Colorado First Lady Joe Rice, Former State Representative Paul Schauer, Former State Representative Linda Newell, State Senator Kent Bagley, RTD Board of Directors Sue Chandler, Littleton Public Schools Board of Education Lucie Stanish, Littleton Public Schools Board of Education Keith Gardner, Centennial City Councilor Former Littleton Mayors Jim Collins Sally Parsons Dennis Reynolds Jim Taylor Susan Thornton

Citizens Libby Bortz and Mike Altenberg Charlie Carroll Rebecca and Bill Kast Anne and Dick Dugdale Ken and Erin Shock Rhonda and David Vanderpool Sue Metsker and Larry Rinaldo Sean O’Shea John Brackney Stew and Patricia Meagher Bill Hopping James Sato Doug Hauck David Svenson Greg Reinke

Quality Of Life Doesn’t Happen By Accident.

For more information go to

www.brucestahlman.org

Paid for by Committee to Re-Elect Bruce Stahlman, Jim Collins, Treasurer


The Independent 7

September 26, 2013

11Final retail-marijuana vote postponed Confusion on ordinance means process starts over

‘Let’s have a public hearing. If you don’t like what the public says, then you can vote your conscience at that time.’

By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@ourcoloradonews.com

Littleton City Council took another turn on the path that might or might not lead to retail sales of marijuana in wears athe city, but on process this time rather t, to heal,than policy. run from “I’m concerned about the process,” illingnesssaid Councilor Jerry Valdes. hat burn- “We’ve been getting a little sloppy on ol wheresome important issues.” ations we On Sept. 17, council heard what was e believe,originally billed as the second reading of an ordinance that would ban retail nd sisterssales, which would have included a uld havepublic hearing. But by meeting time, hat we arestaff had changed it back to first readved, theying, starting the process over. This is the latest turn in what’s been a twisting road for this ordinance. r. We reememberDuring a study session Aug. 27, a slim the pain,majority of council — Mayor Pro Tem e. We cel-Bruce Stahlman and Councilors Peggy ake a hitCole, Jim Taylor and Valdes — indicated terminedsupport for allowing the four existing llenge, tomedical-marijuana dispensaries to add a retail component if they wanted to.

Jim Taylor, city council member Staff drafted an ordinance to that effect, which council heard on first reading Sept. 4 about 2:30 a.m., after the seven-hour meeting that saw the fall of the Broadstone apartment proposal. But Mayor Debbie Brinkman introduced a last-minute amendment to switch the language from allowing retail sales to banning them. Stahlman reversed course that night, saying he wasn’t aware Littleton would be the only south-metro city to allow retail marijuana, even though that had come up during the study session. “Frankly, that’s causing me to reconsider the whole thing,” he said. Cole, Taylor and Valdes pressed to start the process over since the ordinance was substantially changed. “Let’s have a public hearing,” said Taylor. “If you don’t like what the public says, then you can vote your conscience

at that time.” City Attorney Ken Fellman said that wasn’t necessary, since the portion of affected city code wasn’t changing. “We may have the authority, but it’s just not the proper thing to do,” said Valdes. At some point, staff came around to that way of thinking. “Because council voted to revise the ordinance but did not set the date for a public hearing, staff has determined that Ordinance No. 18 was effectively rejected by council,” reads City Manager Michael Penny’s memo to council. “As such, staff is now presenting to council an ordinance on first reading.” The new ordinance passed 4-3, with Cole, Taylor and Valdes against. It’s set for a public hearing and final vote on Oct. 1. If the vote stands, it also extends

the current moratorium on marijuana clubs for another year. “State legislation prohibits on-site consumption in licensed retail marijuana establishments, but the statutes enacted this year and the emergency rules adopted by the Department of Revenue are insufficient to effectively prohibit marijuana clubs,” reads Penny’s memo. A separate ordinance introduced Sept. 17 would bring city code into compliance with Amendment 64, the state’s constitutional amendment that decriminalizes the possession of an ounce or less of marijuana for recreational use by adults. In describing the changes, Littleton Police Chief Doug Stephens noted a situation they create that still needs to be resolved. When officers arrest somebody who is legally in possession of pot on unrelated charges, they have to confiscate the marijuana because it can’t enter the jail. They can’t give it back to the person upon release, because that’s considered drug trafficking under federal law, said Stephens. However, there have been cases where departments have been successfully sued for not returning it. “I hope you have a lot of training for your officers so they’ll be able to figure this mess out,” said Councilor Bruce Beckman, a retired LPD commander.

on Sept. h and evcelebrate We honor brothers s routine, but fully ur duty, to

Castle Rock

Highlands Ranch

Littleton

Lone Tree

Lone Tree

First United Methodist Church 1200 South Street Castle Rock, CO 80104 303.688.3047 www.fumccr.org

Services:

Saturday 5:30pm Sunday 8am, 9:30am, 11am Sunday School 9:15am Little Blessings Day Care www.littleblessingspdo.com

Open hearts. Open minds. Open doors.

Open and Welcoming

Sunday Worship 10:30 4825 North Crowfoot Valley Rd. Castle Rock • canyonscc.org 303-663-5751



“Loving God - Making A Difference”

A place for you

Englewood

 Victory Fellowship  Bible Study on The Harbinger At 4200 South Acoma, Englewood

Sunday Worship

Weaving Truth and Relevance into Relationships and Life

Sunday School 9:00 & 10:30 am

worship Time 10:30AM sundays

8:00 am Chapel Service 9:00 & 10:30 am

303-794-2683 Preschool: 303-794-0510

9:00am Spiritual Formation Classes for all Ages 90 east orchard road littleton, co

9203 S. University Blvd. Highlands Ranch, 80126

303 798 6387

Abiding Word Lutheran Church 8391 S. Burnley Ct., Highlands Ranch

(Next to RTD lot @470 & University)

303-912-5939

 Franktown 

    



Trinity Lutheran Church & School

Sunday Worship 8:00 & 10:45 a.m. Trinity Lutheran School & ELC (Ages 3-5, Grades K-8)

 303-841-4660 www.tlcas.org  

www.gracepointcc.us

First Presbyterian Church of Littleton

Worship Services Sundays at 9:00am

Currently meeting at: 9220 Kimmer Drive, Suite 200 Lone Tree 80124 303-688-9506 www.LoneTreeCoC.com

8:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m.

1609 W. Littleton Blvd. (303) 798-1389 • www.fpcl.org

SErviCES:

Saturday 5:30pm

Sunday 8:00 & 10:30am

Education Hour: Sunday 9:15am Joyful Mission Preschool 303-841-3770 7051 East Parker Hills Ct. • Parker, CO 303-841-3739 www.joylutheran-parker.org

Parker evangelical Presbyterian church Connect – Grow – Serve

Sunday Worship

8:45 am & 10:30 am 9030 Miller road Parker, Co 80138 303-841-2125 www.pepc.org

Where people are excited about God’s Word.

Sunday Worship: 10:45AM & 6PM Bible Study: 9:30AM Children, Young People & Adults 4391 E Mainstreet, Parker, Colorado 80134 Church Office – (303) 841-3836

www.parkerbiblechurch.org Sunday

LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA

Parker

303-791-3315

pastor@awlc.org www.awlc.org

6pm Wednesday nights starting September 11th-October 16th



Welcome Home!

Sunday Worship - 10:00am Bible Study immediately following Wednesday Bible Study - 7:30pm

Parker

Joy

Church of Christ

www.st-andrew-umc.com

An Evangelical Presbyterian Church

Parker

Parker

Community Church of Religious Science Sunday services held in the historic Ruth Memorial Chapel at the Parker Mainstreet Center

Hilltop United Church Of Christ 10926 E. Democrat Rd. Parker, CO 10am Worship Service www.hilltopucc.org 303-841-2808

Pastor David Fisher Fellowship & Worship: 9:00 am Sunday School: 10:45 am 5755 Valley Hi Drive Parker, CO 303-941-0668

www.SpiritofHopeLCMC.org

...19650 E. Mainstreet, Parker 80138

GRACE PRESBYTERIAN

Acts 2:38

Alongside One Another On Life’s Journey

www.gracecolorado.com

You are invited to worship with us:

Sundays at 10:00 am

Grace is on the NE Corner of Santa Fe Dr. & Highlands Ranch Pkwy. (Across from Murdochs)

303-798-8485

60 W Littleton Blvd, Unit 101 Littleton CO 80120 303 523 7332

Sunday School

(for children and adults)

9:00 am

New Thought...Ancient Wisdom Sunday Service

& Children’s Church 10:00 a.m.

Visit our website for details of classes & upcoming events.

303.805.9890

www.P a r k er C C R S.org P.O. Box 2945—Parker CO 80134-2945

Morning Worship Service 10:30 am Evening Worship Service 6:30 pm Breakfast 8:15 am Prayer 6:00 pm

Bible Study

Prayer 5:45 pm Dinner 6:15 pm Additional Meeting Times: Friday 6:30 pm Prayer Saturday 10:30 am—12:00 noon Open Church (Fellowship/Canvassing)

7:00 pm

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call 303-566-4091 or email kearhart@ourcoloradonews.com.


8 The Independent

• “To me the Littleton Independent will always mean Hous Waring, Garrett Ray and Harriet Hixenbaugh. I was in awe of them as they were the heart and soul of Littleton. We used to kid about Mr. Waring’s obituaries since they were extremely detailed about the person’s life, his/her death and all the facts in between. You would have to read them to understand what I mean, but despite the fact that it was a morbid fascination, we all looked forward to reading them each week.” — Marlu Burkamp • “I have been a Littleton or Centennial resident since 1990, and have enjoyed The Independent ever since! I must say that my two favorite issues featured my grandchildren at Littleton Fire Children’s mini academy. And, that is the beauty of a local newspaper. There is not an issue that I’ve read that didn’t have an article, letter, or photo of someone I know personally. It is wonderful in this age of `I-everything’ to still have something to share at the table … that we can both see! (you know how small the print is on those phones …) Thanks for giving me the opportunity to say it — THANK YOU!” — Michelle Stacey

September 26, 2013

An ‘Independent’ life Paper records, experiences historic change By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@ourcoloradonews.com In 1888, H.V. Bullock took pen to paper and wrote, “Now that Littleton has a newspaper, let everyone strive to make her the most beautiful city in the Platte River valley. If you don’t, somebody else will. The day is long gone by for Littleton to slumber. Men with vim are coming in who will push things along.” Then he took paper to printing press, and Issue No. 1 of the Littleton Independent was born. “Mr. Bullock never knew what it was to gather news by telephone; he never had a gas melting pot in his print shop, the government never sent him fifteen publicity stories a day; the court house then was in Denver, a day’s journey away; his cash register was a drawer in a desk which rang a bell when it was yanked open,” wrote iconic editor Houstoun Waring in 1938, the paper’s 50-year anniversary. In 1888, the paper was called the Littleton Gazette. It’s been through a winding but unbroken series of owners since, but anything 124 years old will have withstood changes in its lifetime. The paper has gone from being truly “independent” to being part of a nationwide corporate conglomerate and back, finally, last year. It’s been every possible size and shape, and covered both hyperlocal and international news. But one thing has never changed from that first issue: The stylistic flag. When Jerry Healey bought Colorado Community Media back from Westword Communications in early 2012, he standardized the flags of the other papers

that came with it but left Littleton’s alone. Healey first owned the paper in 1990, having purchased it from Cowles Media in Minneapolis. It had somehow ended up there after Garrett Ray and Vern Bangert sold the company in 1981. Ray had started there in 1961 and worked with Waring until 1966, when Waring retired his 40year career. Hous, as he was affectionately known, was legendary for his eloHoustoun Waring as shown quent and engaging obituin a portrait by Bob Olsen. aries. His son File image George Waring says he wrote them out of respect. “He felt duty bound to write worthwhile obits; it was not pride that kept him at it,” said Waring. “He sought ways to honor each person and their contributions to society, thus he created a sense of pride in the surviving family members as well as friends of the deceased.” George Waring says his dad’s goal was to educate Littleton citizens about news and issues relevant to them at the local, regional, state, national and international levels. “He consulted sources at all levels, but his emphasis in print was toward local news,” said Waring. “The shift today away from pride-building hometown news would not please him.” In an age where readers can find national and global news 24/7 in their pajamas, Healey focuses today on giving them what they can’t find anywhere else. That means news about city leaders and high-school sports, local heroes

and neighborhood notables. “The more you support us, the more relevant we become,” he wrote last year. “And it is that relevance that will make us successful, no matter the medium, and help us remain the historical record for our communities and a force for improvement and progress.” Ray, too, values the local focus that Healey is striving to strengthen. “After the paper’s traumatic times in the mid-1980s, I am pleased to see that it is again focusing on the lives and concerns of local people, helping them to define and nurture their community,” Ray wrote in the 100th anniversary edition. Since then, technology has evolved at a staggering rate. Bullock could never have imagined the $900 worth of printing equipment he started with would eventually morph into microchips and electronic presses, but here we are. Gone are printers’ blocks and wax machines, typewriters and ribbons. Now we have Macs and e-readers, Facebook and blogs. “Because of the great expense of publishing a newspaper these days, there are fewer newspapers in almost every city of the United States.” While Healey could say that today, it’s actually a 1938 quote from Waring. Littleton has had up to three papers at once in its history. Denver once had several morning and evening papers; today the Denver Post stands alone. “This state of affairs … has placed a greater responsibility on the shoulders of the lone editor,” wrote Waring. “Personal partisan journalism is giving way to institutional journalism. Following the example of Adolph Ochs of the New York Times, newspapers have emphasized the presentation of both sides of the news as against the old method of calling all friends white and all enemies black. The staff of the Littleton Independent hopes that it is fulfilling its mission.”

Reaching

higher

to lead the research to cure cancer

“Growing up here I didn’t think I’d go to UCCS. I thought I needed a bigger school to get the quality education and degree I wanted. But all it took was a campus visit and I found out what a hidden jewel UCCS is. I’m a dual major and the academics are challenging. I also love that I’m just a car ride from my family if they need me for anything.” — Dylan Shuster, Junior in Chemistry and Biochemistry

To Reach higher: www.uccs.edu | 800-990-UCCS (8227)


The Independent 9

September 26, 2013

Symposium spotlights urban renewal Littleton hears about efforts in other cities By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@ourcoloradonews. com Littleton City Council took the phrases “condemnation” and “urban renewal” out of the shadows and put them center stage at the city’s second annual Economic Vitality Symposium, held Sept. 19 at the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema. Guests sipping on free Breckenridge Brewery beverages and complimentary snacks from Alamo heard from representatives of Arvada, Fort Collins, Golden, Longmont and Lafayette about their respective projects. “They are rock stars among the cities in our state,” said Sam Mamet, executive director of the Colorado Municipal League. Each one has an urban renewal authority working on public/private partnerships to revitalize blighted areas. They use a number of techniques, including everything from waiving building fees to condemnation of property, which is often donated to a developer. A common practice is tax-increment financing, which assumes the improvements a developer makes will increase tax revenue, benefiting the city in the long run. A short CML film explains the developers normally take the brunt of the risk, shouldering 70 percent or more of the financing. “Developers are not out

The City of Littleton’s Economic Vitality Symposium poster, third from right, got billing right next to movie posters at Aspen Grove’s Alamo Drafthouse theater on Sept. 19. Photo by Jennifer Smith there to make wild sums of money,” explains Greg Moran of MVG Development in the film. “They’re looking for a reasonable return.” But the path to profit can sometimes be messy, as described by Maureen Phair, executive director of the Arvada Urban Renewal Authority. Arvada recently completed projects to spruce up its downtown, which is similar to Littleton’s Main Street, and is planning more in anticipation of light rail. Both phases include condemnations. Phair said the city generally offers a fair market price, but property owners often hold out for more. When the authority condemns the land, she said,

judges often order less than the city offered. But things don’t always shake out in favor of the city. In 2004, the Colorado Supreme Court blocked AURA from condemning a private lake to make way for a Super Walmart parking lot, killing the whole project. “Do you see how much commitment this takes, and how you have to keep your eye on the prize?” Phair asked the audience. Right now, AURA is working on turning 26 acres near a future light-rail station into highdensity apartments. “This is a controversial project for us,” she said, bringing to mind Littleton’s recent Broadstone proposal, a private proj-

Mulvey shares long-term view of life in Littleton

ect just south of the Littleton Courthouse that city council ultimately killed. “We are getting absolutely crucified, but our political people are holding tight. (Opponents) think we’re going to be emptying the prisons and loading up the apartments with convicted criminals.” Golden has used its URA for grants to improve building facades, public art, signage, parking garages and more. It also offers funds to private businesses for remodel design and demolition, and grants for them to build an Internet presence. “This all can help prevent Golden from backsliding into a ghost town,” according to a short film the city of Littleton produced for the symposium.

One thing that seemed to impress representatives from other cities was Fort Collins’ treatment of downtown alleys. The city installed benches, art, paving and better drainage, and property owners were encouraged to divide their buildings so that one store faces the street and another faces the alley. The symposium came just four months after Littleton City Council unanimously approved its new Economic Plan 2013, the result of more than a year of “think tank” meetings. It takes a substantially more aggressive approach than how the city has worked to attract businesses until now. “This is really an opportunity for us to put more tools in our toolbox than just the Economic Gardening, which is all that we offered before,” Mayor Debbie Brinkman said at the time. The city’s former director of business/industry affairs, Chris Gibbons, earned national recognition for developing the Economic Gardening program, which focuses on supporting and growing existing business rather than actively recruiting businesses. The tools Brinkman referrred to include financial incentives, code changes, parking solutions for downtown (possibly meters), transit-oriented development, urban-renewal authorities, revitalization grants, upgrading strip malls, asking the voters for tax increases and much more. “This is not a plan to push toward an eminent-domain program,” said Brinkman in May. “You’re looking at seven people who have no intentions of doing anything with eminent domain.”

Are You a 50+ Jobseeker in the Denver Metro Area?

By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com Betty Mulvey worked for the City of Littleton from 1975 to 1994, managing community relations and innumerable other projects. Recalling Marcia Nelson as the first Littleton Independent reporter she worked with, Mulvey said, “the greatest part of the job with the city was all the people I worked with,” citing City Manager Gale Christy as her mentor. She complimented the commitment of present Littleton reporter Jennifer Smith. Mulvey brought several earlier issues of the Independent with her when we met for coffee, including one that reported her daughter’s 1981 wedding and another with the front page story about the Columbine tragedy — which included a picture of her son, Philip. With West Metro Fire Department, he drove an ambulance that day, she said. “When I was at the city, the Independent was our watchdog, as well as offering opportunities to get stories out about the museum and holiday lighting. We worked hard, as a team, to supply reporters with the numbers they wanted. I did training with the staff to be responsive.” Mulvey started the Littleton Report and the calendar/annual report. “It was the perfect job, involving various facets of the community: League of Women Voters, city council, contributing to a historic newspaper, which preserves a sense of place … It’s not always easy. You have to respect that watchdog.” All seven of Betty and Tom Mulvey’s children went through the Littleton school system and participated in community events and activities — and all are still in the area.

Tough issues? South Platte Park, which preserved the river and changed the community. “Probably the most rewarding was working with the city team on the bond issue for the railroad depression. It changed the community completely,” Mulvey said. The city had wisely saved the transit envelope (railroad right of way) so it could have a first crack at light rail. Painful times included sales tax elections Mulvey and controversy with the business community; the widening of Bowles Avenue and extension of Mineral Avenue across Santa Fe Drive; urban renewal projects; and the election to keep the Littleton Center in downtown. When Mulvey left the city, she headed Western Welcome Week for five or six years and remembers that Ann and Jerry Healey became involved soon after they came to Littleton. (She applauds them for taking the papers on a second time.) “It’s important for the paper to continue as watchdog for the city — although we may not like everything the paper says.” Mulvey is concerned about future leadership in the community, with little or no competition for council seats. She said: “What can the Independent do about this to encourage leadership and community commitment?”

BACK TO WORK 50+ is

a collaboration between AARP Foundation and Arapahoe/Douglas Works! that connects jobseekers age 50 and older to free job search services and in-demand entry level opportunities in health care and other industries. CALL TOLL FREE TO GET STARTED TODAY!

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10 The Independent

September 26, 2013

opinions / yours and ours

Small price to pay for school repairs The list of needed repairs — and the accompanying price tag — is swelling for a district in which the average school is 50 years old. Littleton Public Schools needs money to pay for those repairs, and the district is asking voters to say yes to a bond issue on November’s ballot. We urge you to do so. LPS schools are among the finest in the state, boasting the Denver metro area’s highest on-time graduation rate at 90 percent. In the 2013 Transitional Colorado Assessment Program tests, the district’s students outscored state averages at the proficient and advanced levels in all grades and subjects by 10 to 20 percentage points. At the same time, the buildings in which LPS’ high-achieving students are being educated are not making the grade. That’s not a surprise for facilities that range from 32 to 93 years old. The state’s 15th-largest school district, with more than 15,000 students, is looking to raise $80 million to rectify

our view this. Yes, that money would come from taxpayers. But no, it would not come in the form of a tax increase. How’s that possible? The district has taken advantage of lower interest rates and refinanced its loans down to 2.9 percent from 5.2 percent. If the bond issue does not pass, that savings will be passed on to homeowners to a tune of about one dollar a month for every $100,000 of a home’s value. The owner of a $300,000 home, for example, could expect to save about $36 a year, perhaps to spend on an extra cup of coffee each month. If Ballot Question 3B does pass? Homeowners would simply not have that extra few dollars a month. But that money would be put to great use by helping to get school district buildings

up to par. No new facilities would be built. In short, the money would go toward “basic infrastructure in the schools,” LPS Superintendent Scott Murphy told us last week. Here’s just a partial look at what a yes vote would buy for schools throughout district: • Heating and ventilation systems would be upgraded. • Failing roofing would be replaced. • Inefficient lighting would be repaired or replaced, depending on the building. • Security and fire alarm systems would be improved to meet current codes and standards. • Power and electrical equipment upgrades would be completed. • Technology infrastructure would be enhanced. The bond issue is supported by business groups like the South Metro Denver Chamber of Commerce and the South Metro Denver Board of Realtors, as well

as by a litany of politicians, both Republicans and Democrats, from Arapahoe County. They know the value of excellent schools to a community, including to its property values. South Metro Chamber President John Brackney, himself an LPS product, says the main reason his organization supports the bond issue is because of the school district’s stellar reputation. We won’t ignore the fact that voters are also being asked to pass a nearly $1 billion measure that will appear on the ballot as Amendment 66. That is a statewide ballot issue that would raise income taxes. If it passes, money would be directed to Littleton Public Schools, but would not be used for the capital improvement projects the local bond issue targets. LPS has never lost a bond election. With the quality of the district’s infrastructure lagging so far behind that of its teachers and students, it be would be unfortunate if this were the first. Vote yes on Ballot Question 3B.

Owning Independent Do you want to go to Mars? is responsibility, honor question of the week

A Dutch organization, Mars One, has announced plans to establish a human settlement on Mars by 2023 and has received thousands of applications, even though it might be a one-way. Colorado Community Media asked visitors to the Outlets at Castle Rock if they would be interested in going.

“Probably. It’s something different. I’m a futuristic thinker … (But if it were a one-way trip) “it would depend on if they have a beach or a lake and if I could convince my family to go.” — Chase McCall, Castle Rock

“No. I’m a picky eater. I don’t think I could eat astronaut food. And I like to be outdoors.” — Brittany Dunn, Centennial

“Yes. That would be really cool. The Earth is getting overpopulated. It’s getting too polluted. I totally know my friends would go with me. They totally agree.” — Lauren M., Parker

“No. I’m in the military, I plan on doing that for a while. And I like to (be in) places that are established. And we’re outdoors people. I don’t know how you could be ‘outdoorsy’ there. I like all four seasons. And it’s a really big risk.” — Brian Bergeman, Aurora

City like hometown to newsman Houstoun Waring invited me to become a reporter for the Littleton Independent in 1961, two years after my graduation from the University of Colorado. I had never met him and had never been to Littleton. But Waring was America’s best-known small-town editor. My dad gave us directions. “Go south on Santa Fe Drive,” he said. “There’s an old flour mill at Santa Fe and Bowles. You can’t miss it.” We missed it. Fire had destroyed the historic Rough and Ready mill two years earlier. Still, we found the newspaper office on Main Street. Hous took Nina and me to lunch at Evelyn and King Hudson’s Country Kitchen restaurant. (The log building is now the heart of Hudson Gardens and Events Center.) We were charmed, both by the erudite editor and Littleton’s iconic Main Street. I joined the Independent’s reporting staff, and in a short time, Littleton felt like our hometown. Most Main Street shops were locally owned. You could find Rudy Lemcke’s meat market, a hometown bank, Veto’s shoe repair, and a grocery store with its original tin ceiling. One of the two drug stores boasted a real soda fountain, but the most popular spot for gossip was the

The common joke lately has been telling me how good I look for 125 years old. I take that as a compliment, as newspaper owners have always been closely linked to their publications — and owning the Littleton Independent is truly an honor. The paper got its start in 1888 when H.V. Bullock purchased a state-of-theart hand-cranked press and turned out 500 copies of the paper. They went to the 100 homes concentrated in downtown Littleton and the 400 farms surrounding it. Richard Little was the first subscriber. In 1888, the U.S. flag had 38 stars, electricity in Littleton was still five years away and the city was still two years from becoming a municipality. Why did Bullock do it? Because newspapers are a part of a healthy community. It was true then and it is still true today. The stories, whether read in print, on computers, tablets or mobile phones, are fundamentally the same types of stories that Bullock and his reporters wrote. They covered growth issues, education, marriages, deaths, births, government, sports, business and everyday people.

The Independent 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

gerard healey President and Publisher ChrIS rOTar Editor SCOTT gIlBerT Assistant Editor jennIfer SmITh Community Editor erIn addenBrOOke Advertising Director audrey BrOOkS Business Manager SCOTT andrewS Creative Services Manager round table at Abe’s Café, where locals gathered each morning for coffee. Hous Waring also got news tips from passing friends while sweeping the sidewalk in front of the newspaper office each morning. Although Littleton’s population was only about 14,000, it was no longer the bucolic rural community that it had been a couple of decades earlier. Local industries such as Red Comet, Heckethorn Manufacturing, Coleman Motors, and others were well established. The Martin Co. and Marathon Oil had ratcheted up the transformation in 1956, announcing new facilities in the Littleton area. Nina, commuting to Greeley to finish Ray continues on Page 12

Sandra arellanO Circulation Director

We do the same today. Did Bullock know someone would be writing a column in the 125th anniversary edition? Of course not. But, I am sure he knew the responsibility that comes with being the owner of this newspaper. Ed Bemis knew it when he owned the majority of it from 1919 until 1966. Hous Waring knew it when he bought a minority interest in 1926. Garrett Ray and Vernon Bangert knew it when they owned it from 1966 until 1981. I knew it when my wife, Ann, and I first owned the paper from 1991 until 1997. And I know it now, as its current owner. In preparing for this column, I read Healey continues on Page 12

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Columnists and guest commentaries The Independent features a limited number of regular columnists, found on these pages and elsewhere in the paper, depending on the typical subject the columnist covers. Their opinions are not necessarily those of the Independent. Want your own chance to bring an issue to our readers’ attention, to highlight something great in our community, or just to make people laugh? Why not write a letter of 300 words or fewer. Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone.

email your letter to letters@ourcoloradonews.com We welcome event listings and other submissions. news and Business Press releases Please visit ourcoloradonews.com, click on the Press releases tab and follow easy instructions to make submissions. Calendar calendar@ourcoloradonews.com military notes militarynotes@ourcoloradonews.com School accomplishments, honor roll and dean’s list schoolnotes@ourcoloradonews.com Sports sports@ourcoloradonews.com Obituaries obituaries@ourcoloradonews.com

fax your information to 303-339-7499 To Subscribe call 303-566-4100

we’re in this together Our team of professional reporters, photographers and editors are out in the community to bring you the news each week, but we can’t do it alone. Send your news tips, your own photographs, event information, letters, commentaries... If it happens, it’s news to us. Please share by contacting us at news@ourcoloradonews.com, and we will take it from there. After all, the Independent is your paper.


The Independent 11

September 26, 2013

If it’s autumn, that must be Russell Russell is here twice a year. He is here in the spring and he is here in the fall. It’s just like when we have to change our clocks. He turns on my sprinkler system in the spring, and he turns it off in the fall. Russell has been doing this for 15 straight years. Sometimes he has been here during the year to solve a problem I am having with my sprinklers. I could do what he does by myself, but I prefer to see him. He is reliable, very professional, and a hoot. He always has a joke in his pocket. Most of the time the jokes are corny or raunchy, or I can see the punch line coming up Quebec. I have never seen his boss, Randy, in 15 years. I only hear his phone messages that let me know when Russell is going to be here. Russell’s appearances are meaningful. He shows up when the snows are gone, and when my trees are starting to wake up. Then he shows up when I have put away the mower for another year, and when I have added another year to my pending obituary.

That’s a little grim. I’ll say instead that Russell in the fall signals a life change, a visit with time and aging, and all he does is turn off the valves. Russell is usually wet, somewhere. He goes from house to house and works with water. I have sometimes wondered if he is wet all of the time, even on his days off. I’m a retired schoolteacher. I used to have virtual Russells all of the time. They were scheduled appointments, reviews, committee assignments, things like that. I planned ahead. I was the area coordinator, so I could schedule my own classes. I knew five years out what I

would be teaching. My course outlines were set, so all I had to do was change the dates on the handouts. It was like college football. You can find out today whom your alma mater will be playing five years from now. We play Cal every year. And Stanford. I went to Berkeley one year to watch us play the Bears. My friend Mike and I were late because we drank victory beers at his house. There was no parking. Well, there was parking but it was on front lawns for a dowry. We had a bright idea and became frat brothers. We pulled into a fraternity house driveway, and a young man parked the car, for free. We went inside and added to the beers, and tried to sound like we were fraternal. Anyway, five years from now, we have to play the Bears again. Time flies. Right now I have two birthdays a year. That’s what it seems like. I was just in my 30s an hour ago and I could hit to the opposite field with the best of them. Now it takes a bowl of black coffee to get me moving.

I just read about Todd Helton. He is retiring, and I want to thank him. I have followed his career ever since he was a quarterback at Tennessee. “Entering his junior year in 1994, Helton was the backup to Jerry Colquitt and ahead of Peyton Manning,” a Wikipedia entry says. “After Colquitt tore knee ligaments in the season opener at UCLA, Helton took over as the starter. Three weeks later against Mississippi State, he suffered a knee injury and was replaced by Manning.” Where was I? Oh, Russell. Time and tide. One day I wanted to add a sprinkler head to an area in the backyard that was balding. Russell broke a “Y” branch off of a tree, and witched. He doused for the underground irrigation tube, and found it. After he found it, he told a bad joke, and left until autumn, when he returned and shut it all away. Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@ comcast.net

Support helps when life makes no sense It just does not make sense. The oldest hospice in Denver, the one that I worked for, has closed. Founded 38 years ago by a Catholic priest who was also a nurse, this oldest in-patient hospice in the whole country began serving the dying and supporting their grieving families. Nearly 35,000 patients were served. The number of family members and friends is immeasurable. After three decades of ministry in church settings, I was introduced to the clinical setting as a chaplain at Hospice of Saint John. This very special hospice had more chaplains per patient than any other hospice. That is probably why I got my job, because they needed a chaplain to be on-call at night to visit families when a death occurred. Hundreds of times I stood with families as they experienced the reality of their loved one’s passing and I helped them negotiate the first sad and confusing moments, often in the very early morning hours. It was a tremendous honor to be with families at this sacred time. So quickly these families received me into their homes and lives and shared their fondest memories and deepest pain. What I learned about a caring, listening, presence and the breadth and magnitude of grief in our culture exceeded anything I had known or seen before. I only thought I knew about hospice until I was a part of it. The hospice staff received me into their ranks and in the natural course of doing their work educated me on gentleness and compassionate caregiving. Nurses continually responded to calls for help and ran to the patient’s side to provide the appropriate medication,

words and touch and returned to the charts in their nurses’ station to record their efforts and comply with regulations and best practices of communication in the medical profession. Certified nursing assistants bathed and turned and comforted patients. Medicine did not relieve the pain of one of our male patients. Our CNAs took turns, 15 minutes at a time, to rub his back and be with him, for day after day, so he would not be alone — his family was not nearly as devoted. During interdisciplinary team meetings, when the doctors, nurses, social workers, CNAs, chaplains, alternative therapy director and bereavement people were all present, I understood why the families were frequently profuse in their gratitude that such care was available at their time of need. A variety of factors created the perfect storm that caused a dramatic and tearful end to this amazing service. Certainly it was not the lack of need or the competency of the staff, which makes it even more perplexing. So my grief extends beyond my concern for my next paycheck. I was ministering in my sweet spot and when people needed us, we were there. In a world that needs care, we were providing it. There are other hospices that will serve people; many of them filled with staff from our hospice, some who began their hospice

service with Hospice of Saint John, so to think that in a world of need we cannot work as we were baffles me. There is a group of people who have become very special to me and are my greatest support. In addition to my wife and me, seven new friends make up our community group — that’s what they call “small-groups” in my church. Most churches today have some kind of “small-group” ministry. Community groups, life groups, care groups, journey groups are some of the names they use. Small groups help faith work when things don’t make sense. We meet for a little over an hour, once

a week, to discuss and study a portion of Scripture, share needs, tell stories and generally live the journey of life together. When my crisis was unfolding I was eager to see my group because I knew they would not pound me with advice or meaningless platitudes, but they would listen and care. That is the kind of care everyone needs when life does not make sense. Dan Hettinger is president of The Jakin Group, a ministry of encouragement, especially to Christian workers. You can email him at dan@welcometothebig leagues.org.

OBITUARIES Germain

Ron Germain

June 8, 1962 - September 10, 2013

Preceded in death by his mother Bonnie. He is survived by, wife Jennifer, son Ryan, father Ray, sister Jean Doss (Joel), niece Christina Ruggiero (Michael), nephew Justin Doss. Memorial service at Parker funeral home September 28 at 2:00 pm.

Local Focus. More News. 23 newspapers & websites. Connecting YOU to your LOCAL community.

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Private Party Contact: Viola Ortega 303-566-4089 obituaries@ourcoloradonews.com

Funeral Homes Visit: www.memoriams.com


12 The Independent

September 26, 2013

School board president thanks Independent Editor’s note: Bob Colwell is the outgoing president of Littleton Public Schools Board of Education, where he served over a unified and successful board for eight years. When I met my wife, she was an Arapahoe High School graduate and had lived in Littleton (Centennial now) since her middle-school years. Having come from California to Colorado for college, Littleton was not a speck on my map yet. Her desire was to live in Littleton near her parents, and we bought our first home near Ridge Road and Elati Street. We had both of our children there before moving to the University and Dry Creek area to find more playmates for my son as he entered school, as our neighborhood at the time had families with kids our age, not my kids’ age. My son started school after the move at Highland Elementary, and that started our connections with LPS and the greater Littleton community. I worked for years on Western Welcome Week while living in Littleton, and early on we started subscribing to the Littleton Independent because I felt it was such a good pulse of the community.

We have continued to subscribe, especially since I so look forward to the reporting on the goings on in the school district. Although we live in the actual Centennial city and have lived in that house for the last 28 years, I still identify as a Littleton person when people ask where I am from, and do not yet identify with Centennial as my city. As people so involved with the schools (being a former teacher in Cherry Creek myself 30 years ago, and my wife retired from teaching at Heritage High School), I have always looked to the Independent to get a good and true picture of what is going on, both good and bad, in the district. I feel like the Independent has always been fair and honest in its reporting of

what has been going on in the 36 years I have lived here. When I hear the words “Littleton Independent,” I think, “My hometown newspaper” (much like the Auburn Journal and Placer Herald I grew up with in my small California town). I think of the many things that have been covered over the years in schools and the community. I think of never having to read of another “Columbine.” I think of four years of “Accredited with Distinction” and the wonderful things and times, and some of the not-sowonderful things from the early ‘90s, that Littleton Public Schools has done in my many years of involvement with the district (of course I am a little biased). I think of the special community that Littleton is, being small and having its own identity through downtown, old Marathon, new Aspen Grove, upcoming Breckenridge Brewery. I think of the small-town feel that Littleton has that is fostered by its own newspaper, and the attention to Littleton that was always in the older paper (I have to admit, I think some of that is slowing, leaving the Independent as the coverage of the area widens), but I still look forward to the paper every week,

Parsons likes paper’s Ray ‘nonpartisan news’

Continued from Page 10

Cherry Hills Village. That experience in state and local studies, including housing, the river and South Platte Park, influenced her to run for city council. We asked if there was story she never wanted to see repeated and the reply was the Walmart story, which resulted in divisiveness and the election of one-issue councilmembers, she felt. Parsons likes to speculate on what Littleton will look like in 30 more years and expresses concern over the separation between old Littleton and Southbridge. Was the disconnect a mistake? The subdivision was planned without a connecting road going through, due to traffic concerns. “Heritage was going to be a walk-in school, they said.” Parsons, who majored in home economics, said she developed an early interest in government through participation in Girls State in Sandpoint, Idaho, where she grew up. “We went to Boise for government orientation.” She enjoyed the girls she met there — one of them is Littleton resident Jinx Reidesel. She and Bob were involved in the Friendship Force for many years, traveling abroad via home stays and hosting visitors in Littleton, including young Russian professionals. She has been and is a member of the Littleton Building Authority. “The council can’t control it.” A longtime subscriber, she enjoys reading the Independent’s “open, nonpartisan news” and compliments Littleton reporter Jennifer Smith for her bravery in stating both sides of issues. And she likes having editorials.

her teaching degree, studied in Littleton’s Carnegie Library, built in 1917 at the foot of Main Street. I recall no computers there in 1960. By 1965 the city had a new library, named for Edwin A. Bemis, publisher of the Independent. Arapahoe Community College was born in 1965 from the practical concern of downtown merchants that the town’s commercial center needed a boost. The college quickly grew into its own campus, marked by architect Eugene Sternberg’s love-it-or-hate-it concrete main building. Ed Bemis had collected historic artifacts for decades, storing them in the courthouse basement. But it would be 1970 before they had a home in the new museum. Littleton’s biggest news story of the 20th century occurred on June 16, 1965 — and I missed it. A cloudburst upstream on the South Platte sent a virtual wall of water down the river, destroying homes and businesses. We had taken the year off to work in Congress. Nina called me at the office of New Jersey Sen. Clifford Case to tell me, “Find a TV; Littleton is being washed down the river!” Looking back now, I think the flood was the least of the challenges facing the community. During our first meeting a few years earlier, Hous Waring had said, “The most important job of the newspaper is nurturing a sense of community.” I adopted that goal when I became editor and co-owner in 1966, but the goal became ever more elusive. Highlands Ranch, just south of Littleton, was still a working ranch where Littleton’s horsey set rode to the hounds, chasing a coyote instead of a fox. But new subdivisions filled the wheat fields east of Broadway and west of Platte Canyon Road. Most of those thousands of newcomers had no connection with Littleton except a post office address. When Robert McQuarie, director of

Hous Waring’s portrait hangs in our conference room as a daily reminder of his legacy and the legacy of this newspaper. During his ownership in 1951, the U.S. government filmed a documentary about him and the Independent called “Small Town Editor” and the paper became known far and wide for its social and political activism. During Garrett Ray’s leadership, the Independent was mentioned by Harvard as the foremost weekly in America. Under my previous ownership, the Independent won a national award as the best weekly amongst like-sized publications. We have sur-

prised some by how far the quality of the Independent has improved this past 18 months. We are not there yet, but progress is under way. Hous wrote in a column for the 100th anniversary, “Now let’s get your ideas for the next 100 years.” I’d like to ask for the same as I’m constantly thinking about how to improve the Independent and deliver increased value to advertisers so that we can afford to keep growing. These are difficult waters for newspapers these days. What drives me is providing the Independent with stability that will ensure its legacy as it moves

By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com Former Littleton Mayor and Councilwoman Sally Parsons remembers dedicating the new Littleton Center in 1973, with its solar panels. At the same time, the new county building, the “Windex palace,” was opened nearby. The solar installation had a backup system and was eventually removed. At that time in the 1970s, she noted that Littleton Independent publisher Hous Waring never quoted her, although the city manager got lots of coverage. Parsons was, however named Citizen of the Year by the Independent — an honor that was announced annually for many years. She was impressed with the Colorado Mu- Parsons nicipal League and its services and was distressed that in the recent past, city council’s leadership did not avail themselves of the CML. Parsons looks forward to serving on the city’s Charter Review Committee and was planning, in her highly organized manner, to review Chapter 22 of the Colorado Constitution on different classes of cities. She is convinced of the importance of home rule. (Each councilor appointed two members to the committee.) She joined the Littleton League of Women Voters soon after her 1958 arrival, when her husband, Bob, got a job with Marathon that brought them to the city. She later served as president of the organization when it expanded to become Arapahoe County League of Women Voters, including Englewood, Littleton and

Healey

Continued from Page 10

through many other anniversary editions — the 50th, 60th, 75th, 80th, 90th and 100th — and they provided me with an even greater appreciation for what the Independent means to this community. My office overlooks the newsroom, the very people who cover the news of Littleton, and I am one of their biggest cheerleaders as they write more weekly copy than they ever imagined, as we all do more with less.

and lament when it is late in the mail. All of the above is why I have my company in Littleton and why almost all of my employees are from Littleton and Centennial. Littleton has always been a family place, and I try to run my business and life in the same way. The way Littleton attracts and retains families for generations is one of the things that makes it great. The work of Houstoun Waring and the early leaders of Littleton and the Independent continue to drive Littleton and its paper and the community. Thank you to the Independent for being a constant in our lives for all these years. And thank you, for what I have always considered to be fair and honest reporting on your part for the paper. I still have a copy of the article you wrote on me when I ran for the school board eight years ago, and refer back to it each election season to see if I have been able to affect the schools the way I had wanted to at the time. Bob Colwell, Littleton, Centennial resident for 36 years, LPS supporter, parent, citizen, Independent lover

ABOUT GARRETT RAY Garrett Ray became a journalist at age 11 and never broke the habit. During three childhood summers, he, his siblings and neighborhood friends published the mimeographed “The Neighborhood News” in Greeley. Ray majored in journalism at the University of Colorado-Boulder and became a reporter for the Littleton Independent in 1961. With Houstoun Waring, he founded the Littleton Press Council. Ray was among founders of the Littleton Leadership Retreat with then city manager Gale Christy and was a founder of the Littleton Council on Human Relations. He has served as president of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors, the Colorado Press Association, and Colorado Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. He was a Congressional Fellow in Washington and a Knight Fellow at Stanford. Ray received the ISWNE’s Cervi Award for lifetime achievement in 2009. After selling the newspapers in 1981, he produced documentaries on a local cable station until 1984, when he went to Colorado State University at Fort Collins. On Sept. 20, 2013, Ray was added to the Denver Press Club Hall of Fame. He and his wife Nina moved back to Littleton and now live at Wind Crest. They have two adult children and nine grandchildren. the Littleton Museum, looked back in 1990, he wrote that Littleton in the 1960s and ’70s “was facing its fate, ready to melt into an urban context…Suburbanization was overwhelming the town.” Littleton struggled to maintain its sense of place and its sense of identity, he observed. That struggle continues. Vernon Bangert, my business partner, and I sold the newspaper company in 1982. In 1984 Nina and I moved to Fort Collins, where I taught journalism at Colorado State University. We returned 25 years later, feeling that we had been in a sort of time warp. We have renewed connections with old Littleton friends but feel little stake in the growth-related battles that still dominate our changing community. We have a Littleton post office address and again happily call ourselves Littletonites. But we actually live in Highlands Ranch, where now and then, we still hear a coyote. into the future. Littleton needs the Independent and the Independent needs Littleton. My goal is that my name appears in the middle of the list of owners, not the end. I know I have a lot of previous owners rooting for me and looking over my shoulder. So, feel free to tell me I look good for 125. Because my goal is to make sure the same can be done for future owners when the Independent turns 150, 175, 200 … Jerry Healey, owner of the Littleton Independent, is the president and publisher of Colorado Community Media.


The Independent 13

September 26, 2013

Happy 125th to the Littleton Independent Romano’s, proudly serving Littleton community for 46 years


14 The Independent

September 26, 2013

• “My first job ever was at the Littleton Independent, my first real introduction to the world of journalism. I was 16, a student at Littleton High School and worked a couple of days a week after school as an errand girl. Occasionally, I was thrilled to be able to step in and help proofread a story to help get the paper to print. I have always felt a strong connection to my hometown newspaper; it allows me to stay in touch with what’s going on and allows me to reminisce, and enjoy places and events that are unique to Littleton, like Western Welcome Week. Happy birthday! — Ann Trujillo “I am here to confess to being with the trio of kids that `borrowed’ the bull from the steak place in Englewood on Broadway. We also the same night `borrowed’ the bears from the North Woods Inn on Santa Fe along with a san-o-let and took them to the front lawn of Arapahoe High School. It was an exciting evening for us and I am sure that by now anyone that was upset about it will forgive a high school prank. Your paper ran a picture of the lawn display and maybe a little story or just a caption under the picture … There, I feel better telling you about this and have a clear conscience now.” — Kathy Reynolds

Michael Penny, shown recently in his office, has been Littleton’s city manager since October 2011. “It’s been great. I have not looked back,” Penny says. Photo by Chris Rotar

Penny for his thoughts City manager aims to move Littleton forward By Chris Rotar

crotar@ourcoloradonews.com Michael Penny isn’t your father’s city manager. Penny, 45, moved to Littleton two years ago to take the reins from the retiring Jim Woods. With him, he brought his wife Marie, his then-10-year-old daughter Anna, and a passion for physical fitness.

ACC starts from humble beginnings to help build a vibrant community through education, cultural events, and workforce training.

The former town manager of Frisco — population of roughly 2,700 — has also brought change, including at a number of city staff positions. Two years in, he’s leading a city that seemingly is more attractive and friendly to developers, particularly those of apartments, than in recent memory. Penny clearly isn’t steeped in Littleton tradition, but he says he is mindful of it. He also will tell you he is more focused on what’s to come. Leading Littleton — population of roughly 42,000 — into Penny continues on Page 15

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The Independent 15

September 26, 2013

Penny Continued from Page 14

the future is a big job, but Penny has big plans. Penny recently sat down for an interview with the Independent to discuss matters of the past, present and future.

What primarily attracted you to this job? It was the right-size community. Certainly, the school district — having a child in the K-12 system, we pay a lot of attention to that. My wife went to Arapahoe Community College years ago, so she was much more familiar with the community than I was. When you’re moving a family it’s not just about the job. The location tied in, it’s still easy to get to the mountains. I’m a mountain person. It’s the whole package, I would say.

What, if anything, has surprised you about Littleton? Communitywide, probably not a whole lot. Internally, from a staff perspective, I saw lots of opportunities for improvement. And that’s my management style versus what had been here in place. I didn’t have a lot of expectations. It was a pretty sudden move, so you don’t get to think about it a whole lot. People who live here love the community. It’s been what I would have expected it to be, overall.

My wife loves living here, my daughter is ecstatic with the school system. Every year, they’re her favorite teachers ever. She’s into gymnastics. South Suburban (Parks and Recreation) has provided an incredible opportunity for her. Obviously, I love what I do. Council has been great. We have an incredible staff who are providing the services to the c o m m u n i t y. It’s been great. I have not looked back.

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Do you see one of your primary functions being to enact change, to maybe be part of a “new wave” in the city? We have a lot of people who have been here 30, 40, 50 years. They love what Littleton is. But the reality of communities is that the only constant is change. The world is changing around us. The question for the government is, “Are we prepared for the next generation?” A lot of people’s kids are wanting to move back to Littleton. New people are wanting to move here. I think that the timing of me coming here is good timing to ask those questions. Do we have the amenities? Are we prepared? We want that next generation to come here and participate with us in the conversation of where we’re going. Littleton has been an incredible place. But you don’t get to put a moat up around it and have it be (the same) forever. At the same time, the economy is coming back while we’re having this

conversation. Most of the easy pieces of land have been developed in Littleton. It’s all about, what do we want to do? What’s the prep work we can do so the people coming into the community in 20, 30, 40 years can have the same love? The values (of new residents) are not necessarily going to be the same. We can’t sit on our laurels and say the next generation is going to love (Littleton) for the same reasons we love it.

Does Littleton’s sense of history influence your decision-making process? Certainly, is the short answer. What we have here is incredibly important. You’re not going to raze the city and start over again. The people who built Littleton have deep roots and values.

What is your vision for the city? What will Littleton look like in five years? We set the foundation so people can live their lives. That’s what I believe our job is. We live in a representative democracy. My ultimate goal is that you don’t think about us. We want you to live your life. If we are succesful in what we’re doing, that’s what you get to do. My goal is to be very much out of sight, out of mind, so people can live their lives. What I would expect to have happened, is you’re going to see a transition of a lot of new folks moving into the community. You’re also going to see that in the city organization. You’ll see a lot of employees retiring and new ones moving in. I think it’s an incredibly exciting time to be in Littleton.

• “Bessie’s Hope has been appreciative of the Littleton Independent for almost 20 years now. The newspaper has helped us promote our unique work that bridges generations by bringing communities into nursing homes through volunteer programs that involve youth groups, families, individuals and adult groups. Our work enhances the lives of the nursing home and assisted living elders through the relationships that are cultivated and the meaningful activities Bessie’s Hope provides on a regular basis in Littleton elder care facilities. Most of our volunteer base are youth of all ages from schools, churches and youth organizations. Many of the youth are in at-risk programs or residential treatment centers. Your newspaper has helped us inform the community of how much these two populations have to offer each other — the atrisk youth and nursing home elders. Through the training and facilitation Bessie’s Hope provides mutually rewarding relationships are created. Thank you, Littleton Independent, for being there!” — Linda Holloway, co-founder/development director

‘We have an incredible staff who are providing the services to the community. It’s been great.’ City Manager Michael Penny

Do you love living in Littleton? I do. And I believe it can be better.

With your help, when I join the City Council here is what I recommend:  Control spending instead of forcing new taxes and fees on citizens  Impose a reasonable impact fee on residential development  Change city emphasis back to helping seniors stay in their own homes as long as

possible  Limit high density development and promote retail or commercial zoning  City Council must conduct its business in the open rather than hiding government business in executive sessions  Engage and support citizens in planning, procedures and amendments Better Littleton = Elect John Watson = Vote for John Watson City Council Member at Large JohnWatsonForLittleton.com | jwatson@johnwatsonforlittleton.com | 303-972-6930

Paid for by John Watson for Littleton


16 The Independent

September 26, 2013

DANCING DAYS

Members of the Arapahoe High School Toms dance team perform during halftime at the Sept. 16 football game. Team members perform a dance routine to music that includes a variety of dance moves that won the team a state title last year. Photo by Tom Munds

ulations Littleton on 125 years t a r g n ! Co

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The Independent 17

September 26, 2013

Goggles provide sobering lessons Whiting involved in community Experience shows volunteers the effects of being drunk

By Sonya Ellingboe

By Tom Munds

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews. com

tmunds@ourcoloradonews. com Eight residents donned Drunk Buster Goggles and experienced the impact alcohol potentially has on their performance when they attended the Sept. 11 Impaired and Distracted Driving Class put on by the Englewood Police Department. Volunteers donned three different sets of goggles and were asked to perform routine roadside sobriety tests. The goggles represented three different levels of intoxication. The first represented a blood alcohol level of .04 to .06 percent; the second a level of .08 to .15 percent; and the third represented level of .26 to .35 percent. Three Englewood police officers, Cliff Caskey, Brian Taylor and Mike O’Connor, each administered one of the roadside tests. Caskey had the volunteers wearing the first set of goggles go through walking a straight line and Taylor had volunteers wearing the second-level goggles try to stand on one foot for a specific length of time. O’Connor had the volunteers wearing the third-level goggles try to catch a good-size rubber ball. “I was totally disoriented wearing the goggles and, as you might expect, the last set of goggles were the worst,” Englewood resident Steve Scrum

Volunteer Mark Craft seeks to maintain his balance wearing the Drunk Buster Goggles as he tries to walk a straight line for Englewood Police Officer Cliff Caskey. The goggles showed how alcohol impairs reactions. Photo by Tom Munds said after going through the three tests. “I was arrested for DUI quite a few years ago and, as I remember it, the goggles make my reactions very much the same as drinking did back then.” He said going through the experience helped him be more aware of just how much alcohol can impair reactions and coordination. Charlotte Clark said after the experience wearing the goggles, she was horrified to believe individuals with physical and mental faculties so impaired by alcohol would try to drive after drinking. “Wearing the goggles was quite an experience,” the Englewood resident said. “I guess I never realized the level of impairment drinking could have. When I wore the third-level goggles, I couldn’t even come close to catching

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the ball. No one should even think about driving if they are like I was in those goggles.” Mother Nature dictated that the program schedule be changed. If it hadn’t rained, the volunteers would have gotten to don the goggles and pedal small carts through a weaving course of cones. Since that wasn’t possible, the course was moved inside. This is the first time the Englewood Police Department has offered thes program to the public, and Tony Arnoldy, police community relations representative, said the program went very well despite not being able to use the carts. “I feel the program still went very well. I received a lot of positive comments from the volunteers,” she said. “They told me it was eye-opening to experience the impairment changes that alcohol can cause.”

Darlee Whiting likes to say she was born at the Castlewood Dam, where the dam keeper’s wife was a midwife. She grew up in Douglas County and by the mid 1950s, she was married, living in Littleton and working at the new Marathon Oil Research Center. Since then, she has been an Independent subscriber. In fact, Jack Whiting’s mother, Molly, was editor Houstoun Waring’s secretary for a period and Darlee’s wedding invitations were printed by the paper’s presses. Both Hous Waring and Whiting publisher Ed Bemis were wedding guests, she remembers Active in Littleton Rotary for many years — and one time president — she said, “I tell Rotary presidents they should take the Independent.” She, like other we have interviewed, remembers Hous Waring’s Sunday breakfasts. She also recalls Pat Benero’s society columns in the Independent with a smile. She started college at Colorado State University, returned to school and finished her teaching credentials at the University of Denver, then completed a master’s in counseling at University of Colorado-Denver. Since the elementary schools did not have

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enough budget to hire staff psychologists, she found that her teaching colleagues at Centennial Elementary would consult her. She encouraged male Rotary colleagues to volunteer at the school with children who might not have a male image at home. Rotarians still read to children there, continuing the literacy program that was a focus for her. “I am most proud of being named Mother of the Year by the Independent,” she said. She was also named Most Valuable Citizen, sharing that title with Mary Bradford. She remembers a call from Independent editor Shirley Smith or from employee Deanna Kristopeit to let her know they had received a letter stating: “How dare you pick a divorcee?” “The best thing I ever did was to move to Littleton,” she said, recalling ongoing community involvement: She was Friends of the Library/Museum president and participated in writing and performances in the “Fiasco,” community musical spoofs the organization produced. She was also president of the museum board and library board in addition to ongoing work with Rotary on polio eradication around the world. Her early Douglas County years included a large family which is still nearby and ready for her annual holiday bowling party and dinner. She truly is home.


18 The Independent

September 26, 2013

Wind Crest opens new building Continuing care facility welcomes first residents By Ryan Boldrey

rboldrey@ourcoloradonews.com Wind Crest Retirement Community rolled out the red carpet for the first nine residents of its brand-new continuing care neighborhood this past week. The four-story Mill Vista Lodge, set for its grand opening Oct. 10, features 144 spacious suites and apartments, with one secure floor dedicated to memory care, two floors for residents in need of assisted living and a ground floor that is dedicated to short-term rehabilitation, long-term care and nursing services. Fred Krey, 95, and Hazel Vicenec, 93, became two of the first to call the lodge home, moving into their new assisted living apartments on Sept. 16. “My bed and bathroom, according to my bed, are on the wrong side of the room, but I’ll get that straightened out,” said Krey, who has lived at Wind Crest for six years. “It’s going to be pretty nice once I get used to it. I’ve just got to get situated. “They have a lot of nice places you can come sit when you have company.” Krey, who moved to Wind Crest from Kansas to be closer to his son, two granddaughters and four great-grandchildren, expects a lot of visits from family. Vicenec hopes the friends she made in her old building at Wind Crest make good on their promises to come visit regularly. “They say `we’ll come visit,’ but I’ve got to see that first,” Vicenec said. “I’m excited about meeting new people too. People always say, `Hazel, you make friends everywhere you go,’ and I do.”

About Mill Vista Lodge

“When it comes to architectural design, every space and paint color has a

purpose,” said Micah Peterson, continuing care director at Mill Vista. “There was so much forethought put into how residents can use each space to best suit their needs.” The new facility has eight common areas, two on each floor, that feature a large, comfortable living room space, a kitchen and a dining area. And while there are set meal times, the residents have the flexible option to get meals served to them throughout the day, and also have the ability to use the kitchens themselves 24/7. Other common areas include outdoor garden spaces, enclosed porches on the upper floors, and the lodge also boasts a small movie theater, a physical therapy gym, multiple salons and a massage room. On the memory floor, there is an art studio with panoramic city views, memory stations throughout, and hallways are color-coded. “We have simpler apartment rooms on this level with more comfortable common areas to encourage socialization,” Peterson said. “Socialization is key for people with memory issues. It helps to keep them energized and keep their minds sharp.” In addition to encouraging socialization among seniors, Peterson said Wind Crest also empowers staff to spend time sitting with residents and sharing meals with them, making for a much more familial environment. “We’re all about proactively taking care of people,” he said, adding that the opening of the Mill Vista Lodge allows residents who are developing a need for a higher level of care to stay on the 85-acre campus and not have to look for a new facility to live in. The lodge, which will welcome its residents in slowly, so that staff doesn’t get overwhelmed and can provide optimal care through the transition phase, has also had a significant economic impact on the community, bringing 100 new jobs.

Hazel Vicenec is all smiles and cheers as she gets wheeled into her new home by Wind Crest director of nursing Elizabeth Song on Sept. 16. Vicenec was one of the first five residents to move from the Aspen House into the retirement community’s brand new Mill Vista Lodge. Courtesy photo

Littleton Public Schools: 4

Littleton Independent:

First schoolhouse of Littleton School District, built during the winter of 1865-66 north of Union Avenue and east of the Platte River. (Littleton Historical Museum photo)

LPS congratulates the Littleton Independent for 125 years of history, traditions and excellence


The Independent 19

September 26, 2013

Littleton Museum - a source for History, Art, and Culture

h t 5 2 1 y p Hap e h t o t y r a s r e v i n t n n A e d n e p e d n I n o t e Littl

Luther H. Be Littleton Ind mis at job press at the ependent, c. 1898 e h , t 0 f 0 o 9 r 1 e ublishom 1892 to d is p , r e . Ham endent fr backgroun A h p e Jos ndep sk. In the I n o t Little at the de c. 1898. seated A. Bemis, Edwin

The Littleton Museum’s

collection is enriched by the Independent’s historical archives.

The newspaper has been a

valuable chronicle of the community’s history over its 125 years. This collection is frequently requested by the public in

searches for obituaries, births and documentation of events, articles of interest, and legal publications.

Call the Museum for an

appointment to view the microfilmed copies of the Littleton Independent.

Littleton Museum

6028 S. Gallup Street Littelton, CO 80120 303-795-3950 www.littletongov.org/museum


20 The Independent

• “I grew up here in Littleton and raised my family here, and I have many, many memories of this wonderful small-town newspaper. My father, Walter S. Erwin, started his law practice on Main Street in downtown Littleton in the early 1950s when there were only a handful of lawyers. I spent many hours on Main Street with my dad, including visits to the Littleton Independent office, which moved several times as I grew up. Dad especially enjoyed talking to the sports guys, because my brother was an athlete and three-sport letterman at Littleton High School in the 1970s. The paper extensively covered high school sports them, and my brother was very often mentioned. I spent many hours cutting out articles about Littleton, sports, baseball and my brother while compiling a scrapbook for my brother’s high school graduation, and then continued receiving it by mail after I married, along with the Northwest Arkansas Times, so that I could put together a scrapbook for his college years as well. However, my best memory of the paper was from my eighth-grade year (1965-66) at Euclid Junior High School, where our History teacher, Brooks Harding, gave us an assignment to write a paper on a subject from Colorado History. I chose to write about Alfred Packer, the supposed cannibal who was buried in Littleton Cemetery. My father suggested that I interview Edwin Bemis, the publisher of the paper, for my report, as he had known Alfred Packer personally. My father then made an appointment for me to meet with Mr. Bemis, and I have never been more nervous in my life. He was very kind, and answered all of my questions, with some added information, of course. My paper was a big hit with my teacher, as most kids did not have a personal meeting with the publisher of the local paper as one of their references. I got an A+ on the paper, but my teacher kept it, as he felt it was so well done. I gave it to him gladly, feeling very proud, but wished over the years that I had kept a copy.” — Kathy Erwin Hunter

September 26, 2013

Arapahoe Community College as it looks today. Courtesy photos

Independent was there at ACC’s birth Waring helped drive creation of school By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com “The Story of the Arapahoe Junior College, as told by Houstoun Waring; Littleton Independent, Sept. 2, 1966; … How John Kinghorn et al. Started an Institution.” This is the header for retired history professor Frank Lee Earley’s preface to his recently published “The View From the Fourth Floor: a Personal History of Arapahoe Community College, 1965-2005.” “Waring was the owner, publisher and editor of the Littleton-Arapahoe Independent newspaper. His weekly column carried many items regarding the history of Littleton, as well as statements of editorial opinion on current events … Excerpts from that column: “Someday an historian will try to write about the early days of Arapahoe Junior College. He will describe an election on May 4, 1965, when the people of Littleton and Sheridan voted 1,690 to 1,449 to create a junior college district in the boundaries of District 6 and District 2 (as the public school districts were called). But he may not know the intimate beginnings. Supt. A. A. Brown and other educators had pushed for a junior college six years earlier but the time was not ripe and the plan was voted down on May 5, 1959, by 13 to 1. “Most of us thought the junior college was dead. A vote of 13 to 1 looks pretty final to the average man, but not to Virginia Baker. Virginia had worked successfully to get art taught in the Littleton Schools and in 1964 she began thinking about a junior college ….” The column continues to tell how Baker started with the businessmen at the early morning “Round Table” at Abe’s Restaurant on Main Street, including Jack Thomas, Norman Workman, R.B. Valore and Councilman John Kinghorn. Encouraged by their response, she next visited the city council and arranged a meeting at Town Hall to launch the Junior College Plan on Nov. 20. By the end of that meeting, a steering committee was formed with Kinghorn as chairman. Also on board: Ivan Thomas, Jack Thomas, City Manager Howard McMahan, school board president Richard Ringoen and school executive Kenneth Baker — and Virginia Baker, who was called away by her mother’s illness. “Soon some real muscle was behind the junior college

Arapahoe Community College, in a photo taken during construction. idea: folks like Vic Ross, Peg Williams, Dorothy Hores, the King Hudsons, the Reg Besettes and Mrs. Louis Trujillo were promoting the plan,” Waring wrote. There was a feasibility study and representatives of Littleton, Englewood, Cherry Creek and Sheridan school boards were invited to dinner by Kinghorn’s steering committee. Cherry Creek was beset by Denver’s annexation moves and backed out. Englewood withdrew, fearing the college would be located in Littleton. Littleton and Sheridan moved ahead and pledged a twomill ceiling on a levy, at which point cost-conscious Waring and the Independent actively backed the college. An election was set for May 4, 1965, and intense campaigning ensued, including a half-page endorsement ad in the Independent, signed by individuals and civic groups. Opposition to the plan was led by a William B. Myers, and the vote at Hopkins School in his neighborhood was against — 296-201. The other five polling places were favorable: Centennial School, 251-166; Field, 155-147; Franklin, 356259; and Sheridan, 144-137. On June 26, 1965, the College Governing Council was elected, headed by James McKechnie. Dr. Allan P. Crawfurd was hired, he began to hire faculty, and classes were scheduled to begin in September 1966 in West School and surrounding buildings. The Independent continues to report on the college, which joined the state system in a few years and now has locations in Parker and Castle Rock.

Waring is remembered at college By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com

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At a recent breakfast of Arapahoe Community College retirees, late Independent publisher Hous Waring was remembered for his ongoing support for the college —and curiosity about his world that resulted in attending classes each semester. Former astronomy professor Phil Kepner recalled a night in 1986 when he showed Waring Halley’s Comet as it streaked across the sky. Waring had taken Kepner’s astronomy class several times and was deeply interested. “We walked out the west door and there it was,” Kepner said. Waring told him he had first seen it as a child after sneaking out of the

house with his sister. Other Waring connections: Judy Ganschaw was in charge of the 1990s remodeling, which included dedicating the Houstoun Waring Theater on the second floor, with his portrait in the entrance. Vicky Tramell, who taught biology for many years, questioned Waring’s attitude towards women. Frank Lee Earley had copies of an ACC history he published: “View from the Fourth Floor,” which opens with a Waring column about establishing ACC. Several, including longtime psychology professor Clark Alexander, had been members of the long-running Town and Gown Society that Waring founded to encourage social exchanges between faculty members and local residents.


The Independent 21

September 26, 2013

Denver Press Club honors Garrett Ray Activist keeps eye

on city, newspaper

Independent’s former owner is named to Hall of Fame

By Sonya Ellingboe

By Jennifer Smith

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews. com

jsmith@ourcoloradonews. com The Denver Press Club bestowed its highest honor upon Garrett Ray, the Littleton Independent’s former owner and editor, during an evening ceremony on Sept. 20. The club, the oldest of its kind in the United States, inducted Ray into its Hall of Fame, where he joins the likes of Gene Amole, Fred Brown, Ed Stein, Paula Woodard, Dick Kreck, Jean Otto, Bertha Lynn and Starr Yelland, to name just a few. “More than ever, we need our community newspapers, with people like Garrett who are dedicated to their craft and to giving back to their communities,” Eric Brown, Gov. John Hickenlooper’s spokesman and a former student of Ray’s at Colorado State University, said upon introducing Ray to the audience. “He cares about people, he cares about his family, he cares about his friends and, most of all, he cares about doing it right.” Upon accepting the honor, Ray credited his mother, an editor, for the ink running through his blood. He recalled literally cranking out a neighborhood newsletter at the age of 11, on a hand-crank mimeograph machine. “Over the next half-century, I grudgingly adapted to each new technology,” he said, even to what he calls the “unimaginable new world of digital technology.” Ray pursued two careers in journalism, both of which the press club calls remarkable. After leaving the Independent, he went on to teach countless young, aspiring journalists like Brown at CSU subjects such as media ethics, reporting, edit-

Fred Brown, former Denver Post political correspondent, listens as Garrett Ray, former owner of the Littleton Independent, addresses the Denver Press Club upon being inducted into the club’s Hall of Fame. Photo by Jennifer Smith ing and management. “The world needs real journalists still, men and women with courage and brains and truth,” he told his fellow members of the Fourth Estate. Today, he says, he’s launching his third career from his home at Wind Crest, a seniorliving community in Highlands Ranch. He’s helping his neighbors learn to write their own life stories. “There are so many rich tales of courage, talent and wisdom,” he said. Although Ray is an iconic figure in Littleton, he missed what is perhaps the city’s most iconic story. In 1965, he was in Washington, D.C., on a fellowship. “My wife called and said, `Turn on the TV. Littleton is washing down the river,’ he recalls. “That was the big story I never got to cover, because I was writing press releases for the senator.” That flood launched the career of another of the evening’s inductees, Gary Gerhardt, who spent 40 years at the Rocky Mountain News. “It was cool to be in the

newsroom on the day of that flood,” said Kevin Flynn, who worked many of those years with Gerhardt. Brown reminded everyone of the unprecedented flooding that Colorado was trying to recover from on the night of the Press Club gathering, and the armies of local journalists weathering the storm. “With stories of friends helping friends, neighbors helping neighbors, it’s fitting to honor somebody who is so entrenched in community journalism,” he said. Other 2013 inductees include Michael Balfe Howard, Joseph S. Sinisi, Pocky Marranzino Sr. and poet Eugene Field. The Denver Press Club is the oldest press club in the United States. Local journalists began meeting in 1867 and incorporated in 1877, a year after Colorado became the 38th state. “Ardent political and professional rivals in print, the editors still found time to tap into the barrel of `Taos Lightning,’ discuss events of the day and play a little poker,” according to the club’s website.

“The Littleton Independent can no longer be read in five minutes,” observed Libby Bortz when we sat down to talk about her view of the paper’s role in the community. That was a clear compliment from a woman who has watched over her town closely for decades. “The paper has been important in promoting what is good for the community by reporting on issues, conflicts, etc. … The importance of the written word.” A reader since 1960, she recalls that Hous Waring’s obituaries sometimes made her cringe, but she has felt affection for them as well. And the “doctor’s wife” headline, written when she was chosen as the Independent’s Outstanding Citizen? No, she wasn’t angry — it started a dialogue. And her daughter wrote a letter to the editor about it. It was Libby Bortz who nominated Littleton as one of the 10 Best Suburbs in the Ladies’ Home Journal. Citing her League of Women Voters membership as “a great launching place to learn about political issues,” she commented about the strength of her community, which was able to identify both a problem and a solution. “The newspaper had a great deal to do with identifying issues,” she said, citing an article on a lecture by architect Eugene Sternberg about what needed to

happen in his view as an example. She has been a leader in the Littleton Housing Authority for years and remembered when it decided to build senior housing and realized it was not possible with private funds so they applied to the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Units were approved, then President Nixon took them away and nothing seemed to help. “We decided on a senior demonstration to embarrass HUD. The response: HUD did give back the units, so a positive response was held instead on Bradley House property,” Bortz said. “Newspapers and TV were notified. You could do that in Littleton. I don’t know about anywhere else.” Bortz, always a strong feminist, a recalls the HUD administrator Buzz Bolis saying “just remember baby, you won’t get into the men’s locker room at the Y” as a closing comment. She has had a long involvement with Arapahoe Community College, where events are often reported in the Independent. She appreciates the recent coverage of state issues, expanding to the metro area. “It gives more of a sense of integration.” Is there a story she hopes never appears again? The report on the Columbine tragedy comes to her mind first.

‘The newspaper had a great deal to do with identifying issues.’ Libby Bortz

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22 The Independent

September 26, 2013

No question, a community needs its paper Editor’s note: Littleton Independent reporter Jennifer Smith asked community members a series of questions relating to the newspaper’s 125th birthday. We share some of the answers with you in the following Q&A.

ing people who are working every day to make life better for their families, friends and loved ones.” — Carol Worth

How is the Littleton community special to you?

“It can contribute a lot. A historical perspective on current items, for example.” — Paul and Betty Bingham

“What’s not to love about Littleton, especially the downtown! We’ve been doing business in downtown Littleton since 2009. Before that, we had offices here. I fell in love with downtown Littleton since I laid eyes on the charming little-town as a kid.” — Erin Salazar, Lola’s Sugar Rush

&

QA

“I appreciate the friendly citizens, unique shopping district and diverse activities as there is something for everyone. Littleton has one of the best school districts in the state along with excellent parks and recreation; I am certainly proud to be a part of such an amazing community.” — Nancy Doty, Arapahoe County Commissioner “Littleton is an amazing town with big ambitions. It has culture, business, and innovation in a small town feel. And of course, having South Platte Park set aside is a tremendous decision and opportunity for a small city.” — Skot Latona, supervisor of South Platte Park “I love the people who live in Littleton, they make it special for me. As soon as I moved here I felt this amazing sense of community that I had never experienced.” — Jennifer Orsund Rhea

What does having a historic local newspaper contribute to the community? “Especially with the current state of TV, radio and newspapers, a local newspaper is a critical source of information. I feel informed about the important events in my community because of the local newspaper.” — Amy Conklin “A historic local newspaper contributes a tradition of involvement.” — Frank Atwood “Local papers always highlight community efforts the best. We can all relate as a town! It is great.” — Rachel Diller, The Poodle Shop “Historically, the local newspaper kept us informed about the people we knew and places we went and what we could do. We learned that the world close around us is a wonderful place full of car-

“It shows tradition, my grandma read the Littleton independent, my mom does, I do.” — Derek McKee

“Great continuity over the years, and the ability to read about local (and not just Denver) issues.” — Rob Vander Leest

What stories do you hope the Littleton Independent gets to write in the future? “The growth and the great things happening in our community, and of course, about our military.” — Cindy Dietz, mother of fallen Navy SEAL Danny Dietz “Restoring the river to a more natural state is happening in South Platte Park and will be an outstanding story when it’s complete. Ongoing reinvigoration of the Littleton Blvd., Broadway and Santa Fe commercial corridors is also one that’s exciting.” — Bruce Stahlman, Littleton City Council member “Continuing coverage of activities in the community. As we redevelop and grow, I hope there will be a lot of activities to report on.” — Conklin “An ongoing column about events in the city’s past.” — Will Gravely, retired DU professor “I hope the paper continues to write the stories of the people who made up this town…The people are what a true local paper covers best.” — Lori Lohman “It would be great if the Littleton Independent was able to provide more in depth discussions/op-eds on state-wide ballot issues and if the Independent got to write about the South Platte River’s abundant water supply providing recreation for all age.” — Doty

What stories do you hope we never have to write again? “Columbine. Murder stories. Polarizing of opinion and public policy debates.” — Gravely “No more police/firefighter funerals. They’re just too hard.” — Stahlman “I hope we never have to read again about a destructive flood on the South Platte or any upstream problems such as dam failures (Chatfield, Macllelan, or South Platte Reservoir) or chemical/sewage spills into the river.” — Latona “I would have to say we don’t have to

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An overhead view of downtown Littleton. File photo have any more Gold Star Families and the loss of their loved ones.” — Dietz

ing its way back to prominence.” — Paul and Betty Bingham

“I don’t ever want to see another story of a mass shooting or a war breaking out somewhere in the world. However, if they happen you must write about them and how the community is impacted by the events.” — Worth

“I first think of Houstoun Waring since he embodied the title in his thinking and courageous leadership for the city for so long.” — Gravely

When you hear the words “Littleton Independent,” what’s the first thing that comes to mind? “A well-respected newspaper with a long-time concern with Littleton, having been through some tough years but find-

“The Best Local Newspaper in the West!” — Doty “Trustworthy news.” — McKee “Houstoun Waring, and here’s to the next 125 years!” — Stahlman “Our wonderful community.” — Dietz


The Independent 23

September 26, 2013

Former councilor, reporter remembers By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com Rebeca Kast’s Littleton Independent connection dates back to her work for Gretchen Peacock’s Littleton Times, starting in 1988. (She moved to Littleton in 1987.) Ann and Jerry Healey purchased the Times, followed later by purchase of the Littleton Independent, Highlands Ranch Herald and Englewood Herald. She continued to report for the Independent on Littleton government and local news, including the annexation of Trailmark to Littleton, which involved the plan of getting a golf course for Littleton. (It was never developed.) “People weren’t paying attention,” she observes. In January 1993, Kast was appointed to the Littleton City Council to finish Bob

Tonsing’s term when he left for the RTD board, and in November 1993, she ran for the at-large seat and won a four year term. “After that, I took two years off and ran again in 1999 and served on the council until 2007 — a total of 13 years.” Kast is especially proud of a threepart series she wrote for the Independent about Littleton’s historic preservation ordinance and its lack of “teeth.” This spurred her interest in historic preservation, and she attended a Littleton Leadership Retreat as a reporter and committed to leader Mike Massey’s “do-

able deals.” She agreed to write a historic walking tour for downtown Littleton. She joined the Second Century Fund, which Massey started after that retreat to arrange for low-interest loans for preservation projects. That organization changed to Historic Littleton Inc. and became a membership organization, where she served as president for a period and continues a board member. Later, Kast wrote for the paper as a freelance columnist. When asked about what she hoped the paKast per would never have to cover again, the Walmart story came to her mind. “It was a really difficult time for everyone. There was collateral damage.” She

THINGS TO DO

SEPT. 26

SEPT. 28

Heart Connection); Oct. 23 (Osteoporosis); and Oct. 30 (Caffeine: Are You Addicted?) at the South Denver Heart Center, 1000 Southpark Drive, Littleton. Join Richard Collins, M.D., “The Cooking Cardiologist,” along with Susan Buckley, RD, CDE, as they share their expertise on Heart Healthy nutrition and cooking. For more information or to register, call 303-744-1065, southdenver.com

HOOTENANNY. READYTALK

OCT. 7

BLOOD DRIVE. Latter Day Saints - Littleton Stake community blood drive is from 1:30-7 p.m. Sept. 26 inside the gym at 1939 E. Easter Ave., Littleton. For information or to schedule an appointment contact the Bonfils’ Appointment Center at 303-363-2300 or visit bonfils.org.

presents its third annual HOOTenanny from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 29 at the Audubon Nature Center, 11290 Waterton Road, Littleton. The event features live Colorado owls presented by Hawk Quest at 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.; horse-drawn hay rides by the Highlands Ranch Community Association; live bluegrass music by the Colorado Bluegrass Music Society; and pizza for purchase from Southside Pizzeria. Cost ($7 for adults; $5 for children ages 3-12) include entrance, hay ride, crafts, owl pellet dissection, face painting and more. Registration not required; purchase tickets ahead of time at https://secure.acceptiva. com/?cst=9ae680.

SEPT. 30 GOLF TOURNAMENT. Mark Wiebe will again host the 8th annual Adam’s Camp charity golf tournament, presented by Retirement Plan and Investment Providers, to raise funds for the children, youth and families of Adam’s Camp. The tournament is on Sept. 30 at the Colorado Golf Club in Parker, and 132 golfers will have the opportunity to play the exclusive course, home to the 2013 Solheim Cup. Lunch, provided by Noodles and Company, will begin at 11 a.m. and the tournament shotgun start will be at 12:30 p.m.. Play will be followed by cocktails, dinner, live auction and prizes. Foursomes are $1,600, individual registration is $400 and limited sponsorships are available.  Proceeds will support the children, youth and families of Adam’s Camp, of Centennial, which provides intensive therapy camps to children with developmental disabilities and their families as well as recreational camps for youth and young adults with disabilities. To sponsor, register or to learn more, visit  www.adamscamp.org, call 303-563-8290 or email sarah@ adamscamp.org. OCT. 2, OCT. 9, OCT. 16, OCT. 23, OCT. 30 NUTRITION CLASS. Free Heart Health nutrition classes and cooking demonstrations are offered from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sept. 25 (Controlling Blood Pressure with Food); Oct. 2 (What You Need to Know About Arthritis); Oct. 9 (Top 20 Functional Foods); Oct. 16 (The Insulin/Sugar/

notes the difference in perspective between a reporter and a council member. She also recalls Independent publisher Houstoun Waring’s Sunday breakfasts at Columbine Country Club, when he would invite a small group of local people to gather and talk about what was on their minds that week. She was flattered to be included. She writes: “A community newspaper serves several important roles: 1) community watchdog, to keep its eyes on the various governmental agencies, the schools, etc. and 2) being the `glue’ that keeps a community informed about itself. The Independent is also a fantastic source of historical information about Littleton, since it has been around so long. The Independent is definitely one of the pillars upon which our city stands.”

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OCT. 19 CHARITY LUNCHEON. Alpha Xi Delta alumnae present their annual fundraising Sweet Charity Affair and Luncheon from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at Calvary Baptist Church, 6500 E. Girard, Denver. Money from this bake sale, silent auction, live auction, art boutique and luncheon will go to projects such as Autism Speaks, the Boys and Girls Club of Denver, FACES (Family Advocacy, Care, Education, Support) and the Family Crisis Center. To purchase tickets, contact Barbara Vietti, 6242 W. Coal Mine Place, Littleton, CO 80128; bvietti@comcast.net or 303-979-7561. Tickets purchased by mail can be picked up at the door upon your arrival.

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24 The Independent

September 26, 2013

Scavenger hunt brings out detectives Vintage photos, building details provide clues By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews. com “I saw all you guys in costumes and came to see what was going on,” said a man at Bega Park as he turned in his entry ballot for the Sept. 21 Historic Littleton Scavenger Hunt. He was one of about 250 contestants who traipsed through Littleton’s historic downtown seeking clues in vintage photographs and details on old buildings. Enlarged photographs from the Littleton Museum archives were placed at 15 businesses, chosen by lottery. Questions on the ballots were to be matched with a specific detail in each photo — for example: “Where can I buy a paint brush?”; “Sidewalk sale on the boardwalk”; “Littleton’s first gumball machine”; “Where are the lanterns?” Six photos of architectural details on buildings also required identification. (Included was an old Littleton Independent sign.) The Rootin’ Tootin’s Dixieland Band played as final ballots were returned and volunteers from Historic Littleton Inc., the event’s organizer, checked answers. There were 78 correct ballots returned by detectives of all ages. At 3:30 p.m., Mike Massey, the organization’s founder, strode in with whistle blasting, deliver-

Rebecca and Bill Kast donned period dress and went dancing at Bega Park Sept. 21, where the winners were announced after the Historic Littleton Inc. Scavenger Hunt. Photo by Jennifer Smith ing a suitcase filled with ballots to Sherlock Holmes (Town Hall Arts Center’s Seth Maisel). Historic Littleton Inc. president Charlie Carroll, aka Richard

Little, drew winning names for merchant gifts and cash: Ryan Winterhalter of Littleton won $500; Pamela Holtz of Castle Rock won $300; and Ron Wagner

of Littleton won $150. (Sponsors donated prize money and cash for expenses.) Vice President Liz Eaton, event organizer, recognized

the official mascot, terrier Willis in Sherlock attire, who gave mini magnifiying glasses to all kids 5-10 who entered the contest. And the band played on …

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September 26, 2013

es There’s

more to Reinke than just Halloween Grandparents were family’s first downtown merchants By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@ourcoloradonews.com

Greg Reinke, president of the Historic Downtown Littleton Merchants, has been called lots of things. HooDLuM. Littleton’s man in black. Visionary. The hanging chad of Littleton (he once lost a city council race by 26 votes). Eccentric. The guy with the ponytail. Generous. The Halloween guy. Creative. Code enforcement’s favorite target. Rabble rouser. A giant pain in the you-know-what. And several other things we can’t print. But lately, he says, people have been comparing him to Houstoun Waring, the former Littleton Independent publisher who was known for his visibility and engagement in the community. It’s said Waring enjoyed sweeping the sidewalk in front of his Main Street office, gathering news tips and tidbits from the familiar faces passing by. Like Reinke, Waring surely would have shunned email and texting in favor of a phone call or, better yet, a face-toface. On Sept. 19, Reinke sat at a sidewalk cafe near Reinke Bros., the downtown Halloween store he owns with his brother. rier Willis An older couple walked by, laughed, gave mini and asked if there are two of him. o all kids “You’re everywhere!” said the man. ontest. “I don’t know if the comparison to d on … Houstoun Waring is true,” said Reinke. “He was very distinguished. But you know what? He’s the one who made Littleton come alive. When he passed away, it left a huge hole down here. Did I take it up after him? Not intentionally. But my goal is that when I’m gone from here, there will be successors to take it up, and not a void. “We’ve put in the infrastructure so that downtown will never be held hostage again. We have stages, tables, chairs, a turkey fryer. That turkey fryer cost $6,000. We didn’t have any of that before. When I leave, they can still reproduce everything we’re doing. All they have to do is find the volunteers. And sometimes that’s the hard part, to organize and get people motivated.” Reinke, a third-generation Colorado native, attributes much of what he’s accomplished to a childhood filled with adventure. He was born in Englewood, where his parents, Donald and Charlotte, first met in high school. They moved to Littleton in 1952, where they raised sons Don, Mark, Greg and Chris.

Roots in Littleton

Reinke is not the first downtown merchant in his family. His grandparents owned Reinke’s Laundry on Alamo Avenue from 1951 to 1974, and that’s where he often went after school. His father, a retired Marine, worked three jobs, one of them at Mason Auto Parts downtown. His mother managed the Spinning Wheel dry cleaners on Littleton Boulevard. “I think we were the first latchkey kids,” he said. “But you didn’t worry back then. We weren’t destitute or anything, but we were a frugal family. I wore paisley shirts and striped pants from the bargain room at Montgomery Wards. I never had a pair of jeans until I was 16, and I bought them myself. (Today, he’s rarely seen in anything but.) But I went to school with all those Bow Mar kids. “I was a little spitfire. I didn’t get in many fights, but when I did, they paid the price. There was this bully at God-

Greg Reinke’s influence on Littleton goes far beyond owning a costume shop. File photo dard. We were in the locker room, and I yawned. He spit in my mouth. I was so mad. He says, `Choose ya,’ and I said, `You’re on.’ So I show up by the flagpole after school, and there’s a ton of people out there waiting to see this fight. So I say, `We’re going to fight. But my bus is going to be here, and when it is, I’m going to be on it.’ And he says, `You won’t be able to walk.’ “So I’m in the middle of taking off my coat, and he cold-cocked me in the face as hard as he could. I beat the living tar out of him, and I was just a little guy. And the crowd parted, and I said, `There’s my bus.’ And from that day on, nobody ever picked on me again.” Reinke attended Centennial Elementary, Goddard Middle School and Littleton High School, Class of 1978. Summers were spent swimming and fishing in local ponds and the South Platte River, racing go-karts around Centennial Drive-In after hours, building haunted houses in the basement (and, ever the entrepreneur, charging admission), hosting carnivals and concerts in the back yard, hunting rats with BB guns in the then-empty Old Mill building, riding bikes and occasionally catching their clubhouse on fire.

Animal lover

A lot of Reinke’s youth seems to involve creatures — snakes, orphaned ducklings, even random geese. “We found these two baby geese in the spring, and they lived with the ducks in the pond in the back yard,” he said. “In the fall, we were having a family picnic in the yard, and the geese had grown up. All of a sudden this flock of geese flies over. They heard the calls, looked up, ran across the yard and took off. And they were just gone. That was one of the coolest memories of all the animals.” The pond was quite similar to the one they use for the Turkey Leg and Wine Hoedown today, says Reinke. “A lot of my business is based on what I did as a kid,” he said. “We were just kids playing with what they had. Our generation is the last generation that got to play freely. Most people don’t know about treehouses or tubing down the Platte without worrying about somebody abducting you or molesting you. Not that it didn’t happen then. “Now they all play with the video games or cell phones. I remember at dinnertime, you didn’t call anybody’s house

unless you wanted to get chewed out by their dad. … When my son was young, I was teaching him how to rappel in a valley, and an officer came by and told us it was illegal to climb on the rocks. I was going to build my son a treehouse, and I got a cease-and-desist order. I bought him some fireworks, and I got a ticket. Forget about BB guns and go-karts. Finally I gave my son a dozen eggs and told him not to get caught. Everything I did as a kid, you can’t do now.” Reinke jumped into entrepreneurship pretty much right out of high school, and one of his first big jobs was building the haunted house at Colorado State University. That’s where he met Carin Conard, his wife of six years and the mother of his two children, Brittany, 27, and Tyler, 23. Brittany started law school this year, and Tyler graduated with a degree in biochemical engineering. “I should have a really nice nursing home when I get old,” he jokes. “But seriously, they are the kindest, smartest, most polite young people I know.”

In the news

A gung-ho self-promoter, Reinke often finds himself in the news. His favorite time was after his daughter was born. “The Independent was taking photos at my haunted house, and I’m standing there in full monster costume. I’m holding my baby daughter, and she’s sucking away on a little binkie,” he remembers. “It was hilarious. Another time, I made this costume of a salt vampire from Star Trek. We did a photo op at Larry’s Barbershop on Main Street. The barber was cutting my monster’s hair, and I’m sitting in the monster.” Reinke is nothing if not creative and persistent. “All my life, I was told no. No, you can’t make money with a haunted house. No, you can’t get insurance for a haunted house. No, you can’t buy that building for a haunted house. No, no, no, no. That’s why I don’t listen to no,” he said. “If you have a reasonable explanation for no, I’ll buy into it. When people tell me no, I say you’re out of your mind. Chris and I started a cottage industry, and now Halloween is a month long. Chris and I were on the vanguard of that, and now the whole world feels part of what we did. … Chris and I started with nothing and have gone way further than we ever should have, but we’ve never gone as far as we wanted to. And by the way, Chris is my best friend.”

The Independent 25

• “I lived in Littleton from 1965 until 1998, subscribing to the Littleton Independent the entire time … First of all, I was very lucky to have known Editor Emeritus Houstoun Waring and his wife Irene personally. I still stay in touch with his daughter, Sally Atchison. I always read Hous’ many columns and remember lots of stories where he told about his arrival in Littleton in 1926 and what the town was like at that time ...” — Ruth Trowbridge • “I was recently informed about the upcoming anniversary of the Littleton Independent, and the ability to send in comments/stories that were memorable. I have been traveling and have not had a chance to send this, but here is something that is very memorable to me: I was a carrier for the Littleton Independent/Arapahoe Herald from 1964 to 1972, eight years in total. I have very fond memories of being a carrier!! My story is a bit unique ... I started carrying the papers when I was 4 years old, that’s right 4 years old! My brother who had the route, got sick with asthma and could no longer deliver the paper. I had approximately 25 customers in the downtown Littleton Area. I would deliver to most of the businesses, like Valore Hardware, Stein’s Barbershop, Larry’s, Milner’s Bakery, Lemke Foods, Littleton National Bank, Swanson’s Jewelry, City Hall, Valley Feed, and many more!! My father owned Littleton Liquors, and I attended St. Mary’s of Littleton on Nevada Street so it was easy for me to get to work right after school! The paper was printed twice a week, Tuesday and Thursday. I had the route until I was 12.” — Tom Cummiskey • “During the summer of 1965 the Little Britches Rodeo played all week at the Arapahoe County Fairgrounds and as photographer for the Independent I photographed every afternoon and evening and they published 29 of my pictures in one Western Welcome Week Edition. I also remember about that time when Ed Bemis and/ or Hous Waring sent me out to where Red Rocks Park is now to take a picture of the red rocks and to Castlewood Canyon to photograph the dam that burst in 1933.” — Derald Hoffman • “I am keenly aware that the Independent’s art coverage is a recognition of its value in our community and in our lives. It has long been a passionate supporter of the arts. Current entertainment editor Sonya Ellingboe, now championing artists at every level, 20 years ago and at her own expense, accompanied the Main Street Players and reported upon their presentation of `The Quilters’ at the 1993 World Festival of Amateur Theatre. And former editor Shirley Smith often placed theater reviews in a prominent place on the Independent’s front page, a strong statement of the paper’s support of the arts.” — Annawyn Shamas, a founder of the Main Street Players


26 The Independent

September 26, 2013

Marine veteran Dean Stegman holds still as Katie Derington adjusts the cuff to take his blood pressure during the Sept. 21 veterans fair at Hudson Gardens. Volunteers from the CU school of pharmacy did free tests during the fair. Photos by Tom Munds

Veterans fair offers help, hope Several hundred visit event at Hudson Gardens By Tom Munds

tmunds@ourcoloradonews. com Several hundred men and women visited Hudson Gardens Sept. 21 to check out the booths at this year’s veterans fair, promoted by radio station KEZW. Booths offered a wide range of information, ranging from informing those who served in the military of their veterans’ benefits to booths staffed by representatives of companies offering legal, medical and educational services. Near the entrance, the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences had a booth. Students and staff members from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus offered free blood tests and bone density tests. Todd Redman, an Army veteran who served in Iraq, said he decided to visit the fair after hearing about it on the radio “I’ve been having some stress issues, my blood pressure has been up, but today it is normal and that is good news,” he said. “I am glad I came today. There is so much information available here today. I sort of knew about veterans’ benefits, but today I really learned a lot that will help me in the future.” He said he also talked to representatives of the American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars about their organizations.

“I’m not much of a joiner but I might make an exception this time,” the Arapahoe County resident said. A short distance away, representatives of the Rocky Mountain Honor Flight had a booth. Littleton resident Harvey Stockton, a World War II Army veteran, talked to the group about possibly being included in one of the flight’s upcoming trips taking World War II veterans to Washington, D.C. Englewood resident Norma Weir was among those attending the fair seeking information. “We have a friend who served in Afghanistan and was wounded,” she said. “He doesn’t want help, but I learned so much today that may help him. I also learned more about the policies at Fort Logan. It was time well spent and I am really glad I came.” Army veteran Ed Winters, who served in Korea, also attended the fair. “This was a good turnout and there was a lot of information available here today,” he said. “I got some information today that helped me. For example, I thought Fort Logan was full, but I found out they have added more land.” The event was winding down about noon, and Kerry Attridge, who works in registration at the Denver Veterans Affairs Medical Center, said she felt her booth was able to provide a lot of information to veterans. “We had about 40 veterans who took applications for service at the hospital,” she said. “I don’t think any of those individuals knew about the fact they were entitled to treatment at our facility.”

A Rocky Mountain Honor Flight volunteer, left, talks to Englewood resident Norma Weir about the flights during the veterans fair. More than 30 information booths were set up at the fair.

Army veteran Ed Winters and his wife talk to representatives of the VFW at the Sept. 21 gathering. More than 30 agencies offered services and information at the annual event.


The Independent 27

September 26, 2013

Managers Continued from Page 1

Restaurant recently to reminisce about the more than 50 years of headlines they helped create. Although they’ve sat in countless meetings together as their careers overlapped, they agree this was an unusual meeting in the universe of local government. “The tradition is that you serve as the city manager until you outgrow the city, then you move on to a bigger one,” said Borger. “Somehow Littleton violates the rules. I don’t know of any other cities that can claim they have four former city managers who still live in the area.” The last half-century has seen lots of rules rewritten in Littleton, including the notion that the city would always be small growing into the desire to maintain its small-town feel as the population doubled. Lots of things had to happen to guide that growth, but one of them allowed the Independent to not have to write about tragedy as the rest of the state made national headlines with this year’s historic September flooding. “The river has always been very important to Littleton, and the newspaper was very instrumental in that whole thing, the sales job,” said Borger. After the flood of 1965, the Army Corps of Engineers planned to basically turn the river into a concrete ditch. After years of wrangling, Chatfield Dam was completed and the city of Littleton now boasts its beautiful South Platte Park, an idea that originated in Borger’s administration. “What we were trying to do was, what seemed to us, a very simple idea,” he said. “Then if it floods, there’s no damage. It just does what a river always does. But the Army Corps of Engineers thought, `Well, you’re just a little city. It’s a tax, it’s a bond. If you can get voters to agree, it will take an act of Congress. … Gen. Felix Sparks was a commander in the Colorado National Guard. During World War II, he was literally a war hero. It’s kind of like God is on the other side. We said, `We think we have a better idea.’ He said, `There is no better idea.’ That was his starting position, that we shouldn’t even be there. … The newspaper was very instrumental in getting out the facts and getting people to understand what the issue was.”

River, rails rerouted

Those efforts all came together and, after an actual act of Congress, the river was rerouted to the west side of Santa Fe. Rerouting the train tracks, however, was just as challenging and just as impactful. “The railroad depression, RTD’s southwest corridor and the develop-

ment of Highlands Ranch changed Littleton from an outer-ring suburb to an inner-ring circle,” said McMinimee. He ultimately signed off on the project, but it started on Christy’s watch. “The railroad thought, `Well, we were there before Littleton was,’” said Christy. “But it was becoming pretty clear we had to have the depression. So we sent (Deputy City Manager) Al Salazar to the headquarters of Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railroad. We knew it would increase their speed and be a benefit to the railroad. It would also eliminate the grade crossing. We had a lot of accidents. One time a train ran right into the Arapahoe Community College property. So we had a good story to tell, and Al Salazar was a good salesman. He was very smart, very good with finance. So he sat in the president’s lobby for three days, and they kept telling him he wasn’t there. Finally he got in to see him, and he convinced him in a just a couple of hours. And he got extra rights of way for the light rail.”

Tough customer

Clearly, Littleton’s city managers have never been afraid to butt heads with the big guys — not even mobsters. “We ran out of capital at the sewer plant and had to put a moratorium on new building all the way to Wadsworth,” said Christy. “There were big builders out there with big bucks when Columbine was really starting to develop. Bob Flynn was their attorney. I really liked Bob Flynn, he was funny as could be. So we set up this meeting at Columbine Country Club. I just went over there by myself, and there was Bob and these five homebuilders. One of them was a crime-syndicate name, and he happened to be on the board, so they brought him. He started to threaten me, and Bob Flynn finally had to stand between us, because he thought he was going to clobber me. So I turned and ran, but in a very professional way, of course.” But eventually it was the homebuilders who turned tail, putting up $50,000 to keep the sewer plant running long enough to build the Littleton/Englewood Wastewater Treatment Plant. “Christy gets kudos for the idea of negotiating with Englewood for the plant,” said Borger. “I always thought that was a great thing. Also for the humane shelter, fire training center and cooperation between the fire and police departments. He won an award from the International City Managers Association for that.” Christy is quick to share the love. “We don’t really do

(From left) Gale Christy, Andy McMinimee, Jim Woods and Larry Borger each served a stint as Littleton’s city manager during the last 55 years. Photo by Jennifer Smith it, it was always the city councils,” said Christy. “We always had great city councils. We had almost no bickering. We had city councils that had the gumption to make good decisions, and they did.”

Echostar controversy

One of those decisions ultimately led to Echostar’s presence in the community, but only after a lot of controversy borne by Woods and McMinimee. Under McMinimee, they city condemned a trailer park and some other property to make way for the Riverfront shopping center — right before a staggering economic downturn. “Andy and I were the two guys, you talk about having a big cloud over you,” he said. “Five years that sucker was dark.” But when the people who developed the Denver Aquarium first came calling for the Riverfront property, Woods and McMinimee had the foresight to see through the slick package. “There was this one little detail,” said Woods. “They wanted the city to guarantee $20 million in bonds. I distinctly re-

member them saying that city council did not have enough vision for them. But they ended up going bankrupt in Denver, and Echostar came into Littleton. It was a huge-deal policy decision to give up on retail, but Echostar invested $15 million and they still have 1,500 employees.” Every city manager has stories he wishes the paper had never had to write, the Columbine tragedy being the most obvious. “Some of our first responders have been there for years,” said Woods. “There are still a lot of them who were on that call.” “It’s not a good memory to talk about,” said McMinimee. And they’ve had their share of bones to pick with the paper, as well. “When the racetrack was on the way out, they wrote an editorial against redeveloping the property,” said Christy. “They wanted to the racetrack to stay. We had a lot of problems the last few years the track was there, a lot of people involved that were not very good citizens. I was never

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city council members at a time, but literally hundreds of citizens that give of their time in this community, people that are really vested in the community,” said McMinimee. “The story of Littleton has become moving from outer ring to inner ring, the aging of the community and being a survivor. The foundation of Littleton for me is a really strong K-12 education system, which I think is absolutely critical for a sustainable community and continuing to attract high-quality employers,” said Woods, who is now the outreach director for Littleton Public Schools. “Martin and Marathon blessed us with a lot of professional, high-quality engineering jobs. It’s continued with the medical cluster, CenturyLink, Dish and all the small, highquality businesses that (former business/industry affairs director) Chris Gibbons was able to bring in. We’re not going to expand physically. We’re not cornfields anymore. But we can continue to be a sustainable community. … Everyone talks about the quality of life, but it’s really the quality of the people.”

angry at the Independent, but I can remember feeling they were dead wrong. And that turned out to be a pretty nice development over there.”

Conflict patched up

Borger remembers former Mayor John Kinghorn being not thrilled with former editor Garrett Ray’s take on the infamous concrete “umbrellas” installed on Main Street in the 1970s. “Bless his heart, Garrett thought that it was kind of a dumb idea,” said Borger. “The mayor organized a boycott of the Independent. I did finally get them to sit down together and patch things up. I told the mayor, it’s not good to get the local paper mad at you.” “I can’t remember being really upset with the press,” said McMinimee. “I probably was annoyed more with the Denver press, I think, than with the local press.” Each man has his own hopes for the future of Littleton, and they don’t always agree. But they do all agree that it’s the people that makes Littleton special. “There are only seven

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28 The Independent

September 26, 2013

Thornton ‘happy to see paper back home’ By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com Susan Thornton’s activities were first noted in the Littleton Independent 40 years ago when she was asked by the city council to chair the Littleton Task Force on Natural Resource and Energy Conservation, which studied environmental and growth- related issues for the council. Her involvement continues today with appointment to the committee to look at updating the city’s charter. “I am concerned about time limits,” she commented. Thornton was pleased to be included in Independent publisher Hous Waring’s Sunday breakfasts and discussions and served on the Press Council that he and Garrett Ray formed — a citizen advisory group that brought citizen concerns to the paper. She remembers Hous stopping to pick up bottles and paper trash on his daily walk to work, which reflected community environmental concerns. “I am really happy to see the paper back home again, covering significant things in the community,” she said. Thornton was especially interested in local news coverage when a member of city council, where she served for 16 years, beginning in 1987. A group of former Littleton mayors urged her to run for office and “I felt like a deer in the headlights when I won,” she said. When she was first elected, she remembers that reporter Rebecca Kast “wrote an especially wonderful piece about me.” In 1993, she was chosen the Independent’s “Most Valuable Citizen.” Sometimes, she observes, young reporters were working with no context or history and they “didn’t ask the right questions.” Thornton, who has a master’s in journalism and national experience, recalls bits of humor such as Lemcke Market’s ads about “who didn’t win this week” and Rebecca Kast’s humorous columns. Thornton helped with writing the annual community spoof, “Fiasco,” in the 1980s and has been tuned in to humorous references about city, county, schools and citizen organizations over the years. By contrast, really difficult days surrounded the Columbine tragedy. Thornton was mayor pro tem and Pat

Cronenberger was mayor. “It was a terrible time for the city. The Littleton Independent provided excellent coverage. The Denver media and national media started sensationalism. … I was ashamed to be a journalist. It tested everyone…” Other experiences that contribute to her position as a “go-to” person for answers about Littleton: She was involved with turning Town Hall into an arts center; committee work on and chairmanship of the Littleton Leadership Retreat; board membership and presidency of the Colorado Municipal League; national and state involvement with Superfund issues for her city; state and national environmental committees; South Metro Chamber’s Economic Development Council; Metro Mayors Caucus; and more. During her council terms, the paper reported on local cable outreach, southwest light rail, renovation of the Rio Grande depot as a station, naming of downtown Littleton to the National Register of Historic Places, a local preservation ordinance, a strategic approach to youth development and violence prevention, and an award-winning program to strengthen local businesses. Major infrastructure investments included renovation of the historic county courthouse, improvement of roads, acquisition of land parcels including Chambers Farm, elimination of the atgrade rail crossing at Littleton Boulevard, a major expansion of the Littleton Historical Museum, Bemis Library expansion and more. Thornton looks forward to coverage of the current city council campaign, although she finds the question and answer format hard to use. In recent years, she has been instrumental in formation of the Littleton Immigration Resource Center, housed at Bemis Library, a program that has received national recognition. It offers advice on community resources, language training, instruction in naturalization procedures and more for immigrants living in Littleton and beyond.

‘I am really happy to see the paper back home again, covering significant things in the community.’ Susan Thornton

The Denver Concert Band under the direction of Jacinda Bouton Presents its first concert of the 2013-14 season

Jose and Phyllis Trujillo are hanging up the “Closed” sign for good at their restaurant after September, they say. Photo by Jennifer Smith

Mainstreet mainstay Jose’s to close Restaurant has been a Littleton favorite for 47 years By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@ourcoloradonews.com Editor’s note: This story originally ran in the Aug. 15 issue of the Independent. Phyllis and Jose Trujillo are ready to rest. The family announced last week that they will soon serve the final meal in their Main Street restaurant, Jose’s, after 47 years of devoted care to the building, the business, the family recipes and the community. “After a great deal of thought, it is our decision to slow down after this September,” they wrote in a letter to friends and family. “Phyllis and I, as well as our daughters, Teri and Chris, have built our business as a point of destination and a Littleton landmark. We’re proud to have fed generations of families here in the city we love.” Behind the straightforward letter is a host of conflicting emotions for the Trujillos. They speak of a burden being lifted, of looking forward to traveling. Mrs. Trujillo would like to see the East Coast in autumn; Mr. Trujillo wants to ride the Mississippi River in a paddleboat. They both would like to see some festivals around the state other than Western Welcome Week for a change — in Palisade, perhaps. “Other people get to retire, why can’t we?” wondered daughter Chris Slinkard, who has grown children of her own. “The grandkids grew up here. It’s been our life. If I didn’t have Mom and Dad, there’s no way I could do it. I need the support they give.” Still, it’s been a difficult decision for them, one made with tears and some trepidation, they admit. “That’s the thing that will really hurt me, is if they take that mural down,” said Mr. Trujillo. Painted in 1976 by thenstruggling artist Jose Zamora, Mr. Trujillo says it’s a composite of small-town Main

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Streets from days gone by. “It’s really an attention-getter,” he said. “Wherever you sit, the road is leading to you.” Their plan is to sell the building, but not the business. They hope it will remain a restaurant, a place they can enjoy visiting for a margarita themselves and perhaps continue their Wednesday-night family gatherings. “The building is going to have to live on its own two feet like I did,” said Mr. Trujillo. “The economy, it’s hit everybody. We just want to get out of here while we’re ahead of the game.” “I hope they make a go of it,” agreed Slinkard. Asked to name his proudest business accomplishment, Mr. Trujillo, who twice served on city council, said it’s that he’s remained consistent and true to his family recipes. “It means a lot to people,” said Mrs. Trujillo, slipping her hand over his. “But I think you should be so proud of going into the business not knowing anything, and you had your own place by the time you were in your 30s.” Mr. Trujillo gives credit to Evelyn Hudson for that. While a student at Littleton High School, he worked for her at Country Kitchen, the large log building that is now the Inn at Hudson Gardens. They did everything in house, he said, which is pretty much how Jose operates — grinding meat and preparing everything fresh every day. After some military duty and a stint at Martin Marietta, he and Phyllis, his highschool sweetheart, decided to start their own restaurant. “Once Evelyn gave me her blessing, I said, `Well, that’s good,’ ” remembers Mr. Trujillo. “She was a great mentor.” Mrs. Trujillo gives a lot of credit to her huband’s large family for a lot of help, and the whole family thanks its customers for years of loyal support. “We’ve met so many people, and we’ll miss them so much,” said Mrs. Trujillo. “I’m proud that we’ve been part of the community.”

Littleton Sertoma is holding a chili cook-off as a fundraiser for next summer’s Mile High Soap Box Derby Race. Join members and others for dinner from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Oct. 12 at Jerry Standers Collision Works, 3900 Norwood Drive in Littleton. A meal is $7 for adults, $5 for kids 17 and younger. RSVP to Marty Morgan, martym@generalagencycorp.com or call 303-991-0681 by Oct. 8.

City offering business grants

The city of Littleton is accepting applications for its Revitalization Incentive Grant program. The deadline for an application is Sept. 30. The grants are

intended to revitalize the appearance of businesses located in buildings constructed prior to 2000. A total of $50,000 is budgeted, and matching funds are available for up to $10,000 per project. The goal is to leverage private money to make affordable and creative improvements to older business properties. All work must be in areas visible from the public rightof-way and can include landscaping, signage, exterior lighting, architectural/ design assistance, and parking area and facade improvements. Other benefits include the potential elimination of permit fees, additional News continues on Page 29


The Independent 29

September 26, 2013

Firehouse parrot bound for better life The Pirates of Broadway mascot flies into retirement By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@ourcoloradonews.com Editor’s note: This story originally ran in the April 25 issue of the Independent. Sam bites, babbles, cries at bedtime, knows a few choice words, creates a constant mess, occasionally tries to escape and once caused a serious wardrobe malfunction, but her BFF loves her and is sad to see her go. “But I think that she’ll like having bird friends,” said Kari Buckingham, the Littleton firefighter who was Sam’s best friend. Sam is the Mexican red-headed Amazon parrot that’s had the longest shift ever at Station 12. But after 20 years on the job, Sam packed up her cage, hopped a Delta flight out of Denver International Airport and retired to a birdie retreat in Washington. “She deserves to fly. She’s a bird,” said firefighter Dan Arkin. “She is kind of like our amusement, but really she’s a bird. It makes me feel good about her going.” Having a parrot was never really in the plans for Station 12, even though the firefighters there are known as The Pirates of Broadway. But when one of their regular customers succumbed to diabetes, his family offered them his pet as a mascot and friend. She’s delighted scores of visitors since then, particularly children visiting on field trips. “I think the kids are going to miss her the most,” said Buckingham. Sam fit right in at Station 12 — she even already knew how to “stop, drop and roll.” Her previous owner used to forget food on the stove on a fairly regular basis, filling up the home with smoke. Buckingham remembers finding Sam on the floor by the front door on several such occasions. Even though she loved her home, Sam tried to make a break for it on occasion. She once flew all the way across Broadway, just skimming the tops of the cars. “Thank God she made it all the way across instead of landing in the middle,”

Soopers Continued from Page 1

any grocery store. The city will split any taxes the store generates above and beyond its average until the $500,000 is paid back or for six years, whichever comes first. The deal is the same one Englewood gave the store at Federal Boulevard and Belleview Avenue. “If they do nothing, we’re not losing anything in this proposal,” said Penny. Three citizens spoke against the incentives, including council candidate John Watson. “I don’t want to be like Englewood,” he said. “I don’t know how we got to be in

Sam the Mexican red-headed Amazon parrot is retiring from Littleton Fire Rescue after 20 years of loyal service to The Pirates of Broadway. Photo by Jennifer Smith said Buckingham. Firefighter Jens Pietrzyk can’t stop laughing as he recalls Sam’s most notorious moment, which came as the company was moving from the old building south of the current facility. During the grand-opening party, Sam hopped on a woman’s finger, and the woman thought it would be fun to put her on her shoulder like a real pirate as a crowd of adults and kids looked on. Something happened, the lady freaked out, Sam freaked out, Sam grabbed on to the lady’s spaghetti strap and fell downward and boom — the aforementioned wardrobe malfunction. Sam was clearly spoiled. Pietrzyk said she once actually relaxed so much that she fell off her perch as he massaged her little birdie shoulders, and Buckingham often treated to her showers under the kitchen-sink sprayer.

“She doesn’t love it, but sometimes she likes it,” she said. “She’ll spread out her wings and let you spray under them.” The rookies were tasked with putting Sam to bed at night, and Buckingham said she’ll miss watching them figure out creative ways to lure the reluctant Sam into her cage. “It’s just fun to watch,” she said. “Some people are deathly afraid of birds.” The firefighters have never been exactly sure of the parrot’s gender, not knowing if Sam is short for “Samuel” or “Samantha.” Although female pronouns have stuck, Buckingham thinks she’s probably actually a boy, since she’s never shown nesting tendencies. They’re also not sure how old Sam is, but a vet estimated her at 15 to 20 when they got her, making her 35 to 40 now. She could live another 30 or 40 years

— beyond the retirement age of most of her current caretakers. “It’s not that we don’t want to take care of her,” said Buckingham. “It’s just time.” Sam’s new digs, Macaw Rescue and Sanctuary, are designed to mimic the birds’ natural environment, and she’ll meet lots of new friends. “Within a week, she’ll find a mate or a friend that she’ll cling to, and then they’ll be inseparable,” said Buckingham. She herself has been that special someone since 2002, when Sam’s first true love, Gary Metz, retired. Lots of firefighters pitched in to buy Sam’s airplane ticket, and Buckingham said some of the proceeds would be donated to her new home. Her new caretaker has promised to post photos of Sam on the sanctuary’s Facebook page for those who’d like to see what her new life of leisure has in store.

the business of picking winners and losers, and why we’re doing that without any input from the citizens, I have no idea.” He added that it would be tough to collect sales taxes in a city that doesn’t tax groceries. But it’s only food that isn’t taxed, and Councilor Phil Cernanec noted that the new Englewood store carries a wider variety of taxable items like cookware and beauty products. Councilor Jim Taylor said he’s noticed a marked increase in customers at the new Englewood store, where he shops. “It attracts more people, and you get a wider range of customers, so I think this is probably a good deal,” he said. The deal seeks to guarantee that King Soopers won’t follow the path of several Safeway stores and Albertson’s out of the city, as it includes a 34-year lease with

options to renew every five years for 99 years. “It’s not unheard of to have a grocery store vacate a premises,” said Councilor Stahlman, in response to citizen comments that King Soopers would likely remodel even without incentives. The proposed $20 million project includes several infrastructure improvements, including a new parking lot, better access and lighting. It will also allow the store to add 10 percent more employ-

ees. It does not include the two outlying buildings, but Penny said owner Regency Centers plans facade improvements. This is the second time the city has used its recently approved incentive program. The first was a $300,000 package for Breckenridge Brewery. That caused some consternation among councilors after Penny told them about it just five days before they were set to approve the site plan.

news in a hurry Continued from Page 28

funding for extensive renovations and bonus funding if a contractor is used who is located and licensed in the city of Littleton. For more information, visit www.littletongov.org/index. aspx?page=123 or contact Jo Anne Ricca at 303-795-3749.

Scholarship applications accepted

Motivated, college-bound highschool seniors are encouraged to visit www.DanielsFund.org to apply for the

Daniels Scholarship Program before the deadline, Nov. 15. Each year, approximately 250 new Daniels Scholars are selected from among thousands who apply. Those chosen get a four-year college education at any nonprofit accredited college or university in the United States, complete with financial and personal support. To be eligible, students must be current high-school seniors in Colorado, New Mexico, Utah or Wyoming who can demonstrate financial need and meet other requirements.


30 The Independent

September 26, 2013

Clubs in your Community

Professional american association of University Women, Littleton-Englewood Branch invites baccalaureates to participate in activities that further goals of equity for women and girls, lifelong education and positive societal change. Meetings usually are Mondays each month, September through May, at Koelbel Library, Orchard Road and Holly Street, Centennial. Social time is followed by business meeting and informative program on subjects ranging from public policy issues to poetry. Call Pam Hansen, 303-753-0838. american Business Women’s Association meets on the second Wednesday each month at 6:30 p.m. welcoming women, working or not, to Success Chapter programs for success and positive living. Call Lori Smith at 303-688-3100 ext. 360 or e-mail loris@intermountain-rea.com for upcoming speakers and events at Marriott Denver South, 10345 Park Meadows Drive, Littleton. contacts unlimited is a business and professional leads group that meets at Courtesy Ford, 8252 S. Broadway, Littleton in the meeting room on the first, second, and third Thursday of every month. Meeting time is 8-9:15 a.m. Visitors are welcome. Call Jenifer at 303-221-6550. destination success provides

an opportunity for professionals to gather, form connections, expand relationships and exchange information. Business Success meets every fourth Tuesday from 9:30-11:30 a.m. at the Bear Rock Cafe, 7903 South Broadway, Suite B, Littleton. As with other networking groups, membership and referrals are not required. To RSVP and for information, e-mail Info@behindthemooninc.com or call 303-250-4528.

non-Practicing and Part Time

Nurses Association meets from 12:302:30 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Southglenn Library, 6972 S. Vine St., Centennial. All nurses are invited to attend for medical presentations. Contact: Barbara Karford, 303-794-0354.

Women investment Group Master Mind Group meets to empower all women to build a real financial freedom through the power of real estate in any market condition. We network, share ideas, leads, resources and encourage each other. We meet once a month. For meeting information, call Lorena 303-981-6539 or e-mail WomenInvestmentGroup@ comcast.net. recreation deer creek Women’s Golf Association. The 2010 golf season is just around the corner and we’re looking forward to a terrific new year! If you’re looking for a challenging course and the company of friendly women on Tuesday mornings, please consider joining our league. We’ve got the best deal in town. If interested please contact Chris Jackson at chris.dcwga@q. com or 303-347-9193. Homestead 9-Hole Golf Women’s

Golf League is accepting membership applications for the 2012 season. You do not need a GHIN number to join, but can acquire one as you play. We golf Monday mornings, April through October. To join this fun and active group, contact Barbara McGovern, barbmc30@gmail.com. Homestead Golf Course is at South Kipling and W. Hampden Ave., 11500 W. Hampden. Call 720-963-5181.

ladies golf League at Raccoon Creek Golf Course, Littleton, is accepting new members. Call 303-973-4653. meadoWs Women’s Golf League

offers relaxing Tuesday mornings of friendly golf for ladies at the Meadows

Golf Course, 6937 S. Simms St., near Ken-Caryl Ranch. The league plays 18 holes weekly from mid-April to mid-October. This fun group competes for prizes while playing from the red tees. Afterward, lunch can be ordered on the patio overlooking the course. Call Laura at 303-526-9598.

rec and Rock for ages 10-14 meets

from 7-11 p.m. every first and third Saturdays at the Goodson Recreation Center in Littleton. The cost is $6. Call 303-798-2476 ext. 11.

rocky mountain Basketball

Academy club, expert training for youth basketball players grades fifth through 12th meets twice per week and operates all year. Play in leagues and tournaments. Send inquiries to ronkburgin@yahoo.com.

stroller strides is a group fitness program that provides moms with a challenging workout and the opportunity to build relationships and gain the emotional support needed to adjust to the tremendous life change called motherhood. Classes are offered at 9:30 a.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at DeKoevend Park, near University and Arapahoe, and at 9:30 a.m. Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays at Clement Park, near Wadsworth and Bowles. For more information, visit the Stroller Strides Web site at www.strollerstrides. com or call Kathy or Karen Zawadzki at 888-684-0641 or e-mail kandk@ strollerstrides.net. services creative counseling Center is a network of mental health providers with offices in Denver, Aurora, Lakewood and Littleton. To meet therapists or to learn about locations, scheduling and fees, visit www.cccdenver.com or call 303-267-2310. englisH conversation Sessions. Go to the Bemis Public Library Friday mornings from 9-10:30 a.m. to practice English in an informal group and learn about American culture. No registration is required. Call 303795-3961. nutrition classes. Free bootcamp class meets at 8:30 a.m. three Saturdays per month at L-Town Nutrition, 1360 W.  Littleton Blvd., Littleton. Go to the park for a fun, energizing start to the weekend. Visit our Facebook pages for updates: Littleton 24Fit Club or L-Town Nutrition. Also offered is a Body Exchange Challenge. This consists of weekly meetings to discuss both nutrition and fitness. We deliver all of the tools that you need to help you reach your goal. There is an optional fitness class offered after the class. The class meets Wednesdays at noon or 6 p.m. You can join the challenge anytime, the fees are prorated. Visit L-Town Nutrition, call Gen McKenna at 303-730-2038 or email ltownnutrition@gmail.com to sign up. single dads Resource Center Inc., a nonprofit organization, offers free parenting classes such as “The Ins and Outs of Single Fathering Parenting” focused on single fathers. Classes are from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Wednesdays at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 6322 S. Lakeview St., Littleton. Call Jamey O’Donnell, founder and executive director of the group, at 720-2982021 or e-mail info@sdrci.org. summit cancer Solutions is a nonprofit organization that offers exercise programs in the Denver Metro area to adult cancer survivors. Our goal is to improve the health and well being of cancer survivors through exercise. Contact us at 303-409-2206, e-mail us at info@summitcancersolutions.org or visit www.summitcancersolutions.org. social american needlePoint Guild, Colorado Columbine Chapter, meets third Mondays each month, except

August and December. Call Doris at 303-403-8703.

antique cluB meets the second Saturday each month from 10 a.m. to noon at Antique Gallery, 5501 S. Broadway, Littleton. Call 303-7948100. araPaHoe county Young Democrats meetings are the third Thursday each month. Call Benjamin Godfrey at 303-745-3418 or e-mail bhgodfrey@ qwest.net. amazing titan Toastmasters meets from 6-8 p.m. Mondays at Marie Callender’s, Dry Creek Court and Broadway. Call Art Gomen at 303-762-9726. aarP greater Littleton Chapter meets at 1 p.m. the third Monday each month at Douglas H. Buck Community Recreation Center, 2004 W. Powers Ave. Meetings feature informational programs or entertainment, refreshments and social time. July and December meetings feature potlucks. Anyone 50 and older can join. Local chapter dues are $5 per year. For information on meetings, call 303-578-2669. Bemis evening Book Group meets at the library, 6014 S. Datura St., in Littleton, the third Monday each month at 7 p.m. Call 303-795-3961. Bemis knitting Group invites knitters to the library’s knitting group, which meets Fridays at 2 p.m. in Sophie’s Place. Just bring a pair of needles and a skein of yarn. Beginners learn skills such as casting on, knitting, pearling, and casting off, while experienced knitters get project ideas and provide hints and tips. The group is creating mittens, scarves and hats for elderly library users at Bemis’ sister libraries in Stara Zagora, Bulgaria. Bemis nonfiction Writers’

Group. Unpublished nonfiction writers of personal essays and/or articles meet the second Monday each month at 6:30 p.m. in the café area of Sophie’s Place at the library. Take a pencil and five copies of a recent essay, no longer than 650 words, to share and read aloud. Elaine Kallos, a language arts instructor, facilitates the group.

Benevolent and Protective Order

of Elks Lodge No.1650 meets at 8 p.m. Thursdays at 5749 S. Curtice St., Littleton. Call 303-794-1811.

Boards of Directors of the South-

gate Water District and the Southgate Sanitation District, Arapahoe and Douglas counties, meet at 4 p.m. the second Tuesday each month at office of the districts, 3722 E. Orchard Road, Littleton. Agenda information for each meeting is posted at Southgate office not less than 24 hours before meetings.

Boy scouts of America Pack 633 welcomes all first- through fifth-graders to join any time during the year. Call Nick Erlenburg at 303471-4172. tHe Breakfast Club Singles 50 Plus meets on the second Saturday of each month at Maggiano’s at 7401 S. Clinton Street, Englewood at 9 a.m. Arrival is 8:30 a.m. and buffet starts at 9 a.m. Must RSVP the Hotline at 303-794-3332 for reservation. cHatfield sertoma Club meets the first and third Mondays at Bistro Aspen Grove, 7301 S. Santa Fe Drive, Littleton. Contact Linda Holloway at 303-423-4197 or linda@bessieshope. org. coffee and Conversation Group connects people in the community who like to discuss books, current events and any topic of interest. The group meets from 10-11 a.m. the second Monday of each month in Sophie’s Place at Bemis Public Library, 6014 S. Datura St., Littleton. Free snacks and beverages are provided. Call 303-795-3961.

tHe columBine Genealogical and Historical Society has a program meeting on the second Tuesday of each month, except in June, July, August, and December. A social meeting is the second Tuesday of December. A genealogy workshop is the third Tuesday of each month, except in June, July, August, and December. Contact JoAnn LaGuardia at 303-770-3420 or visit www.rootsweb.com/~cocghs/ index.htm. columBine ladies is a warm,

welcoming, fun loving group of ladies. We offer a variety of activities: regular or duplicate bridge, canasta, Mah Jongg, Pinochle and we’re very willing to teach you how to play. We have monthly luncheons at new and different places as well as take side trips to museums, plays, sporting events, movies, etc. There are special quarterly events and our summer ice cream social will be coming up. We also do community outreach through Shiloh House, a support program for teen moms. Annual dues are only $20. For more information or to make a reservation to visit us at our next luncheon, call Iris McMullen at 303-794-3739.

columBine communicators

Toastmasters can help if speaking in public makes you anxious. We improve your communications and leadership skills in a thoughtful, supportive environment. Our club meets from 7-8:30 p.m. the first and third Tuesday of the month at the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Station, 11139 Bradford St., Littleton. Visitors are welcome. Contact Herb Dreo at herb@dreomc.com (303-763-7334) or Pam Toyen at ptoyen7@hotmail.com (303-570-8606). Visit http://columbine.toastmastersclubs.org/

current events Group meets the first Wednesdays of the month from 1-3 p.m. at the Buck Recreation Center, 2004 Powers Ave. in Littleton. Call 303-730-4609. daugHters of the American

Revolution, Mount Rosa Chapter meets at 1 p.m. every first Monday of the month at Koelbel Library, 5955 S. Holly St. in Littleton. Call Donna Elin at 303-781-6400.

daugHters of the British Empire is a national organization with a philanthropic purpose. For almost a century, DBE has been a common bond for women of British heritage living in the United States. DBE is open to women who are citizens or residents of the United States who are of British Commonwealth birth or ancestry or who are married to men of British Commonwealth birth or ancestry. There are six chapters in Colorado, including chapters in Littleton, Englewood, Centennial, Evergreen and Boulder County. Call Chris at 303683-6154 or Olive at 303-347-1311 or visit www.dbecolorado.org and use the contact form available. discovery cluB is a fun and exciting way to meet new friends and enjoy recreational activities. Activities include sports, arts and crafts, drama, singing, dancing, board and computer games, group and individual activities. Volunteer opportunities exist for people older than 15. Student volunteers can earn community service hours. Club meets third Saturday each month at St. Luke’s United Methodist Church, 8817 South Broadway. Call Jenita Rhodes at 303-791-0659. dry creek Sertoma Club. The only

all Women’s Sertoma club in the metro area meets for breakfast at 7 a.m. the first and third Wednesday of the month at Toast Restaurant, 2700 W. Bowles Ave., Littleton, or for lunch on the second Friday of the month at interesting restaurants. The club comprises women dedicated to the common goal of helping people in the community with funds and volunteer time, especially in the area of hearing health. Help make a difference

through SERvice TO MAnkind and make new friends while you are at it. For more information contact Carol at 303-798-3912 or bcworth@aol.com.

tHe HigHlands Ranch/Littleton Chapter of Mothers and More meets the second Tuesday of each month. See www.mothersandmore.org/chapters/highlandsranchlittletonCO/ or e-mail hrmothersandmore@hotmail. com for more information. JoB’s daugHters International, Bethel No. 33, of Littleton, is a youth organization for girls ages 11-20 who have a Masonic relationship with either Master Masons, Job’s Daughters, Eastern Star or other Masonic organizations. The girls meet first and third Mondays at 7:15 p.m. at the Masonic Hall across from the Melting Pot restaurant. tHe league of Women Voters of Arapahoe County has two meetings per month. No unit meetings are in June through August, but the two unit meetings per month will begin again in September on second Monday evenings and second Thursday mornings. Call 303-699-7365. littleton garden Club meets at 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month, September through May. A speaker is featured at each meeting. Guests are welcome. Additional information can be found at http:// groups.yahoo.com/group/littletongardenclub/. littleton Junior Chamber of Commerce, Jaycees, welcomes interested parties between the ages of 21-40 to become involved with this social and community service organization. Jaycees meet at 7 p.m. the first Tuesday each month at Burt Chevrolet, 5200 S. Broadway, and at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday each month at Breckenridge Grille, 2852 W. Bowles Ave. Call 303-914-0180 or visit littletonjaycees.org. tHe littleton Lions Club meets the first and third Thursdays each month at the Egg and I, 2630 W. Belleview Ave. No. 100, from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. We have been serving the Littleton Community since 1949. Sight and Sight Conservation. Interesting programs and speakers. For membership information call Jeff Bridges 303-730-7616 or Al Wieder 303-730-3085. littleton neWcomers Club is a social club for women in Littleton and the surrounding areas. Come have fun and meet new friends. You don’t need to be new to the area to join. Interest groups include bridge and other card games, wine tasting, book clubs, party animals, luncheons, stitch and chat, and many other events. Our monthly general meetings and luncheons are the third Wednesday of each month. Call 303-430-4898 and leave your name and number or e-mail littletonnewcomersclub@ yahoo.com. littleton sertoma meets from 7-8 a.m. the first, third and fifth Friday each month for breakfast and a program at the Shack Sports Grill, Mineral and Broadway, Littleton. Doors open at 6:30 a.m. and they welcome ndividuals looking to serve the community and who wish to find a fun active service club. Contact Terry Boucher, 303-880-7559 or bouchertp@aol.com. tHe loving Hands crocheting and knitting group meets one Saturday a month from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Parish Hall at St. Frances Cabrini Parish, 6673 W. Chatfield Ave. (intersection of Pierce) in Littleton. For those who cannot attend but can work on projects at home, we are always in need of newborn and infant hats and booties as well as bereavement gowns/fetal pouches. Check out our Loving Hands Ministry Web page at www.saintfrancescabrini.org or call Karen at 303-791-8385.


kind and you are at it. ntact Carol at h@aol.com.

South Metrolife

The Independent 31 September 26, 2013

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High Country Newfoundland Club secretary Meg Morrison, of Lafayette, sends her dog, Bojie, off the back of a boat with a reel and line Sept. 15 at Chatfield State Park. Bojie, who is in the top class of Water Rescue Dog Excellent, swam 100 yards to shore with the line so the boat could be reeled in by a person waiting there. Photos by Ryan Boldrey

Putting skills to the test

Newfoundlands born to swim, save lives By Ryan Boldrey

rboldrey@ourcoloradonews.com

D

espite heavy rains, 30 Newfoundlands and their humans — destined to get wet anyway — found the conditions perfect to undergo a series of water tests at Chatfield State Park near Littleton. Hosted by the High Country Newfoundland Club, a regional chapter of the Newfoundland Club of America, the Sept. 13-15 event allowed dogs from as far away as California and Texas the opportunity to chase after a variety of NCA titles by demonstrating proper water rescue technique in a variety of situations. “Newfoundlands were bred to be water rescue dogs,” said HCNC secretary Meg Morrison, of Lafayette. “It’s instinctual for them. Over in Europe, they

are used in the Coast Guard. The U.S. is yet to include us in the Coast Guard, but maybe someday.” Morrison has three Newfoundland dogs, including Bojie — who is training at the top level of Water Rescue Dog Excellent — 3-year-old Rigsby, and Smooch, a 15-week old puppy. Morrison, the test chair for the recent series of water tests, said dogs at all levels of expertise showed up to compete for titles, or NCA certification. To earn their titles, dogs do everything from leaping off boats to fetch paddles or rescue their handlers, to carrying life rings to a person in distress, to towing boats to shore. “It’s really amazing what they are capable of doing,” said Melissa Sharp, who drove 6½ hours from Rio Rancho, N.M. with her dog Koda to undergo testing. “We’re here because we want the titles, but it’s really about having fun with our dogs.” Sharp and Koda have been working

with a trainer in New Mexico for four years, and she said there have been times where she has seen training pay off for other’s dogs, including once when high-powered winds kept a crew from rowing into shore and a friend’s Newfoundland was able to tow them in safely. “Most of us do it because it is mainly just a demonstration of the dog’s natural abilities,” said Littleton resident Mark O’Connor, whose 7-year-old Newfoundland Panda has junior and senior rescue titles. “She kind of knows they are faking it (in testing), but if it were real she would know what to do. Instinct would just take over.” The High Country club, whose members come from Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming and Utah, hosts two water tests a year at Chatfield, attracting dogs from all over. The next closest tests, geographically, occur in Dallas and Kansas. For more information on the HCNC, please visit www.highcountrynewfs. com.

a meets

hird and fifth eakfast and ports Grill, ittleton. and they ing to serve wish to lub. Contact 7559 or

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I’m all about supporting women’s groups, and this Douglas County Divas networking organization sounds like a hoot. Plus, I love everything “Diva,” from “Double Divas” to “Drop Dead Diva.” The Douglas County Divas normally meet the third Tuesday of every month, giving women a chance to network and increase business contacts. But on Oct. 15, the group will be holding a special co-ed event from 6-8 p.m. at The Fowl Line at 774 Maleta Lane in Castle Rock. Attendees are asked to bring “plenty of business cards.” For more information, contact Pam Anderson at 303-596-8075 or pamsgonegreen@gmail.com or Theresa Buckley at 720-280-2910 or theresa. girlsgonegreen@gmail.com. For more details about the group, visit www.douglascountydivas.com.

in theaters now

Denver bigwig and deep-pocket giver Larry Mizel is proud to announce that “Jewtopia,” a movie written by daughter Courtney Mizel, is out in theaters. If you are thinking about a date night with your significant other, this is the one to see, so I’m told. Courtney sent this email missive about her project: Dear Friends, “As many of you know, I have spent the past couple of years working on `Jewtopia.’ First the play at the Greenway Court Theater, and then, the movie! I am very excited to announce that the movie will be out (today) in theaters around the country as well as on VOD on most cable carriers as well as on iTunes, XBox and a number of other online platforms. “Needless to say I am very excited about this release and I would greatly appreciate your support!” The film’s cast includes Ivan Sergei, Joel David Moore, Jennifer Love Hewitt, Jamie Lynn Sigler, Rita Wilson and Jon Lovitz. To see the trailer go to: www.youtube.com/watch?v=7a0zZSVeW-k. “Jewtopia” opened on Sept. 20 at the AMC Cherry Creek 8 in the Cherry Creek Shopping Center.

blast from the past

Colorado Neurological Institute’s 25th anniversary will celebrate the 1940s at Wings Over the Rockies featuring music, dancing, vintage dress and decor and dining from 6-10 p.m. on Oct. 12. The event’s emcee is 9News meteorologist and traffic tracker Amelia Earhart. Tickets are $250 each. “Early career” tickets are $175. To purchase your tickets, go to www.blacktie-colorado.com/ rsvp and enter event code: CNI1012 (All one word, not case sensitive). Sponsorship and donation opportunities are also available. For details, contact Nancy Miller at 303-806-7415, 303-8067415 or email nmiller@thecni.org.

One of the 30 Newfoundland dogs that spent Sept. 13-15 at Chatfield Reservoir working on water rescue techniques brings a boat to shore after swimming out to retrieve it.

Parker continues on Page 33


32 The Independent

September 26, 2013

RedLine show is oh, so ironic “The Ironic Object, an Exhibition Examining the Changing Landscape of Contemporary Art” will be held in RedLine’s Project Space Oct. 4-27. RedLine gallery is at 2350 Arapahoe St., Denver. There will be a public reception from 7 to 10 p.m. on Oct. 4. Curator Frances DeVuono said, “I wanted to narrow the exhibit to focus largely on sculptural objects and was particularly looking for artists whose use of materials veered into cultural critique.” There are 10 participating artists from Colorado, California, Illinois and Washington. Gabriel Brown, who has performed as a “Garbologist,” will collaborate with RedLine artists during the reception. Gallery hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. 303296-4448.

Banned Books Week

Play Banned Books Bingo at Bemis Library, 6014 S. Datura St., Littleton, during Banned Books Week, Sept. 29 to Oct. 5. Match book titles in the library with those on a Bingo card. Win Amazon gift certificates worth from $5 to $50. Pick up a card at the reference desk. 303-795-3961.

Garden wisdom

Panayoti Keladis from Denver Botanic

Earnest endeavor

Gardens will be the speaker at the Oct. 4 Littleton Garden Club meeting at 6:30 p.m. The club meets on the first Wednesday of the month from September to May in the cafeteria at the Littleton Public Schools Administration Building at 5776 S. Crocker. (Enter from Ida Street.) Guests and new members are welcome.

Mavuno Market

The Mavuno Market returns to the Grange in the Meadows, 3692 Meadows Blvd., Castle Rock, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Oct. 5. More than 500 artisans from six countries use funds generated from the sale of their handmade goods to feed and educate their children. This event will be the second annual “Shop Once, Give Twice” auction/fundraiser, organized by Lisa Stucky. Please RSVP to mavunomarket@gmail.com. For information, see mavunomarket.org.

Littleton High School’s theater department will present Oscar Wilde’s comedy of mistaken identities, “The Importance of Being Earnest” (Steam Punk Rendition), on Oct. 3 (7 p.m.); Oct. 4 (7 p.m.) and Oct. 5 (6 p.m.) in the LHS Mane Stage Theatre, 199 E. Littleton Blvd. kryssi martin is the director. Tickets: $10 adults/$7 students/seniors free. Order online: seatyourself.biz/ lhsperformingarts

Ragtime Society show

Pianist Frank French will perform a concert of ragtime, jazz, blues and Latin music for the Ragtime Society of Colorado at 3 p.m. Oct. 6 at the Forte Academy of Music, 8030 S. Holly St., Centennial (south of Dry Creek Road, north of County Line Road) — a new venue. Tickets: $20/$15 members. Send checks to society president Colleen Vander Hoek, 8360 S. Zephyr St., Littleton, CO 80128. 303-979-4353.

Genealogists meet

The Columbine Genealogical and Historical Society meets at the Lutheran Church of the Holy Spirit, 6400 S. University Blvd., Centennial: • Oct. 8, 1 p.m. — Carol Swenson will tell about her favorite genealogical sites, most of them free. She blogs as “Carol:

German Day gets new home Centennial fest offers food, drink, music

German Day will be celebrated 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. October 5 and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 6 at Centennial Center Park, 13050 E. Peakview Ave., Centennial. Entry fee of $5 includes the first beverage. Children under 12, free. For information: GermanDayinColorado. org. 303-380-1843.

Chamber music opens season Englewood Arts Presents sets show sellingboe@ourcoloradonews. com

sellingboe@ourcolorado news.com

If you Go

the Family Detective.” • Oct.15, 9 a.m. — Megan Smoleyak: “Reverse Genealogy: Finding the Living.” 1 p.m. — “What the Library of Congress has for Genealogists” by Peggy Cummings.

By Sonya Ellingboe

By Sonya Ellingboe

Families are invited to a new venue to celebrate the annual German Day in Colorado on Oct. 5 and 6: Centennial Center Park, located at 13050 E. Peakview Ave. in Centennial. Gemuetlichkeit, a good feeling of belonging and coziness, is guaranteed — with food, drink and music. With a bit of a different slant than the numerous Oktoberfests celebrated in America, this German-American day honors contributions Germanspeaking immigrants for their

“Devil Horns Crystal Brass Knuckles (mosh safely)” by Debra Baxter is included in ”The Ironic Object, an Exhibition Examining the Changing Landscape of Contemporary Art” at RedLine. Courtesy photo

Zither player Peppi Gruenwald will perform during German Day in Colorado, Oct. 5 and 6 at Centennial Center Park. Courtesy photo contributions to our country and communities. A weekend of family-friendly events is planned, including live bands, folk-dance performances from all the Germanicspeaking regions of Europe, food and beer. Among attractions in the Culture Garden will be Peppi Gruenwald with his zither. The festival will feature many other activities and traditional children’s games.

Organizer Cara Meier, a retired Littleton Public Schools teacher, shared a 1987 quote from President Reagan that she likes: “Few people have blended so completely into the multicultural tapestry of American society and yet have made such singular economic, political, social, scientific and cultural contributions to the growth and success of these United States as have Americans of German extraction.”

“Chamber Music of the Masters,” the 2013-14 classical music series presented by Englewood Arts Presents, will open at 2 p.m. Oct. 5 with a benefit for the Up Close and Musical ensemble, UCAM, a local nonprofit that offers concerts to area elementaryschool children who might not otherwise have an opportunity to experience professional concerts. Eric Bertoluzzi is founder and conductor and musicians are primarily from the Colorado Symphony Orchestra, where cellist Bertoluzzi was a member for 40 years until his retirement this year. He also heads Englewood Arts Presents. The concert season will showcase Colorado Symphony members and other professional area musicians in a smaller ensemble chamber music repertoire in Hampden Hall, in the Englewood Civic Center. The opening concert will honor Penny and Joe Shoemaker. They founded the Helen Marie Black Music Education Fund,

If you Go The Englewood Arts Presents concerts are performed at Hampden Hall, second floor of the Englewood Civic Center, 1000 Englewood Parkway. Tickets for the Chamber Music series cost $15/$12/free under 18. They are available at englewoodarts.org or a half-hour prior to concert time. dedicated to engaging young people throughout the Denver area in the world of music, both performance and education. The fund has provided annual support to UCAM for more than a decade until Penny’s passing, when the endowment was transferred to UCAM so its mission could continue and expand. The Oct. 5 program will include Aaron Copland’s “Appalachian Spring” (chamber version) and George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue,” performed by the Shoemakers’ talented son, pianist Jeff Shoemaker. Future concerts are planned on Oct. 19, Nov. 23, Jan 18, Feb. 15, March 15, April 26 and May 17, including four with the Ainomae Ensemble. Also on Friday nights: Starlight Rhythms, featuring pops, rock, blues and jazz: Oct. 18 (That Damn Sasquatch); Nov. 15; Dec. 20; Feb. 14; March 14; May 16.


The Independent 33

September 26, 2013

adindex The Independent is made possible thanks to our local advertisers. When you spend your dollars near your home – especially with these advertisers – it keeps your community strong, prosperous and informed. AUTO Automotive MEDVED ...........................................................................40 AUTO Community

Colorado Ballet artists perform in the ballet “Giselle” at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House. Courtesy photo by Terry Shapiro

‘Giselle’ tells romantic story through dance Colorado Ballet joins forces with orchestra By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews. com Gill Boggs, Colorado Ballet’s artistic director, says “Giselle’ is his favorite ballet: “It is the epitome of a classical ballet, demonstrating love, betrayal, death and forgiveness.” “Giselle,” with choreography by Jean Coralli and Jules Perrot and music by Adolphe Adam, will be performed by the Colorado Ballet, with live orchestra, from Oct. 4 to 13 at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House in the Denver Performing Arts Complex. A count in disguise falls in love with Giselle, a beautiful, but fragile,

If you Go “Giselle” will be performed by the Colorado Ballet from Oct. 4 to 13 at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House, Denver Performing Arts Complex. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 4, 5, 11, 12; 2 p.m. Oct. 5, 6, 12, 13; 6:30 p.m. Oct. 10. Tickets range from $25 to $155: 303-837-8888, ext. 2, or coloradoballet.org. peasant girl. She discovers who the count really is and that he’s engaged to another woman and dies of a broken heart. She becomes a Wili, a vengeful spirit who has suffered unrequited love when alive and is destined to roam the earth, trapping men and dancing them to death. Only Giselle can save the count when he enters the Wili’s influence ...

Other Colorado Ballet news: Veteran dancer and teacher Valerie Madonia was hired as academy director, while Anne O’Connor moved from that position to director of education and community partnerships. The partnerships will include connections with the Santa Fe Arts District, where the company will move when its new headquarters at 11th Avenue and Santa Fe Drive are renovated. The South and Central Academies, where young dancers are trained, have been combined, due to the additional space available. Colorado Ballet’s 2013-2014 season continues with: • Nov. 30-Dec. 28 — “The Nutcracker” • Feb. 14-23 — “Cinderella” • Mar. 28-30 — “Director’s Choice” innovative works

Lone Tree Symphony reaches out to kids Season opener will feature ‘Doctor Noize’ By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews. com Many youngsters in the area have met Doctor Noize, aka Cory Cullinan of Lone Tree, and kids will love to see his show, “Phineas McBoof Crashes the Symphony” at 2 p.m. Oct. 5 at the Lone Tree Arts Center. The Lone Tree Symphony has a history of introducing children to instruments at intermission and, under conductor Jacinda Bouton, the orchestra takes it a step further to start its new season. Doctor Noize is a nationally known singer and multi-instrumentalist who loves pop/rock mu-

Parker Continued from Page 31

The Sink sticks out

Boulder’s The Sink restaurant (1164 13th St.), perhaps best known for a visit from President Barack Obama during one of his Colorado whistlestops, has been named No. 3 on The 25 Best College Campus Bars list, according to Complex City Guide. Here’s the blurb:

If you Go The Lone Tree Symphony will perform at the Lone Tree Arts Center, 10075 Commons St., Lone Tree, at 2 p.m. Oct. 5. Tickets: $12/$6, plus a handling fee of $3, are available at the box office, 720-509-1000, lonetreeartscenter.org.

sic but has a degree in classical music from Stanford. His musical play about Phineas McBoof teaches kids about the color and fun in orchestral sounds and forms — as well as about the composers. He said, “Beethoven, Berlioz, Stravinsky — these guys were crazy revolutionaries! I knew if I could get kids curious, they would be hooked. And they are! They realize that the music is rebellious, deep, magnificent beyond conventional imagination. After

the premiere of `Phineas McBoof Crashes the Symphony,’ a teacher told me that kids walked in not caring about classical music and walked out thinking that anyone who thinks kids can’t handle classical music is uncool.” The orchestra, in its 14th season, announces a full season of concerts: • Dec. 6 and 7: A holiday concert will include the Castle Rock Chorale and the Smithtonian Handbell Choir. • Feb. 28, 2014: Beethoven’s Sixth Symphony and “Rainbow Body,” a modern work by Christopher Theofanidis. • May 9: Concert will feature Grofe’s “Grand Canyon Suite” and pianist Dana Landry performing Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue.” The orchestra will offer a free show to invited school groups on Oct. 4.

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Quasquicentennial Celebration THIS FRIDAY

S E E PAGE 36 F OR DE TA I L S “Come for the best burger in Boulder and stay for the Beatnik wall art. True to the green culture of Colorado, the Sink is run by 100 percent wind power and only serves Angus and grass-fed beef. If you aren’t down with the Sink Burger, they offer a full and varied menu that includes brisket, the Cowboy Reuben, and tilapia. If you’re tall, watch out for the low ceilings, but otherwise, there is absolutely nothing to complain about at The Sink.” Read more at www.complex. com/city-guide/2013/04/the-

25-best-college-campus-bars/ the-sink. Penny Parker’s “Mile High Life” column gives insights into the best events, restaurants, businesses, parties and people throughout the metro area. Parker also writes for Blacktie-Colorado.com. You can subscribe and read her columns (Monday, Wednesday and Friday) at www.pennyparker.blacktiecolorado.com. She can be reached at penny@blacktie-llc.com or at 303-619-5209.

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34 The Independent

September 26, 2013

Highlands Ranch native and Colorado State sophomore Andrea Matlock, right, spent three weeks this summer in Guatemala as a junior leader with Walking Tree Travel, helping build a women’s center and schoolhouse. Matlock has also traveled to Costa Rica and Peru with the organization in the past. Courtesy photo by Chad Leto

Mission trips change perspective Guatemalan adventure opens eyes, may help change lives By Ryan Boldrey

rboldrey@ourcoloradonews.com Andrea Matlock has a different mindset than most college sophomores when it comes to how she spends her summer vacations. Joining up with Denver-based Walking Tree Travel for the third time in six years, the Highlands Ranch native spent three weeks this summer in Guatemala, helping lead a group of 12 high school girls and one boy in building a school and women’s center. For the Colorado State University art major, who may eventually attend veterinary school, it was her first time in a leadership role, having twice been one of the younger travelers, heading to both Costa Rica and Peru, while a student at Regis Jesuit. “It snaps you back into reality,” Matlock said of why she does the trips.

“In America, you get caught up stressing about day-to-day things, which most of the time are things you shouldn’t even really care about. There you value family, you value eating, you value staying out of the rain. It has really changed my perspective. “I saw beauty in a pretty rough city in Guatemala. A lot of people think about problems existing in other countries, but they don’t realize it is happening as we speak. Awareness needs to be raised a bit, and I want to be a part of that.” In her travels, Matlock has witnessed the kind of poverty she could previously only imagine, staying in a two-room house with eight people and one light bulb. She has also developed strong relationships with fellow travelers and her host families. “The service projects are important, but interacting with my host family is more important to me,” she said. “They are all such wonderful people, and what they have done for me is help to teach me what truly matters in life.” What Matlock hopes she taught people in Guatemala was a sense of empowerment for the women in the country,

Being one of 13 young women doing steady manual labor — something women just don’t do there — Matlock hopes that she was able to lead by example. She also hopes to return to do a photographic project on how animals are treated. “Animals in Third World countries aren’t pets, just things that walk around the earth, that people throw rocks at,” she said. “They are dirty, people don’t feed them. I want to get involved in animal rescue and help spread the message of what’s happening.” The eye-opening adventures Matlock Andrea Matlock, a college student from Highlands has had are exactly why Denver native Ranch, said part of her goal in a three-week trip to Paul Laurie started Walking Tree with two Guatemala was to “help empower my fellow women.” friends in 2005. The company, which conducts about She also hopes to get involved in animal rescue, 40 annual service trips to small groups after seeing how animals are treated in Third World and individuals in 15 countries worldcountries. Courtesy photo wide, works with roughly 500 high school students and recent graduates a year. “We hope that our participants bring and a sense of equality to the men. “Women’s main roles there are mak- their experiences home and start a diaing tortillas and making babies,” she said. logue with other young people to better “I wanted to build something for appreciate the world which we all share,” them and help empower my fellow wom- Laurie said. “We’re all about fostering an. It was the hardest trip I’ve ever been global citizenship.” For more information, visit www. on, seeing the way their men treat the walkingtree.org. women.”

Costa Vida Restaurant set to locate in Englewood Fresh Mexican grill to occupy spot in Marketplace By Tom Munds

tmunds@ourcoloradonews.com Crews continue the project of transforming the former Blockbuster Video location in the Marketplace Center into a new location for the Costa Vida Restaurant. The restaurant will be located adjacent to the Little Dry Creek Plaza area on the southeast corner of the shopping center. “This will be the second Costa Vida location in the metro area,” said Spencer

Bowen, manager. “Work on the Englewood location is progressing well and our goal is to open in late October.” Costa Vida Restaurants began in Utah and the menu features Baja-inspired dishes. “Some of our menu items are different than most menu items at most Mexicanstyle restaurants,” Bowen said. “For one thing, we make everything, including the tortilla, from scratch when a customer places an order. Also, we feature seafood as the main ingredient in many of our items such as our shrimp taco.” He said the menu also includes traditional items like the chicken burrito, while one of the most-ordered items is

the sweet pork burrito that is covered with melted cheese. Bowen said he thinks it is important to note that, since everything is prepared when the order is placed, the staff can cater to individuals with food allergies. Menu items will range in price from $4.99 to $8.99, and the restaurant is scheduled to be open from 10:30 a.m. until 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Bowen said Englewood city officials have worked with him on the project. “We looked around and decided Englewood would be a good location for our restaurant,” he said. “There is so much going on in the city and in the area around our planned location. We also are pleased with the fact the

city is working to fix up the area adjacent to our building.” Earlier this year, the Englewood City Council approved a proposal to spend about $100,000 to upgrade the plaza area. Dave Lee, open space manager, said the spring project will involve cleaning the stone areas around the fountain and filling in the former fountains so landscaping can be installed. The project will also replace the existing handicap ramp to bring it up to ADA standards. “We are looking forward to the city makeover of the area near our restaurant,” Bowen said. “We also are planning a small patio seating area that will overlook the plaza and lake.”


LittletonSportS

The Independent 35 September 26, 2013

Warriors win defensive showdown Arapahoe edges Mountain Vista, 7-6 By Jim Benton

jbenton@ourcoloradonews.com If saves could be awarded in football like baseball, Arapahoe quarterback Gabe Peterson deserves one. Arapahoe edged Mountain Vista, 7-6, on Sept. 19 at Shea Stadium in Highlands Ranch in the final non-league game for both schools. With the Warriors nursing the lead and trying to run out the clock with 2:20 remaining in the game, Peterson rolled to his right, avoided a Mountain Vista tackler, bounced off two other defenders and wound up gaining 8 yards. He picked up a first down instead of a possible 5-yard loss. That play virtually sealed the victory for an Arapahoe team that was playing its second game in four days. “I guess it was a pretty big play,” said Peterson. “I was just trying to get the first down and trying to get the win. When that guy came right at me I thought I was either going to have to truck him or juke him. I decided to juke him. I made the right decision.” Mountain Vista did get the ball back deep in their own territory with 20 seconds remaining but an incomplete pass and a sack saddled the Golden Eagles with their second loss in four games. “That was the best play of the night for us on offense,” Arapahoe coach Mike Campbell said of Peterson’s third down scramble. “He won the game on that play. That play put the game away. I didn’t like everything our quarterback did with the ball throwing it but I did like what he did with his feet.” The victory, coming after a 41-40 overtime loss to Fort Collins Sept. 16 in a game that was postponed from Sept. 13 because of heavy rains, boosted Arapahoe’s record to 3-1. “Everyone on this team is beat up,” confessed Peterson. “We were still feeling the Fort Collins loss but we came back and won.” Arapahoe opens Super 6 league play Sept. 26 against Columbine and a normal week of rest and preparation was welcomed. “We played two one-point games in four days,” pointed out Campbell. “I don’t think anybody else will be able to say that this year. Football continues on Page 39

Arapahoe running back Jose Cancanon gets wrapped up by Mountain Vista LB Tyler Spond (59). Photo by Paul DiSalvo

Heritage falls to Rock Canyon in soccer Jaguars player’s first-ever varsity goal is the game-winner By Jim Benton

jbenton@ourcoloradonews.com Kyle Rimer has played varsity soccer the past three years for Rock Canyon High School but never scored a goal. The senior defender ended his scoreless streak Sept. 17 at Littleton Public Schools Stadium as he scored the lone goal of the game in Rock Canyon’s 1-0 Continental League victory over Heritage. Rimer lofted a 60-yard free kick towards the goal 79 seconds into the second half. The ball bounced in front of the net among scrambling players, went over the head of Heritage junior keeper Riccardo Commelli and into the goal. “My job was to just to put it on target, challenge the keeper a little bit and keep it on the spot so our team could crash the box and get it in,” said Rimer. “It wasn’t all me, my team jumped up and created a distraction for the goalie and threw him off his game. I thought somebody had touched it.” Rock Canyon coach Sean Henning was delighted. “Everybody challenged for it, nobody touched it and it just went in,” he said. Heritage coach Adam Buseck called it a fluky goal. “You’ve got to be able to make a play

Rock Canyon’s Tyler Riviere (24) and Heritage’s Conrad d’Leeuwen during the Sept. 17 game. Photo by Jim Benton on those kinds of balls,” admitted Buseck. “We have a young goalkeeper who has made fantastic saves all season and he’ll keep getting better. And, the defenders could have helped there a little bit too.” Heritage controlled play most of the first half and toward the end of the match launched a lot of shots at the Rock Canyon goal in an effort to tie the game. Rock Canyon goalie Sam Makikalli made three of his eight saves in the closing minutes. The Jaguars back line of

Rimer, Ben Flannery-Bartlett, Jeremy Purchase and Andrew Greiner provided Makikalli with good support. “Our back line is definitely the strength of our team,” claimed Rimer. “We have great chemistry. We are all seniors except our left back (Greiner) is a junior. We’ve been playing together on the varsity for the last three years. “Heritage definitely threw everything they had at us. Heritage made a great effort to come back. They are tough.”

Rock Canyon lost to Heritage during the regular season last season, but beat the Eagles in the state playoffs. “Heritage is a good team,” said Henning. “It was a tough game, it was hardfought on both sides. I’m pleased with the result but that game could have gone either way. “Once we scored we were able to hold on and absorb everything they threw, and they threw a lot at us.” The win improved Rock Canyon’s record to 6-0-0 and 3-0-0 in the league. The Jaguars had a game Sept. 19 against Castle View and played Mountain Vista Sept. 24. “Beating Heritage was good, especially away,” said Rimer. “We knew Heritage was most likely going to be our toughest opponent in the Continental League. Our coach said the winner ultimately dictates the league championship. That’s our goal this year. We’ve never won a league championship.” Heritage’s defending Continental League champions saw its record fall to 1-2-1 and 1-1-0 in the league but the Eagles have played Regis Jesuit Sept. 19, Mountain Range Sept. 21 and Littleton Sept. 24. “We did a great job against Rock Canyon,” said Buseck. “The guys fought the whole game. The leadership from Conrad d’Leeuwen, Erik Gentile and Josh Peil was excellent. Those seniors really pushed hard the whole game. They never stopped fighting. Rock Canyon is good. We were pushing to generate as many shots as we could. I think the guys will get better.”


36 The Independent

September 26, 2013

invites you to join us for our

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This Friday ✶ Rain or Shine! Sept. 27 ✶ 6:00 pm ✶ Garden Canopy at Hudson Gardens

Free admission! Bring the whole family! Music by John Akal’s Ultraphonic Jazz Orchestra 20 piece band highlighting 6 eras of music and history Dancing ✶ Food ✶ Drinks ✶ Cake ✶ and FUN! Visit OurLittletonNews.com for more info

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The Independent 37

September 26, 2013

Heritage catcher Kursten Shaffer comes up to try to pick off a Rock Canyon runner attempting to steal second. The runner was safe and the Jaguars went on to win the game, 13-3. Photos by Tom Munds

Rock Canyon tops young Heritage team League softball game comes to 13-3 end By Tom Munds

tmunds@ourcoloradonews.com Rock Canyon’s bats produced hits while Heritage played well but struggled getting on base Sept. 20 as the Jaguars won the Continental League softball game, 13-3. The game boosted Rock Canyon’s record to 9-3 overall and 4-0 in league. The loss means the young Heritage team record was 5-7 overall and 1-2 in league. “I am proud of our team and the leadership our seniors have provided to get us to this point in the league,” Rock Canyon coach Debby Kortbawi said after the game. “All league games are important, and this one has added importance to our team as we get ready to face the two other unbeaten league teams next week.” Heritage coach Pablo Severtson said his team is very young and some of his players get intimidated when facing a strong team like Rock Canyon. “Today definitely is not how we have been playing lately. But these things happen with a young team. We only have two seniors on the roster and we are starting four freshmen and two sophomores so, at times, our inexperience shows,” Severtson said. “We did some good things today but we also made a lot of mistakes. We’ll keep battling because we’re still in the hunt, so we will try to keep getting better and reach our goal of getting into the playoffs.” Rock Canyon next will face back-toback challenges, as the Jaguars are home against the other two undefeated league teams. The Jaguars were to be at home Sept. 26 against Douglas County, which will come in with an 11-0 record and 3-0 in league. Then, on Sept. 28, Rock Canyon is at home against Legend, which is 10-3 overall and 4-0 in league. Both games will be played at the softball field at Rock Canyon High School, with the first pitch scheduled each day at 4:30 p.m. Heritage also will continue its pursuit of a playoff berth. The schedule called

Heritage third baseman Amanda Stanton lines up to catch an infield fly during the Sept. 20 game against Rock Canyon. Heritage battled but Rock Canyon got the 13-3 victory in six innings. for a Sept. 25 home game against undefeated Douglas County, and then the Eagles will play Regis Sept. 27, a team with a 1-3 league record. On Sept. 20, the visiting Rock Canyon team scored twice in the first inning and got a solo home run from freshman Sloane Stewartson, and pushed a second run across in the second inning to take the lead for good. Stewartson also drove in two more runs with a double later in the game. The Jaguars threatened again with two on and no outs in the third, but the rally was defused when Eagles senior shortstop Stefanie Peck executed an unassisted double play. “The unassisted double play just shaped up in front of me when the girl on second didn’t break toward third,” Peck said after the game. “I just scooped

up the ground ball and touched both runners.” This is the senior’s fourth year playing softball, but she played baseball from the time she was about 5 until she started high school. “I have always been a shortstop,” she said. “It is a position I like because I get to make a lot of plays there. I enjoy being in the field. But I like hitting too, because that is also fun.” During the game, the Jaguars pounded out 10 hits to score 13 runs. Starting senior pitcher Lauren Page threw strikes for four innings and left leading 5-0. She also collected a hit but didn’t add to her league-leading seven home runs. Rock Canyon scored at least one run in each inning to win the game in six innings, 13-3. Heritage got on the scoreboard with a run in the third inning, add-

ed a run in the fourth on an RBI double by Peck, and had a solo run in the fifth inning. After the game, the Jaguars coach said one of her senior leaders is catcher Brooklyn Travis. “I have been playing softball about eight years. Most of the time I played third base or first base until they asked me to catch,” she said after the game. “When I got behind the plate, I found I liked it and that is where I stayed. It was hard to learn to catch, and I think the hardest thing for me is being able to move quickly to block a ball in the dirt. I have had people tell me being left-handed is a problem for catchers, but I haven’t found it to make any difference.” Travis she now likes catching best because it means she is involved in every play and is a team leader.


38 The Independent

September 26, 2013

Jerry Healey

Chris Rotar

Owner & Publisher

Editor

Erin Addenbrooke

Scott Gilbert

Sales Director

Assistant Editor

Littleton 7.25.13

Sandy Arellano

Arapahoe County, Colorado • Volume

Circulation Director

125, Issue 1

July 25, 2013

75 cents

A Colorado Community Media Publication

GETTIN’ DOWN AT THE HOED

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Pending projects face fees

OWN

Sonya Ellingboe

Entertainment Reporter

Council sets August vote on development charges

By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@ourcoloradon

ews.com

Riders take a spin in paddleboats

at Littleton’s Turkey Leg and Wine

Hoedown July 20. For more photos

from the Hoedown, turn to page

14. Photo by Jennifer Smith

Champion dog groomer loves a challenge Henriksen hones skills

through competition

By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@ourcoloradon

ews.com

Fluffy is a dog fraught with irony. He’s a bichon frise, a breed often touted as safe for people allergic to ly, Fluffy himself is allergic dogs. But sadto a long list of things — cats, cotton, hemp, horses and more, including many ingredients common in grooming products. “It’s so strange that a dog that’s supposed to be hypoallergenic for the benefit of all of us has all these insane allergies,” said Carolyn Brimson, Fluffy’s owner. That’s why she feels lucky to have discovered groomer Christie Henriksen. “She’s a good part of the ongoing general good health of our dog,” said Brimson. Henriksen is conscientio us about avoid- Christie Henriksen is a master groomer, and the Littleton businesswoman has won a bundle ing the multitudes of things Fluffy can’t National Dog Groomers Association of America competitions. This week, she’s competing of first-place awards in tolerate, and she keeps a close eye out for held in Las Vegas. Courtesy photo at an international challenge the hot spots that indicate a flare-up. And to top it off, says Brimson, she’s an excellent groomer. “It’s going to be my fi She’s proved that by rst big show,” she on achieving the level said him. before leaving. “I’m pretty of master groomer and winning a bundle of right freaked out She moved from Michigan now.” first-place awards in National Dog Groomto Littleton in 2007, started working Henriksen has loved dogs ers Association of America in a pet spa and all her life and joined the NDGAA. When she This week, she’s competing competitions. got her first show dog, Kodiak, found a storewhen she front at 5501 at an interna- was 15. tional challenge held With guidance from other S. Broadway that was in Las Vegas. cheaper handlers, she practiced the finer points of grooming Groomer

Audrey Brooke

Business Manager

continues on Page 9

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Littleton City Council will vote Aug. 20 on whether to start charging developers fees to help offset the impacts their projects have on the community . It’s a timely discussion, as decisions on two major projects are scheduled to happen before that. On July 30, council will vote on the controversi al Broadstone project proposed for the southwest corner of Littleton Boulevard and Bemis Street. City staff recommended that council approve it, while the city’s planning board unanimously rejected it on June 25. The board and staff agreed on July 6 that Littleton Village, the long-antici pated project for the old Marathon Oil site, should be approved. Council will vote on that one Aug. 6. City Manager Michael Penny says because the impact fee is collected when the developer pulls the building permit, all projects currently pending in the city will pay. “No applicant is at that stage, so everyone pays from here forward,” he said. “It is our stance that no project can avoid the pending impact fees.” He explains that Colorado pending-ordinance doctrine, also has a would apply to any application so the fees on the table when council approved the ating them on first reading legislation creon July 16. “The short answer is, under the ordinance as presented, all projects in the pipeline would have to pay the fees,” he said. He said credit will be given to any developer who has already paid ties fee or the open-space a public-facilifee, which these new fees will replace if approved. BBC Research and Consulting says Littleton should be charging impact fees of $5,274 per dwelling unit for residential construction, and $1,811 per 1,000 square feet of commercial. “In light of renewed interest in development and the prospect of considerable future development activity, the city council is considering developme nt as part of its larger strategy impact fees to ensure that growth pays its own way and that existing residents and existing services are not financially burdened by new growth,” writes BBC’s Ford Frick in the recommendation. The money can only be used for expansion of capital assets necessary due to growth, not maintenan ce. Littleton is mostly built out, so there likely will be more and more infill projects as developable land runs out. According to BBC, redevelopment will be charged only for net new space added. If the Littleton Village plan is approved, it could bring roughly $4.7 million in residential fees and $450,000 in commercial

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The Independent 39

September 26, 2013

Prep sports Scoreboard Football ARAPAHOE HIGH SCHOOL

had seven saves.

VALOR CHRISTIAN HIGH SCHOOL

Cross Country Coronado Cougar Classic Arapahoe finished 10th overall at the Coronado Cougar Classic in Colorado Springs. Emily Wolff finished in third place overall.

HERITAGE HIGH SCHOOL Softball Heritage 4, Douglas County 6 The Eagles lost to an undefeated Douglas County team Sept. 17 who is 11-0 on the season. They had nine hits compared to Heritage’s five. Eagles senior Stefanie Peck had two RBI on the day. Heritage 12, Valor 2 The Eagles swung the bats well Sept. 18 and played well defensively. The Eagles scored six runs in the third inning. Carly Carlson pitched a great game striking out three batters. Stefanie Peck went 1-for-3 with two RBI.

LITTLETON HIGH SCHOOL Boys Soccer

Softball Valor Christian 2, Heritage 12 Valor lost to Heritage Sept. 18 at Euclid Middle School. Valor produced the two runs in the fifth inning. Freshman Erica Mann and junior Makenna Roth went 1-for-2.

UPCOMING GAMES Cross Country FRIDAY 3 p.m. - Arapahoe at Dave Sanders Invite @ Clement Park WEDNESDAY 3 p.m. - Arapahoe at Dakota Ridge Invite @ Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield

Softball THURSDAY 4 p.m. - Valor Christian vs. Holy Family 4:30 p.m. - Heritage vs. Regis MONDAY 4:30 p.m. - Heritage @ Legend TUESDAY 4:30 p.m. - Valor Christian @ Cheyenne Mountain

Boys Soccer

Littleton 1, Ponderosa 2 The Lions lost to Ponderosa Sept. 19, 2-1 in overtime. Ponderosa scored the first goal in the first half and the Lions scored in the second. Ponderosa’s goalkeeper Kyran Johnson

THURSDAY 5 p.m. - Littleton at Rock Canyon @ DC Stadium TUESDAY 7 p.m. - Littleton vs. Mountain Vista

Continued from Page 35

“I’m not sure we should have played that game on Monday (against Fort Collins) especially how it looks like it will go nowhere, a no-play is better than a loss. Maybe we should have not played it and had all our players out here and done better against Mountain Vista. But we didn’t get that memo until noon on Monday (Sept. 16).” Arapahoe scored on its first possession of the game, driving 50 yards in six plays to take a 7-0 lead with 8:19 to play in the first quarter. Peterson, who passed for 79 yards and ran for 47 in the game, connected with Ethan Brunhofer on three straight passes, the last one for 21 yards and a touchdown. Mountain Vista came back on the next possession and drove 80 yards in nine plays with Nick Schmalz scoring on a 3-yard run. However, the Golden Eagles missed the extra point kick and trailed by a point with 4:33 left to be played in the first quarter. There was no more scoring in the game, although Mountain Vista had three chances to score in the first half. Vista linebacker Tyler Spond returned an inter-

cepted pass 79 yards to the Arapahoe 6-yard line but the Golden Eagles failed to score on a fourth and goal from the 2-yard line on the first play of the second quarter. Mountain Vista took possession at the Arapahoe 44and 34-yard lines later in the second period but couldn’t take advantage of ideal field position. “We had lots of chances,” acknowledged Golden Eagles coach Rick Cash. “Lost opportunities are what stand out. It is part of competition, it’s part of games. There are situations where you take chances and if they work out then it’s great. If they don’t work out, then you end up looking at a situation where we go a whole game after scoring two touchdowns in the first quarter and nobody else scores. Who would have thought that would be how it works out. “So you take that chance. Should we have kicked a field goal on the opportunity when we were on the goal line, you can second guess that like every other decision made. When it doesn’t work out, it’s always easy to second guess.” After the first quarter, the game turned into a defensive slugfest. Defensive lineman TJ Scherping had nine tackle to pace a Vista defense that held Arapahoe to 233 yards total offense.

Mountain Vista had only 144 yards total offense. “Our `D’ was awesome,” said Campbell. “A lot of bend but no break. Jaylen Mosqueira (senior linebacker) had a huge night. I though our D line with Kyle Foss and Alex Schmidt played well. We got great play from our back safeties, they were making some great tackles in the open field.” Mountain Vista begins Continental League play Sept. 26 against Douglas County and Cash hopes to have a two of his three injured captains in the lineup. Running back Tanner Smith is lost for the season with a knee injury. Wide receiver Rocco Palumbo missed the second half of the Arapahoe game with an ankle injury and Spond banged up his shoulder late in the game. “I’m proud of my boys,” said Cash. “We have three captains on our team and all three of them are out with injuries. That’s tough on a team. That’s a lot of adversity and we had some other things that were self-induced things and some other things that just went against us. It was too much adversity for a team that honestly is awfully young. “That being said, what Arapahoe was able to do in their very difficult circumstance, hats off to them. They did a great job.”

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40 The Independent

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For Sale By Owner Castle Rock 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, Sun room, Shed, Open Space, Mountain Views 1500? SqFt. Pre Qual letter required $252,500 (719)661-7330

WITH FULL SERVICE… CALL FOR DETAILS!!! SAVE THOUSANDS OF $$$$ WHY PAY MORE?

OR LESS!

303-995-4925 MIKE BIESBOER, BROKER

SHORT SALE R.E. BROKER

METRO BROKERS - THE BRIAN PETRELLI TEAM

I NEGOTIATE PENNIES ON THE $!!!

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Charles Realty 720-560-1999 OurColoradoNews.com Your Community Connector to Boundless Rewards

BROKERAGE OWNER - 25 YRS EXPERIENCE!

denverrealestatecharles@gmail.com

WE BELIEVE ENERGY STAR IS JUST A STARTING POINT. OurColoradoNews.com

WE ARE NEW TOWN BUILDERS. OurColoradoNews.com

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THE PARADE ES OF HOtoM Sept 2

R

August 8

We’re inspired by classic Colorado architecture and passionate about craŌsmanship. Yet we geek out on the latest technology and building techniques. The thicker walls in our high performance homes allow for 60% more money-saving insulaƟon than in a convenƟonal home, and our roof is 6 inches higher than a typical home, so we get 2½ Ɵmes MORE insulaƟon in the aƫc. This reduces heat loss, and more importantly, reduces your energy bill!

BRAND NEW HOMES IN CASTLEWOOD RANCH!

Margaret Sandel - 303.500.3255 Margaret.Sandel@newtownbuilders.com 7001 Weaver Circle, Castle Rock

newtownbuilders.com

Walking Distance to Schools! Semi-Custom Homes on One Acre Up to 4-Car Garages 3 to 7 Bedrooms, 2-1/2 to 4-3/4 Baths 2,887 to 3,576 s.f. Homes 2-Story Plans Main Floor Master Plans

From the $400’s

Price, features, specifications, availability and other terms and conditions are subject to change without notice.

For All Your Real Estate Advertising Needs

Call 303-566-4100


B2 The Independent

September 26, 2013

ourcolorado

ourcolorado

CLASSIFIEDS

.com

TO ADVERTISE CALL 303-566-4100

TO ADVERTISE, CALL 303-566-4100

Instruction

Misc. Notices

Financial Financial Financial Financial CREDIT CARD DEBT? Discover a Financial CREDIT CARD DEBT? Discover Discover a new wayCARD to eliminate CREDIT DEBT? CREDIT CARD DEBT? Discover a a new way to eliminate credit card debt fast. Discover Minimum new way to CREDIT CARD DEBT? a new way to eliminate eliminate credit card debt fast. Minimum $8750 intodebt required. credit card debt fast. Minimum new way eliminate credit card debt fast. Minimum $8750 in debt required. Free information. Call recor$8750 in credit card debtrequired. fast.24hr Minimum $8750 in debt debt required. Free information. Call 24hr recorded message: Free information. Call $8750 in debt1-801-642-4747 required. Free information. Call 24hr 24hr recorrecorded message: 1-801-642-4747 _____________________________ ded message: 1-801-642-4747 Free information. Call 24hr recorded message: 1-801-642-4747 _____________________________ GET FREE OF1-801-642-4747 CREDIT CARD _____________________________ ded message: _____________________________ GET CARD DEBTFREE NOW!OF GET FREE OF CREDIT CREDIT _____________________________ GET FREE CREDIT CARD CARD DEBT NOW!OF Cut payments by CREDIT up to half.CARD Stop DEBT NOW! GET FREE DEBT NOW!OF Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 877-858Cut payments by up to half. Stop DEBT NOW! Cut payments bycalling. up to half. Stop creditors from 877-8581386 creditors from calling. 877-858Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 877-8581386 _____________________________ 1386 creditors from calling. 877-8581386 _____________________________ Cut STUDENT LOAN pay_____________________________ 1386your _____________________________ Cut your LOAN payments in STUDENT HALF or more Cut your STUDENT LOAN _____________________________ Cut your STUDENT LOAN paypayments in HALF or more Even if Late or in Default. GetpayRements in HALF or more Cut your STUDENT LOAN ments in HALF or more Even if Late or in Default. Get Relief FAST Even if Late or in Default. Get Rements in HALF or more Even if Late or in Default. Get Relief FAST Much LOWER payments. lief FAST Even if Late or in Default. Get Relief FAST Much LOWER payments. Call Student Hotline 877-295-0517 Much LOWER payments. lief FAST Much LOWER payments. Call Student Hotline 877-295-0517 _____________________________ Call Hotline 877-295-0517 Much LOWER payments. Call Student Student Hotline 877-295-0517 _____________________________ Guaranteed Income877-295-0517 For Your Re_____________________________ Call Student Hotline _____________________________ Guaranteed Income For Your Retirement Guaranteed Income _____________________________ Guaranteed Income For For Your Your ReRetirement Avoid marketIncome risk & get guaranteed tirement Guaranteed For Your Retirement Avoid market risk & get guaranteed income in retirement! Avoid market risk & get guaranteed tirement Avoid market risk & get guaranteed income retirement! CALL forin our SAFE income in retirement! Avoid market riskcopy & getofguaranteed income inFREE retirement! CALL for FREE copy our SAFE MONEY Plus of Annuity CALL for FREE copy of our income retirement! CALL forinGUIDE FREE copy of our SAFE SAFE MONEY GUIDE Plus Annuity Quotes from A-Rated companies! MONEY GUIDE Plus Annuity CALL for FREE copy of our SAFE MONEY GUIDE Plus Annuity Quotes from A-Rated companies! 800-669-5471 Quotes from A-Rated companies! MONEY GUIDE Plus Annuity Quotes from A-Rated companies! 800-669-5471 800-669-5471 Quotes from A-Rated companies! 800-669-5471 Business Opportunity 800-669-5471 Make Up To $2K+ Per Week! New Credit Card Ready Drink-Snack Vending Machines. Minimum $4K to $40K+ Invest Req'd. Locations Avail. BBB Accredited Business. (800) 962-9189 ____________________________ **ATTENTION: JOB SEEKERS!** MAKE MONEY! Mailing Postcards! www.PostcardsToWealth.com NOW ACCEPTING! ZNZ Referral Agents! $20-$60/Hour! www.FreeJobPosition.com HOME WORKERS! Make Money Using Your PC! www.SuperCashDaily.com Earn Big Paychecks Paid Every Friday! www.LegitCashJobs.com ____________________________ MAKE MONEY AND SAVE LIVES Offering exclusive rights in your area, work from home, guaranteed investment return, Low maintenance, don't pay until you see your business running Www.smallbusinessideasUS.com 1-800-895-6521

Piano or Guitar lessons

At your home or my Parker studio by experienced, patient teacher. Parker, Highlands Ranch, S. Aurora. We can also work singing or songwriting into the lessons, and can include music that the student loves to keep it fun. Visit musictreecolorado.com or phone John at 303-521-8888.

Lost and Found

4/11

4/13

.com

Lost at Golden First Friday on Sept 6th med sized blue canvas bag-includes prescription sunglasses inside. If found please call 303-921-7621

Misc. Notices ADOPTION- A loving alternative to unplanned pregnancy. You chose the family for your child. Receive pictures/info of waiting/approved couples. Living expense assistance. 1-866-236-7638 Business Opportunity

NEEDED NOW!! On Every Person, In Every Vehicle, In Every Home, In Every Business. Easily Give them what they need & earn thousands monthly! 800-961-6086 Want To Purchase minerals and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: P.O. Box 13557 Denver, CO 80201

Want To Purchase minerals and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: P.O. Box 13557 Denver, CO 80201

Dept Code CNNB2A93

Misc. Notices

My Computer Works Computer problems? Viruses, spyware, email, printer issues, bad internet connections - FIX IT NOW! Professional, U.S.-based technicians. $25 off service. Call for immediate help. 1-866-998-0037 _____________________________ Advertise your product or service nationwide or by region in up to 12 million households in North America's best suburbs! Place your classified ad in over 815 suburban newspapers just like this one. Call Classified Avenue at 888-486-2466 or go to www.classifiedavenue.net _____________________________ Dish Network lowest nationwide price $19.99 a month. FREE HBO/Cinemax/Starz FREE Blockbuster. FREE HD-DVR and install. Next day install 1-800-375-0784 _____________________________ *REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! * Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, SO CALL NOW. 1-800-6997159 _____________________________ SAVE on Cable TV-Internet-Digital Phone-Satellite. You`ve Got A Choice! Options from ALL major service providers. Call us to learn 1. Go t more! CALL Today. 877-884-1191 2. Com _____________________________ 3. Onc Alone? Emergencies Happen! Get Hon Help with one button push! $29.95/month. Free equipment, Free set-up. Protection for you or a loved one. Call LifeWatch USA 1800-357-6505 _____________________________ ADOPTION- A loving alternative to unplanned pregnancy. You chose the family for your child. Receive pictures/info of waiting/approved couples. Living expense assistance. 1-866-236-7638

Ex

TO

Home Improvement

_____________________________ All Things Basementy! Basement Systems Inc. Call us for all of your basement needs! Waterproofing? Finishing? Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold Control. FREE ESTIMATES! Call 1-888698-8150 _____________________________ Appliance Repair - We fix It no matter who you bought it from! 800934-5107 _____________________________ One call, does it all! Fast and Reliable Electrical Repairs and Installations. Call 1-800-908-8502 _____________________________ One call, does it all! Fast and Reliable Plumbing Repairs. Call 1- 800796-9218

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At Shea Homes, we build more

WE BUILD QUALITY

than houses. We build floor plans designed to make life a little sweeter. We build communities nestled in prime locations. We build teams dedicated to helping you find your dream home. We build Shea Homes. What will you build inside of them?

Highlands Ranch Pkwy. & Fairview in Highlands Ranch From the low $300s to the mid $400s

303.346.5200

MOD

SA L E

!

SPACES at Reunion Just west of 104th & Tower Road in Northeast Denver From the low $200s

303.286.7601

$ 4 ,0

00

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START BUILDING YOUR TRADITIONS

IN A HOME BUILT FOR YOU.

Shea Homes is developing and building some of the finest communities and homes in America – and features five communities in the Colorado front range. Our Shea SPACES collections have taken Colorado by storm. Here is where they’re being offered…

OR ELS F

3225

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so you can build traditions that last.

SPACES at The Ranch

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Stepping Stone RidgeGate Parkway & Stepping Stone Circle in Parker

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From the upper $200s to the low $400s

720.675.7683

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START BUILDING YOUR TRADITIONS IN A HOME BUILT FOR YOU. You can find our iPhone app at the App Store. And to stay connected, find us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter. *Shea Homes reserves the right to make changes or modifications to floorplans, elevations, specifications, materials and prices without notice. All square footages shown herein are approximate. **Offer is valid for new buyers/contracts on select dirt start homesites at Shea’s SPACES location at Reunion, only. Closing costs may vary and Shea reserves the right to pay up to, but not exceeding, $4,000 per contract. Buyer(s) must use Shea Mortgage in order to receive $4,000 incentive. Prices subject to change without notice. See Sales Associates for full details. Home pictured may not be actual home for sale or actual model home, but rather a representation of similar model or elevation design. © 2013 Shea Homes

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WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home-Workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.workingcentral.com _____________________________

The Independent B3

September 26, 2013

ourcolorado

, spyad inNOW! echnior im37 _____ ervice to 12 Amerr clasurban e. Call -2466 e.net _____ nwide FREE Blocknstall. 784 _____ ILL! * atellite d pro9/mo. r new 0-699-

TO ADVERTISE YOUR JOBS, CALL 303-566-4100

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

EMERGENCY DISPATCHER

Excel Personnel…

Communications Officer (Emergency 911 Dispatcher), City of Black Hawk. Hiring range is $42,437 - $48,803, DOQ/E. Position is responsible for the operation of the emergency communications console including the receipt of calls and proper dispatch of appropriate equipment and personnel to provide assistance to the citizens and visitors of Black Hawk in the areas of Police, Fire and Emergency Medical Services. Requires high school diploma or GED; valid Colorado driver’s license with a safe driving record; ability to work a variety of shifts, including days, evenings, weekends, and holidays. Must be at least 18 years of age. Applicant must successfully complete several preemployment tests including but not limited to typing, mathematical and multi-tasking skills, psychological exam, physical exam, drug testing and background investigation as conditions of employment. If you are interested in serving a unique historical city and enjoy working with diverse populations visit www.cityofblackhawk. org for application documents and more information on the Black Hawk Police Department. To be considered for this opportunity, please forward a completed City application, Police Background Questionnaire, and copies Employment Opportunity of certifications and driver’s license to Employee Services, City of Black Hawk, P.O.____________________________ Box 68, Black Hawk,MAKE CO 80422, PAID IN ADVANCE! $1000 A or by fax to 303-582-0848. Pleasemailing brochures from WEEK home! Helping Home-Workers note that we are not accepting since 2001. Genuine Opportunity! e-mailed application documents at No experience required. Start Immediately! www.workingthis time. We will begin processing central.com your application upon receipt of all _____________________________ Employment Opportunity application documents. EOE. ____________________________

is ALWAYS hiring!

Clean Room Assemblers – Englewood, CO Book Assemblers – Englewood, CO Warehouse Associates – Englewood, CO Assemblers – Golden, CO General Labor – Denver/Lakewood, CO

_____ Digital Got A major learn 1. Go to www.excelpersonnel.com -1191 2. Complete the application including your job history _____ 3. Once completed, call Excel Personnel at 303-427-4600 n! Get Honored to be in business in Colorado for over 20 years. Excel Personnel is an Equal Employment Opportunity employer. M/F/D/V. push! ment, u or a Help Wanted SA 1-

TO APPLY:

_____ tive to chose eceive roved ssist-

Excel Personnel is now HIRING!! Excellent opportunity to put your filing and assembly skills to work for the world’s leading provider of aeronautical data! 1ST SHIFT MON – FRI: 6AM – 2:30PM $9.50/hr 2ND SHIFT MON – FRI: 2:30PM – 11PM $10.50/hr 3rd SHIFT WED – SAT (SWING 10HRS) 7AM – 5:30PM $9.50/hr ** Clerical/Filing tests required **

TO APPLY:

1. Go to www.excelpersonnel.com 2. Complete the application including your job history 3. Once completed, call Excel Personnel at 303-427-4600 Honored to be in business in Colorado for over 20 years. Excel Personnel is an Equal Employment Opportunity employer. M/F/D/V.

ourcolorado

Help Wanted Employment Opportunity ____________________________ PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home-Workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.workingcentral.com _____________________________ NOW HIRING!!! $28/HOUR. Undercover Shoppers Needed To Judge Retail and Dining Establishments. Genuine Opportunity. PT/FT. Experience not required. If You Can Shop- You Are Qualified!! www.AmericanShopperJobs.com _____________________________ NOW HIRING! LOCAL PEOPLE Canada Drug Center is choice Canada Drug Center is your your In choice NEEDEDMen & Women DeCanada Drug Center is your choice for and affordable medicafor safe safe and affordable medicamand For Simple Work. P/TF/T. for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail tions.Be Our licensed Canadian mail Can Done From Home. Accepttions. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy provide you order Guaranteedpharmacy will will provide you ance Noprovide Experience order pharmacy will you with savings of up to 90% on all with savings of up to 90% on R e q savings u i r e d , ofAup l l toW90% e l c oon m all e! with all your medication needs. Call today your medication needs. Call today w w w . E a s y P a y W o r k . c o m your medication for needs. Callofftoday 1-800-418-8975, $10.00 your 1-800-418-8975, for $10.00 off your _____________________________ 1-800-418-8975, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free and firstHealth prescription and Beauty free shipping. shipping. __ first prescription and free shipping. _____________________________ _____________________________ AIRLINES ARE HIRING – Train for _____________________________ ATTENTION SLEEP SLEEP APNEA APNEA SUFSUFATTENTION hands on Aviation Career. FAA apATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFERERS with Get FERERSprogram. with Medicare. Medicare. Get CPAP CPAP proved Financial aid if FERERS with Medicare. Get CPAP Replacement Supplies at little or Replacement Supplies at little or qualified Job placement assistReplacement Supplies at little or NO plus FREE delivNO COST, COST, plus FREE home home delivance. CALL Aviation Institute of NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin ery! Best of all, prevent red skin Maintenance 877-818-0783 ery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores sores and and bacterial bacterial infection! infection! Call Call sores and bacterial infection! Call 1-866-993-5043 1-866-993-5043 1-866-993-5043 _____________________________ _____________________________ _____________________________ Medical Medical Alert Alert for for Seniors Seniors -- 24/7 24/7 Medical Alert for Seniors - 24/7 monitoring. monitoring. FREE FREE Equipment. Equipment. monitoring. FREE Equipment. FREE FREE Shipping. Shipping. Nationwide Nationwide SerSerFREE Shipping. Nationwide Service. vice. $29.95/Month $29.95/Month CALL CALL Medical Medical vice. $29.95/Month CALL Medical Guardian Today 866-992-7236 Guardian Today 866-992-7236 Guardian Today 866-992-7236 _____________________________ _____________________________ _____________________________ CASH for unexpired unexpired DIABETIC DIABETIC CASH for CASH unexpired DIABETIC TEST for STRIPS! Free TEST STRIPS! Free Shipping, Shipping, TEST STRIPS! Free Shipping, Friendly Service, Service, BEST BEST prices prices and Friendly and Friendly Service,Call BEST prices and 24hr payment! today 1- 87787724hr payment! Call today 124hr payment! Call today 1- 877588 8500 or visit www.Test588 8500 or visit www.Test588 8500 or visit www.TestStripSearch.com Espanol 888-440StripSearch.com Espanol 888-440StripSearch.com Espanol 888-4404001 4001 4001

TO SELL YOUR GENTLY USED ITEMS, CALL 303-566-4100 Farm Products & Produce Grain Finished Buffalo

quartered, halves and whole

719-775-8742

HILL’S HARVEST

Fresh Farm Produce 3225 E 124th Ave - Thornton Veggies • Peaches • Preserves Roasted Green Chili & More Pumpkin Patch

www.hillsharvest.com 303.451.5637

Locally raised, grass fed and grain finished Beef & Pork. Quarters, halves, wholes available. Can deliver 720-434-1322 schmidtfamilyfarms.com

Wanted Senior Woman come join this

50th Anniversary of Suburbanites. The first Wednesday of each month for luncheons and entertainment. Bridge, poker, needle craft, movies, and tours are also avail. We welcome new members. For more info call Joyce 3/421-3898 or Julie 3/425-4151

Garage Sales Aravada

BIG SALE 2 families September 26th, 27th & 28th Alkire Court off of Yank Way Household, clothes, sports, gifts, collectibles, jewelery, antique glassware, 100's of items

Arts & Crafts

Crafters Wanted

Lakewood Elks Anuual Holiday Craft Fair November 30th 9am-4pm 8x8 booth $35.00 kamperkarivanlw1777@gmail.com 303-989-0188

.com

Arts & Crafts Harvest Craft Fair

September 28th 9am-3pm Applewood Valley United Methodist Church 2035 Ellis St Golden Booths still available Call KateCrafters 303-396-9635 Wanted /

Vendors

November 23rd for Englewood High Schools' Annual Holiday Sale benefiting EHS special needs students Please call 303-806-2239 or email ehs_craftfair@englewood.k12.co.us for reservation

Firewood Split and dry hardwood $200 a cord Free delivery w/in 10 miles of yard 303-424-7357

Furniture $ Mattress Liquidation $ Name Brands, new in plastic K$200 Q-$150 F-$145 First Come First Serve 303-803-2350

$150 Queen Pillow Top Mattress Set in original plastic Call or text 303-803-2350

FREE- Brown leather recliner 303-947-2469 - Sedalia area

Health and Beauty TRIM INCHES FROM THEIGHS AND HIPS In your own home with the original Sears Vibrating Belt Machine it really works, Call today (303)798-6812 $85 Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90% on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-418-8975, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping. _____________________________ ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFERERS with Medicare. Get CPAP

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NOW HIRING!!! $28/HOUR. Undercover Shoppers Needed To Judge Retail and Dining Establishments. Genuine Opportunity. PT/FT. Experience not required. If You Can Shop- You Are Qualified!! www.AmericanShopperJobs.com _____________________________ NOW HIRING! LOCAL PEOPLE NEEDED- Men & Women In Demand For Simple Work. P/T- F/T. Can Be Done From Home. Acceptance Guaranteed- No Experience Required, All Welcome! www.E a s y PWanted ayWork.com Help _____________________________ __ AIRLINES ARE HIRING – Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-818-0783

Academy for Dental Assisting Careers October 5th Session!

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academyfordentalassistingcareers .com

GAIN 130 LBS!

Savio House needs foster parents to provide temporary care for troubled teens ages 12-18. Training, 24 hour support and $1900/month provided. Must complete precertification training and pass a criminal and motor vehicle background check. Call Michelle 303-225-4073 or visit saviohouse.org.

Caregivers to provide in-home care to senior citizens who need assistance with activities of daily living. Call Today 303-736-6688 www.visitingangels.com /employment

LEGITIMATE WORK AT HOME No Sales, no Investment, No Risk, Free training, Free website. Contact Susan at 303-646-4171 or fill out form at www.wisechoice4u.com

Medical Needed full time MA, LPN or RN in Ken Caryl area for busy pediatric office. Includes Saturday mornings Please fax resume to Nita 303-791-7756

.com Lost and Found

Lost orange Cat with no tail Missing around Independence Circle and 104th in Westminster, very friendly, answers to Bob or kitty like calls. Contact Dana Connor 413-446-6523

Wanted

Autos for Sale CASH FOR CARS! Any Make, Model or Year. We Pay MORE! Running or Not. Sell Your Car or Truck TODAY. Free Towing! Instant Offer: 1-888-545-8647 _____________________________ SAVE $$$ on AUTO INSURANCE from the major names you know and trust. No forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call READY FOR MY QUOTE now! CALL 1-877-8906843 _____________________________ Got junk cars? Get $ PAID TODAY. FREE towing. Licensed towers. $1,000 FREE gift vouchers! ALL Makes-ALL Models! Call today. 1-888-870-0422

*OLD ROLEX & PATEK PHILIPPE WATCHES WANTED!** Daytona, Sub Mariner, etc. TOP CASH PAID! 1-800-401-0440 ________________________ *OLD GUITARS WANTED!** Gibson, Martin, Fender, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite, Rickenbacker, Prairie State, D’Angelico, Stromberg, and Gibson Mandolins/Banjos. 1920’s thru 1980’s. TOP CASH PAID! 1-800401-0440

Collector Only: 1979 VOLVO 242 DL,2.1, Mint Condition, 50,517 Miles, Always Garaged, $7100 (303)841-2682 Jeep Grand Cherokee 2007 V6, auto, radio, A/C, 4- wheel drive. Great condition- excellent for mountain driving. 93k miles Call 303-287-3783 $12,000

Cash for all Cars and Trucks

HELMETS: Vespa Helmet 12/2001 new light blue S55 $300 HCL Black 2001 extra large $75 THH Black 1995 extra large $50 ZR 2002 extra large $100 ZR SX 2002 $100 BIKE COVER: Nelson Rigg Universal only used in garage $70 (303)690-5019

Under $1000 Running or not. Any condition

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Top Cash Paid for Junk Cars Up to $500 720-333-6832

Motorcycles/ATV’s

RV’s and Campers 2011 Snug Top Topper Large windows, excellent condition all accessories included White, '07-'13 GMC 6ft bed $600 720-454-7043

AMERICAN MOTORCYCLE COMPANY.com Investor Relations $25k - $5mil / Direct: 719.252.0909

2013 Curt R-20 (20,000lbs) 5th wheel slider hitch for short bed pick ups. Asking $1200 303-450-2432 or 303-910-4375


B4 The Independent

September 26, 2013

ourcolorado

SERVICES TO ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICES, CALL 303-566-4100 Carpet/Flooring

Joes Carpet Service, Inc. Joe Southworth

Commercial & Residential Sales

Deck/Patio UTDOOR

Electricians

ESIGNS, INC

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• Decks • Fences • Stairs • Overhangs •

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~ Carpet Restretching ~ Repair ~ Remnant Installs Residential & Commercial

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Cleaning

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for a free estimate • satisfaction guaranteed •

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Concrete/Paving

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Office 303-642-3548 Cell 720-363-5983 No Service in Parker or Castle Rock

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insured/FRee estimates Brian 303-907-1737

303-683-7990 • Trex Pro

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Sanders Drywall Inc. All phases to include

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’s DeSpain Home SolutionS

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Solving All your Remodeling & Repair Problems – Just Ask!

DepenDable, Reliable SeRvice Over 30 Years Experience Licensed & Insured

Eric DeSpain 303-840-1874 FREE Estimates

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• Home Renovation and Remodel • 30 years Experience • Insured • Satisfaction Guaranteed

• Home • Business • Junk & Debris • Furniture • Appliances • Tree Limbs • Moving Trash • Carpet • Garage Clean Out

Dirt, Rock, Concrete, Sod & Asphalt

Free estimates 7 days a Week

Call Bernie 303.347.2303

Home Improvement For ALL your Remodeling & Repair Needs

A+

HIGHLANDS HOME IMPROVEMENT, INC.

Licensed/Insured

Call Don

at

303-915-6973

donlease@mtnhighlandscaping.com

Fall Cleanup – Sprinkler Winterization aeration/poWer rake – Sprinkler DeSign inStallation anD repairS – laWnCare tree anD Shrub Care – WeeDControl

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FREE Estimates

Family owned business with over 35 yrs. exp.

Call or email Ron 303-758-5473 vandergang@comcast.net

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•XERISCAPING •LANDSCAPING •FLAGSTONE OR PAVESTONE •SHRUB/TREE INSTALLATION & PRUNING •SPRINkLER •DESIGN & INSTALLATION - PATIOS & wALkwAyS - SOD & SOIL •AmENDmENTS - RETAINING wALLS - wATER FEATURES •LAwN mAINTENANCE - Commercial & Residential

30 Years Exp.

$

303-791-5551

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www.AMLandscapingServices.com

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AMLandscaping@gmail.com

!

JIM 303.818.6319

“HONEY-DO’S DONE THAT YOUR HONEY DON’T DO.” — SMALL JOBS INSIDE AND OUT —

• Honest pricing • • Free estimates •

303-960-7665 Quality Painting for Every Budget • Exteriors • Interiors • Decks • Insured • Free Estimates No Money Down

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10% discount-Expires 8/31/2013

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Notice... Check Internet Reviews, BBB, etc. b4 hiring anyone!

INSURED QUALITY PAINTING All American Paint Company Interior Painting Specialists, Drywall Repair, Exteriors and more…

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Columbine Lawn & Sprinkler

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Aeration $40 Fertilization $30 Gutter Cleanouts $35 and up Licensed Plumber and Custom Contracting Hardwood Floors, Fencing, Remodels

Tony 720-210-4304

PROFESSIONAL OUTDOOR SERVICES TREES/ SHRUBS TRIMMED Planted, Trimmed & Removal • Sod Work • Rock & Block Walls • Sprinklers • Aeration • Stumps Ground • Mulch Please Recycle this Publication Licensed / Insured when Finished

DICK 303-783-9000

Accent Glass

INSURED

“W

“Painting Done Right!”

Alpine Landscape Management

No money down, Free estimates 20 years Colorado Business

303-370-0446

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720- 298-3496 Plumbing

Anchor Plumbing Residential:

For Local News Anytime of the Day Visit OurColoradoNews.com

30

Pl

Brush and Roll Quality

303-791-4000

A+

HIGHLANDS HOME IMPROVEMENT, INC. 303-791-4000

trash hauling

Instant Trash Hauling

General Repair, Remodel, Electrical, Plumbing, Custom Kitchen & Bath, Tile Installation & Basement Finish

Electricians FREE Estimates

Call 720-257-1996

• All rep rep • Bat rem • Gas inst • Spr

Painting

We will match any written estimate! Same day service! No job too small or too big!

A+

HIGHLANDS HOME IMPROVEMENT, INC.

Call Ed 720-328-5039

Your Community Connector to Boundless Rewards

Family Owned and Operated We are a full service design, installation and maintenance company.

Weekly Mowing • Fertilization Aeration - 7/1000 sq.ft. 35/5000 sq. ft. Power Raking & Vacuuming - $85/5000 sq. ft. or $17/1000 sq.ft. water features • sprinklers

FREE ESTIMATES

Highly rated & screened contractor by Home Advisor & Angies list

We are community.

Mountain HigH Landscape, irrigation, and Lawncare

$

• Dependable • Affordable • • Prompt Service 7 days a week • • Foreclosure and Rental clean-outs • • Garage clean-outs • • Furniture • • Appliances •

PAUL TIMM

35 Years Experience

FBM Concrete LLC.

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A&M Lawn Service

HAULERS

Handyman

Drywall

Mike Martis, Owner

Driveways, Sidewalks, Patios Tear-outs, colored & stamped concrete. Quality work, Lic./Ins. Reasonable rates "Small Jobs OK!" 303-514-7364

Licensed and Insured

Call Us Today! 720-545-9222

Lawn/Garden Services

Bronco

www.mikesgaragedoors.com

Br

~ Lic

720-724-3658

Hauling Service

Drywall Finishing

T.M. CONCRETE

Landscaping/Nurseries

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All Phases of Flat Work by

Starting at $2995

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Residential • Commercial Move Outs • New Construction References Available

WALK-IN-TUBS

AFFORDABLE

independent Hardwood Floor Co, LLC • Springs, Repairs • New Doors and Openers • Barn and Arena Doors • Locally-Owned & Operated • Tom Martino’s Referral List 10 Yrs • BBB Gold Star Member Since 2002

with a Warranty Starting at $1575

• carpentry • painting • general home repair • over 30 years experience

Call (720) 541-4625

Misc. Services

STAIRLIFTS INSTALLED

Victor’s Handyman Service

Carpentry • Painting Tile • Drywall • Roof Repairs Plumbing • Electrical Kitchen • Basements Bath Remodels Property Building Maintenance

Garage Doors

30+ years experience Clem: 303-973-6991

A continental flair

Affordable Electrician

Fence Services

720.227.1409 303-471-2323

In home carpet & vinyl sales

Handyman

• Hot Water Heat • Forced Air • Water Heaters • Kitchens • Baths • Service Repair • Sprinkler Repair •

(303) 961-3485 Licenced & Insured

F S

AL

P F


The Independent B5

September 26, 2013

ourcolorado

SERVICES TO ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICES, CALL 303-566-4100

Bryon Johnson

Drain Pros Plumbing

Master Plumber

• All plumbing repairs & replacement • Bathroom remodels • Gas pipe installation • Sprinkler repair

~ Licensed & Insured ~

303.979.0105

Got a clogged sink, toilet, or main? Don’t just clear it… Find the ROOT of the problem!

Plumbing

RALPH’S & JOE’S AFFORDABLE

FREE CAMERA INSPECTION WITH EVERY DRAIN CLEANING Got another plumbing problem? We’re a Full Service Plumbing Company Warranties on all work performed Licensed and Insured

720-352-9442

Roofing/Gutters

Tile

Thomas Floor Covering • FREE ESTIMATES • CSU ALUMNI • LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED • LICENSED INSURED

O

STATE UN

OR COL AD

Plumbing

RSITY IVE

Plumbing

~ All Types of Tile ~ Ceramic - Granite ~ Porcelain - Natural Stone ~ Vinyl 26 Years Experience •Work Warranty

FREE Estimates

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Your experienced Plumbers.

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Sprinklers

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ALAN ATTWOOD, Master Plumber

PH: 303-472-8217 FX: 303-688-8821

Please Recycle this Publication when Finished

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Local Focus. More News. 23 newspapers & websites. Connecting YOU to your LOCAL community.

OurColoradoNews.com 303-566-4100 For local news any time of day, find your community online at

OurColoradoNews.com

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GALLERY OF GAMES For Local News Anytime of the Day Visit OurColoradoNews.com

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Abraham Spilsbury Owner/Operator

Certified Arborist,Insured, Littleton Resident

Insured & Bonded

PLUMBING

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ABE’S TREE & SHRUB CARE • Pruning • Removals • Shrub Maintenance • FreeEstimates

Roofing/Gutters

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Tree Service

GALLERY OF GAMES


B6 The Independent

Public Trustees Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0427-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On March 12, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): Royce L. Smith and Melissa J. Smith Original Beneficiary(ies): FirstBank of South Jeffco Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: FirstBank Date of Deed of Trust: October 22, 2009 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: October 29, 2009 Recording Information (Reception Number): B9118491 Original Principal Amount: $128,716.67 Outstanding Principal Balance: $79,010.88 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. See Exhibit A attached The property to be foreclosed is: Also known by street and number as: 7037 South Platte Canyon Road, Littleton, CO 80128. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 10/23/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 8/29/2013 Last Publication: 9/26/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 03/12/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Stephen Johnson #10226 Rothgerber, Johnson & Lyons LLP 1200 17th St, #3000, Denver, CO 80202 (303) 623-9000 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Attorney File # 30358-373 ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012 0427-2013 Exhibit A PARCEL A: A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 NORTHWEST ¼ OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 68 WEST OF THE 6TH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MORE PARTICULARY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 30; THENCE NORTH A DISTANCE OF 160 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN BOOK 1730 AT PAGE 389; THENCE EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN BOOK 1730 AT PAGE 389, A DISTANCE OF 348.24 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE HIGHWAY NO. 124; THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 47 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID HIGHWAY NO 124, A DISTANCE OF 170.94 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 30, A DISTANCE OF 297.6 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. PARCEL B: AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS TO AND FROM STATE HIGHWAY NO. 124 OVER AND ACROSS THE PARCEL OF LAND DESCRIBED IN DEED RECORDED APRIL 21, 1914, IN BOOK 78 AT PAGE 242. EXCEPT THAT PORTION ON THE EAST CONVEYED TO THE DENVER UNION WATER COMPANY BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED APRIL 21, 1914, IN BOOK 78 AT PAGE 242, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. PARCEL C: THE SOUTH 160 FEET OF THE EAST 93 FEET OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 5, SOUTH, RANGE 68 WEST OF THE 6TH P.M., COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, all water and riparian rights, wells, ditches, reservoirs and water stock and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described. Legal Notice NO.: 0427-2013 First Publication: 8/29/2013 Last Publication: 9/26/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent

Public Trustees Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1013-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On June 27, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): Nancy G DeCamillis and Wilfrid L. DeCamillis Original Beneficiary(ies): JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Date of Deed of Trust: June 18, 2007 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: July 10, 2007 Recording Information (Reception Number): B7087910 Original Principal Amount: $260,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $256,119.82 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: LOT 20, BLOCK 8, RIDGEWOOD SUBDIVISION-SECOND FILING, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Also known by street and number as: 6937 S Hill St, Littleton, CO 80120. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 10/23/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 8/29/2013 Last Publication: 9/26/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 06/27/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Caren Jacobs Castle #11790 Barbara A. Bader #10394 Katharine E. Fisher #39230 Kimberly L. Martinez #40351 Camille Y. Harlan #43789 Reagan Larkin #42309 Deanne R. Stodden #33214 Jennifer C. Rogers #34682 Christopher T. Groen #39976 Joanna D. Studeny #41740 Cynthia Lowery #34145 Elizabeth S. Marcus #16092 Britney Beall-Eder #34935 Deanna L. Westfall #23449 Alison L. Berry #34531 J.P. Goeschel #37988 The Castle Law Group, LLC 999 18th Street #2201, Denver, CO 80202 (303) 865-1400 Attorney File # 13-02209 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012 Legal Notice NO.: 1013-2013 First Publication: 8/29/2013 Last Publication: 9/26/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1016-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On June 27, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): Scott D Gohr Original Beneficiary(ies): Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Date of Deed of Trust: June 30, 2003 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: August 12, 2003 Recording Information (Reception Number): B3176095 Original Principal Amount: $184,683.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $154,074.74 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: LOT 9, BLOCK 3, VISTA VERDE EST A T E S C O U N T Y O F A R A P A H O E, STATE OF COLORADO Also known by street and number as: 6835 S Logan St, CENTENNIAL, CO 80122. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

Home Mortgage, Inc. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Date of Deed of Trust: June 30, 2003 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: August 12, 2003 Recording Information (Reception Number): B3176095 Original Principal Amount: $184,683.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $154,074.74 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: LOT 9, BLOCK 3, VISTA VERDE ESTATES COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, S T A T E O F C O LO R A D O Also known by street and number as: 6835 S Logan St, CENTENNIAL, CO 80122. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 10/23/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 8/29/2013 Last Publication: 9/26/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 06/27/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Robert J. Aronowitz, Esq. #5673 Lisa Cancanon #42043 Emily Jensik #31294 Joan Olson, Esq. #28078 Jennifer H. Trachte #40391 Monica Kadrmas #34904 Catherine A. Hildreth #40975 Aronowitz & Mecklenburg, LLP 1199 Bannock St., Denver, CO 80204 (303) 8131177 Attorney File # 9105.05931 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012

Public Trustees

Legal Notice NO.: 1016-2013 First Publication: 8/29/2013 Last Publication: 9/26/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1022-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On June 27, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): Gary R. Fiegel and Eileen M. Fiegel Original Beneficiary(ies): Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for First Funding Financial Services, Inc. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Date of Deed of Trust: May 30, 2003 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: June 24, 2003 Recording Information (Reception Number): B3134057 Original Principal Amount: $170,012.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $140,870.31 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: SEE EXHIBIT A ATTACHED HERETO AND INCORPORATED HEREIN BY REFERENCE Also known by street and number as: 3060 West Prentice Avenue, Unit K, Littleton, CO 80123. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 10/23/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 8/29/2013 Last Publication: 9/26/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 06/27/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Caren Jacobs Castle #11790 Barbara A. Bader #10394 Katharine E. Fisher #39230 Kimberly L. Martinez #40351 Camille Y. Harlan #43789 Reagan Larkin #42309 Deanne R. Stodden #33214 Jennifer C. Rogers #34682 Christopher T. Groen #39976 Joanna D. Studeny #41740 Cynthia Lowery #34145 Elizabeth S. Marcus #16092 Britney Beall-Eder #34935 Deanna L. Westfall #23449 Alison L. Berry #34531

● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 06/27/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Caren Jacobs Castle #11790 Barbara A. Bader #10394 Katharine E. Fisher #39230 Kimberly L. Martinez #40351 Camille Y. Harlan #43789 Reagan Larkin #42309 Deanne R. Stodden #33214 Jennifer C. Rogers #34682 Christopher T. Groen #39976 Joanna D. Studeny #41740 Cynthia Lowery #34145 Elizabeth S. Marcus #16092 Britney Beall-Eder #34935 Deanna L. Westfall #23449 Alison L. Berry #34531 J.P. Goeschel #37988 The Castle Law Group, LLC 999 18th Street #2201, Denver, CO 80202 (303) 865-1400 Attorney File # 13-04324 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012

Public Trustees

1022-2013 EXHIBIT A CONDOMINIUM UNIT K, IN CONDOMINIUM BUILDING 3060, STEEPLECHASE II CONDOMINIUMS, PHASE VI, ACCORDING TO THE CONDOMINIUM MAP THEREOF, RECORDED SEPTEMBER 12, 1996 AT RECEPTION NUMBER A6118639 IN PLAT BOOK 131 AT PAGE 36 IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK AND RECORDED OF THE COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, COLORADO, AND AS DEFINED AND DESCRIBED IN THE CONDOMINIUM DECLARATION FOR STEEPLECHASE II CONDOMINIUMS, RECORDED MARCH 27, 1996 AT RECEPTION NUMBER A6036769 AND FIFITH AMENDMENT RECORDED SEPTEMBER 12, 1996 AT RECEPTION NUMBER A6118640, AND ANY AMENDMENTS, ANNEXATIONS AND SUPPLEMENTS THERETO, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Legal Notice NO.: 1022-2013 First Publication: 8/29/2013 Last Publication: 9/26/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1031-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 1, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): THOMAS A. TINDALL Original Beneficiary(ies): HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III Date of Deed of Trust: March 02, 1999 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: March 05, 1999 Recording Information (Reception Number): A9038425 Original Principal Amount: $391,912.82 Outstanding Principal Balance: $348,316.35 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: LOT 3, BLOCK 1, HAMLET AT COLUMBINE, FIFTH FILING, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Also known by street and number as: 5936 BLUE SAGE WAY, LITTLETON, CO 80123. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 10/30/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/5/2013 Last Publication: 10/3/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 07/01/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Holly L. Decker #32647 Toni M.N. Dale #30580 Medved Dale Decker & Deere, LLC 355 Union Blvd., Suite 302, Lakewood, CO 80228 (303) 223-7883 Attorney File # 13-913-24671 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012 Legal Notice NO.: 1031-2013 First Publication: 9/5/2013 Last Publication: 10/3/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1034-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 1, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): Leslie R Cone Original Beneficiary(ies): Home123 Corporation Current Holder of Evidence of Debt:

Outstanding Principal Balance: $185,867.97 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: LOT NUMBERED 31, BLOCK NUMBERED 2, LININGER SUBDIVISION, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Also known by street and number as: 5361 S Hickory St, Littleton, CO 80120. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 11/13/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/19/2013 Last Publication: 10/17/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 07/17/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Robert J. Aronowitz, Esq. #5673 Lisa Cancanon #42043 Emily Jensik #31294 Joan Olson, Esq. #28078 Jennifer H. Trachte #40391 Monica Kadrmas #34904 Catherine A. Hildreth #40975 Aronowitz & Mecklenburg, LLP 1199 Bannock St., Denver, CO 80204 (303) 8131177 Attorney File # 9105.05738 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012

September 26, 2013

Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1034-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 1, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): Leslie R Cone Original Beneficiary(ies): Home123 Corporation Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Morgan Stanley ABS Capital I Inc. Trust 2006-NC4 Date of Deed of Trust: February 06, 2006 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: February 15, 2006 Recording Information (Reception Number): B6020176 Original Principal Amount: $263,500.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $253,299.04 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: LOT 28, BLOCK 2, HUNTER'S HILL FILING NO. 2, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. The property to be foreclosed is: Also known by street and number as: 8344 East Fremont Circle, Centennial, CO 80112. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 10/30/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/5/2013 Last Publication: 10/3/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 07/01/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Caren Jacobs Castle #11790 Barbara A. Bader #10394 Katharine E. Fisher #39230 Kimberly L. Martinez #40351 Camille Y. Harlan #43789 Reagan Larkin #42309 Deanne R. Stodden #33214 Jennifer C. Rogers #34682 Christopher T. Groen #39976 Joanna D. Studeny #41740 Cynthia Lowery #34145 Elizabeth S. Marcus #16092 Britney Beall-Eder #34935 Deanna L. Westfall #23449 Alison L. Berry #34531 J.P. Goeschel #37988 The Castle Law Group, LLC 999 18th Street #2201, Denver, CO 80202 (303) 865-1400 Attorney File # 13-04611 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012

Public Trustees

Legal Notice NO.: 1034-2013 First Publication: 9/5/2013 Last Publication: 10/3/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1124-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 17, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): Abraxas Aguilera and Stacy Aguilera Original Beneficiary(ies): Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. acting solely as nominee for Metro Finance Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: Wells Fargo Bank, NA Date of Deed of Trust: February 06, 2009 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: March 18, 2009 Recording Information (Reception Number): B9027580 Original Principal Amount: $194,673.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $185,867.97 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: LOT NUMBERED 31, BLOCK NUMBERED 2, LININGER SUBDIVISION, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Also known by street and number as: 5361 S Hickory St, Littleton, CO 80120. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 11/13/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street,

Legal Notice No.: 1124-2013 First Publication: 9/19/2013 Last Publication: 10/17/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1128-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 17, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): David Cooper and Margie Cooper Original Beneficiary(ies): Beneficial Mortgage Co. of Colorado Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: Beneficial Financial I Inc. Date of Deed of Trust: July 21, 2004 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: July 23, 2004 Recording Information (Reception Number): B4131701 Original Principal Amount: $246,315.43 Outstanding Principal Balance: $227,237.97 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: LOT 3, BLOCK 2, NOB HILL FIRST FILING AMENDED, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Also known by street and number as: 6723 S Ash Wy, Centennial, CO 80122. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 11/13/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/19/2013 Last Publication: 10/17/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 07/17/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Holly L. Decker #32647 Toni M.N. Dale #30580 Medved Dale Decker & Deere, LLC 355 Union Blvd., Suite 302, Lakewood, CO 80228 (303) 223-7883 Attorney File # 13-913-24950 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012 Legal Notice NO.: 1128-2013 First Publication: 9/19/2013 Last Publication: 10/17/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1133-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 18, 2013, the undersigned Public


September 26, 2013 Public Notice

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1133-2013

Public Trustees

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 18, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): Jerry Duane Jensen Original Beneficiary(ies): Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Guild Mortgage Company, a California Corporation Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: Guild Mortgage Company Date of Deed of Trust: August 18, 2010 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: August 31, 2010 Recording Information (Reception Number): D0085209 Original Principal Amount: $40,100.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $35,080.63 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: SEE EXHIBIT A ATTACHED HERETO AND INCORPORATED HEREIN BY REFERENCE Also known by street and number as: 280 East Highlince Circle # 307, Centennial, CO 80122. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 11/13/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/19/2013 Last Publication: 10/17/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 07/18/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Caren Jacobs Castle #11790 Jennifer C. Rogers #34682 Christopher T. Groen #39976 Joanna D. Studeny #41740 Cynthia Lowery #34145 Deanne R. Stodden #33214 Britney Beall-Eder #34935 Deanna L. Westfall #23449 Alison L. Berry #34531 J.P. Goeschel #37988 Barbara A. Bader #10394 Katharine E. Fisher #39230 Kimberly L. Martinez #40351 Camille Y. Harlan #43789 Reagan Larkin #42309 The Castle Law Group, LLC 999 18th Street #2201, Denver, CO 80202 (303) 865-1400 Attorney File # 13-04796 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012 1133-2013 EXHIBIT A CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 280307, HIGHLINE MEADOWS CONDOMINIUMS, IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE DECLARATION RECORDED OCTOBER 25, 1978, IN BOOK 2873 AT PAGE 367, AND CONDOMINIUM MAP RECORDED IN OCTOBER 25, 1978, AT RECEPTION NO. 1786266, BOOK 36 AT PAGES 31 AND 32 OF THE COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE RECORDS, TOGETHER WITH THE EXCLUSIVE RIGHT TO THE FOLLOWING COMMON ELEMENTS: PARKING SPACE 290C, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO Legal Notice NO.: 1133-2013 First Publication: 9/19/2013 Last Publication: 10/17/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1144-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 22, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): Michael St John Original Beneficiary(ies): Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: Wells Fargo Bank, NA Date of Deed of Trust: August 30, 2002 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: September 13, 2002 Recording Information (Reception Number): B2171794 Original Principal Amount $76,800.00 Outstanding Principal Balance $62,682.75 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: SEE EXHIBIT A ATTACHED HERETO AND INCORPORATED HEREIN BY REFERENCE Also known by street and number as: 100 E Highline Cir #306, Centennial, CO 80122. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 11/20/2013, at the East

E Highline Cir #306, Centennial, CO 80122. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 11/20/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/26/2013 Last Publication: 10/24/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 07/22/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Robert J. Aronowitz, Esq. #5673 Lisa Cancanon #42043 Emily Jensik #31294 Joan Olson, Esq. #28078 Jennifer H. Trachte #40391 Monica Kadrmas #34904 Catherine A. Hildreth #40975 Aronowitz & Mecklenburg, LLP 1199 Bannock St., Denver, CO 80204 (303) 8131177 Attorney File # 9105.05567 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012

Public Trustees

1144-2013 EXHIBIT A CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 100-306, HIGHLINE MEADOWS CONDOMINIUMS, IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE DECLARATION RECORDED OCTOBER 25, 1978, IN BOOK 2873, AT PAGE 367 AND CONDOMINIUM MAP RECORDED ON OCTOBER 25, 1978, AS RECEPTION NO. 1786266, BOOK 36, AT PAGES 31 AND 32 OF THE COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE RECORDS, TOGETHER WITH THE EXCLUSIVE RIGHT TO USE THE FOLLOWING COMMON ELEMENTS, PARKING SPACES 29 AND 189C, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Legal Notice NO.: 1144-2013 First Publication: 9/26/2013 Last Publication: 10/24/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1153-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 22, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): Douglas E. Jara and Stephanie M. Jara Original Beneficiary(ies): Land of Oz Inc. DBA Affordable Interest Mortgage Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC Date of Deed of Trust: June 03, 2009 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: June 08, 2009 Recording Information (Reception Number): B9060256 Original Principal Amount: $227,207.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $215,897.49 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: LOT 18, BLOCK 11, SOUTHCREEK SUBDIVISION, FILING NO. 1, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Also known by street and number as: 8127 South Memphis Way, Englewood, CO 80112. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 11/20/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/26/2013 Last Publication: 10/24/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 07/22/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Caren Jacobs Castle #11790 Jennifer C. Rogers #34682 Christopher T. Groen #39976 Joanna D. Studeny #41740 Cynthia Lowery #34145 Deanne R. Stodden #33214 Britney Beall-Eder #34935 Deanna L. Westfall #23449 Alison L. Berry #34531 J.P. Goeschel #37988 Barbara A. Bader #10394 Katharine E. Fisher #39230 Kimberly L. Martinez #40351 Camille Y. Harlan #43789 Reagan Larkin #42309 The Castle Law Group, LLC 999 18th Street #2201, Denver, CO 80202 (303) 865-1400 Attorney File # 13-05012 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012 Legal Notice NO.: 1153-2013

Kimberly L. Martinez #40351 Camille Y. Harlan #43789 Reagan Larkin #42309 The Castle Law Group, LLC 999 18th Street #2201, Denver, CO 80202 (303) 865-1400 Attorney File # 13-05012 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012

Public Trustees

Legal Notice NO.: 1153-2013 First Publication: 9/26/2013 Last Publication: 10/24/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1158-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 23, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): Daniel C. Brost and Joyce Y. Brost Original Beneficiary(ies): Argent Mortgage Company, LLC Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Argent Securities Inc., Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2004-W9 Date of Deed of Trust: January 09, 2004 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: January 16, 2004 Recording Information (Reception Number): B4011140 Original Principal Amount: $499,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $441,157.99 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: See Exhibit A attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference Also known by street and number as: 7990 S Santa Fe Drive, Littleton, CO 80120. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 11/20/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/26/2013 Last Publication: 10/24/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 07/23/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: David A. Shore #19973 Edward P. O’Brien #11572 Scott D. Toebben #19011 Martin H. Shore #1800 Hellerstein and Shore PC 5347 S. Valentia Way, Suite 100, Greenwood Village, CO 80111 (303) 573-1080 Attorney File # 13-00230SH The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012 1158-2013 Exhibit A BLOCK 45, WOLHURST HEIGHTS, AND THOSE PARTS OF SANTA FE STREET AND ARNETT AVENUE, AS SHOWN IN SAID PLAT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID BLOCK 45; THENCE EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID BLOCK 45 A DISTANCE OF 300.8 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID BLOCK 45; THENCE NORTH ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID BLOCK 45 A DISTANCE OF 600 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID BLOCK 45; THENCE EAST TO THE CENTERLINE OF SAID FE STREET; THENCE SOUTH ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID SANTA FE STREET A DISTANCE OF 360 FEET; THENCE EAST A DISTANCE OF 15 FEET FROM THE CENTERLINE OF SANTA FE STREET; THENCE SOUTH AND PARALLEL TO THE CENTERLINE OF SAID SANTA FE STREET A DISTANCE OF 270 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF SAID ARNETT AVENUE; THENCE WEST ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID ARNETT AVENUE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY LINE OF THE DENVER AND SANTA FE RAILROAD RIGHT OF WAY AS SHOWN IN SAID PLAT; THENCE NORTHEAST ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BLOCK 45, WOLHURTS HEIGHTS, AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING, ACCORDING TO THE RECORDED PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED JULY 11, 1892, IN PLAT BOOK A2 AT PAGE 33, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Legal Notice NO.: 1158-2013 First Publication: 9/26/2013 Last Publication: 10/24/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1167-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 24, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): ANNA TUBIS Original Beneficiary(ies): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR WR STARKEY MORTGAGE, L.L.P. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: COLORADO HOUSING AND FINANCE AUTHORITY Date of Deed of Trust: May 27, 2009 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: June 08, 2009 Recording Information (Reception Number): B9060460 Original Principal Amount $183,150.00

Original Beneficiary(ies): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR WR STARKEY MORTGAGE, L.L.P. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: COLORADO HOUSING AND FINANCE AUTHORITY Date of Deed of Trust: May 27, 2009 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: June 08, 2009 Recording Information (Reception Number): B9060460 Original Principal Amount $183,150.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $173,366.38 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: LOT 9, BLOCK 32, WALNUT HILLS THIRD FILING, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. PARCEL ID NUMBER: 2075-28-2-10-011 Also known by street and number as: 7498 EAST DAVIES PLACE, CENTENNIAL, CO 80112. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. If applicable, a description of any changes to the deed of trust described in the notice of election and demand pursuant to a f f i d a v i t a s a l l o w e d b y s t a t u t e s: C.R.S.§38-35-109(5) PURSUANT TO AFFIDAVIT RE: SCRIVENERS ERROR RECORDED ON 08/07/2009 AT RECEPTION B9086107 TO CORRECT THE LEGAL DESCRIPTION.

Public Trustees

NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 11/20/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/26/2013 Last Publication: 10/24/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 07/24/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Lynn M. Janeway #15592 Eve M. Grina #43658 David R. Doughty #40042 Jennifer K. Cruseturner #44452 Sheila J. Finn #36637 Elizabeth S. Marcus #16092 Janeway Law Firm PC 9800 S. Meridian Blvd., Suite 400, Englewood, CO 80112 (303) 706-9990 Attorney File # 30766 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012 Legal Notice NO.: 1167-2013 First Publication: 9/26/2013 Last Publication: 10/24/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1197-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On August 1, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): Norma S Harbert Original Beneficiary(ies): Seattle Mortgage Company Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: Champion Mortgage Company Date of Deed of Trust: November 16, 2006 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: November 21, 2006 Recording Information (Reception Number): B6165158 Original Principal Amount: $296,250.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $179,145.19 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: LOT 6, EXCEPT THE NORTH 5 FEET THEREOF, BLOCK 1, LITTLE'S CREEK SUBDIVISION, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Also known by street and number as: 1605 West Sterne Parkway, Littleton, CO 80120. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 11/20/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/26/2013 Last Publication: 10/24/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 08/01/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is:

Recording Date of Deed of Trust: December 05, 2005 Recording Information (Reception Number): B5182305 Original Principal Amount: $21,000,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $20,471,354.08 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: See Exhibit A attached hereto and incorporated herein by this reference Also known by street and number as: Centennial, CO 80112. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 10/30/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/5/2013 Last Publication: 10/3/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 07/03/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: M. Lou Raders #15636 Kutak Rock LLP 1801 California Street, Denver, CO 80202-2626 (303) 297-2400 Attorney File # Willow Creek The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012

The Independent B7

DATE: 08/01/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Robert J. Aronowitz, Esq. #5673 Lisa Cancanon #42043 Emily Jensik #31294 Joan Olson, Esq. #28078 Jennifer H. Trachte #40391 Monica Kadrmas #34904 Catherine A. Hildreth #40975 Aronowitz & Mecklenburg, LLP 1199 Bannock St., Denver, CO 80204 (303) 8131177 Attorney File # 8686.00034 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012

Public Trustees

Legal Notice NO.: 1197-2013 First Publication: 9/26/2013 Last Publication: 10/24/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1064-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 5, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): Trayce Brinkman and Erik Martinez Original Beneficiary(ies): Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: Wells Fargo Bank, NA Date of Deed of Trust: November 29, 2001 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: December 06, 2001 Recording Information (Reception Number): B1210713 Original Principal Amount: $207,075.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $186,188.36 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: LOT 14, BLOCK 22, CENTENNIAL ESTATES - SECOND FILING. COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Also known by street and number as: 5003 South Newton Street, Littleton, CO 80123. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 10/30/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/5/2013 Last Publication: 10/3/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 07/05/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Robert J. Aronowitz, Esq. #5673 Lisa Cancanon #42043 Emily Jensik #31294 Joan Olson, Esq. #28078 Jennifer H. Trachte #40391 Monica Kadrmas #34904 Catherine A. Hildreth #40975 Aronowitz & Mecklenburg, LLP 1199 Bannock St., Denver, CO 80204 (303) 8131177 Attorney File # 9100.00032 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012 Legal Notice NO.: 1064-2013 First Publication: 9/5/2013 Last Publication: 10/3/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1058-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 3, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): 8350 Wilshire Associates, LLC, a California limited liability company, 828 Willow Creek, LLC, a Colorado limited liability company, and Willow Creek Shopping Center, LLC, a Colorado limited liability Company, as tenants in common Original Beneficiary(ies): Artesia Mortgage Capital Corporation Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor-in-interest to Bank of America, N.A., as Trustee, successor to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Trustee for the registered holders of Wachovia Bank Commercial Mortgage Trust, Commercial Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-C23 Date of Deed of Trust: November 26, 2005 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: December 05, 2005 Recording Information (Reception Number): B5182305 Original Principal Amount: $21,000,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $20,471,354.08 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof.

Public Trustees

1058-2013 EXHIBIT “A” Parcel A: Lot 1, WILLOW CREEK VILLAGE CENTER, County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado. Parcel B: Lot 4, EXCEPT the ownership of the buildings, improvements and structures now located on the land as conveyed in Special Warranty Deed recorded June 15, 2004, at Reception Number B4102802, WILLOW CREEK VILLAGE CENTER, County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado. Parcel C: Lot 5, WILLOW CREEK VILLAGE CENTER, County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado. together with additional lands, estates and development rights hereafter acquired by Borrower for use in connection with the development ownership or occupancy of such real property, and all additional lands and estates therein which may, from time to time, by supplemental mortgage or otherwise be expressly made subject to the lien of this Security Instrument; (b) any and all buildings, structures and other improvements now or hereafter erected, constructed, placed or located on the Land including, without limitation, fixtures, tenements, attachments, appliances, equipment, building systems, machinery, and other articles now or hereafter attached to or used in connection with said buildings, structures and other improvements (collectively, the “Improvements”), and any and all additions to, substitutions for or replacements of such Improvements and such Land and all interests, estates or other claims, both in law and equity, which Borrower now has or may hereafter acquire in the Land or the Improvements, including, without limitation, all right, title and interest now owned or hereafter acquired by Borrower in and to any greater estate in the Land or the Improvements; (including without limitation all of the tenancy in common interests of all of the Owners [defined in Section 1.31 captioned “Tenant in Common Provisions” hereof]) (c) all easements, tenements, hereditaments, appurtenances, rights-of-way and rights now owned or hereafter acquired by Borrower used or useful in connection with, or located on, under or above all or any part of, the Land or as a means of access thereto, including, without limitation, all rights pursuant to any trackage agreement; all rights to the nonexclusive use of common drive entries; all oil and gas and other hydrocarbons; all minerals, crops, timber and other emblements; water, groundwater, water rights and shares of stock evidencing the same; any and all right, title and interest of Borrower, now owned or hereafter acquired, in and to any land lying within the right-of-way of any street, open or proposed, adjoining the Land; and any and all sidewalks, vaults, alleys and strips and gores of land adjacent to or used in connection with the Land (collectively, the “Appurtenances”); (d) all leasehold estate, right, title and interest of Borrower in and to all written and oral leases, subleases, subtenancies, licenses, franchises, usufructs, occupancy agreements and other agreements affecting all or any portion of the Property or the Improvements or the use or occupancy thereof, now or hereafter existing or entered into, whether before or after any proceeding is instituted by or against Borrower under 11 U.S.C. § 101 et seq., as amended (the “Bankruptcy Code”), including, without limitation, extensions, renewals and subleases (all of the foregoing, individually, a “Lease” and collectively, “Leases”), and all rights and claims of any kind that Borrower may have against any tenant under the Leases or in connection with the termination or rejection of the Leases in a bankruptcy or insolvency proceeding, and all right, title and interest of Borrower thereunder, including, without limitation, all cash or security deposits, prepaid or advance rentals, and deposits or payments of similar nature which are hereby specifically assigned, transferred and set over to Lender; including, without limitation, all rents, royalties, issues, revenues, profits, proceeds, income and other benefits, including, without limitation, accounts receivable, of, accruing to or derived from such Leases and from the renting, leasing or bailment of Improvements and equipment, including, without limitation, any payments made by tenants under Leases in connection with the termination of any Lease and all oil, gas and other mineral rights, royalties and profits, whether paid or accruing before or after any proceeding is instituted by or against Borrower under the Bankruptcy Code (all of the foregoing, collectively, “Rents”), and all proceeds from the sale or other disposition of the Leases and the right to receive and apply the Rents to the payment of the Secured Obligations (defined below) and all lease guaranties, letters of credit and any other supporting obligation for any of the Leases (collectively, “Lease Guaranties”) given by any guarantor in connection with any of the Leases, and all rights, powers, privileges, options and other be-


er mineral rights, royalties and profits, whether paid or accruing before or after any proceeding is instituted by or against Borrower under the Bankruptcy Code (all of the foregoing, collectively, “Rents”), and all proceeds from the sale or other disposition of the Leases and the right to receive and apply the Rents to the payment of the Secured Obligations (defined below) and all lease guaranties, letters of credit and any other supporting obligation for any of the Leases (collectively, “Lease Guaranties”) given by any guarantor in connection with any of the Leases, and all rights, powers, privileges, options and other benefits of Borrower as lessor under the Leases and beneficiary under Lease Guaranties; (e) all the estate, interest, right, title, other claim or demand, both in law and in equity, including, without limitation, claims or demands with respect to the proceeds of and any unearned premiums on insurance policies in effect with respect to the Property, which Borrower now has or may hereafter acquire in the Property, including, without limitation, the right to receive and apply the proceeds of any insurance, judgments or settlements made in lieu thereof, for damage to the Property, and any and all awards made for the taking by eminent domain, or by any proceeding of purchase in lieu thereof, of the whole or any part of the Property, including, without limitation, any awards resulting from a change of grade of streets and awards for severance damages; (f) all goods, chattels, construction materials, furniture, furnishings, equipment, machinery, apparatus, appliances, and other items of personal property, whether tangible or intangible, of any kind, nature or description, whether now owned or hereafter acquired by Borrower, including, without limitation, improvements including, without limitation, furnaces, steam boilers, hot water boilers, oil burners, pipes, radiators, air conditioning and sprinkling systems, gas and electric fixtures, carpets, rugs, shades, awnings, screens, elevators, motors, dynamos, cabinets, and all other furnishings, tools, equipment and machinery, appliances, building supplies, materials, fittings and fixtures of every kind, which is, are or shall hereafter be located upon, attached, affixed to or used or useful, either directly or indirectly, in connection with the complete and comfortable use, occupancy and operation of the Property and Improvements, whether or not any of such personal property is now or becomes a Fixture (defined below), including, without limitation, any and all licenses, permits or franchises used or required in connection with such use, occupancy or operation, together with any and all additions, replacements or substitutions thereto, thereof or therefor, as well as the proceeds thereof or therefrom regardless of form (hereinafter sometimes together referred to as the “Personal Property”; such Personal Property shall include, without limitation, all Accounts, Documents, Instruments, Chattel Paper, Goods, Equipment, General Intangibles, Fixtures and Inventory, as those terms are defined in the Uniform Commercial Code of the State where the Property is located); (g) all plans and specifications, contracts and subcontracts for the construction of any Improvements, density rights, bonds, permits and other development or use entitlements, licenses, guarantees, warranties, causes of action, claims, condemnation proceeds, profits, security deposits, utility deposits, governmental agency fees and deposits and refunds thereof, refunds of taxes or insurance premiums, policies, claims, and proceeds of insurance, claims and proceeds arising from condemnation, vehicles, together with all present and future attachments, accessions, replacements, additions, products and proceeds thereof; (h) all monies deposited by Borrower, or deposited on behalf of Borrower, with any City, County, public body or agency, irrigation, sewer or water district or company, and any other body or agency, for the installation, or to secure the installation, of any utility pertaining to the Property; (i) all refunds, rebates, reimbursements, reserves, deferred payments, deposits, cost savings, governmental subsidy payments, governmentally-registered credits (such as emissions reduction credits), other credits, waivers and payments, whether in cash or in kind, due from or payable by (i) any federal, state, municipal or other governmental or quasi-governmental agency, authority or district (each, a “Governmental Agency”) or (ii) any insurance or utility company relating to any or all of the Property or arising out of the satisfaction of any conditions imposed upon or the obtaining of any approvals for the development or rehabilitation of the Property; (j) all refunds, rebates, reimbursements, credits and payments of any kind due from or payable by any Governmental Agency for any taxes, special taxes, assessments, or similar governmental or quasi-governmental charges or levies imposed upon Borrower with respect to the Property or upon any or all of the Property or arising out of the satisfaction of any conditions imposed upon or the obtaining of any approvals for the development or rehabilitation of the Property; (k) all monies deposited by Borrower with or for the benefit of Lender pursuant to any reserve, escrow or cash collateral agreements executed by Borrower in favor of Lender; (l) contract rights, accounts receivable, management agreements, business records; (m) all additions, accessions, replacements, substitutions, proceeds and products of the real and personal property, tangible and intangible, described herein;

B8 The Independent

Public Trustees

Legal Notice NO.: 1058-2013 First Publication: 9/5/2013 Last Publication: 10/3/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1073-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On July 9, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): 160 INVERNESS, LLC Original Beneficiary(ies): MORGAN STANLEY MORTGAGE CAPITAL INC. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: MSCI 2006-HQ10 INVERNESS DRIVE, LLC Date of Deed of Trust: August 01, 2006 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: August 03, 2006 Recording Information (Reception Number): B6111825 Original Principal Amount: $11,500,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $11,296,021.58 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: PARCEL 1: LOT 1, BLOCK 15, INVERNESS SUBDIVISION FILNG NO. FIVE, LOT 1, BLOCK 15, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 14, 1979 UNDER RECEPTION NO. 1880159, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. PARCEL 2: A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF PERMITING THE PASSAGE OF PEDESTRIANS AND VEHICLES OVER AND ACROSS THE

A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: PARCEL 1: LOT 1, BLOCK 15, INVERNESS SUBDIVISION FILNG NO. FIVE, LOT 1, BLOCK 15, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 14, 1979 UNDER RECEPTION NO. 1880159, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. PARCEL 2: A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF PERMITING THE PASSAGE OF PEDESTRIANS AND VEHICLES OVER AND ACROSS THE "ACCESS EASEMENT PROPERTY" AS DEFINED AND DESCRIBED IN EASEMENT AGREEMENT RECORDED NOVEMBER 7, 2005 UNDER RECEPTION NO. B5168537. Also known by street and number as: Englewood, CO 80112. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 11/06/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/12/2013 Last Publication: 10/10/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 07/09/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: S. Kent Karber #15084 Holland & Hart LLP Cs 90 South Cascade Avenue, Suite 1000, Colorado Springs, CO 80903 (719) 475-7330 Attorney File # 45742.0078 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012

Public Trustees

Legal Notice NO.: 1073-2013 First Publication: 9/12/2013 Last Publication: 10/10/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent

Name Changes PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given on August 28, 2013 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Arapahoe County Court. The petition requests that the name of Jana Marie Burnham be changed to Jana Marie Johnson. Case No.: 2013 C 100532 Tammera Herivel Clerk of the Court By: Beth Hunter Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 15475 First Publication: September 12, 2013 Last Publication: September 26, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given on September 3, 2013 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Arapahoe County Court. The petition requests that the name of Constance Taylor Thornley be changed to Constance Elaine Taylor. Case No.: 2013 C 100546 Tammera Herivel Clerk of the Court By: Julie Rich Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 15473 First Publication: September 12, 2013 Last Publication: September 26, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given on August 26, 2013 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Arapahoe County Court. The petition requests that the name of Nacera Dennai-McGinnis be changed to Nacera Avalos. Case No.: 2013 C 100527 Tammera Herivel Clerk of the Court By: Laura Larson Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 15474 First Publication: September 12, 2013 Last Publication: September 26, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given on September 3, 2013 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Arapahoe County Court. The petition requests that the name of Douglas Wayne Harries be changed to Deanna Wednesday Harries. Case No.: 2013 C 100547 Tammera Herivel Clerk of the Court By: David Kiester Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 15477 First Publication: September 12, 2013 Last Publication: September 26, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given on August 30, 2013 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Arapahoe County Court. The petition requests that the name of

entative or to the District Court of Arapahoe County, Colorado on or before January 19, 2014 or the claims may be forever barred.

Public notice is given on August 30, 2013 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Arapahoe County Court.

Name Changes

The petition requests that the name of Amy Nicole Pedersen be changed to Ami Nicole Pedersen. Case No.: 2013 C 100540 Tammera Herivel Clerk of the Court By: Robert Chase Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 15483 First Publication: September 12, 2013 Last Publication: September 26, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given on September 4, 2013 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Arapahoe County Court. The petition requests that the name of Sandra Louise Molski be changed to Cerena Marie Rose. Case No.: 2013 C 100552 Tammera Herivel Clerk of the Court By: John Jesse Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 15486 First Publication: September 12, 2013 Last Publication: September 26, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given on September 4, 2013 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Arapahoe County Court. The petition requests that the name of Carlos Alejandro Binns-Aird be changed to Carlos Alejandro Binns. Case No.: 2013 C 100560 Tammera Herivel Clerk of the Court By: Laura Larson Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 15493 First Publication: September 12, 2013 Last Publication: September 26, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given on September 3, 2013 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Arapahoe County Court. The petition requests that the name of Charles James Corsaro be changed to Curtis James Lockhart. Case No.: 2013 C 100545 Tammera Herivel Clerk of the Court By: Julie Rich Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 15508 First Publication: September 19, 2013 Last Publication: October 3, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given on September 16, 2013 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Arapahoe County Court. The petition requests that the name of Ashutosh Kumar, aka FNU Ashutosh Kumar, aka Ashutosh Kumar LNU be changed to Ashutosh Kumar Choudhary. Case No.: 2013 C 100588 Tammera Herivel Clerk of the Court By: Laura Larson Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 15512 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: October 10, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given on September 16, 2013 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Arapahoe County Court. The petition requests that the name of Robin Jean Tankersley be changed to Charlotte Elizabeth Tankersley. Case No.: 2013 C 100589 Tammera Herivel Clerk of the Court By: Laura Larson Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 15513 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: October 1o, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given on September 16, 2013 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Arapahoe County Court. The petition requests that the name of Louis Hill be changed to Jeffrey Louis Keeve. Case No.: 2013 C 100591 Tammera Herivel Clerk of the Court By: Laura Larson Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 15515 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: October 10, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent

Gail Marleen Ross-Williams be changed to Gail Marleen Ross. Case No.: 2012 C 100325

Name Changes

Tammera Herivel Clerk of the Court By: Beth Hunter Deputy Clerk

Legal Notice No: 15517 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: October 10, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given on September 17, 2013 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Arapahoe County Court. The petition requests that the name of Kyle Matthew Cox be changed to Kyle Matthew Vassella. Case No.: 2013 C 100594 Tammera Herivel Clerk of the Court By: John Jesse Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 15518 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: October 10, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent

Public Trustee Public Notice COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 1195-2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On August 1, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s): Maureen J Stuart Original Beneficiary(ies): Commercial Federal Mortgage Corp. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: Bank of the West Date of Deed of Trust: July 02, 2002 County of Recording: Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust: July 05, 2002 Recording Information (Reception Number): B2122734 Original Principal Amount: $106,150.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $86,698.70 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property to be foreclosed is: SEE EXHIBIT A ATTACHED HERETO AND INCORPORATED HEREIN BY REFERENCE Also known by street and number as: 2686 E Otero Pl #4, Centennial, CO 80122. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 11/20/2013, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado,, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 9/26/2013 Last Publication: 10/24/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ● IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; DATE: 08/01/2013 Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Cynthia D Mares, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Robert J. Aronowitz, Esq. #5673 Lisa Cancanon #42043 Emily Jensik #31294 Joan Olson, Esq. #28078 Jennifer H. Trachte #40391 Monica Kadrmas #34904 Catherine A. Hildreth #40975 Aronowitz & Mecklenburg, LLP 1199 Bannock St., Denver, CO 80204 (303) 8131177 Attorney File # 2327.00047 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 9/2012 1195-2013 EXHIBIT A BUILDING 4, RESIDENTIAL UNIT 4, PARKING UNITS 82 AND 83, OTERO RIDGE CONDOMINIUMS, IN ACCORDANCE WITH AND SUBJECT TO THE CONDOMINIUM DECLARATION FOR OTERO RIDGE CONDOMINIUMS RECORDED ON DECEMBER 28, 2000 AT RECEPTION NO. B0167417, AND THE CONDOMINIUM MAP RECORDED ON DECEMBER 28, 2000 AT RECEPTION NO. B0167418, AND ANY AND ALL AMENDMENTS THERETO, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK AND RECORDER, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Legal Notice NO.: 1195-2013 First Publication: 9/26/2013 Last Publication: 10/24/2013 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Howard C. Baker, Deceased Case Number: 2013PR30165

Public notice is given on September 13, 2013 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Arapahoe County Court. The petition requests that the name of Gail Marleen Ross-Williams be changed to Gail Marleen Ross. Case No.: 2012 C 100325 Tammera Herivel Clerk of the Court By: Beth Hunter Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 15517

All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Arapahoe County, Colorado on or before October 3, 2013 or the claims may be forever barred. Legal Notice No: 15461 First Publication: September 12, 2013 Last Publication: September 26, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent

September 26, 2013

Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Patsy R. Hokit, aka Patsy Rae Hokit, aka Patsy Hokit, Deceased Case Number: 13 PR 30272 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Arapahoe County, Colorado on or before January 20, 2014 or the claims may be forever barred. David T. Hokit Personal Representative 26030 141 Avenue, SE Kent, WA 98042 Legal Notice No: 15476 First Publication: September 12, 2013 Last Publication: September 26, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of O’Rena G. Puetz, aka O’Rena Puetz-Panesi, O’Rena B. Puetz, O’Rena Brant Puetz Panesi O’Rena B. Puetz Panesi and O’Rena Gertrude Puetz Panesi, Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 30254 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Co-Personal Representative or to the District Court of Arapahoe County, Colorado on or before January 13, 2014 or the claims may be forever barred. Thomas J. Puetz Co-Personal Co-Representative 2401 E. 126th Loop Thornton, Colorado 80241 Marilyn Puetz Barrere Co-Personal Co-Representative 1100 E. Girard Avenue Englewood, Colorado 80113 Legal Notice No: 15478 First Publication: September 12, 2013 Last Publication: September 26, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Albert W. Knott, Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 030248 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Arapahoe County, Colorado on or before January 13, 2014 or the claims may be forever barred.

James W. Larrick Co-Personal Representative 1230 Bordeaux Drive Sunnyvale, California 94089-1202 Phone: 415-264-6311

Notice To Creditors

Donald R. Larrick Co-Personal Representative 322 S. White Tail Drive Franktown, Colorado 80116 Phone: 303-917-7400 Margaret L. Liliestedt Co-Personal Representative 7580 S. Ulster Place Centennial, Colorado 80112 Phone: 303-810-6162 Legal Notice No: 15499 First Publication: September 19, 2013 Last Publication: October 3, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Derith A. Wills , Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 30204 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Arapahoe County District Court, 7325 S. Potomac, Englewood, Colorado, 80112, on or before January 30, 2014 or the claims may be forever barred. Date: September 9, 2013 /s/ original signature on file in office of Tamra, A. Palmer Personal Representative 6060 Greenwood Plaza Blvd., No. 200 Greenwood Village, Colorado 80111 303-789-2899 Legal Notice No: 15504 First Publication: September 19, 2013 Last Publication: October 3, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent

Misc. Private Legals Public Notice Arapahoe County, Colorado 7325 S. Potomac Street Centennial, Colorado 80220 In the Matter of the Petition of: Scott McBride For the Adoption of a Child Case Number: 13JV115 Division: 22 * Courtroom: 22 NOTICE OF HEARING To: Blane Chapel Pursuant to §19-5-208, C.R.S., you are hereby notified that the above-named Petitioner has filed in this Court a verified Petition seeking to adopt a child. If applicable, an Affidavit of Abandonment has been filed alleging that you have abandoned the child for a period of one year or more and/or have failed without cause to provide reasonable support for the child for one year or more.

Roberta R. Knott Personal Representative c/o Gelman & Norberg, LLC 8480 E. Orchard Road, Suite 5000 Greenwood Village, Colorado 80111

You are further notified that an Adoption hearing is set on October 8, 2013, at 9:00 a.m. in the court location identified above.

Legal Notice No: 15479 First Publication: September 12, 2013 Last Publication: September 26, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent

You are further notified that if you fail to appear for said hearing, the Court may terminate your parental rights and grant the adoption as sought by the Petitioner.

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of William Howard Pelham, aka William H. Pelham, Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 30205

Legal Notice No.: 15430 First Publication: August 29, 2013 Last Publication: September 26, 2013 Publisher: The Littleton Independent Public Notice

All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Arapahoe County, Colorado on or before January 13, 2014 or the claims may be forever barred.

DISTRICT COURT, ARAPAHOE COUNTY, STATE OF COLORADO CIVIL ACTION NO. 2013CV421, Division/Courtroom 201

/s/ original signature on file in office of Palmer, Goertzel & Associates, P.C. Warren Ray Davis Personal Representative 5056 San Miguel, Milton, FL 32583 850-994-8957

ALTON PARK HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Plaintiff, v. FRANZ J. WEDEMANN; AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.; and CYNTHIA MARES AS THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE OF ARAPAHOE COUNTY, COLORADO. Defendant(s).

Legal Notice No: 15487 First Publication: September 12, 2013 Last Publication: September 26, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of John P. Bowman, aka John Patrick Bowman, aka John Bowman, Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 628 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Arapahoe County, Colorado on or before January 12, 2014 or the claims may be forever barred. Cris Bowman Personal Representative 5391 West Kent Place Denver, Colorado 80235 Legal Notice No: 15494 First Publication: September 12, 2013 Last Publication: September 26, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Cecil C. Watkins, aka Cecil Watkins, Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 30247 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Arapahoe County, Colorado on or before January 20, 2014 or the claims may be forever barred. Anne L. Firor Personal Representative 8544 Double Header Ranch Road Morrison, Colorado 80465 Legal Notice No: 15498 First Publication: September 19, 2013 Last Publication: October 3, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Louise G. Larrick, Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 30260 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Co-Personal Representative or to the District Court of Arapahoe County, Colorado on or before January 19, 2014 or the claims may be forever barred. James W. Larrick Co-Personal Representative 1230 Bordeaux Drive Sunnyvale, California 94089-1202 Phone: 415-264-6311 Donald R. Larrick Co-Personal Representative 322 S. White Tail Drive Franktown, Colorado 80116

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL PROPERTY

Regarding: Lot 70, Block 1, Alton Park, Filing No. 4, County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado: Also known as: 1176 South Boston Street, Denver, CO 80247. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS, Please take notice: You and each of you are hereby notified that a Sheriff's Sale of the referenced property is to be conducted by the Civil Division of the Sheriff's Office of Arapahoe County, Colorado at 10:00 A.M., on the 7th day of November, 2013, at 13101 East Broncos Parkway, Centennial, CO 80112, phone number 720-874-3851. At which sale, the above described real property and improvements thereon will be sold to the highest bidder. Plaintiff makes no warranty relating to title, possession, or quiet enjoyment in and to said real property in connection with this sale. BIDDERS ARE REQUIRED TO HAVE CASH OR CERTIFIED FUNDS SUFFICIENT TO COVER THEIR HIGHEST BID AT THE TIME OF SALE. PLEASE NOTE THAT THE LIEN BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN ON THE SUBJECT PROPERTY. Judgment is in the amount of $5,184.89. Dated July 31, 2013 J. Grayson Robinson, Sheriff Arapahoe County, Colorado By: Sgt. James Osborn Deputy Sheriff Legal Notice No.: 15384 First Publication: September 12, 2013 Last Publication: October 10, 2013 Published In: Littleton Independent, 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., #210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 Public Notice District Court, Arapahoe County, State of Colorado Address: 7325 S. Potomac Street, Centennial, CO 80112 Phone Number: 303-649-6355 Plaintiffs: SABLE COVE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION v. Defendants: MARVIN F. KEEN; CAROL A. KEEN; GERALD MORRIS; HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC.; and MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. Case Number: 12CV2244, Division: 202 SHERIFF'S NOTICE OF SALE Under a Default Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure entered July 15, 2013, in the above entitled action, I am ordered to sell certain real property, as follows:


September 26, 2013

Case Number: 12CV2244, Division: 202 SHERIFF'S NOTICE OF SALE Under a Default Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure entered July 15, 2013, in the above entitled action, I am ordered to sell certain real property, as follows:

Misc. Private Legals

Original Grantor: Marvin F. Keen and Carol A. Keen Original Beneficiary: Sable Cove Condominium Association Current Holder of the evidence of debt secured by the Notice of Lien: Sable Cove Condominium Association Date of Notice of Lien: October 26, 2012 Date of Recording of Notice of Lien: October 30, 2012 County of Recording: Arapahoe County, Colorado Recording Information: D2124687 Original Principal Balance of the secured indebtedness: $11,270.00 Outstanding Principal Balance of the secured indebtedness as of the date hereof: $10,267.00 Amount of Judgment entered 7/15/2013: $13,337.20 Description of property to be foreclosed: Condominium Unit 16, also known as 16D in Condominium Building 6. Sable Cove Subdivision Filing No. 1, Phase 6, according to the Condominium Map thereof, recorded April 26, 1983 in Book 63 at Page 52 in the records of the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Arapahoe County, Colorado, as defined and described in Condominium Declaration for Sable Cove Condominiums, recorded September 15, 1982 in Book 3698 at Page 273 in said records, and the Statement of Annexation of Additional Land recorded November 17, 1982 in Book 3737 at Page 528 of the aforesaid records, County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado a/k/a 14561 E. Ford Pl., #16, Aurora, Colorado 80012 THE PROPERTY TO BE SOLD AND DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN. THE LIEN BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. NOTICE OF SALE THEREFORE, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that I will, at 10 o'clock A.M., on November 14, 2013, at the Office of the Arapahoe County Sheriff, 13101 East Broncos Parkway, Centennial, Colorado 80112, telephone 720-874-3851, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property described above, and all interest of said Grantor and the heirs and assigns of said Grantor therein, for the purpose of paying the judgment amount entered herein, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. **BIDDERS ARE REQUIRED TO HAVE CASH OR CERTIFIED FUNDS SUFFICIENT TO COVER THEIR HIGHEST BID AT TIME OF SALE.** The name, address and business telephone number of the attorneys representing the holder of the lien are as follows: Kerry Simpson, Atty. Reg. No. 35514, Pickard & Associates, P.C., 10146 West San Juan Way, Suite 200, Littleton, Colorado 80127, 303-989-6655. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. This Sheriff's Notice of Sale is signed August 7, 2013. J. Grayson Robinson, Sheriff Arapahoe County, Colorado By: Sgt. James Osborn Deputy Sheriff Legal Notice No.: 15405 First Publication: September 19, 2013 Last Publication: October 17, 2013 Published in: Littleton Independent 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd, #210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, ARAPAHOE COUNTY, STATE OF COLORADO CIVIL ACTION NO. 2011CV2305 DIVISION NO. 402 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Plaintiff, CHARLESTON PLACE ASSOCIATION, INC., a Colorado nonprofit corporation, v. Defendants, FELICIA HOLLAND; IRWIN M OR TGAGE C OR POR ATION ; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., acting solely as nominee for Irwin Mortgage Corporation; INTEGRAL RECOVERIES, INC.; ANA MARIA PETERS-RUDDICK, as Arapahoe County Public Trustee, DOUG MILLIKEN, as County Treasurer or Manager of the Department of Finance Regarding: Condominium Unit 5, Building 13, Charleston Place, according to the Map recorded May 8, 1978 in Book 34 at Page 47 and the Declaration of Covenants, Conditions of Restrictions, Charleston Place, a Condominium recorded May 10, 1978 in Book 2773 at Page 196, County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado. Also known as: 14013 E. Utah Circle, Aurora, CO 80012. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS, Please take notice: You and each of you are hereby notified that a Sheriff's Sale of the referenced property is to be conducted by the Civil Division of the Sheriff's Office of Arapahoe County, Colorado at 10:00 A.M., on the 31st day of October, 2013, at 13101 E. Broncos Pkwy., Centennial, CO 80112; phone number 720-874-3851. At which sale, the above described real property and improvements thereon will be sold to the highest bidder. Plaintiff makes no warranty relating to title, possession, or quiet enjoyment in and to said real property in connection with this sale.

vision of the Sheriff's Office of Arapahoe County, Colorado at 10:00 A.M., on the 31st day of October, 2013, at 13101 E. Broncos Pkwy., Centennial, CO 80112; phone number 720-874-3851. At which sale, the above described real property and improvements thereon will be sold to the highest bidder. Plaintiff makes no warranty relating to title, possession, or quiet enjoyment in and to said real property in connection with this sale.

Misc. Private Legals

**BIDDERS ARE REQUIRED TO HAVE CASH OR CERTIFIED FUNDS SUFFICIENT TO COVER THEIR HIGHEST BID AT TIME OF SALE. ** Further, for the purpose of paying off, curing default or redemption, as provided by statute, intent must be directed to or conducted at the above address of the Civil Division of the Sheriff’s Office of Arapahoe County, Colorado. PLEASE NOTE THAT THE LIEN BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN ON THE SUBJECT PROPERTY. DATED at Centennial, Colorado this 8th day of August, 2013. J. Grayson Robinson, Sheriff Arapahoe County, Colorado By: Sgt. James Osborn Deputy Sheriff ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF: ORTEN CAVANAGH & HOLMES, LLC 1445 Market Street, Suite 350 Denver, CO 80202 Legal Notice No.: 15406 First publication: September 5, 2013 Last Publication: October 3, 2013 Published in: Littleton Independent, 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., #210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, ARAPAHOE COUNTY, STATE OF COLORADO CASE NO.: 12CV1972 DIVISION: 408 BRANDON PARK 2000 OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Colorado non-profit corporation Plaintiff, v. VINCENT P. PALAZZOTTO; THE SECRETARY OF VETERANS AFFAIRS, an Officer of the United States of America, Successors/Assigns; and ANA MARIA PETERS-RUDDICK, the ARAPAHOE COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE Defendant(s). COMBINED NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL PROPERTY This is to advise you that a Sheriff sale proceeding has been commenced through the office of the undersigned Sheriff pursuant to a Court Order for Default Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure dated February 22, 2013, and C.R.S. §§ 38-38101 to 401, by Brandon Park 2000 Owners Association, Inc., [sic] the current holder of a statutory lien. The judicial foreclosure is based on a default under the Declaration of Covenants, Conditions, and Restrictions of Brandon Park 2000 Owners Association, recorded on December 19, 2000, at Reception No. B0163742, in the records of the Arapahoe County Clerk and Recorder, State of Colorado, as amended. The Declaration and notices, as recorded, establish a lien for the benefit of Brandon Park 2000 Owners Association, Inc., WHICH LIEN BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN ON THE SUBJECT PROPERTY AND IMPROVEMENTS legally described as follows: Unit 108, Building C, Brandon Park 2000 Owners Association, according to the Condominium Map thereof, Recorded on February 26, 2001 at Reception No. B1026185, in the Records of the Clerk and Recorder of Arapahoe County, Colorado, and as defined and described in the Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions of Brandon Park 2000 Owners Association, Recorded on December 19, 2000 at Reception No. B163742 in said records, County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado. Also known by street and number as 1080 S Walden Way, #108, Aurora, CO 80017 The property being foreclosed is all of the property encumbered by the Association’s lien. You are advised that the parties liable thereon, the owner of the property described above, or those with an interest in the subject property, may take appropriate and timely action under Colorado statutes. In order to be entitled to take advantage of any rights provided for under Colorado law, you must strictly comply and adhere to the provisions of the law. The Sheriff’s sale has been scheduled to occur at 10:00 A.M., on the 24th day of October, 2013, at the Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Office, 13101 E. Broncos Parkway, Centennial, Colorado 80012; telephone number (720) 874-3850. At the sale, the Sheriff will sell the above described real property above and improvements thereon to the highest bidder. Plaintiff makes no warranty relating to title, possession, or quiet enjoyment in and to said real property in connection with this sale. **BIDDERS ARE REQUIRED TO HAVE CASH OR CERTIFIED FUNDS SUFFICIENT TO COVER THEIR HIGHEST BID AT THE TIME OF SALE. ** The name, address, and telephone number of the attorney representing the Plaintiff is: Travis B. Keenan, #41354, Travis B. Keenan, P.C., 10200 E. Girard Ave., C-255, Denver, Colorado 80231, telephone (303) 695-6600. DATED at Denver, Colorado this 13th day of August, 2013. J. Grayson Robinson, Sheriff Arapahoe County, Colorado By: Sgt. James Osborn Deputy Sheriff Legal Notice No.: 15417 First Publication: August 29, 2013 Last Publication: September 26, 2013 Published in: Littleton Independent

Misc. Private Legals Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO CASE NO: 12CV1714 DIV./CTRM.: 207 Plaintiff: ROUNDTREE-AURORA HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Colorado nonprofit corporation v. Defendants: KHALED ABOELEYOUN; MARIAM N. NETANEL; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., acting solely as nominee for BANK OF AMERICA CORPORATION f/k/a COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC.; BANK OF AMERICA CORPORATION f/k/a COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC.; THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON f/k/a THE BANK OF NEW YORK as Trustee for the Certificateholders of THE CWABS, INC., AssetBacked Certificates, Series 2006-5; SAMMI SALHI; and DIANA SPRINGFIELD as the Interim Arapahoe County Public Trustee COMBINED NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE AND RIGHT TO CURE OR REDEEM This is to advise you that a Sheriff sale proceeding has been commenced through the office of the undersigned Sheriff pursuant to a Court Order for Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure dated February 19, 2013, and C.R.S. §§ 38-38-101 to 401, by the Roundtree-Aurora Homeowners Association, Inc., the current holder of a lien recorded with the County of Arapahoe Clerk and Recorder on August 8, 2011, at Reception No. D10753442. The judicial foreclosure is based on a default under the Roundtree-Aurora Homeowners Association, Inc. Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions recorded with the Arapahoe County Clerk and Recorder on October 26, 2007, in Reception No. B7137764 (“Declaration”). The Declaration and notices as recorded, establish a lien for the benefit of the Roundtree-Aurora Homeowners Association, Inc. - THE LIEN BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN ON THE SUBJECT PROPERTY AND IMPROVEMENTS – against the property legally described as follows: Lot 9, Block 1, Roundtree-Aurora First Filing, County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado.

establishes a lien for the benefit of High Hollows Condominium Association, Inc. and the Order (Decree of Foreclosure) dated December 12, 2012 on the real property legally described as:

District Court, Arapahoe County, Colorado Court Address: 7325 S. Potomac Street Centennial CO 80112

Condominium Unit 109, Building No. 10712, High Hollows Condominium, County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado, as shown on the Condominium Map recorded in Book 46 at page 11 and subject to the Condominium Declaration for High Hollows Condominium recorded in Book 3236 at Page 64. County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado.

Plaintiff(s): Tom C. Dunning Vs. Defendant(s): Sara C. Fielding; and all unknown persons who claim an interest in the subject matter of this action.

Misc. Private Legals

Also known by street and number as 10712 E. Exposition Ave., Unit 109, Aurora, CO 80012. THE LIEN BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The Sheriff’s sale has been scheduled to occur at Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Office at 10:00 a.m. on November 21, 2013, at 13101 East Broncos Parkway, Centennial, Colorado 80112. **BIDDERS ARE REQUIRED TO HAVE CASH OR CERTIFIED FUNDS SUFFICIENT TO COVER THEIR HIGHEST BID AT TIME OF SALE.** All telephone inquiries for information should be directed to the office of the undersigned Sheriff at (720) 874-3851. The name, address and telephone number of the attorney representing the legal owner of the above-described lien is: Sean M. Wells, Esq. Sweetbaum Sands Anderson PC 1125 17th Street, Suite 2100 Denver, CO 80202 (303) 296-3377 Dated: August 28, 2013 J. Grayson Robinson, Sheriff Arapahoe County, Colorado By: Sgt. James Osborn, Deputy Sheriff Legal Notice No.: 15463 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: October 24, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., #210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

DISTRICT COURT, ARAPAHOE COUNTY, COLORADO CIVIL ACTION NO. 2011CV1209, DIV. 206 Plaintiff: HIGH HOLLOWS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC., a Colorado non-profit corporation Defendant: JODEAN ZIESKE NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE

Condominium Unit 145, Building No. 10782, High Hollows Condominium, County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado, as shown on the Condominium Map recorded in Book 46 at Page 11 and subject to the Condominium Declaration for High Hollows Condominium recorded in Book 3236 at Page 64. County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado.

Date: August 21, 2013 J. Grayson Robinson, Sheriff Arapahoe County, Colorado By: Sgt. James Osborn Deputy Sheriff

Also known by street and number as 10782 E. Exposition Ave., Unit 145, Aurora, CO 80012.

Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, ARAPAHOE COUNTY, COLORADO CIVIL ACTION NO. 2011CV1209, DIV. 206 Plaintiff: HIGH HOLLOWS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC., a Colorado non-profit corporation Defendant: JODEAN ZIESKE NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: RE: Sheriff’s Sale of Real Property pursuant to Court Order and C.R.S. 38-38-101 et seq.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANT(S): You are hereby summoned and required to appear and defend against the claims of the complaint filed with the court in this action, by filing with the clerk of this court an answer or other response. You are required to file your answer or other response within 35 days after the service of this summons upon you. Service of this summons shall be complete on the day of the last publication. A copy of the complaint may be obtained from the clerk of the court.

Dated: September 4, 2013 [Court Clerk Stamp] Andi Lurett, Deputy Clerk

Public Notice

All telephone inquiries for information should be directed to the office of the undersigned Sheriff at 720.874.3850. The name, address and telephone number of the attorney representing the legal owner of the above described lien is: K. Christian Webert, #43739, Moeller Graf, P.C., 385 Inverness Parkway, Englewood, CO 80112, telephone (720) 279-2568.

Legal Notice No.: 15440 First Publication: September 5, 2013 Last Publication: October 3, 2013 Published in: The Littleton Independent, 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, Co 80129

Case Number: 13CV30916 Division: 407 SUMMONS (BY PUBLICATION)

This is an action to quiet the title of the Plaintiff in and to the real property situate in Arapahoe County, Colorado, more particularly described on Exhibit A, attached hereto and by this reference made a part hereof.

**BIDDERS ARE REQUIRED TO HAVE CASH OR CERTIFIED FUNDS SUFFICIENT TO COVER THEIR HIGHEST BID AT TIME OF SALE.**

The Sheriff’s sale has been scheduled to occur at 10.00 a.m. on October 31, 2013, at the 13101 E. Broncos Parkway, Centennial, CO 80112, telephone 720.874.3850. At the sale, the Sheriff will sell the real property described above, and the improvements thereon, to the highest bidder. Plaintiff makes no warranty relating to title, possession, or quiet enjoyment in and to said real property in connection with this sale.

Attorney for Plaintiff John W. Weaver, Atty. Reg. #1163 JW WEAVER LAW 6200 S. Syracuse Way, Ste. 125 Greenwood Village, CO 80111 Phone Number: 303-740-8696 FAX Number: 303-874-5159 E-Mail Address: JackWeaver@JWWeaverLaw.com

If you fail to file your answer or other response to the complaint in writing within 35 days after the date of the last publication, judgment by default may be rendered against you by the court for the relief demanded in the complaint without further notice.

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: RE: Sheriff’s Sale of Real Property pursuant to Court Order and C.R.S. 38-38101 et seq. This is to advise you that a Sheriff sale proceeding has been commenced through the office of the undersigned Sheriff pursuant to Order Directing Sheriff To Sell Foreclosed Properties, dated August 7, 2013 and C.R.S. 38-38-101 et seq., by High Hollows Condominium Association, Inc. the current holder and owner of a statutory lien against the real property located in the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado. The foreclosure is based on an Order – Re: Findings of Fact and Entry of Judgment dated November 6, 2012 which establishes a lien for the benefit of High Hollows Condominium Association, Inc. and the Order (Decree of Foreclosure) dated December 12, 2012 on the real property legally described as:

Also known by street and number as: 233 South Newark Circle, Aurora, CO 800121232 (the “Property”).

Misc. Private Legals

THE LIEN BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The Sheriff’s sale is scheduled to occur on November 21, 2013, at 10:00 a.m., at the Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Office, 13101 East Broncos Parkway, Centennial, Colorado, 80112. **BIDDERS ARE REQUIRED TO HAVE CASH OR CERTIFIED FUNDS SUFFICIENT TO COVER THEIR HIGHEST BID AT TIME OF SALE.** All telephone inquiries for information should be directed to the office of the undersigned Sheriff at (720) 874-3851 The name address and telephone number of the attorney representing the owner of the above-described lien is: Sean M. Wells, Esq. Sweetbaum Sands Anderson PC 1125 17th Street, Suite 2100 Denver, CO 80202 (303) 296-3377

By: JW Weaver Law John W. Weaver, Registration #1163 Attorney for Plaintiff EXHIBIT A LOT 1, BLOCK 7, CHERRY HILLS CREST, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. More commonly known as 2000 Crabtree Drive, Greenwood village, CO 80121-2640 Legal Notice No.: 15492 First Publication: September 12, 2013 Last Publication: October 10, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent Public Notice SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF THURSTON FAMILY AND JUVENILE COURT Dependency of: LEXSIS WALLACE D.O.B.: 01/07/96 No: 13-7-00417-3 Notice and Summons by Publication (Dependency) (SMPB) To: Misty Wallace, Mother Keith Wallace, Legal Father A Dependency Petition was filed on August 14, 2013; A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: November 8, 2013, at 1:30 p.m. at Thurston County Family and Juvenile Court, 2801 32nd Avenue SW, Tumwater, Washington 98501. You should be present at this hearing. The hearing will determine if your child is dependent as defined in RCW 13.34.050(5). This begins a judicial process which could result in permanent loss of your parental rights. If you do not appear at the hearing, the court may enter a dependency order in your absence. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, call DSHS at 360-725-6700 or 1-888-8223541. To view information about your rights, including right to a lawyer, go to www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.aspx. Dated: August 17, 2013 By Betty Gould, Thurston County Clerk Legal Notice No.: 15516 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: October 10, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent Public Notice COUNTY COURT, ARAPAHOE COUNTY, COLORADO 1790 W. LITTLETON BLVD. LITTLETON, CO 80120 Plaintiff: CAVALRY PORTFOLIO SERVICES, LLC vs. Defendant(s): TRAVIS L. SCOTT

RE: Sheriff’s Sale of Real Property pursuant to Court Order and C.R.S. 38-38101 et seq. This is to advise you that a Sheriff sale proceeding has been commenced through the office of the undersigned Sheriff pursuant to Order Directing Sheriff To Sell Foreclosed Properties, dated August 7, 2013 and C.R.S. 38-38-101 et seq., by High Hollows Condominium Association, Inc. the current holder and owner of a statutory lien against the real property located in the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado. The foreclosure is based on an Order – Re: Findings of Fact and Entry of Judgment dated November 6, 2012 which establishes a lien for the benefit of High Hollows Condominium Association, Inc. and the Order (Decree of Foreclosure) dated December 12, 2012 on the real property legally described as:

Dated: August 28, 2013 J. Grayson Robinson, Sheriff Arapahoe County, Colorado

Condominium Unit 109, Building No. 10712, High Hollows Condominium, County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado, as shown on the Condominium Map recorded in Book 46 at page 11 and subject to the Condominium Declaration for High Hollows Condominium recorded in Book 3236 at Page 64. County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado.

Plaintiff(s): Tom C. Dunning Vs. Defendant(s): Sara C. Fielding; and all unknown persons who claim an interest in the subject matter of this action.

David A. Bauer, #7576 David A. Bauer, P.C. 2594 South Lewis Way, Suite A Lakewood, Colorado 80227 Phone: 303-986-1200 Fax: 303-988-8913

By: Sgt. James Osborn Deputy Sheriff

Case Number: 07C316476

Legal Notice No.: 15464 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: October 24, 2013 Published in: Littleton Independent, 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., #210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE WHEREAS, Plaintiff has moved this Court pursuant to said rules of civil procedure that the judgment entered in the instant matter on November 16, 2007 in favor of the Plaintiff and against the Defendant(s) which judgment remains unsatisfied, be revived, NOW THEREFORE,

Public Notice District Court, Arapahoe County, Colorado Court Address: 7325 S. Potomac Street Centennial CO 80112

Attorney for Plaintiff John W. Weaver, Atty. Reg. #1163 JW WEAVER LAW 6200 S. Syracuse Way, Ste. 125 Greenwood Village, CO 80111 Phone Number: 303-740-8696 FAX Number: 303-874-5159 E-Mail Address: JackWeaver@JWWeaverLaw.com

IT IS ORDERED, the Defendant(s), TRAVIS L. SCOTT , shall show cause within fourteen (14) days from the service of this Notice to Show Cause if any he has, why the judgment heretofore entered should not be revived with like force and effect. WITNESS the hand and seal of the Clerk of the Court in LITTLETON, Colorado, this 26th day of June, 2013.

revived, NOW THEREFORE, IT IS ORDERED, the Defendant(s), TRAVIS L. SCOTT , shall show cause within fourteen (14) days from the service of this Notice to Show Cause if any he has, why the judgment heretofore entered should not be revived with like force and effect.

The Independent B9

Misc. Private Legals

WITNESS the hand and seal of the Clerk of the Court in LITTLETON, Colorado, this 26th day of June, 2013. /s/ Tammy L. Herivel Clerk of the Court Legal Notice No.: 15522 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: October 24, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, ARAPAHOE COUNTY, STATE OF COLORADO CIVIL ACTION NO. 2011CV1354 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Plaintiff, Foxdale Condominium Association, Inc., a Colorado nonprofit corporation, v. Defendants, Jason Lee Evans and Jessica L. Mills; Ana Maria Peters- Ruddick as Public Trustee for Arapahoe County; Fitzsimons Community Federal Credit Union Regarding: UNIT 107 BLDG 27 AS PER CONDO DECLARATION RECORDED IN Block 3461 P495 FOXDALE CONDOMINIUMS 14th SUPPLEMENT, County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado Also known as: 905 S. Zeno Way, #107, Aurora, CO 80117 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS, Please take notice: You and each of you are hereby notified that a Sheriff's Sale of the referenced property is to be conducted by the Civil Division of the Sheriff's Office of Arapahoe County, Colorado at 10:00 A.M., on the 14th day of November, 2013, at 13101 E. Broncos Parkway, Centennial, CO 80112; telephone number 720-874-3851. At which sale, the above described real property and improvements thereon will be sold to the highest bidder. Plaintiff makes no warranty relating to title, possession, or quiet enjoyment in and to said real property in connection with this sale. **BIDDERS ARE REQUIRED TO HAVE CASH OR CERTIFIED FUNDS SUFFICIENT TO COVER THEIR HIGHEST BID AT TIME OF SALE. ** Further, for the purpose of paying off, curing default or redemption, as provided by statute, intent must be directed to or conducted at the above address of the Civil Division of the Sheriff’s Department of Arapahoe County, Colorado. PLEASE NOTE THAT THE LIEN BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN ON THE SUBJECT PROPERTY. DATED at Centennial, Colorado this 30th day of August, 2013. J. Grayson Robinson, Sheriff Arapahoe County, Colorado By: Sgt. James Osborn Deputy Sheriff ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF: ORTEN CAVANAGH & HOLMES, LLC 1445 Market Street, Suite 350 Denver, CO 80202 Legal Notice No: 15480 First Publication: September 19, 2013 Last Publication: October 17, 2013 Published In: Littleton Independent, 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., #210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

Government Legals Public Notice NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON EXCLUSION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all interested persons that a Petition for Exclusion of Real Property (the “Petition”) has been filed, or is expected to be filed, with the Board of Directors of Littleton Village Metropolitan District No. 1, County of Arapahoe, Colorado (the “District”) requesting that the land described below be excluded from the boundaries of the District. The Petition shall be heard at a public meeting on Monday, September 30, 2013, at 9:30 a.m., at 2154 East Commons Avenue, Suite 2000, Centennial, Colorado. Accordingly, notice is hereby given to all interested persons that they shall appear at the public meeting and show cause in writing why such Petition for Exclusion should not be granted. The name and address of the petitioner and the description of the land to be excluded are as follows: Name of Petitioner: WIP Littleton Village LLC, a Delaware limited liability company Address of Petitioner: 2716 Ocean Park Blvd., Suite 3020, Santa Monica, CA 90405 Description of Land: A PARCEL OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 68 WEST OF THE SIXTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, GENERALLY LYING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF S. BROADWAY AND E. DRY CREEK ROAD, CITY OF LITTLETON, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE DISTRICT. By: WHITE, BEAR & ANKELE Professional Corporation Attorneys for the District Legal Notice No.: 15514 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: September 26, 2013 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press

Public Knowledge = Notices Community

**BIDDERS ARE REQUIRED TO HAVE CASH OR CERTIFIED FUNDS SUFFICIENT TO COVER THEIR HIGHEST BID AT TIME OF SALE. ** Further, for the purpose of paying off, curing default or redemption, as provided by statute, intent must be directed to or conducted at the above address of the Civil Division of the Sheriff’s Office of Arapahoe County, Colorado.

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE LIEN BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN ON THE SUBJECT PROPERTY.

DATED at Centennial, Colorado this 8th day of August, 2013. J. Grayson Robinson, Sheriff Arapahoe County, Colorado By: Sgt. James Osborn Deputy Sheriff ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF: ORTEN CAVANAGH & HOLMES, LLC 1445 Market Street, Suite 350 Denver, CO 80202

Read the Notices!

Legal Notice No.: 15406 First publication: September 5, 2013 Last Publication: October 3, 2013 Published in: Littleton Independent, 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., #210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

Also known by street and number as 10712 E. Exposition Ave., Unit 109, Aurora, CO 80012. THE LIEN BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

The Sheriff’s sale has been scheduled to occur at Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Office at 10:00 a.m. on November 21, 2013, at 13101 East Broncos Parkway, Centennial, Colorado 80112.

**BIDDERS ARE REQUIRED TO HAVE CASH OR CERTIFIED FUNDS SUFFICIENT TO COVER THEIR HIGHEST BID AT TIME OF SALE.**

All telephone inquiries for information should be directed to the office of the undersigned Sheriff at (720) 874-3851. The name, address and telephone number of the attorney representing the legal owner of the above-described lien is: Sean M. Wells, Esq. Sweetbaum Sands Anderson PC 1125 17th Street, Suite 2100 Denver, CO 80202 (303) 296-3377 Dated: August 28, 2013 J. Grayson Robinson, Sheriff

/s/ Tammy L. Herivel Clerk of the Court

Legal Notice No.: 15522 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: October 24, 2013 Publisher: Littleton Independent

Case Number: 13CV30916 Division: 407 SUMMONS (BY PUBLICATION)

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANT(S): You are hereby summoned and required to appear and defend against the claims of the complaint filed with the court in this action, by filing with the clerk of this court an answer or other response. You are required to file your answer or other response within 35 days after the service of this summons upon you. Service of this summons shall be complete on the day of the last publication. A copy of the complaint may be obtained from the clerk of the court.

About Your

Be Informed!

If you fail to file your answer or other response to the complaint in writing within 35 days after the date of the last publication, judgment by default may be rendered against you by the court for the relief demanded in the complaint without further notice.


B10 The Independent

September 26, 2013

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The Independent B11

September 26, 2013

1901 - 1997

Houstoun Waring “I’m just an ordinary man, but I work at it harder than most.” — Teddy Roosevelt, Motto of Hous Waring

Tribute to Hous Waring

Editor from 1926-1966

Founder of Western Welcome Week Subject of U.S. Information Agency film, Small Town Editor, identifying him around the world as a grassroots editor Founder of the University of Denver Journalism Department


B12 The Independent

September 26, 2013

invites you to join us for our

[ quas·qui·centennial : a 125th anniversary ]

Friday, September 27 6:00 pm ✶ Garden Canopy at Hudson Gardens

Free admission! Bring the whole family! Music by John Akal’s Ultraphonic Jazz Orchestra Dancing ✶ Food ✶ Drinks ✶ Cake ✶ and FUN! Visit OurLittletonNews.com for more info

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