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Blown out of proportion Work the runway Artist brings larger-than-life art to PSU (pg. 4)

Fashion show raises self-defense awareness (pg. 6)

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January 28, 2010 Volume 94, No. 10

p i t t s b u r g

www.psucollegio.com

s t a t e

u n i v e r s i t y

Obama: ‘I don’t quit’ WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama is renewing his pledge to have all of the nation’s combat troops out of Iraq by the end of August. And he says he’s confident of success in Afghanistan. In his State of the Union address,

Obama said of Iraq, “This war is ending, and all of our troops are coming home.” He said the U.S. will support Iraq’s government as it holds elections and help Iraq’s people work toward peace and prosperity. He’s warning of “difficult days

ahead” in Afghanistan but said Afghan forces are being trained so they can “begin to take the lead” by July of next year and U.S. troops can start to come home. And he said he’s “confident we will succeed” there. Declaring “I don’t quit,’” the

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Sneak peek

embattled president vowed in his first State of the Union address Wednesday night to make job growth his topmost priority and urged a divided Congress to boost the still-ailing economy with fresh stimulus spending. Defiant

see Obama page 3

One year down Crude cliche Even arch angels can’t redeem this apocalyptic disaster (pg. 5B)

Open for business AP

President Barack Obama walks along the West Wing Colonnade toward the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2010, ahead of his State of the Union address.

SIFE sponsors fourth-grade economic lesson. (pg. 4)

Obama receives average grade from students Bartholomew Klick Collegio Reporter Obama appears to be slowly losing the support of voters aged 18 to 30, a group that supported him by a more than a 2-to-1 ratio in November 2008. A Zogby poll conducted from Jan. 15 to Jan. 18 found that only 50 percent of this age group support Obama, which is down from 54 percent in a December 2009 poll. It’s easy to tell by talking to PSU students that college-aged voters are growing cool to President Obama. “He’s not doing a very good job,” Aaron Voth, senior in automotive technology, said. “I don’t think he knows what he’s doing. The guy is

out of touch.” Voth isn’t the only PSU student who thinks Obama doesn’t know how to do his job. “I like him,” Ari Haviland, junior in history, said. “I think he’s trying to do good, but at times I don’t think he knows what he’s doing. We need someone with more experience.” Other students were critical of Obama receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. “He won the Nobel Prize, but I don’t know why,” Ziyou Li, senior in computer science, said. “The army is still in Iraq.” Not every student is openly critical of Obama, however, and many students have complex opinions about him that cannot be summed up with

the simple labels of approval and disapproval. “He has some high points and he has some low points,” Justin Young, senior in communication, said. Young says he hates the healthcare bill and sees areas where Obama’s performance could use improvement. “But, he brings a new idea on how things should go and he has a more peaceful attitude,” Young said. “I’d give him a B+. He’s not letting old politics block him.” Keeping in mind what the country was like before, Emily Bachtel says Obama isn’t doing too bad of a job. “I think Obama is doing good, considering what he was given,” Bachtel, junior in graphic communication management and commercial

graphics, said. “The economy was s--t.” Jonathan Dennis, senior in psychology, says he thinks the president is doing the best he can. “Republicans and Democrats, instead of working together, work against each other. They have an attitude of, ‘We get it done my way or not at all.’” Still, many students choose not to have an opinion on the president’s performance. Mohammed Alassaf, a graduate student with his MBA studying English at PSU, is one such student. “He’s been president for only a year,” Alassaf said. “You can’t have an opinion in one year.”

Possible ban Discussion about a different kind of war on driver texting Brock Sisney Collegio Reporter Seven speakers provided students, faculty and staff with information and insight during the “Terrorism, War, and the Challenge Facing the U.S. in Afghanistan and Pakistan” symposium held Tuesday inside the Crimson and Gold Ballroom. President Barack Obama recently announced that he wants 30,000 more troops in Afghanistan, which will move the overall American troop number in Afghanistan closer to 100,000. In July 2008, for example, the United States had 33,700 troops committed to Afghanistan. Senators John Kerry and Dick Lugar cosponsored a bipartisan bill called the Enhanced Partnership with Pakistan Act of 2009. Both Congressional houses passed the bill. William Lambert, course director of the Afghanistan elective at the U.S. Army’s Command and General Staff College in Fort Leavenworth, gave an overview of the Afghanistan-Pakistan theater. Lambert showed the evolution in media coverage of Afghanistan by presenting

Jen Rainey Collegio Reporter

Jim Quist/Collegio

Major Nelson David responds to a question during the “Terrorism, War, and the Challenge facing the U.S. in Afghanistan and Pakistan” discussion in the Crimson and Gold Ballroom on Tuesday, Jan 26. various Time Magazine headlines over the last eight years. A December 2001 headline read “The Last Days of the Taliban.”

see War page 3

The Kansas Legislature has Heather Hopkins’ full support on banning Kansas’ drivers from sending text messages while driving. “I know a few people who have wrecked their vehicles because of text messaging,” Hopkins, junior in English literature, said. Both the House and Senate committees in Kansas addressed passing a law to ban texting, instant messaging and e-mailing on Kansas roadways last week. If passed, drivers will be given a year to gain awareness of the law and $100 fine would be enforced beginning July 1, 2011, according to Kansas.com. Nineteen states, including the District of Columbia and Guam, have already enforced this law. Teenage drivers in Kansas have also already been banned from using cell phones on roads.

This is a part of the state’s graduated driver’s license bill that went into effect Jan. 1. “When I text and drive, I really notice that I’m distracted. That’s why I try to avoid it,” Tracey Fienen, sophomore in communication, said. “I can usually tell when other drivers are texting because they aren’t paying attention and they hold up traffic.” According to fox4ks.com, some professional truck drivers would have a problem with the ban. Several truck drivers use an on-board computer system to communicate with their companies. If they pass a law to ban these types of programs, truckers believe it will make it that much more difficult to do their jobs. However, truck drivers using these programs are 10 percent more likely to cause an accident, according to a study conducted at Virginia Tech University.

see Texting page 3

Hit the note PSU professor almost grabs Grammy nomination (pg. 5B)

Last week’s question Which late night host were you rooting for, Conan or Leno?

Remember to check out this week’s question on page 2B

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January 28, 2010

Iran leader predicts Israel’s destruction TEHRAN, Iran — Iran’s supreme leader is predicting the destruction of Israel in one of his harshest comments in years about the Jewish state. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei says the timeline for Israel’s demise depends on how Muslim nations “approach the issue.” He did not elaborate. The Iranian leader posted the comments on his office Web site on Wednesday. Khamenei has previously called Israel a “cancerous tumor” that must be removed from the map. But his new comments mark the first time in years Khamenei has publicly predicted Israel’s downfall. The remarks also come as Jews mark International Holocaust Remembrance Day, the 65th anniversary of the liberation of the Nazi-run Auschwitz death camp.

New home sales fall 7.6 pct in December WASHINGTON — New home sales unexpectedly fell 7.6 percent last month, capping the industry’s weakest year on record. December’s sales fell to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 342,000 from an upwardly revised November pace of 370,000, the Commerce Department said Wednesday. Economists surveyed by Thomson Reuters had forecast a pace of 370,000 for December. The results were the weakest since March and indicated demand remains sluggish despite newly expanded tax incentives to spur sales. The report is likely to fuel concern that the housing market turnaround will falter when government support ends this spring.

Chilling messages sent before killings LAGOS, Nigeria — Chilling text messages urged both Christians and Muslims to commit violence during rioting that left more than 300 people dead, a human rights organization said Wednesday, with one message reading: “Kill them before they kill you.” Shehu Sani, president of the Civil Rights Congress in Nigeria, said his group has collected about 150 text messages that were sent before and during the violence in Jos. Even as the military kept an uneasy calm in the central Nigerian town, another pastor said Wednesday that agitators are sending new text messages to those in surrounding communities to reignite the sectarian violence. The messages gave readers addresses to mosques and churches, suggesting that some structures be set ablaze, he said. The texts also offered instructions on what weapons to use and how to dispose of bodies, he said. The chance of prosecuting those sending the messages appears to be small. In Nigeria, the government does not require cellular phone owners

to register their SIM cards — the portable memory chips that tell a phone what its number is and what carrier it uses. Sectarian violence in this region of Nigeria has left thousands dead over the past decade. The latest outbreak came despite the Nigerian government’s efforts to quell religious extremism in the West African country.

Police link phone plot to conservative group NEW ORLEANS — The four men accused of trying to tamper with Democratic U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu’s office phones share a common experience as young ideologues writing for conservative publications. Federal authorities said two of the men posed as telephone workers wearing hard hats, tool belts and fluorescent vests when they walked into the senator’s office inside a federal building in New Orleans on Monday. The other two were accused of helping to organize the plan. The most well-known of the suspects is James O’Keefe, a 25-year-old whose hidden-camera expose posing as a pimp with his prostitute infuriated the liberal group ACORN and made him a darling of conservatives.

Kan. House panel rejects tax hike plan TOPEKA, Kan. — A House committee has rejected a proposal by Gov. Mark Parkinson to increase the state sales tax rate to balance the budget. The Republican-dominated Taxation Committee voted 13-to-7 on Wednesday to recommend that the bill not be passed. The move was not unexpected and kills the proposal contained in the bill. Parkinson proposes raising the sales tax to 6.3 percent from 5.3 percent to raise revenue to close a projected $400 million shortfall in the 2011 state budget. Democrats on the panel objected to the move, saying no options should be removed from consideration this early in the session, which began Jan. 11.

California school ends dictionary ban MENIFEE, Calif. — A California school district that pulled a dictionary from classrooms because it defined oral sex will allow it back on the shelves. A committee of parents, teachers and administrators decided on Tuesday to permit fourth- and fifth-graders at Oak Meadows Elementary School in Menifee to use Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary. However, parents can opt to have their kids use an alternative dictionary. The Riverside County district has 9,000 students and pulled the reference book last week after a parent complained about a child stumbling across the oral sex definition. That led to cries of censorship.

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Apple unveils long-anticipated iPad SAN FRANCISCO — Apple CEO Steve Jobs introduced the iPad, saying the tablet-style creation will be marketed as a third mobile device: something larger than a cell phone but more intimate than a laptop. Jobs says the iPad will be useful for reading books, playing games and watching video. But Apple will have to win over recession-weary consumers, many of whom already have numerous Internet-connected electronics. With his showman-like presentation Wednesday, Jobs said the $499-and-up iPad is “so much more intimate than a laptop and so much more capable than a smart phone.” The comparison to an iPhone makes sense, given the minimalist silver-and-black style of the iPad. The machine allows users to browse the Web using an on-screen keyboard on a crisp screen, which is 9.7 inches on the diagonal — while the iPhone is just 3.5 inches. When one holds the iPad with the wider side down, in landscape mode, it’s nearly big enough for touch typing — an improvement over the way that the iPhone’s cramped keyboard sometimes causes errors. As on the iPhone, the iPad’s screen is extremely responsive to finger swipes and taps, which made it easy to scroll through Web sites like Facebook and select photos and articles to read on news sites. The iPad comes with Apple’s new iBook software, which opens up to reveal a realistic-looking wooden bookshelf stocked with all the titles in your e-book collection.

Judge orders decorum in abortion shooting case WICHITA, Kan. — People in the courtroom for the trial of the man accused of killing Kansas abortion provider Dr. George Tiller need to watch their

behavior as the case heads to its more “emotional aspects,” the judge warned on Wednesday. District Judge Warren Wilbert said he wouldn’t tolerate any “moans, groans,” or other “verbal outburts,” and that violators would likely be subject to contempt of court charges. “I don’t want the jury to be distracted by anything in the gallery,” Wilbert said Friday as prosecutors prepared to wrap up their evidence in the case against Scott Roeder, 51, of Kansas City, Mo. The warning coincided with the first day the court instituted a lottery system for spectator seats in the gallery. Roeder’s trial has lured activists from both sides of the abortion debate to Wichita. Wednesday also marked the first day a few antiabortion protesters gathered outside the courthouse in support of Roeder. Roeder, who has publicly confessed to killing Tiller, has pleaded not guilty to charges of firstdegree murder and aggravated assault. Much of the testimony so far has been seen as a for-the-record recitation of facts of Tiller’s death and Roeder’s movements before and after the killing.

Russia: Arms deal possible within weeks MOSCOW — Russian and U.S. negotiators could hammer out a new nuclear arms reduction deal within weeks, the Russian Foreign Ministry said Wednesday. The statement from ministry spokesman Igor Lyakin-Frolov followed weeks of uncertainty and sent a strong signal that the long-running talks were nearing an end. Russia and the U.S. have been negotiating a successor to the 1991 Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, or START I, that expired on Dec. 5. They had hoped to reach a deal before the end of the year, but differences persisted and officials had been evasive about a timeline.

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January 28, 2010

n Texting from page 1 “When you text message or email from your phone, your eyes spend more time reading and correcting your message than they do watching the road,” Hopkins said. “It would save a lot of pain to ban text messaging while driving before it becomes even more of a serious problem.” According to the 2010 U.S. Census Bureau’s Statistical Abstract of the United States, there are about 110 billion text messages sent each year. According to an interview Chair of the House Committee on local government Jene Vickrey had with kake.

com, drivers are 85 percent more likely to have an accident while texting. “I feel that texting while driving is dangerous,” Chelsey Fuller, junior in communication, said. “If you have to answer someone back and there is a person riding with you, you should have them reply back for you.” A report conducted in 2008 by the Department of Transportation says that 5,780 people died in vehicle wrecks caused by distractions and 515,000 more were injured.

n Obama from page 1 despite stinging setbacks, he said he would not abandon ambitious plans for longer-term fixes to health care, energy, education and more. “Change has not come fast enough,” Obama said before a politician-packed House chamber and a TV audience of millions. “As hard as it may be, as uncomfortable and contentious as the debates may be, it’s time to get serious about fixing the problems that are hampering our growth.” Obama looked to change the conversation from how his presidency is stalling — over the messy health care debate, a limping economy and the missteps that led to Christmas Day’s barely averted terrorist disaster — to how he is seizing the reins. A chief demand was for lawmakers to press forward with his prized health care overhaul, which is in severe danger in Congress, and to resist the temptation to substitute a smaller-bore solution for the far-reaching changes he wants. “Do not walk away from reform,” he implored. “Not now. Not when we are so close.” On national security, Obama proclaimed some success, saying that “far more” al-Qaida terrorists were killed under his watch last year in the U.S.-led global fight than in 2008. Hoping to salve growing disappointment in a key constituency, Obama said he would work with Congress “this year” to repeal the ban on gays and lesbians serving openly in the military. The president devoted about two-thirds of his speech to the economic worries foremost on Americans’ minds, emphasizing his ideas, some new but mostly old and explained anew, for restoring job growth, taming budget deficits and changing a polarized

n war from page 1 By 2004, Time called Afghanistan the Other War, and in April 2009, Time centered on how not to lose in Afghanistan. He called President Obama’s strategy of focusing on Afghanistan and Pakistan and ignoring Pakistan’s conflict with India “absolutely wrong.” “We will never succeed in Afghanistan unless Pakistan wants us to succeed,” Lambert said.

Feuding countries

AP

President Barack Obama walks down the center aisle greeting members of Congress on his way to deliver his State of the Union address on Capitol Hill in Washington on Wednesday. Washington “where every day is Election Day.” Declaring that “I know the anxieties” of Americans’ struggling to pay the bills while big banks get bailouts and bonuses, Obama prodded Congress to enact a second stimulus package “without delay,” specifying that it should contain a range of measures to help small businesses and funding for infrastructure projects. Also, fine tuning a plan first announced in October, Obama said he will initiate a $30 billion program to provide money to community banks at low rates, provided they agree to increase lending to small businesses. The money would come from balances left in the $700 billion Wall Street rescue fund — a program “about as popular as a root canal” that he made of point of saying “I hated.” Acknowledging frustration at the government’s habit of spending more than it has — and yet

placing much blame on Republicans for record deficits, he said he would veto any bills that do not adhere to his demand for a threeyear freeze on some domestic spending (while proposing a 6.2 percent, or $4 billion, increase in the popular arena of education). budget line by line” to find more. In the Republican response to Obama’s speech, Gov. Bob McDonnell of Virginia showed no sign of his party capitulating to the president. In fact, the choice of McDonnell to represent Republicans was symbolic, meant to showcase recent GOP election victories by him and others. McDonnell reflected the anti-big government sentiment that helped lead to their wins, saying in excerpts from his own post-speech remarks that Americans want good health care they can afford, just not by turning over “the best medical care system in the world to the federal government.”

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Pakistan and India have been feuding and fighting since 1947, when the United Nations officially recognized Pakistan as a nation state. The nations are in dispute over land rights to a territory called Kashmir. The United Nations has a group called the United Nations Military Observer Group in India and Pakistan (UNMOGIP) that oversees the region since the first Indo-Pakistani War ended in 1949. India and Pakistan fought additional Indo-Pakistani Wars in 1965 and 1971. The world’s three largest Muslim populations are outside the Middle East region. Pakistan and India have the world’s second- and third-largest Muslim populations, 159 million and 151 million, respectively. Both nations have developed nuclear weapon capabilities and have major population centers within reach of atomic devastation. A.Q. Khan, known as “The Merchant of Menace” and considered the world’s most dangerous nuclear trafficker, calls Pakistan home. Lambert pointed out that Afghanistan and Pakistan have their own historical struggle. When Pakistan sought entry into the United Nations, Afghanistan voted against it, the only negative vote. Afghanistan never recognized the Durand Line as its border with Pakistan, a demarcation line originally established in 1893 that involved Great Britain. A Pakistani minority group, called the Pashtuns, seeks a nation between Afghanistan and Pakistan. The border areas present a major problem to any military force. According to Lambert, increased militant activity in Western Pakistan will lead to a greater potential for major attacks against the United States, a greater threat to Pakistani stability and a hin-

drance of U.S. efforts to stabilize Afghanistan.

A different war Don Wright, a historian at the Fort Leavenworth Combat Studies Institute, wrote a book called “A Different Kind of War” that analyzed the Afghanistan conflict from 2001 to 2005. The title comes from a segment of a speech given by President Bush saying the war in Afghanistan will be different than World War II, Korea and Vietnam. Wright said U.S. involvement passed three phases during those years. A concerted effort to avoid placing a large troop print on Afghanistan and not alienating the Afghan population comprised the first phase. The second phase involved combating the Taliban and Al Qaeda, training Afghan security forces, and civil military operations, moving toward nation building. Counterinsurgency made up phase three. Earlier on in our involvement, it was believed there was no insurgency and the Northern Alliance would be able to establish itself as the legitimate central government in Afghanistan, ending Taliban presence once and forever. Prussian military theorist Carl Von Clausewitz believed in a concept known as economy of force or “any unnecessary expenditure of time, every unnecessary detour, is a waste of strength and thus abhorrent to strategic thought.” Wright said that Operation Enduring Freedom became an economy of force to the main effort, Operation Iraqi Freedom.

How it all ties in Maj. Dave Conner, Maj. Paul Culberson, Maj. Nelson David, Maj. Nicholas Dickson and Lt. Col. Omari comprised the Military Officers Panel that brought in-the-field experience to the discussion. After brief introductions, they answered questions from the audience. Culberson said it’s difficult to measure success as greater expectations are fostered over time inside a nation. He stressed that it takes interaction and cooperation between multiple organizations

to establish rules of law, law enforcement agencies, and banking and finance regulations in a society that takes more pride in their family, village and tribe than any nation and province. Conner said that Afghans have become increasingly frustrated with the question, “What do you want?” Dickson said it’s easy to get lost in the stark, mountainous Afghan terrain. David said that we can win in Afghanistan. History department chair John Daley moderated the Wrap-Up Panel that integrated Lambert and Wright into the dialogue. A student asked the panel for their opinion about the way the American media have covered Afghanistan. Culberson says that media accentuate the negative over the positive. “If it doesn’t sell, it’s not going to be in the paper or on the news,” Culberson said. Lambert defended journalists. “I’ve been impressed by the professionalism of 99 percent of the journalists I’ve worked with over the years,” Lambert said. Dickson and David said that it’s best to seek out as many news sources as possible, including outside the United States. Kevin Huebner, senior in history, attended the morning session. “William Lambert’s presentation was interesting,” Huebner said. “The way he focused on the connection between Afghanistan and Pakistan and the perilous situations the Afghan government and the U.S. military are in and the charts that showed the resurgence of the Taliban. Wright gave a good overview of the first four years of the Afghan involvement.” William Cichy, senior in education, attended the Q & A panel involving all speakers. “Based on the questions asked, the answers made me realize the complexity of the situation and that opinions we form quickly are based on less knowledge,” Cichy said. The International Academic Affairs Committee, the history department, the social sciences department and the International Studies Program sponsored the symposium.

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January 28, 2010

Building blocks

Attention Students

Elementary kids test their construction skills

Bartholomew Klick Collegio Reporter As 40 children filed into Room 102S at the Kansas Technology Center, student judges passed out bags filled with Lego blocks, string, tinfoil and rocks.

With these materials, they are instructed to build the best creative structure they can in an hour. The Block Kids event began at noon on Saturday, Jan. 23, and lasted until 3 p.m. Children from grades 1 through 6 joined in on the competition. Winners in each

Andrew Dodson/Collegio

Fifth-graders Sammy Jamison(left) and Jacob Otter(right) build their architectures for the contest on Saturday, Jan. 23.

grade level were chosen based on the creativity of their project and received prizes such as hats and toolboxes. The overall first place winner, Kyle Wescott, first grade, received a tool kit, a shirt and a hard hat for his entry. “I built a house that has stands under it, so that it can’t fall down and break,” Wescott said. Wescott’s project impressed a number of the judges on the panel, including Caleb Krier. “He had a house with fire protection, a lightning rod and a sewage system,” Krier, sophomore in construction management, said. “It was a complicated thought process for a first-grader.” The judges consisted of PSU construction majors and members of the National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC), who helped sponsor the event. Krier says Wescott wasn’t the only participant whose creativity surprised him. “Another kid had a very

unique design based on Greek and Roman architecture,” Krier said. Rhonda Richardson, a member of NAWIC and a judge at Block Kids, says one project especially impressed her. “One of the little boys had a model of the rebuilding of Haiti,” Richardson said. “He said he wanted to make that to help the people who had lost their homes.” To fill the time while the judges scored the projects, parents were given a tour of the KTC and the children were given a number of different activities, including digging for candy with remote-controlled Bobcats, watching Modern Marvels and building bridges. “I showed them West Point Bridge,” Seth O’Brien, professor in construction management and construction engineering technologies, said. “It’s a program where the goal is to build the cheapest possible bridge without dumping a truck into the river.”

Just a reminder... Andrew Dodson/Collegio

Concentrating deeply on his project, sixth-grader Kyle Steinmiller starts to build the foundation to his house during the building contest on Saturday, Jan 23. Dennis Audo, professor in construction management and construction engineering technologies, organizes the event along with the Wichita, Kan., chapter of NAWIC. “I suggested it would be a good event for Pitt State and James Otter [chair of construction management and construction engineering technologies] said, ‘Why don’t you go get it started?’” This year marks the third annual Block Kids program the organizations have put on.

The deadline for general university scholarships is Monday, Feb. 1. Although students are allowed to submit their applications after Feb. 1, late applications may miss out on scholarships that they otherwise would have been awarded. PSU awarded more than $2.86 million in scholarships last year. Students can complete their scholarship applications online. For more information or to complete your online application, go to https:// go.pittstate.edu/scholarship. app.init. Also available in case of questions is the PSU Office of Financial Assistance at 1-800-854 PITT.

Elementary MSRP SIFE gives fourth-graders economic lesson Gillian Murrell Collegio Reporter

Yellow booths decorated with balloons and streamers were sprawled around the basement of Memorial Auditorium. Fourth-graders shouted from these stands, one even holding a sign that read, “Buy U Bandana,” trying to get their peers’ attention to buy their product. More than 200 fourth-graders from five elementary schools attended Just Imagine Nation, the twoday event sponsored by Students in Free Enterprise on Monday and Tuesday, Jan. 25 and 26. Just Imagine Nation, SIFE’s biggest event of the year, is held for the fourth-graders in the Pittsburg area to learn about the marketing economy in the different regions of the United States. Li Chin, sophomore in finance and accounting, says the fun hands-on environment helped the pupils learn better. “This is a great way for them to learn the characteristics of how to market products,” Chin, SIFE member, said. “The kids are having a great time and they’re learning a lot.” Lily Watts is proof the event was a success. “I learned how to do a PowerPoint and I also learned about what crops are grown in the Western region,” Watts, a fourth-grader at Meadowlark Elementary, said. The event consisted of a mock economy where the fourth-graders not only have an opportunity to learn how to market a product, but

to also learn about the U.S. economy in general and how it works. The pupils were split into smaller groups where they were assigned a particular regional product and snack mix to market and sell. The Northeast group sold cranberry trail mix and flying discs. The West group sold raisin trail mix and bracelets. The Midwest marketed little airplanes and sunflower seed trail mix, while the Southeast region promoted bandanas and apricot trail mix. Each group developed a marketing plan, designed posters and decorated their booths to advertise their specific product. They also produced and packaged their product to represent the region they were assigned. After students were done preparing their products for sale, each group presented the products to the SIFE members for a product marketing evaluation. In addition to selling, each pupil was given $100 in play money to spend on the regional products, which cost between $40 and $60. At the end of the day, there were awards given to the group who did the best job in marketing its product. SIFE members spent a month preparing for the economic event. “The kids are very enthused and have learned a great deal about the economy,” Bev Snodgrass, a fourth-grade teacher at Meadowlark Elementary School, said. The second annual Just Imagine Nation had a better turnout than last year. “This year was the biggest one of all,” Chin said.

Hunter Peterson/Collegio

Students bag trail mix they made for a product during SIFE’s Just Imagination. Pittsburg fourth-graders set up a mock economy, creating and selling products. It was held on Jan. 25 and 26.

Twisters brings in some rockin’ honky tonk

Aaron Anders/Collegio

Over 800 people came to Twisters on Friday night, Jan. 22, to hear Jason Boland and the Stragglers perform their red dirt country/rock music including their hits “Pearl Snaps” and “Bottle by My Bed.”

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5

January 28, 2010 Editorials and columns do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Collegio as a whole.

Ad & Business Manager Amy Spigarelli Bowyer 235-4816 Editor in Chief Madison Dennis 235-4901 Adviser Gerard Attoun 235-4809

Short is the road to madness when passion and politics collide grabbed my boyfriend in the kitchen the other night and told him I needed a moment — just a moment — to get something off my chest. “Don’t judge me,” I begged. “I know that what I’m about to say is fatheaded and wrong, but I just need to get it out.” He nodded and I braced myself against the kitchen counter, making sure to distance myself from a nearby block of knives. And then I screamed. “THE CONSERVATIVES ARE RUINING IT FOR EVERYBODY!” I’d reached a breaking point that had been long coming. When I first came to college, I believed wholeheartedly that there was no such thing as “stupid people” and that the hateful rants that members of opposing political parties engaged in were sophomoric. People just needed to take time to understand each other, I thought. We just need to empathize a little more. But then I got involved in the news business and everything changed. I paid more attention to politics. I watched commentators on cable news programs. I listened to conversations around the classrooms. And eventually, not long after Obama took office, it just came to me: These conservatives are absolutely delusional. They’re like spoiled children. Heartless, fear-mongering trolls. But how could so much of this country be populated by mentally unstable minions? It didn’t make sense. There had to be more to it.

What matters most Of course, it’s clear that liberals and conservatives have sometimes dramatically different values, and that the bulk of the bickering that occurs between the two groups comes from the idea that so-and-so “doesn’t get it.” But when the thinking of the other side frustrates us, it’s not always because we find their values repugnant. Many of us, deep down, believe that we’re all working toward the same goal — liberals and conservatives alike. We want

to do right by humanity, and so when one group makes choices that seem counterintuitive or even dangerous to that shared cause, we assume the members of that faction irretrievably stupid. How could you possibly think that’s a good idea? What we don’t seem to understand is that the shared goal of doing right by the citizens of these United States takes two fundamentally different forms. In a 2008 article published by Psychology Today, Jesse Prinz summarized the work of psychologist and REBECCA researcher Jonathan BAUMAN Haidt: “For liberals, morality is pretty much Staff about harm and justice. Writer To decide whether a policy is wrong, they want to know whether any one will be hurt by it and whether it will be fair to all those affected. Conservatives care about harm and justice, too, but they also care about three things that liberals tend to ignore: purity, respect for authority, and loyalty to the ingroup.” Prinz illustrates Haidt’s ideas by pointing to gay marriage and flag burning. One might guess that most liberals would find these institutions and behaviors worthy of protection, as preventing anyone from participating in otherwise harmless activities would be civilly unjust. Conservatives, on the other hand, are far more likely to object, as the first issue demonstrates moral corruption or godlessness and the latter “desecrates” a powerful American symbol and disrespects the country for which our forefathers fought and died.

Gray areas Still, according to Prinz, the biggest difference between conservatives and liberals is held in the metaphor of national “parenting” strategies. He writes: “… for liberals, the ideal family is one that is run by a nurturing parent who forgives mistakes and wants all of her children to flourish and have new experiences. For conservatives, the ideal family is run by a parent, who emphasizes accountability and self-reliance, not self-expression.” Such thinking explains a perceived conservative “inconsistency” in the belief that abortion should be illegal but that the death

Collegio Online

readers write back On “‘Writing to Learn’ or learning to write?” 12/1/09 The writing to learn program looks as if it could be very beneficial to today’s college student. As with any skill writing must be practiced to develop proficiency. Writing daily for an intended purpose is one way to develop that skill. And doing so for public scrutiny further enhances attention to accuracy, detail, spelling and grammar. Venues that would assist the writing to learn programs exist in college. Writing newsletters and releases for various student organizations would be valuable practice. Writing letters to the editor in the college student newspaper on issues of interest promotes recognition, thought and discussion. Writing to learn moves to a higher scale when one is under daily or weekly deadline pressure to produce quality work. Work that will come under public scrutiny for accuracy. That sort of experience is available to students through their media outlets. Jeff Latz posted 1/23/10

On “Friends, family remember student Jake Price” 1/21/10 I had the remarkable pleasure of having Jake in one of my online Justice Studies courses for a short time before his bone marrow transplant. I was delighted and humbled by his talent for articulating complex ideas online. I consider myself so fortunate to have shared some conversations in cyberspace with such an incredibly brave human being. I was truly inspired by him. K. Cameron posted 1/24/10

penalty should be enforced. To academics like renowned linguist George Lakoff, this paradox is evidence that debates over such hot-button issues aren’t really about righteousness, but about a vital need for consequences and accountability. In 2003, Stanford and UC Berkeley researchers published an article in which an analysis of 22,800 people from various political backgrounds revealed that conservatives tend to have an intolerance for the mealy-mouthed nature of ambiguity, where liberals tend to embrace ambivalence and the like. From the former’s perspective, waffling over seemingly unanswerable questions and conjecture is a real waste of time when there are so many pressing, clear-cut issues to be addressed. To the latter, nothing is ever black and white, and attention to nuance, no matter how timeconsuming, is the only road to justice and understanding.

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pigheaded and myopic — they’re actually making good choices that, if left unchallenged, might well lead to their grand ideal. It’s not that conservatives are ruining everybody’s chances of living a most glorious existence; they’re just ruining my chances and the chances of like-minded liberals. And the liberal mob and I are, in turn, muddying many conservatives’ chances of getting to their Promised Land. If such is the case, we have to stop debating over the means to our perfect end, because no two groups believe in the same paradise. And we must begrudgingly recognize that many of our opponents are, indeed, thoughtful, rational individuals with whom we can carry on productive conversations … though their beliefs might forever seem at odds with their intelligence.

So where does that leave hoppin-mad, bleedin-heart, veggie-eating liberals like me? I maintain that there are a lot of wackos dispersed among the major and minor political parties and ideological groups. But I’ve also come to believe that many of the folks that I assume are wackos might indeed be exactly what I thought they were back when I was still an idealist: misunderstood. As, perhaps, am I. If we convince ourselves that all politically minded U.S. citizens are trying to get to the same place — the Best America Ever ç then, yes, we will see those who oppose our varying opinions as stupid. Because their ideas of how we can get to that land of milk and honey seem, to us, ineffective, downright irrational, perhaps even corrupted. But these detractors are not always insane. For the most part, they are merely gunning for a different kind of Utopia, and the best and brightest of them aren’t

Eric Harden, sophomore in military science

To submit a guest column, letter or story idea, contact the Collegio: e-mail psucollegio@gmail.com phone 235-4901 address 210 Whitesitt Hall

“I work at UPS so I already have to get up early. With some of this weather I’ve had to get up even earlier to scrape the snow off and warm up the truck.”

Joe Burnham, freshman in auto tech

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Aaron McKinzie, senior in psychology

“I live on a farm, so I have to get up every morning and break up the ice for the cattle, so they can have water to drink. I enjoyed the first couple days, but after awhile the ten degree weather got old.” Ryan Martin, freshman in auto tech

“I haven’t minded it at all. I kind of enjoy it. I’ve always been a fan of cold weather for no particular reason. My buddies and I plow snow for business and stuff so it actually makes us some money.”

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Has the winter weather affected your routine?

“A couple times over break I was trying to get to some places and got stuck. I had to push a friend’s truck out of the snow.”

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thisweek’squestion

John Sanell, sophomore in accounting

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“I’m a track athlete. It has stressed me out because we can’t do our workouts as well. It’s cool to run at the rec center, but it’s better when we can do it outside.”

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“I kind of just lay back and enjoy it. (When it’s bad), I just kind of hang out at the house and watch videos and stuff.” Lindsey Greve, undeclared freshman

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January 28, 2010

6

Self-defense promoted with prom show Canese Jarboe Collegio Reporter

Roger Kemp arranged for the sketch to be shown on a highway billboard and the public response was huge. In November 2004, Benjamin Appleby was arrested in Connecticut. At the time of the crime, he owned a pool Colorful lights are shining onstage and the music maintenance business in Leawood. Appleby confessed is thumping while models walk with sass and display to the crime and was found guilty of capital murder sparkling, sequined prom dresses and sharp tuxedos. and given a life sentence in Johnson Country District Whistling and cheering the models on, as many as Court. 200 fraternity “As and sororhard as my ity members, daughter students and fought for her parents filled life, if she’d the auditohad some rium. training, Among all she might of the tulle have had and feathered a chance,” boas, there is Roger Kemp a more serisaid. ous purpose For this for the show. reason, Kemp Sigma Phi also founded Epsilon and the T.A.K.E. Sigma Sigma Defense proSigma hosted gram, which the Ali Kemp offers free Foundation self-defense prom fashion classes for show and women of T.A.K.E. selfall ages. To defense class Brianna Watson, sophomore in nursing, practices punching at a date, more at Pittsburg T.A.K.E. self-defense class at the Pittsburg Memorial Auditorium than 36,000 Memorial on Jan. 23. females have Auditorium been trained on Saturday. by the T.A.K.E. Defense class. The free self-defense Ali Kemp, 19, fought for her life on June 18, 2002, class was offered following the fashion show on the at a Leawood community swimming pool where she lower level of Memorial Auditorium. worked. Although she fought bravely, Kemp was U.S. Army SFC David Brock, PSU military science beaten and strangled when her father found her in the instructor, gave the T.A.K.E. Defense class after the pump room of the swimming pool. Kemp had just fashion show. finished her first year at Kansas State University and Brock told the class that he wanted them to be carecalled it “the best year of [her] life.” Before the final parade of dresses, Roger Kemp, Ali ful and aware of their surroundings at all times. “I want to make you smart,” Brock said. Kemp’s father, stepped onstage to speak on behalf of Jean Scene provided the prom fashions, Salon 9 his daughter and the foundation. styled the models’ hair and FX Studios helped with “Every nine weeks we could fill up the twin towers photos by Natalie Rex/Collegio with murder victims in our country,” Roger Kemp said. advertising for the event. Colby Neal, sophomore in automotive technology “We want to put a stop to this senseless violence.” Logan Falletti of Frontenac poses in a prom gown supplied by the Jean Scene at and Sigma Phi Epsilon member, says the fraternity’s The foundation put a video together for audithe Ali Kemp Fashion Show held at the Pittsburg Memorial Auditorium in Pitts- ences nationwide showing excerpts of the case from involvement was well worth it. burg on Saturday, Jan. 23. Sigma Phi Epsilon and Sigma Sigma Sigma hosted “I feel that if this class could just save one life, it’s America’s Most Wanted in 2005. Upon discovering Ali both the show and a T.A.K.E. self-defense in honor of murdered Kansas State worth it,” Neal said. “I like knowing that I helped set Kemp’s body, witnesses came forth and police created University student Ali Kemp. this up.” a composite sketch of the suspect.

‘Legion’: Christian-Pop meets steroids Blame it on the Mayans. Because their calendar ends on Dec. 21, 2012, the human race will be facing at least two BROCK more years SISNEY of apocalyptic movies. Staff The last year Writer alone has brought us “Knowing,” “2012,” “The Road,” “The Book of Eli,” and now, “Legion.” Apocalyptic scholars no doubt know their way around the seven signs of the Apocalypse, whereas this reviewer knows three common signs of a bad movie: a quote from the Bible, voice-over narration and a self-contained opening action sequence within the first 10 minutes of a movie. “Legion” keeps on piling up the insults to match the on-screen corpses. Studio executives must have given director and co-writer Scott Stewart the green light to make “Legion” once they heard the pitch that archangels Gabriel and Michael will be participating in the usual, predictable apocalyptic action mayhem, giving the film a pseudo-religious undertone. The pseudo-religious material and the blood and guts sensationalism of the 21st century Hollywood action spectacular do not mesh and

leaves a bad taste in the mouth of anybody who takes spirituality or the action movie seriously. We have already covered three standards used by Stewart, and why stop at three since he adds them by the minute? I’ll name the desert setting with an ironic name like Paradise Falls, the unlikely cadre of survivors who alternately fight among themselves and against the menace right outside the door, the hard-working pregnant waitress and bearer of mankind’s last hope for survival, the resident believer and the resident nonbeliever, the dysfunctional yuppie couple and the final showdown between good and evil as obvious clichés. We know what characters will die and what characters will live, as well as what characters will give heroic speeches and what characters will face existential dramas, sometimes overlapping big dramatic moments. Stewart assembles the prerequisite dull character stereotypes. Jon Tenney, Willa Holland and Kate Walsh play the yuppie version of the standard issue dys-

functional screen family inherited from “Night of the Living Dead.” Naturally, their SUV breaks down and they’re stuck inside a hole in the wall in a no-horse town. The hole in the wall assumes the unfortunate position of being the couch on Dr. Phil or Jerry Springer, as the family yells out all their familial demons. And, we yawn. The materially blessed stereotypes do fare worse than their workingclass counterparts. Veteran character actor Charles Dutton represents the believer and Dennis Quaid speaks for the nonbeliever. You know it’s more bad news when an established movie star like Quaid plays a character named Bob Hanson. Quaid has finally been in a film worse than “Jaws 3-D,” although it would have been comforting to see a phony-looking mechanical shark crash right into this movie. Bob’s son positions himself as the protectorate of the pregnant waitress and good ‘ol Bob named his only begotten son Jeep. This is the most awkward product placement for an auto manufacturer in an apocalyptic or post-apocalyptic action movie since Kevin Costner’s “The Postman,” where Larenz Tate played a supporting character named Ford Lincoln Mercury. In a shocking plot development, Jeep works on cars. Not surprisingly, he’s not a

‘Legion,’ 2010 good auto mechanic and he’s not a good character. “Legion” plays like one extremely long cinematic echo chamber. The plot feels like a worn-out retread of a “Terminator” sequel, with the mother that will bear mankind’s last hope and the ultimate struggle between good and evil over her and her child having nothing on Linda Hamilton, Arnold Schwarzenegger and James Cameron. Rather than automated killing machines

like “T2: Judgment Day,” we get angelic killing machines in “Legion.” Michael and Gabriel are live-action Precious Moments dolls genetically crossbred with Schwarzenegger and Sylvester Stallone. I will never claim to be an expert on the Bible, yet I do not recall that Gabriel and Michael displayed action movie stud potential in any way, shape or form. Key scenes involving Michael and Gabriel recall past secu-

lar moments: Gabriel and Michael have a mid-picture conversation faintly echoing Robert De Niro and Al Pacino’s famous “timeout” scene in “Heat” and the final violent showdown between two archangels reeks of Jean-Claude Van Damme vs. Dolph Lundgren at the end of “Universal Soldier.” We quickly find out that archangels cannot transcend a generic screenplay and generic direction. They are literally brought down to Earth by this material.


p i t t s b u r g

www.psucollegio.com

s t a t e

u n i v e r s i t y

They’ve got skills: Chris York Sports Editor The PSU men’s and women’s indoor track team got off on the right foot last Friday and Saturday at the MSSU Invitational in Joplin, Mo. Two seniors, Brian Allen and Jeremy Jackson, were awarded an automatic spot in the NCAA DII indoor championships Friday and Saturday, March 12 and 13, in Albuquerque, N.M. Allen earned his spot by placing first in the shot put with a throw of 59 feet, and also received a provisional qualifying first place finish in the weight throw with a 62-02.25 foot toss. Jackson reserved his spot in Albuquerque by taking first in the 60m hurdles with a time of 7.95 seconds. On the men’s side, the Gorillas

enjoyed a good weekend, placing several team members in the top three for various events. Junior Darius Johnson won the 400m in 50.49 and also contributed to the 4x400m-relay team first-place finish with a 3:25.9 finish. Senior Tim Testa put up a 4:23.10 time in the mile, good enough to take first. Senior Jon VanGundy took second in the 800m at 2:00.28, while sophomore Anthony Garrett also finished second in the 400m with a 51.07 time. Junior Kiara Jones earned a provisional qualifying spot as he won the triple jump with a 49-5 foot jump, and freshman Colbie Snyder came out flying as he placed second in the pole vault with a 14-9 foot best. The Pitt women enjoyed success this weekend as well, as freshman

Track athletes dominate at MSSU Invitational

Jalexis Peterson earned a provisional qualifying spot as she won the triple jump with a 37-8.75 mark. The young freshmen showed their stuff as freshman Hilary Dickey won the 600m with a 1:32.95 time. Junior Rosalyn Nelson won the 60m in a 7.04-second mark and junior Jennifer Butler placed second in the 3000m with a 10:28.82. Sophomore Heidi Smith came through with 42-05.5 foot heave in the shot put, good enough to take third place. Allen was named the MIAA men’s field athlete of the week for his efforts at the MSSU invitational. The Gorillas hope to take some of that magic with them this weekend as they return to Joplin again for the Baymont Inn/Fazolis Invitational Friday and Saturday, Jan. 29 and 30.

Jim Quist/Collegio

Michelle Mitchell cleared 11' 5 3/4" in the women's pole vault on her second attempt at the MSSU Radio Shack Invitational in the Leggett and Platt Athletic Center on Saturday, Jan 23.

Back in the hunt: Jacob Faber Collegio Reporter

The Pitt State Gorillas’ losing streak was extended to two games with their 74-67 loss at the claws of Missouri Western’s Griffons. Looking at individual stats, the Gorillas did not do too poorly. Senior Nicole McCombs showed up offensively, scoring a careerhigh 22 points and defensively by pulling down six rebounds for the Gorillas. Sophomore Amanda Orloske came off the bench to score a career-high 16 points, while senior DePrice Taylor filled each column of the stat sheet scoring 12 points, pulling down five rebounds, dishing it out for three assists and snatching four steals on the night. But even with two players shooting career numbers, and Taylor’s outstanding defensive performance, the Gorillas simply could not get it done against a statistically weaker Missouri Western team. “Western played a good game,” senior guard Whitney Conerly said. “It’s hard playing in the MIAA, especially on the road, with the teams being so competitive.” The Griffons’ basket was seemingly untouched by the Gorillas for most of the first half, as they were behind in scoring for the first 10 minutes of the contest. The Griffons were led offensively by Kayla Vice, who scored a game-high 26 points, many of

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Pitt State returns to form

MIAA Women’s Basketball Standings School Overall

MIAA

Emporia St. Washburn Pittsburg St. Fort Hays St. Central Mo. NW Mo. St. MSSU Neb.-Omaha Mo. Western Truman SW Baptist

11-1 9-3 8-4 7-4 6-6 6-6 5-7 5-7 5-7 2-10 1-10

18-1 15-3 10-9 14-4 10-9 10-9 11-8 10-9 7-12 7-12 3-15

which came in an attempt by the Griffons to regain the lead before the half. But with eight minutes to go in the first half, the Gorillas went on a big 16-4 scoring run to take a four-point lead going into halftime. The Gorillas came out hot in the second half going on an eightpoint run to take an 11-point lead. As always, no lead was safe enough as Western’s Vice scored 15 of her 26 points in a fiveminute burst to make up for lost time, along with lost points for the Griffons. Midway through the half, junior Bailey Waugh tied the game up at 57-57, but the tie was as close as the Gorillas would get to victory, as both teams battled offensively. Pitt State didn’t ever regain the lead and would eventu-

ally fall to the Griffons 74-67. “We played hard and came up short, but we learned from the experience and are looking forward to the games to come,” Conerly said. The Gorillas snapped that losing streak last night against the Bulldogs of Truman State. The ladies came out firing from all cylinders to jump out to an early lead in the first half. Scoring for the Gorillas came from Maya Onikute, who went on a tear in the second half scoring five treys in a row and finished with 20 points on the night. Orloske’s three-point shooting contributed 14 points and Nicole McCombs followed with an impressive 11 points from inside the paint. The Gorillas’ non-stop intense play led to a big lead late in the second

Jim Quist/Collegio

Pitt State’s DePrice Taylor and Truman State’s Becka McHenry scramble for a loose ball, which is recovered by Taylor. The Gorillas beat the Bulldogs 83-63 in the John Lance Arena on Wednesday, Jan 27. half, giving them a chance to rest their starters. The Gorillas came out on top winning by 20 points

with the final score being 83-63. The Gorillas will be in action this Saturday, Jan. 30, in War-

Gorillas in the cellar Jacob Faber Collegio Reporter

Jim Quist/Collegio

Rodney Grace, senior forward, goes up for a jump shot against Truman State University in the second half. The Gorillas lost to Truman State 62-58 in John Lance Area on Wednesday, Jan. 27.

Last Saturday, the Pitt State men’s basketball team was in action against the Missouri Western Griffons. Although senior Spencer Magana stepped up offensively, the Gorillas continued to struggle as they lost a hard-fought contest to the Griffons 69-62. Magana finally broke out of his small scoring slump to scorch the net for 24 points against Western, with 21 of his points coming in a hard-fought first half. “It felt good to get my offense going again,” Magana said. “I needed to keep it going into the second half, but I just cooled off coming in out of halftime.” Senior Rodney Grace, who contributed 13 points in the contest, followed Magana. Freshman guard JaVon McGee was a familiar face in the stat column, pulling down a team-high of eight rebounds. McGee, who has been an offensive presence all year for the Gorillas, says getting playing time as a freshman is special for him. “I feel blessed and lucky,” McGee said. “Just in the right place at the right time, I guess.” Not only has McGee been seeing considerable playing time as a freshman, he’s also been putting up impressive numbers. “I think playing within my

bounds and knowing my role are other reasons that I’ve been seeing a lot of playing time,” McGee said. The Gorillas looked to be in trouble early in the first half as the Griffons started the game by going on a 9-0 scoring run. The early deficit proved to be troublesome for the Gorillas as they shot only 43 percent from the field, compared to 61 percent for the Griffons in the first half. The close score at halftime was because of the offensive performance of Magana, and the key rebounding of McGee. “We just couldn’t get our shots to fall in the first half,” McGee said. “[Magana’s] 21 points showed how much he was carrying the team.” The second half proved to be more of a defensive struggle as the Griffons held Magana to only three points, while the Gorillas shutdown defense brought the score to 50-41 in favor of the Griffons midway through the half. The two teams exchanged baskets, and Andy Smith hit a key shot from behind the arch to cut the Gorillas’ deficit to four within the final 30 seconds of the game. Fouls would prove to be the Achilles’ heel for the Gorillas as Missouri Western hit their shots and came out on top, 69-62. The loss put the Gorillas’ conference record at 1-10 for the season, leaving a lot of room for improvement, but somewhat diminishing any hopes of a shot at the MIAA tournament this year.

The message from Magana was simple, but strong, for the rest of Pitt State’s conference play. “Win games. Everything seems to turn around for a program when they can get some wins,” Magana said. “And that’s what we’re looking to do in the second half of the conference season.” The Gorillas’ losing streak continued against the Truman State Bulldogs last night, as they looked to move out of last place in the conference with a 1-10 MIAA record. The first half started off slowly, but picked up offensively for the Gorillas when senior guard Rodney Grace started picking up some key points in the paint. The Gorillas did a good job of shutting down the big presence of Vesko Filchev, the 6-10” Bulgarian sensation for the Bulldogs, holding him to only six points in the first half. Good defense allowed the Gorillas to enter the locker rooms leading by a score of 31-22 at the half. Although the Gorillas were ahead at the half, the lead quickly slipped away as Magana, who was held scoreless in the first half, caught fire, but a little too late. The Gorillas tried to foul Filchev in the closing seconds, who extended the lead to 4, giving the Bulldogs the lead, along with the win 62-58. The Gorillas look to end their losing skid at 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 30, when they travel to Warrensburg, Mo., to take on Central Missouri.

rensburg, Mo., where they will be taking on the Jennies of Central Missouri.

Kan. HS basketball coach to get tickets, after all OLATHE, Kan. (AP) A Kansas girls’ high school basketball coach whose blindfolded half-court shot became an Internet sensation will be going to the Final Four after all. Joel Branstrom can’t disclose where the tickets are coming from. But he said Wednesday he’s been told he and his family will get tickets, lodging and transportation to Indianapolis for the NCAA men’s basketball semifinal and final games in April. Branstrom, a former University of Kansas walk-on, went along with what was supposed to be a prank last week during a pep rally at Olathe Northwest High School, where he also teaches biology. Students who set up the prank and promised the basketball tickets were shocked when he made the blindfolded shot, especially since they didn’t have any tickets. Branstrom says the donor of the trip will be revealed soon.

CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK


2B

January 28, 2010

pittstatebriefs Gift funds technology scholarships PSU announced the receipt of $87,000 from the estate of E. Neural R. Reagan to be used for scholarships for students in plastics engineering technology. For more information about endowed scholarships and gifts, call the Office of University Development at 235-4768.

PSU office supply store closing The office supply store located in the Physical Plant will be closed as of Monday, Feb. 1. No orders will be accepted after Friday, Jan. 29. For more information, contact the storeroom (4780) or the purchasing office (4167).

Choir hosts Valentine’s Day dinner The musical dinner, sponsored by the PSU Choirs, will take place on Sunday, Feb. 14. Tickets are $27. Cost includes both the dinner and the performance. Reservations must be made in advance. For more information on the tickets, call Susan Marchant at 235-4476 or e-mail smarchan@pittstate.edu.

Kansas Corps Kansas Corps volunteers and the Kansas State Historical Society will assist with Kansas Day celebrations in Topeka on Friday, Jan. 29. Kansas Corps’

purpose is to unite student volunteers from Kansas colleges and universities to serve the public service needs of the state of Kansas. Kansas Corps welcomes the input of the community. For more information, email Leah Noakes at Kansascorps@fhsu. edu or call 785-628-4668.

cost is $3,000 to $3,200 per person, which includes airfare, rail pass, ground transportation, hotels, travel insurance, entrance fees and one meal per day. For more information, e-mail Susan Nakao at snakao@pittstate.edu or call 859-4962001.

SIFE value cards

Dishing divas and dudes Presented by Cindy Price, Dishing Divas and Dudes is having a romantic dish night for the month of February from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 2, in the Homer Cole building 3003 N. Joplin. A $5 building fee is required along with the recipe that goes with your dish. For more information, contact Sarah Prince at sarahprince80@yahoo.com.

College Bowl College Bowl will take place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 20, in the student center. Teams of students will be competing against each other for cash prizes. To participate, just for fun, or for more information, e-mail David Adams at dadams@pittstate.edu.

SIFE will be selling its value cards now through Friday, Feb. 19. Cards cost $5, but are worth more than $100 in savings. Value cards can be used for Taco Bell, Papa John’s, Hardee’s, Wheat State, Subway and more. To purchase a card, contact any SIFE member, stop by 102 Kelce or call 235-4599. Card payments can be made with cash or checks payable to ‘PSU SIFE.’

Baroque concert The PSU Baroque Chamber Ensemble will perform at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 30, in the McCray Hall lobby. The repertoire for the concert includes both solo harpsichord literature and chamber pieces that the performers have been studying over the past semester. The concert is free and open to the public.

Trip to Japan

Karaoke night

PSU faculty from all academic disciplines are invited to join Susan Nakao for an eight-day trip during Spring Break. Faculty will visit ancient and contemporary shrines, as well as temples, museums and other sites of interest. Estimated

The first karaoke night of the semester will be 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 28, in the U-Club. Gorillas in Your Midst, sponsor of the event, will give away T-shirts, Wheat State Pizza and Wal-Mart gift cards. Refreshments are provided. For more information, call J.T.

Knoll at 235-4062.

Lori VanDyne, Jon Fargo, Andrew Molgren and Michael Gillis; junior Derek Jackson; and sophomore Derek Morgan.

Yoga time Yoga for Balance and Stress Relief will be at 5 p.m. on Monday and Wednesday, Feb. 1 and 3, in the Kansas West room of the Overman Student Center. Because of space limitations, participation is on a first-come, firstserve basis. For more information, call J.T. Knoll at 235-4062.

Construction team sets record A team of construction management students at Pittsburg State University has returned from this year’s International Builders Show with record-setting honors. Six students in the Department of Construction Management and Construction Engineering Technologies competed Jan. 18 at the IBS’s Residential Construction Management Competition in Las Vegas, in which 39 schools competed.  The team’s task was to analyze the demographics of a real city and develop a construction plan to fit that community. The team submitted a 150-page business plan, which they presented and defended at the competition alongside top Division 1 teams. The team, coached by construction management instructor Justin Honey, took home Rookie of the Year honors as well as third-place overall, becoming the competition’s first rookie to place that high. The PSU team consisted of seniors

NCAA honors celebration PSU fans will be able to see former student-athlete Venessa Lee accept her Top VIII Award at the NCAA Honors Celebration on television on Monday, Feb. 15. The hour-long show will air at 1 p.m. (CST) on ESPN2.

Did Heidi Montag look better before her plastic surgeries? Remember to visit psucollegio.com to cast your vote.

Recession could raise bar for higher education Madison Dennis Collegio Editor-in-Chief There’s a silver lining to every cloud, and Pitt State is discovering the good that comes along with a bad economy. An increasing number of students are choosing to continue on to grad school in order to become more competitive in the job market, and for Pitt State, that could be a good thing. “At one time, that bachelor’s degree was all you needed, but now the master’s degree is becoming more the norm,” B.B. Stotts, director of continuing and graduate studies, said. Recent surveys by the Survey of Graduate Enrollment and Degrees show a marked increase in applications for and enrollments

in graduate studies. This could be due to a more competitive job market. Recently graduated students are discovering that they are now not only competing with their peers for jobs, but also competing with older workers with more familiarity in their field of study. Layoffs and budget cuts means young job seekers are up against more experienced applicants. What will give them the edge they need to stand out from the crowd? Higher education. “We did see an influx of applications the last two weeks of school in December right up until class started,” Stotts said. “I think what a lot of students do is say, ‘OK, I’ll look for a job up until this date, and grad school is always an option. If I don’t

get a job by then, I’ll go to grad school.’ Nationally, enrollment in grad school has increased by an average of 4.8 percent the last two years, compared to an average of 3.6 percent in the last decade. “Pitt State has had a steady growth of grad students for a number of years,” Stotts said. “Enrollment has been rising since 2006, and we’ve maintained that steady growth.” Another recent trend that may be due to a rockier job market is the increase of domestic students vs. international students getting their master’s degree. Since 2004, enrollment has grown more rapidly among international students than U.S. students, a trend that has been in place since 1998. However, in 2008, enrollment

for U.S. students grew by 4.7 percent, whereas international students’ enrollment grew by 3.3 precent. “I think on all levels of education, no matter if it is technical school, a bachelor’s degree or graduate degree, because of the outplacement of jobs, people know they have to have the skills, so they come back to school, on all levels,” Stotts said. Students appear to be enrolling in grad school immediately after getting their bachelor’s or braving the job market for only a year or two before coming back to school. “We did a study of demographics and age groups, of our grad students, and a lot of them are within the 23-28 range. There are very young professionals … over

50 percent of our students fell within that age range,” Stotts said. This presents a catch-22 for many aspiring grad students. Because the economy is slow, the job market is tougher to break into. However, in order to go back to school to get a leg up on this market, students need jobs, which are not readily available due to the slow economy. “I do think in the long run, it will pay off,” Stotts said. Unfortunately, the long run is not immediately helpful for students with large loans. Although getting a master’s degree does make a student more desirable to hire, they often start at lowerpaying jobs than expected due to their inexperience. “They do have kind of a misconception in the beginning of,

‘Oh, I have this MBA degree, no work experience, but an MBA degree, and I’m automatically going to be worth more money,’” Stotts said. “Initally, you’re not. You’re competing with the undergraduate degrees and this experience level. But then, once you have that experience under your belt, and the time comes for promotion or there are opportunities for advancement, because you have that master’s degree, you’re going to forge ahead.” There is some speculation that the economic downturn could incite a permanent change across America – raising the standards for higher education. “I do think we were already in that trend, we were already headed that direction,” Stotts said. “And this just really fuels that.”

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January 28, 2010

Blowin’ up

Artist’s inflatable work on display in Porter Hall Mandy Toepfer Copy Editor Students, instructors and kids gathered around the back entrance of Porter Hall, anxious to see what Jimmy Kuehnle was going to do with the brightly colored slick material on the ground. Kuehnle took fans and blew air into the material. After it was blown up, he put on the inflatable suit made of neon pink, orange and purple lightweight nylon over his head. Now it’s time to show the campus his artwork. More than 50 students and onlookers followed the walking inflatable sculpture around campus, including the Oval, watching as he spun around like a tornado, ran into trees and tried to fit his oversized suit through doorways last Thursday. His work of art, entitled “You Wear What I Wear,” looked like a distorted molecule. The main part of the suit consisted of two large pink rectangles with a thin layer of purple between them that had more than 50 bright orange inflatable cylinders attached. Pink and purple inflatable squares were attached to the cylinders, resembling the many legs of a centipede. The artwork’s bright colors were more reminiscent of summer, and added a pop of color to the dreary, cold and misty winter day. Rachel Hegarty followed Kuehnle around for 30 minutes and says she enjoyed other students’ reactions. “I like that he ran into doors and scared people and people ran away from him,” Hegarty, freshman in elementary education, said. Students did more than run away from the unusual sight. One pulled out a camera phone. Another tried to body-slam him. While others couldn’t help but talk about it: “This is too amusing to leave” and, “Someone may think he’s a stupid student and attack.” He walks on and passes the dining hall, leaving students rushing to the window to see what’s going on. Hegarty says these reactions are probably Kuehnle’s goal.

“I think that was part of the artwork, how people react to it,” she said. After wandering the campus grounds, Kuehnle headed downtown to see what reactions he would get there. He says he jaywalked in front of the sheriff and the sheriff did nothing. But, he says he’s gotten reactions before from law enforcement when he’s walked around in his inflatable suit. “It’s so absurd that they don’t have a numbered code for that,” Kuehnle said. “And before they can think it’s a bad idea, the serve-and-protect part of their job comes in and they’re helping me out.” Later, after his public performance, Kuehnle, pronounced “keenly,” gave a lecture to a crowd of students, with every chair taken in Room 316 Hughes Hall. Originally from St. Louis, Mo., Kuehnle completed his bachelor of fine arts in sculpture at Truman State University in 2001 and his master’s in sculpture, video and performance from the University of Texas at San Antonio in 2006. Since then, he’s traveled around the world, including places such as Japan and Finland. His artwork is eclectic, complementing his quirky personality. In addition to his inflatable sculptures, he has created volcanoes that spew nacho cheese, bikes that look like words, such as “ART,” and a video sculpture where the viewing individual sits on a chair made of televisions that play an image. To come up with project ideas, Kuehnle says one doesn’t have to look to famous artists. Inspiration is all around. “… You’re influenced by everything. You’re influenced by the trash on the ground, the McDonald’s sandwich you eat. You know, the argument with your friends, you know, a movie you saw. You know, everything influences you,” he said. After seeing pictures of Kuehnle’s artwork at the lecture, Candy Hill, sophomore in art education, says she learned a lesson from the presentation. “If I would take anything it would

Aaron Anders/Collegio

Jimmy Kuehnle in his “inflatable suit” keeps students wondering what is going on as they walk by the artist on Thursday, Jan. 21. Kuehnle’s inflatable art is on display in Porter Hall through Feb. 26. be moving on to new things, not just be stuck in my ways artistically and to explore new things, because I’m sure that when he started out with the bike, I’m sure he didn’t see himself sewing together these giant sculptures,” she said. Kuehnle’s exhibit “Things Bigger Than People” will be on display in the University and Harry Krug Gallery until

Friday, Feb. 26. The showcase includes his inflatable art sculptures “Air to Air Communication” and “Stuffed Full.” Neither inflatable can be overlooked. “Air to Air Communication” consists of five large yellow inflatable rectangles that have an inflatable cylinder connecting them, end to end. The other inflatable, “Stuffed Full,” resembles hot tamales. The art has more than 20 elon-

gated red inflatable cylinders overflowing out of a room. S. Portico Bowman, associate professor in the art department, says Kuehnle’s work won’t be soon forgotten. “If another exhibit might have a piece that really impacted you, then you might remember it for a long time. I think those of us who were here for it will always remember (the exhibit).”

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January 28, 2010

Senate approves cuts to Kansas budget TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Senators approved a bill Wednesday amending the current Kansas budget, ratifying cuts and transfers from government programs made by Gov. Mark Parkinson. The 36-4 vote Wednesday sends the bill to the House, where legislators are working on a similar measure. Senators said the bill represented the Democrat Parkinson’s “heavy lifting” and it was now their turn to make choices. Among them is next year’s budget, which already has a projected gap of $400 million between revenues and expenditures. Sen. John Vratil said there would be more pain to come for agencies as legislators continued the 2010 session, but the vote was the first chance to do what they told voters was needed to balance

the budget. “It’s sort of put up or shut up time in their minds,” said Vratil, a Leawood Republican. Passage came after a protracted debate on Sen. Jeff Colyer’s amendment to restore $22 million for Medicaid reimbursements through June 30. The cut amounts to a 10 percent reduction in the rate paid to health care providers. Colyer, an Overland Park Republican and physician, said the cut would have a detrimental effect statewide, putting strain on the health care system and nursing homes. His proposal failed, 24-16. “We do not have pleasant choices, but this is the worst possible choice,” Colyer said. He and others said it was wrong to hurt providers and shun some $60 mil-

lion in federal matching funds that could help stimulate the Kansas economy. But Sen. Susan Wagle, a Wichita Republican, said legislators would be hypocritical to try to restore cuts after promising Kansans they would make do with less. The bill includes reducing transfers in funds for highway maintenance and cutting the postage for legislators to send mailings to constituents. Despite approval of the budget bill, Parkinson was dealt a setback when the House Taxation Committee rejected his proposal to increase the sales tax rate. Parkinson wants to raise the rate to 6.3 percent from 5.3 percent. But the Republican-dominated Taxation Committee voted Wednesday to recommend the bill not be passed. The

move was not unexpected and kills the proposal contained in the bill. Democrats on the panel objected to the move, saying no options should be removed from consideration this early in the session, which began Jan. 11. Rep. Julie Menghini of Pittsburg said to kill the proposal now was “at best premature, at worst irresponsible” when legislators don’t know just how much new revenue will be needed for the 2011 budget. Rep. Richard Carlson, a St. Mary’s Republican and committee chairman, says other tax proposals will be considered as they are brought forward. “The opportunities are not lost at this time,” Carlson said. Beth Martino, the governor’s spokes-

Man accused of shooting abortion doctor to testify

Racial threat puts Ohio college on alert NELSONVILLE, Ohio (AP) — An attacker could find many places to hide at Hocking College, a campus carved into a forest in the Appalachian foothills. And with the threat of a mass killing looming over black students at the community college, Allen Edwards is steering clear of the trees. “I don’t feel too safe walking by the woods,” said Edwards, a 19-year-old black student from Canton. “There’s woods everywhere. And somebody could be out in them, and I don’t know.” The FBI is investigating a threat scrawled last week on a bathroom wall warning that black students would be killed Feb. 2. It bore the trademarks of just another casual — though chilling — threat of violence on a college campus, but students here aren’t taking any chances. At least two black students have withdrawn permanently from school out of fear for their safety, and another dozen have moved out of the dorm where the threat was found, officials at the two-year technical college said. Some students seem unperturbed, but others say the threat has brought simmering racial tensions to the surface. The school confirmed that the threat said black students would be killed Feb. 2. At least one subsequent note reading “kill the n------” was reported. Hocking covers hundreds of densely treed acres in the Wayne National Forest about 60 miles southeast of Columbus. The campus overwhelms Nelsonville, an economically depressed rural town plagued with heroin addiction and unemployment. About 400 of the school’s 6,300 students are black, many of whom are foreign exchange students from the Caribbean. The college has provided temporary housing for students who are too scared to stay in Hocking Heights, the dorm where the threats were found. And for those wary of venturing outside until after Feb. 2, teachers are making allowances for missed classwork. Since the first threat was discovered Friday, the school has installed more security cameras in dorms and beefed up foot patrols. A $5,000 reward is being offered, and extra counselors are on hand. Campus spokeswoman Judy Sinnott said that she had not heard previous complaints of racist taunting, but that on a small campus, anything can happen. “Any time that there are young people, you know, there’s going to be tension,” Sinnott said. “Young people will be young people.”

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woman, said it still was early in the session and Parkinson was eager to hear legislators’ plans for generating new revenue. “The governor proposed the sales tax as one possible option for solving this budget crisis. As he said in his budget proposal, we can’t cut our way out of this so we must find revenue somewhere,” Martino said. Parkinson argues there is little left to trim spending, and that without new revenue more cuts would be needed in education, corrections and social services. The state expects to spend $651 million less in general tax revenues in its current budget than it did two years ago, a drop of nearly 11 percent.

AP/Collegio

A campus safety officer patrols outside of Hocking Heights residence hall at Hocking College on Wednesday, Jan. 27, in Nelsonville, Ohio. Two black students have withdrawn from the Ohio technical college and several others plan to miss class after a message scrawled in a dormitory bathroom made a racial threat. Edwards lives on the second floor of Hocking Heights, a few doors down from the two black students who abruptly quit. He’s contemplating leaving, too, but hasn’t decided. Edwards said he has seen racist comments written on the same bathroom wall in the past but didn’t let it bother him. But two days after the first threat was found, he saw the second on the bathroom wall and reported it to campus police. “I’m not sure how to feel,” he said. “I’m just going to see how everything plays out.” Another resident of the second floor, Amelinda Marengo, sat on her bed and said that even though the threat doesn’t include her, she is still afraid. Marengo, who is half Puerto Rican, said she and her black roommate endured racist taunts in the cafeteria on several occasions last year. Her roommate declined to be interviewed. “We’d be sitting at a lunch table and some guys would be sitting across the room, and they’d be screaming, like, ‘n----- lover’ across the table,” Marengo said. “I had enough of it one day and I got up and I just started yelling at them and telling them, like, ‘There is no reason for you to treat someone like that.’”

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Defense attorneys have “a formidable and daunting task” ahead if the man who has confessed to killing a Kansas abortion provider is hoping for a chance at a lesser sentence by arguing he sincerely believed his actions were necessary to save unborn children, a judge said Wednesday. Scott Roeder will take the witness stand to testify on his own behalf, attorney Steve Osburn told The Associated Press in the wake of a heated hearing about which defense evidence jurors will be allowed to hear. Osburn said the defense expects to present its case in a single day Thursday. Roeder, 51, is charged with premeditated, first-degree murder in the May 31 shooting of Dr. George Tiller, one of the nation’s few late-term abortion providers. The Kansas City, Mo., man also was charged with two counts of aggravated assault for allegedly using a gun to threaten two ushers who tried to stop him after the shooting. Attorney Mark Rudy confirmed to the court for the first time Wednesday that the defense would build a case based on the lesser charge of voluntary manslaughter — defined in Kansas as “an unreasonable but honest belief that circumstances existed that justified deadly force.” A voluntary manslaughter conviction for someone with little criminal history carries a sentence of about five years, compared to the life sentence Roeder faces if convicted of first-degree murder. “I didn’t enact the voluntary manslaughter statute — the Legislature did,” District Judge Warren Wilbert said.

But Wilbert reminded attorneys they must couple a voluntary manslaughter defense with a showing of imminent danger posed by the doctor. Wilbert will rule at the end of the defense’s case whether there is sufficient evidence to instruct jurors that they can consider the lesser charge. Roeder will be allowed to testify about his personally held beliefs, the judge said, not about medical procedures of which he has no knowledge or expertise. “He is not going to be able to get up there and just blurb out what he wants to say,” Wilbert said. Also Wednesday, Wilbert threw out a subpoena defense attorneys had issued to Kansas Deputy Attorney General Barry Disney, the lead prosecutor in a case that brought 19 misdemeanor charges alleging Tiller failed to obtain a second opinion for lateterm abortions from an independent physician, as required by Kansas law. Tiller was acquitted just two months before his death IN a trial Roeder said he attended. Rudy had argued Disney’s testimony was a necessary “building block” in the defense case to show Roeder went to the trial and relied on Disney’s belief that Tiller was breaking the law. “The state does not believe any of this mishmash is relevant ... to this case,” District Attorney Nola Foulston countered. “This is the kind of psychotic, circuitous kind of logic we are dealing with.” The judge told the defense they could put their client on the stand to make the same point. “Scott Roeder can testify ‘til the cows come home about the (Tiller) trial,” Wilbert said.

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They’ve got skills: Chris York Sports Editor The PSU men’s and women’s indoor track team got off on the right foot last Friday and Saturday at the MSSU Invitational in Joplin, Mo. Two seniors, Brian Allen and Jeremy Jackson, were awarded an automatic spot in the NCAA DII indoor championships Friday and Saturday, March 12 and 13, in Albuquerque, N.M. Allen earned his spot by placing first in the shot put with a throw of 59 feet, and also received a provisional qualifying first place finish in the weight throw with a 62-02.25 foot toss. Jackson reserved his spot in Albuquerque by taking first in the 60m hurdles with a time of 7.95 seconds. On the men’s side, the Gorillas

enjoyed a good weekend, placing several team members in the top three for various events. Junior Darius Johnson won the 400m in 50.49 and also contributed to the 4x400m-relay team first-place finish with a 3:25.9 finish. Senior Tim Testa put up a 4:23.10 time in the mile, good enough to take first. Senior Jon VanGundy took second in the 800m at 2:00.28, while sophomore Anthony Garrett also finished second in the 400m with a 51.07 time. Junior Kiara Jones earned a provisional qualifying spot as he won the triple jump with a 49-5 foot jump, and freshman Colbie Snyder came out flying as he placed second in the pole vault with a 14-9 foot best. The Pitt women enjoyed success this weekend as well, as freshman

Track athletes dominate at MSSU Invitational

Jalexis Peterson earned a provisional qualifying spot as she won the triple jump with a 37-8.75 mark. The young freshmen showed their stuff as freshman Hilary Dickey won the 600m with a 1:32.95 time. Junior Rosalyn Nelson won the 60m in a 7.04-second mark and junior Jennifer Butler placed second in the 3000m with a 10:28.82. Sophomore Heidi Smith came through with 42-05.5 foot heave in the shot put, good enough to take third place. Allen was named the MIAA men’s field athlete of the week for his efforts at the MSSU invitational. The Gorillas hope to take some of that magic with them this weekend as they return to Joplin again for the Baymont Inn/Fazolis Invitational Friday and Saturday, Jan. 29 and 30.

Jim Quist/Collegio

Michelle Mitchell cleared 11' 5 3/4" in the women's pole vault on her second attempt at the MSSU Radio Shack Invitational in the Leggett and Platt Athletic Center on Saturday, Jan 23.

Back in the hunt: Jacob Faber Collegio Reporter

The Pitt State Gorillas’ losing streak was extended to two games with their 74-67 loss at the claws of Missouri Western’s Griffons. Looking at individual stats, the Gorillas did not do too poorly. Senior Nicole McCombs showed up offensively, scoring a careerhigh 22 points and defensively by pulling down six rebounds for the Gorillas. Sophomore Amanda Orloske came off the bench to score a career-high 16 points, while senior DePrice Taylor filled each column of the stat sheet scoring 12 points, pulling down five rebounds, dishing it out for three assists and snatching four steals on the night. But even with two players shooting career numbers, and Taylor’s outstanding defensive performance, the Gorillas simply could not get it done against a statistically weaker Missouri Western team. “Western played a good game,” senior guard Whitney Conerly said. “It’s hard playing in the MIAA, especially on the road, with the teams being so competitive.” The Griffons’ basket was seemingly untouched by the Gorillas for most of the first half, as they were behind in scoring for the first 10 minutes of the contest. The Griffons were led offensively by Kayla Vice, who scored a game-high 26 points, many of

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Pitt State returns to form

MIAA Women’s Basketball Standings School Overall

MIAA

Emporia St. Washburn Pittsburg St. Fort Hays St. Central Mo. NW Mo. St. MSSU Neb.-Omaha Mo. Western Truman SW Baptist

11-1 9-3 8-4 7-4 6-6 6-6 5-7 5-7 5-7 2-10 1-10

18-1 15-3 10-9 14-4 10-9 10-9 11-8 10-9 7-12 7-12 3-15

which came in an attempt by the Griffons to regain the lead before the half. But with eight minutes to go in the first half, the Gorillas went on a big 16-4 scoring run to take a four-point lead going into halftime. The Gorillas came out hot in the second half going on an eightpoint run to take an 11-point lead. As always, no lead was safe enough as Western’s Vice scored 15 of her 26 points in a fiveminute burst to make up for lost time, along with lost points for the Griffons. Midway through the half, junior Bailey Waugh tied the game up at 57-57, but the tie was as close as the Gorillas would get to victory, as both teams battled offensively. Pitt State didn’t ever regain the lead and would eventu-

ally fall to the Griffons 74-67. “We played hard and came up short, but we learned from the experience and are looking forward to the games to come,” Conerly said. The Gorillas snapped that losing streak last night against the Bulldogs of Truman State. The ladies came out firing from all cylinders to jump out to an early lead in the first half. Scoring for the Gorillas came from Maya Onikute, who went on a tear in the second half scoring five treys in a row and finished with 20 points on the night. Orloske’s three-point shooting contributed 14 points and Nicole McCombs followed with an impressive 11 points from inside the paint. The Gorillas’ non-stop intense play led to a big lead late in the second

Jim Quist/Collegio

Pitt State’s DePrice Taylor and Truman State’s Becka McHenry scramble for a loose ball, which is recovered by Taylor. The Gorillas beat the Bulldogs 83-63 in the John Lance Arena on Wednesday, Jan 27. half, giving them a chance to rest their starters. The Gorillas came out on top winning by 20 points

with the final score being 83-63. The Gorillas will be in action this Saturday, Jan. 30, in War-

Gorillas in the cellar Jacob Faber Collegio Reporter

Jim Quist/Collegio

Rodney Grace, senior forward, goes up for a jump shot against Truman State University in the second half. The Gorillas lost to Truman State 62-58 in John Lance Area on Wednesday, Jan. 27.

Last Saturday, the Pitt State men’s basketball team was in action against the Missouri Western Griffons. Although senior Spencer Magana stepped up offensively, the Gorillas continued to struggle as they lost a hard-fought contest to the Griffons 69-62. Magana finally broke out of his small scoring slump to scorch the net for 24 points against Western, with 21 of his points coming in a hard-fought first half. “It felt good to get my offense going again,” Magana said. “I needed to keep it going into the second half, but I just cooled off coming in out of halftime.” Senior Rodney Grace, who contributed 13 points in the contest, followed Magana. Freshman guard JaVon McGee was a familiar face in the stat column, pulling down a team-high of eight rebounds. McGee, who has been an offensive presence all year for the Gorillas, says getting playing time as a freshman is special for him. “I feel blessed and lucky,” McGee said. “Just in the right place at the right time, I guess.” Not only has McGee been seeing considerable playing time as a freshman, he’s also been putting up impressive numbers. “I think playing within my

bounds and knowing my role are other reasons that I’ve been seeing a lot of playing time,” McGee said. The Gorillas looked to be in trouble early in the first half as the Griffons started the game by going on a 9-0 scoring run. The early deficit proved to be troublesome for the Gorillas as they shot only 43 percent from the field, compared to 61 percent for the Griffons in the first half. The close score at halftime was because of the offensive performance of Magana, and the key rebounding of McGee. “We just couldn’t get our shots to fall in the first half,” McGee said. “[Magana’s] 21 points showed how much he was carrying the team.” The second half proved to be more of a defensive struggle as the Griffons held Magana to only three points, while the Gorillas shutdown defense brought the score to 50-41 in favor of the Griffons midway through the half. The two teams exchanged baskets, and Andy Smith hit a key shot from behind the arch to cut the Gorillas’ deficit to four within the final 30 seconds of the game. Fouls would prove to be the Achilles’ heel for the Gorillas as Missouri Western hit their shots and came out on top, 69-62. The loss put the Gorillas’ conference record at 1-10 for the season, leaving a lot of room for improvement, but somewhat diminishing any hopes of a shot at the MIAA tournament this year.

The message from Magana was simple, but strong, for the rest of Pitt State’s conference play. “Win games. Everything seems to turn around for a program when they can get some wins,” Magana said. “And that’s what we’re looking to do in the second half of the conference season.” The Gorillas’ losing streak continued against the Truman State Bulldogs last night, as they looked to move out of last place in the conference with a 1-10 MIAA record. The first half started off slowly, but picked up offensively for the Gorillas when senior guard Rodney Grace started picking up some key points in the paint. The Gorillas did a good job of shutting down the big presence of Vesko Filchev, the 6-10” Bulgarian sensation for the Bulldogs, holding him to only six points in the first half. Good defense allowed the Gorillas to enter the locker rooms leading by a score of 31-22 at the half. Although the Gorillas were ahead at the half, the lead quickly slipped away as Magana, who was held scoreless in the first half, caught fire, but a little too late. The Gorillas tried to foul Filchev in the closing seconds, who extended the lead to 4, giving the Bulldogs the lead, along with the win 62-58. The Gorillas look to end their losing skid at 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 30, when they travel to Warrensburg, Mo., to take on Central Missouri.

rensburg, Mo., where they will be taking on the Jennies of Central Missouri.

Kan. HS basketball coach to get tickets, after all OLATHE, Kan. (AP) A Kansas girls’ high school basketball coach whose blindfolded half-court shot became an Internet sensation will be going to the Final Four after all. Joel Branstrom can’t disclose where the tickets are coming from. But he said Wednesday he’s been told he and his family will get tickets, lodging and transportation to Indianapolis for the NCAA men’s basketball semifinal and final games in April. Branstrom, a former University of Kansas walk-on, went along with what was supposed to be a prank last week during a pep rally at Olathe Northwest High School, where he also teaches biology. Students who set up the prank and promised the basketball tickets were shocked when he made the blindfolded shot, especially since they didn’t have any tickets. Branstrom says the donor of the trip will be revealed soon.

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January 28, 2010

SGA asks for support from Chamber of Commerce Larry Fleury Collegio Reporter The Student Government Association requested support from the Pittsburg Chamber of Commerce to help promote funding for higher education in the state of Kansas during its meeting Wednesday night. President Andrea Cole submitted the three-page resolution, the most in-depth resolution that has been presented in recent time, to the student Senate and said that the resolution was given to SGA from the Student Activities Council during Cole’s time in Topeka at the Kansas Board of Regents. “SAC approved a statement saying that we (regent universities) will all come together and try to approve this resolution, which will go to the Chamber of Commerce,” Cole said. “It’s basically asking them to stand behind everyone in higher education and not cutting higher education (funding) anymore.” Cole said the source for the funding is unknown, but suggested some possibilities. “Whether that (money) comes from an increase in taxes or taxing things that aren’t currently taxed, such as laundromats,” Cole said. “We’re not for sure how that money is going to be made up. Basically what they told us is that it’s not our decision, but the legislator’s decision. If this passes the (Senate) body, this will go to the Chamber of Commerce. The same thing is happening with the other regent universities.” Part of the resolution says, “State University funding has declined from $7,779 per full-time equivalent student in 1988 to $6,256 per full-time equivalent student in 2008, a 20 percent decline.”

Vice President Sam Heady asked Cole if SGA was asking the Chamber of Commerce as a whole or specific businesses that belong to the Chamber. Cole says the idea will be presented to the Chamber, and if the resolution passes, it will be encouraged throughout the community. “We will go to the Chamber board, that’s who we will present this to,” Cole said.” “The theory behind this is that not only will it appear to people in higher education, but the business community, which is a big body. The president is working with the alumni association. I believe it’s trying to go through Faculty Senate and Classified Senate as well.” During SGA’s Jan. 20 meeting, treasurer Eric Jones said the Black Student Association appealed the allocations that were allotted to them. SGA allocated $33,111.94 to campus organizations last semester to fund activities for each group. The Black Student Association received $649.42, but Jones said there is no official appeal policy as of yet, but that’s about to change. “Basically, I’m going to formalize it,” Jones said. “With the appeal process right now, (organizations) just have to let me know, and from there, I get a hold of the adviser, David Adams, and we do interviews.” Jones said the appeal process would be completely different from appeals in the past. “What I’m going to do is formalize it and make an actual appeal form,” Jones said. “So they can say they are appealing ‘this’ amount, we got denied for ‘this’ reason, and this is why ‘we’ think it’s wrong. Instead of having the groups come before the finance commit-

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tee again, the Senate will decide if the appeal goes through.” SGA also discussed the possibility of $500 in aid for the Conference of Student Government Associations, or COSGA, which will take place later this spring in Corpus Christi, Texas. Cole said COSGA is already in the SGA budget, but extra money is needed. However, there is a carryover amount in SGA’s budget to allow allocation without financial difficulties. “The total is around $4,500,” Cole said. “We had $1,750 budgeted. But, through the work of fundraising, we made approximately $300 and through us talking to others and getting contributions, we made $2,000. I thought my original request would be 1,000, so I’m really impressed with the work we have done and the people that have helped us.” The COSGA resolution will be voted on during next week’s meeting. The election board for SGA’s yearly elections was passed with Amy Ster, Megan Ballock, Andrea Cole, Landis Tompkins and Sam Heady making up the board. Carson Felt, campus affairs director, said Kansas Corps wanted help from SGA. “There’s a project this Friday in Topeka,” Felt said. “It’s for the Kansas State Historical Society and they need about seven people to go. You’ll be working with elementary kids and the goal is to help keep the museums open by showing Aaron Anderson/Collegio support around the area.” SGA will meet next Wednesday at 7 p.m. in the Overman Student Center. Stu- Jason Bilberry, community affairs director for the Student Government Association, brings up the idea of having the Pittsburg Chamber of dents are invited to voice their concerns Commerce visit SGA. during student opinion time.

2010

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