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Women’s soccer falls just short of ACC title, earns first-ever NCAA tournament top seed see page six for more Tuesday, November 12, 2013 An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 110th year, issue 51 News, page 2

Lifestyles, page 5

Opinions, page 3

That they may serve: Virginia Tech honors vets

Sports, page 6

Study Break, page 4

TUESDAY MORNING TAKEAWAYS

Thomas, rushing attack power Tech past Hurricanes

NICK GANGEMI / THE MIAMI HURRICANE

ALEX KOMA

BEN WEIDLICH / SPPS

A member of the Corps of Cadets reads off the names of veterans who have passed away while in active duty for the military.

Since 1872, over 12,000 Hokies have served overseas. The Corps of Cadets celebrated their service on Monday for Veterans Day. The Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets has graduated many soldiers in its 141 years. As such, the Corps holds Veterans Day near and dear to its heart and had several events to commemorate the sacrifice that so many have made in the name of freedom. Among those graduates are over 20 bandsmen that enlisted in the Spanish American War and seven Medal of Honor recipients. Since 1872, over 12,000 Hokies

have served overseas, with almost 400 having been killed. The recent wars in the Middle East have resulted in over 6,600 total American deaths, nine of which were Hokies. Starting at midnight on Veterans Day, cadets formed a guard on Memorial Court in front of the cenotaph at the Pylons. The cenotaph is an empty tomb in honor of those who have fallen while serving in active duty. Guard duty entailed cadets holding rifles and

standing at parade rest. The guard watched over the pylons from midnight on Monday to midnight on Tuesday, with cadets being relieved every hour. Cadets also formed a guard in front of the rock on Upper Quad, which honors the Virginia Tech alumni who died during World War I and is situated in front of the flagpole between Rasche and Brodie Halls. see VETS / page two

sports editor

The Virginia Tech football team’s 42-24 triumph over Miami was the win every Hokie fan has been dreaming of. Every part of the offense worked to perfection against the Hurricanes after a pair of frustrating, turnover-laden efforts in the last two weeks. The defense gave up some long plays, but it didn’t seem to matter. Tech might’ve benefitted from a few very lucky bounces, but the team played a complete game and the Hokies find themselves at a good place in the ACC Coastal Division. Running Game Resurgence For the first time in Tech’s

last three games, quarterback Logan Thomas didn’t lead the Hokies in rushing, while the offense managed its second highest point total on the season. That’s no coincidence. Trey Edmunds ran the ball often, turning 14 carries into 74 yards and four touchdowns, while J.C. Coleman got 22 carries for 68 yards. “I think our backs ran harder than I’ve seen them run,” said head coach Frank Beamer. Thomas still carried the ball 10 times for 53 yards, but offensive coordinator Scot Loeffler seemed to put a clear emphasis on handing the ball to the running backs early and often. see TMT / page six

‘Sisters’ script plays Band collects canned food for locals to modern audience LESLIE MCCREA news reporter

KATRINA SPINNER-WILSON said. “And the research you do for Chekhov is life itself.” lifestyles staff writer The committee who choosThe production of Anton es the season’s shows asked Chekhov’s “Three Sisters” Johnson last spring if he would premieres tonight with the direct “Three Sisters” after the playwright translation by Sara original director, a graduate Ruhl chosen by director David student, left to become a visitJohnson for its poetic quality ing professor at the Cincinnati and accessibility to modern Conservatory of Music. audiences. With a graduate degree in Johnson, also a professor theater and an emphasis on at Virginia Tech, will direct directing, Johnson has been “Three Sisters” as the second teaching and directing at Tech installment of the Theatre since 1988. Although he has Mainstage Series from the directed three productions of School of Performing Arts. “Three Sisters,” this marks his The play will take place in the first time directing the play Squires Studio Theatre Nov. at Tech. 12-15, Nov. 17 and Nov. 18-20. “When I found out David “I had to do some reading, was going to be directing but I’ve been teaching this (“Th ree Sisters”), I really play and reading this play for wanted to be in it because a long, long time,” Johnson see PLAY / page five

NEWS

Th is coming Saturday, as the Hokies take on Maryland in football, the Marching Virginians will be tackling hunger by hosting the 17th annual Hokies for the Hungry canned food drive. Running on the slogan “One can from every fan,” the goal of the drive is to collect 66,233 cans worth of food and donations — the amount of fans that Lane Stadium can hold. “It’s really easy,” explained Jeanette Staats, campus staff member for the New Life Christian Fellowship. “A lot of times we have cans that may be just sitting on a shelf somewhere and those should be donated.” The Marching Virginians have partnered up with the New Life Christian Fellowship

LIFESTYLES

to gather the food. Over 80 volunteers from the New Life Christian Fellowship, along with band members, will be collecting cans at each entrance to Lane Stadium on game day. Pep bands will also march through parking lots encouraging fans to donate. “I think it’s just a way for us to use our football game and all of the people coming together to give back to the community that we’re a part of,” Staats said. All contributions will be given to the Montgomery Country Christmas Store, a non-profit organization that helps families of Montgomery County in need. “What we do is provide new goods for everybody. We serve local people and try to give them a happier Christmas,” said Joan Cliff, coordinator

Miss TEDxVirginiaTech this weekend? Check out photos from the event. see page 2 see page 5

see HUNGRY / page two

OPINIONS Step into Joan Grossman’s multimedia exhibit in the new Center for the Arts.

Architecture students help build a Little League field house. see page 2

PHOTOGRAPHER / SPPS

Student volunteers for Hokies for the Hungry collect canned goods outside of Lane Stadium prior to a football game last year. for the food department at who work year-round to gaththe store. er, sort and pack the goods. Local families within cer“Starting right after tain age ranges, income levels Halloween, things start pickand other qualifications may ing up. I expect that we are register to receive new goods going to get quite a bit of food from the store. The store is this year,” Cliff said. entirely run by volunteers

see page 6

ONLINE The women’s soccer beat undefeated Virginia in the ACC tournament, but fell in the title game to Florida State. Read about what happened to the Hokies.

Watch our video of Connor Grennan speaking last night.

ctlifestyles CollegiateTimes @collegiatetimes


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newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

November 12, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

TEDxVirginiaTech takes main stage at CFTA

NEWS

weather watch A

fter a warm but blustery weekend, all attention turns to an arctic cold front set to push through the area today, brining rain and snow into Southwest Virginia. Snow accumulation will remain minimal on the eastern slopes of the Blue Ridge Mountains, as the front pushes through. After quite a bit of anticipation, the once promising first snow of the season is looking more and more unlikely. The high temperature today will likely occur around mid-morning as the arctic front arrives early in the day. Precipitation will start before mid-day and will begin as a cold rain. As temperatures begin to plummet, there will likely be a changeover to snow in the afternoon. Snowfall will be light and last only a short time before pushing to our south and east just after sunset. A dusting on the grassy surfaces is possible, while the highest

Months of preparation culminated Saturday at Tech’s second annual TEDxVirginiaTech conference.

peaks of the Blue Ridge could see up to an inch. Temperatures will quickly dive below freezing Tuesday evening into Wednesday, freezing any leftover moisture. Icy spots could pose a problem as you wake up early on Wednesday, but temperatures will slowly rise to a chilly 37 degrees in the afternoon. Wind speeds will be the story of the day as gusty Northwest winds will stream across the Drillfield at 10-15 mph throughout the afternoon. Lows will once again fall below freezing. Thursday will mark the beginning of another warmup period. Temperatures will rise into the mid-50s by Friday, and approach 60 by game day. The Hokies’ final home football game of the season looks dry, as the next weather system holds off until early next week.

@wxBONE

JAMES MORROW James Morrow is CT’s news weather correspondent. He is a senior Meteorology major and a Hokie Storm Chaser. He currently serves as the Meteorology Club President and is the Chief Meteorologist at WUVT 90.7 FM Blacksburg.

Above: Scott Geller, Alumni Distinguished Professor of Psychology, shares an inspirational story about how principles of playing drums can be applied to real life. Right: Assistant professor of mechanical engineering Chris Williams demonstarates a 3D-printed quad copter onstage at the conference. The body of the helicopter was 3D printed by a Blacksburg High School senior.

Vets: Community gathers to honor those that served from page one

Hungry: Group hopes to collect 66,233 cans of food from page one

“The economy is picking up and people are giving more.” “I think it’s not too much to ask for every fan to bring a can to the game and it would be incredible to be able to gather that many cans,” said Brianna Corleto, public relations officer for the Marching Virginians. Patsy Dillon-Long, president of the Montgomery County Christmas Store, explained the impressive amount of work that goes into Hokies for the Hungry every year. “We get plenty of other food drives, but as

far as volume and participation by both students and the community, this is by far the largest,” she said. After all of the cans are sorted and packed, qualifying families are assigned a time to come in and shop between Dec. 10-14. Everything is free for those families, and if there is surplus food after the shopping time period, it is given to local food banks. “People should participate because of the holiday spirit and because of what it means to be a Hokie and part of the Virginia Tech community,” Corleto said. “Take a

moment to think about the people who may not be as fortunate as you are, or people who have fallen on hard times, and just remember to help when you can.” Staats agreed, noting, “It’s easy to come to school here and kind of be in our own little bubble here at Tech, but this is an opportunity to realize that there’s people outside of the school community who need our help, especially during the holiday season.”

@LeslieMccrea

At 10:30 a.m. the Corps held a remembrance ceremony in War Memorial Chapel to honor Virginia Tech students who have served our nation, bringing in over 100 members of the community, including over 20 local veterans. The Southern Colonels Brass Quintet provided music for the ceremony, and Command Sergeant Major Daniel Willey, a 30-year Army veteran and a training NCO for the Corps, spoke emotionally about veterans and what it means to be a veteran in today’s world. “Today, soldiers give a check payable to the country. Some write it for their life,” said Willey, referring to those men and women who have given the ultimate sacrifice for their country. After Willey spoke, the ceremony transitioned to Memorial Court, where a maroon and orange wreath was placed in front

of the cenotaph by cadets Peter Nettekoven and Austin Dickey, both members of the Regimental Staff. Following the placement, the Corps Gregory Guard fired a 21-gun salute for the veterans, and a member of the Bugle Guard played taps at 11 a.m. At 2 p.m., the student’s veterans group, Veterans@ VT, remembered those who have served in Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn. A moment of silence was held on Memorial Court, followed by a reading of the name of every service member who has been killed in those conflicts. “The reading of the men and women who have died during the War on Terror this afternoon will be an emotional event for all of us,” said Willey. The Corps of Cadets also held a formal retreat on Upper Quad to honor veterans. Formal retreats include all cadets in the Corps

forming up by Battalion on Upper Quad, Skipper being fired and the Highty Tighties playing the national anthem as the flag is lowered. Tech has several services and resources available for its veterans through programs and resources on campus. “Virginia Tech offers instate tuition for all veterans, as well as guaranteed admission for Marines who meet the GPA and SAT criteria,” said Colonel Chris St. Jean, a 26-year Army veteran and assistant director for Undergraduate Admissions. “Tech always honors the military, creating a welcoming environment for our veterans. When we feel valued and welcome, we feel at home, and that’s what we want our veterans to feel here,” said Dr. Patricia Perillo, vice president for Student Affairs.

@TPenkwitz

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

status

Oct. 2

10:15 a.m. - 5:45 p.m.

Follow-up to Burglary / Fraud

Brodie Hall

Inactive

Oct. 25

1:00 a.m.

Appear Intoxicated in Public

East Ambler Johnston Hall

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct

Oct. 26

10:40 p.m.

Underage Possession of Alcohol x 3

Lee Hall

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct

Nov. 9

12:53 a.m.

Larceny of a Credit Card (recovered)

Outside Squires Student Center

Inactive

Nov. 9

1:19 a.m.

Intoxicated in Public / Underage possession of Alcohol

Newman Hall

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Nov. 9

11:15 p.m.

Appear Intoxicated in Public

Draper Road

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Nov. 6 - 10

12:00 a.m. - 10:41 a.m.

Burglary / Breaking and Entering

Vawter Hall

Active

Nov. 7 - 10

7:19 p.m. - 7:19 p.m.

Vandalism to a Vehicle

I-lot

Inactive

Oct. 4

11:43 a.m.

Larceny

Squires Student Center

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct

Oct. 17

8:30 p.m.

Underage Possession of Alcohol x 5

Slusher Wing

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct

Oct. 18

12:00 a.m.

Underage Possession of Alcohol x 4

Lee Hall

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct

Oct. 25

12:55 a.m.

Underage Possession of Alcohol x 2

Lee Hall

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct

Oct. 16

9:15 p.m.

Underage Possession of Alcohol x 4

Cochrane Hall

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct

Oct. 26

8:00 p.m.

Underage Possession of Alcohol

Slusher Tower

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct


OPINIONS

opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com

November 12, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

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The Collegiate Times is an independent studentrun newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Priscilla Alvarez Managing Editor: Danielle Buynak Art Director: Kevin Dickel Design Editors: Brad Klodowski, Andrea Ledesma Public Editor: Andrew Kulak Web Editor: James O’Hara Multimedia Editor: Nick Smirniotopoulos News Editors: Cameron Austin, Dean Seal News Reporters: Melissa Draudt, Leslie McCrea News Staff Writers: Kelly Cline, Josh Higgins, Matt Minor Features Editor: Chelsea Giles Features Reporters: Madeline Gordon, Jessica Groves Opinions Editors: David Levitt, Shareth Reddy Sports Editors: Jacob Emert, Alex Koma Sports Media Manager: Mike Platania Assistant Photo Editor: Ben Wiedlich Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: James Dean Seal Circulation Manager: Keith Bardsley

MCT CAMPUS

Rape-safe wear shows societal woe T

here are bulletproof vests and flame-retardant jackets, but the next stage in protective clothing might be anti-rape wear. A campaign for AR Wear on the fundraising site Indiegogo has begun to create a line of clothes — including underwear, running pants and shorts — that are resistant to pulling, tearing and cutting. Bands around the thighs and waist can be tightened and then locked with a mechanism that needs to be set to a special position unique to each pair of clothing to be unlocked. While the intentions of the clothing line’s creators are praiseworthy, the execution of the product and the fact that it was even created in the first place, raise a lot of questions past “how does one use the bathroom in them?” First and foremost is the sickening realization that we live in a society where someone actually felt that

share your views The Collegiate Times is your newspaper. Share your thoughts with the rest of the Virginia Tech community by writing a letter to the editor. Writing guidelines: Students: Please include your full name, year and major Faculty/ staff: Please include your full name, position and department Please send letters to opinionseditor@ collegiatetimes.com

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there was a need to create clothing that women can wear under their clothes at all times to protect them from being raped. We are genuinely living in a time when some women feel so threatened that they want to wear a modern-day suit of armor underneath their clothes. What is equally as disturbing, though, is that these clothes seem to promote the idea that it is a woman’s job to protect herself from getting raped, rather than teaching people not to rape. If these clothes become widespread, could the fact that a woman was not wearing her “anti-rape” clothing at the time that she was raped be used as sufficient reason to let the rapist off the hook? It seems like what should be more important is educating people about rape, what constitutes rape and what constitutes consent.

Please also note, the use of the word “people” in that last point. Women are not the only gender that can be raped, and men are not the only gender that can be rapists; AR Wear seems to briefly forget this fact as the protective clothing is only targeted toward, and made for, women. In their defense, however, the company is still in the fundraising stage with only prototypes of clothing to show; the company could in the future create anti-rape wear for all other genders. Hopefully they will also create anti-rape wear that doesn’t just focus on the lower half of a person’s body, as rape isn’t restricted to the genital area. Another thing that has been striking some people as odd is the company’s slogan: “A clothing line offering wearable protection for when things go wrong.”

Rape is not something that “goes wrong.” Spilling coffee on your white shirt before a presentation is something “going wrong.” This slogan seems to trivialize rape into almost sounding like an accident or a misstep in what would have been an otherwise pleasant outing. However, despite the many questions the product raises, clothing like this could still offer a sense of security to rape victims or women who live in areas with high rates of rape and sexual assault. For some women, this could be the thing that saves them when a can of pepper spray fails.

AMY RIEGER - regular columnist - sophomore - communication

Atheist ‘church’ an oxymoron C hurch — who is it for? According to atheists Sanderson Jones and Pippa Evans, church can be an institution for believers and non-believers alike: a place where like-minded people can meet and form a community. Nothing wrong with that, I suppose. The church they formed, affectionately named Sunday Assembly, features non-religious renditions of popular songs sung by fellow churchgoers — hymns, perhaps? For a group whose identity stems from its lack of belief and self-professed lack of organization, this sure brings out an unfavorable likeness to their organized religious counterparts. There is an advent — no pun intended — of atheist megachurches, mirroring the nationwide growth of the atheist population in the past few decades. The idea of an atheist megachurch seems at odds with the inherent free-thought mentality of atheists. Not only does it detract from the “pillars” of atheism rooted in inquiry and self-reliance, it is just plain mockery of organized religion. Perhaps it is a subtle dig into the hearts of those who practice their faith, with the intent to subvert religious belief.

This idea of a mega-church for atheists doesn’t exactly help their image in the U.S., where atheists in many regions are not held in high regard. Data amassed about Americans’ opinions on atheists backs this assumption. A University of Minnesota study found that atheists are the nation’s least trusted minority. George H.W. Bush even felt that atheists shouldn’t be regarded as citizens for their lack of belief in a God, citing that the U.S. is “one nation under God.” Other studies indicate that Americans have a difficult time tolerating atheists; around the country, there have been various instances of atheist discrimination, which got so bad at one time that entire families were driven from their neighborhoods. Eight states’ constitutions currently ban atheists from holding public office. I don’t blame atheists for wanting to stick together, given how Americans feel about the vast majority of them. But what I don’t understand is the tendency of non-theists to distance themselves from organized religion, yet simultaneously with these churchlike congregations liken themselves to another iteration of

Christianity. While I am not opposed to the idea of an atheist “church,” there are other groups that better achieve its intended purpose. Unitarian Universalists accomplish the mission through a theology not bound by any religious dogma at all; instead, they utilize a liberal theological interpretation not contingent on any belief, whatsoever. Soon enough, these churches will feature an assumed leader, a minister of sorts, providing fellow churchgoers with a message in the form of a sermon. Maybe it is human nature to find someone to turn to, but this leads me to believe that atheism is slowly losing its emphasis on personal choice and rationality and moving toward a more organized structure. The rise of these atheist ideological strongholds indicates the rise of atheism as a religion, and those who see it as such undermine the inherent nature of atheism. Instead of embracing their lack of belief, they, in turn, have created one.

ANDREW WIMBISH - regular columnist - senior - English

College Media Solutions Ad Director: Michelle Sutherland Assistant Ad Director: Cameron Taylor Account Executives: Eric Dioglin, Touhi Zaman, Danielle Pedra, Gary Johnston Inside Sales Manager: Catie Stockdale Assistant Account Executives: Emily Reinas, Rach Biltz, Josh Dolinger, Jess Angelos, Sephanie Morris Creative Director: Diana Bayless Assistant Director: Samantha Keck Creative Staff: Mariah Jones, Ashlyn Davidson, Luke Lesinski, Emily Bollman Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2013. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


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November 12, 2013

Today’s Birthday Horoscope: Explore your passions, talents and dreams for the world this year. Learn and study. Assess what you love most, and then increase exposure. Your creativity takes new strides in fertile bursts this autumn and again next spring. Indulging fun like this gets romantic. A partnership levels up next July. Go with love, and the money follows.

Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham Quote of the Day

“I walk slowly, but I never walk backward.”

FREE 2008 HONDA CBR1000RR Wonderful bike. Runs perfectly. I am giving it out for free due to my late son’s death. If interested, email chrishrollins862@gmail.com

Textbooks for Sale BOOKS: After catastrophic biological warfare, we may not agree on what nature is or what civilization is. WILDERNESS, a science fiction novel, is by Alan Kovski. Available via Amazon.com

- Abraham Lincoln

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Greek Notes

For Sale

Here’s A Big Thank You! The sisters of Sigma Kappa would like to thank all of the faculty and staff here at Virginia Tech. We truly appreciate all that you do for us, and we wish you a happy holiday season!

BOOKS: What will we become, years from now? Better or worse? Fools, victims, fortunate souls, survivors in dangerous times? Remembering the Future, science fiction stories by Alan Kovski. Available via Amazon.com.

62 Sheltered, at sea 63 Mimic 64 Lover of Tristan 65 Student's stressor

music downloads

By Erik Agard

11/12/13

ACROSS 1 Taj Mahal city 5 Merry 11 One doing serious crunching in 29-Down 14 Perturb 15 Hang on a clothesline 16 One of a swiveled pair 17 1981 Richard Pryor film 19 Sit-__: protests 20 Ancient Greek theater 21 Merry old king 22 In a funk 23 Managed

for the week of November 12th to 15th

The Spark ft. Spree Wilson- Afrojack Hold On, We’re Going Home (Kastle Remix)- Drake Hannah Montana (Twerk Remix)- Migos Live for the Night- Krewella Royals- Timeflies

listen up

24 Band whose frontman passes through the audience in a plastic bubble, with "The" 27 Typical "Twilight" fan 28 Billy of "Titanic" 29 Daisylike blooms 32 Pipe dream 36 Bartlett, e.g. 37 Distress signal 38 Pop 39 Chew out 42 Chic 44 "How steak is done" sauce

45 Like a battery needing a charge 46 "Everything but" item 50 "Don't __": 2005 R&B hit 53 Dull discomfort 54 Chess ending 55 Cultural values 57 King of Spain 58 Jolly Roger fliers 60 The word, as suggested by the saying formed by the ends of this puzzle's four longest answers 61 Cab rider-to-be

DOWN 1 Shady alcove 2 Dutch cheese 3 Gotten up 4 Choir member 5 "The Brady Bunch" girl 6 Tin Woodman's saving grace 7 Auto race noise 8 Puts on a pedestal 9 Arms supply 10 Caustic substance 11 It's measured in alarms 12 Man cave hanging 13 Church areas 18 Suss out 22 Leading a charmed life 25 Guitar great Paul 26 Novel-sounding beast 27 Outdoor dining spot 29 Busy month for 11-Acrosses 30 Notice 31 Percussive dance 32 Homer call? 33 Charged particle 34 Like 2011, e.g.

35 Anti's cry 37 Plot outline 40 "Delightful!" 41 Causes of pallors 42 Phil Rizzuto's number 43 Fall implements 45 Tried to lose, in a way 46 Fate 47 Freeze, as a road 48 Herb in a bouquet garni

49 Slot in a stable 50 Country that's nearly 25 times as long as its average width 51 Crosses one's fingers 52 Liability's opposite 56 The other one 58 Key letter 59 Before, to a bard

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

11/8/13

WORDSEARCH: Snakes Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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WORD BANK 1 Anaconda 2 Asp 3 Boa 4 Boomslang 5 Charmer 6 Cobra 7 Copperhead 8 Coral 9 Cornsnake 10 Garter 11 Grass 12 Habu 13 Viper 14 Wart 15 Mamba 16 Taipan

Aries (March 21-April 19) Don’t let technological breakdowns keep you from pursuit of a dream. You can igure out a way around them. Slow down and you notice the details. Let others worry about the big picture. Lay low. Celebrate the small successes.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You ind satisfaction in staying busy now. The money is there. Figure an honest approach to provide well for family. Infuse it with your arts. Share something you’ve been withholding. A bene icial development knocks.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Your wit and intellect are honed and sharp. Use them to your advantage. Pay attention to what’s really being said, and avoid an argument. Learn from a wise friend. Choose the item that will last the longest.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Take advantage of the developing situation. Friends are there for you, and they help you soar. Return the favor. Your education and experience pay off. Don’t get so excited that you miss important steps. Haste makes waste.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Your efforts and dedication are appreciated. Sure, there may be some bumps along the way and you may think you can do better, but it’s best to focus on accomplishments. They took something. Reinforce partnership.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your talent impresses others, but watch out for jealousies. Passions can get intense. Friends offer good advice and help you ind a truth. You can afford to save. You already have what you need. Share delicious food and appreciation.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) You can handle more than usual as you gain new responsibilities. Don’t throw your money around just because you have it or because there’s more work coming in. Have a private dinner with a friend. Share valuable information. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Recognize the value of the past and lessons taught. Don’t fear the future and lessons ahead. Bring some pebbles into the forest to ind your way back ... if you’re so inclined as to return.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Discuss money now; you have a better chance of making more. It requires dedication and motivation. Moving furniture around or renovating the house could be tempting, but it’s best to chop wood and carry water now. Get your chores done irst. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Your artistic side itches to get out and express. You have a lot to say, so sit with it and articulate. You’ll get farther than expected when you play for the fun of it. Learn from another’s inancial mistakes.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Curtail impulsive spending. Focus on making new income and preparing invoices instead. New information points out the weakness of the competition. Learn from their mistakes. Provide solid value at a good price. Promote the value. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) You’re on ire and you know it. The hurdles in the way are small for you. Keep your temper anyway. Use it to get into action. Accept coaching from your partner. Inhale deeply as you exercise.


LIFESTYLES

lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

November 12, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

5

Artist captures creative process Play: Senior actors practice character development skills ABBEY WILLIAMS lifestyles staff writer

Nested inside Virginia Tech’s new Center for the Arts is a dim room with swivel chairs and projection screens on every wall. This is the Cube, a high-tech space where art and engineering meet. “This Edge I Have to Jump,” an exhibit by visiting professor Joan Grossman, is currently running in the Cube as its inaugural piece and will continue to be on display until Nov. 24. “It’s a video installation on four screens that explores the idea of creative process,” Grossman said. “It is built around conversations recorded with a number of people in different fields — artists, musicians, architects, performers and scientists.” Commissioned by the Institute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology (ICAT) and supported by the School of Performing Arts, the piece weaves together interviews, visual components and musical selections in an attempt to encourage meditation on the idea of the creative process. Grossman, an independent media artist based out of Brooklyn, has been teaching Cinema Production at Tech since Fall 2012. “I started working on the piece about a year ago,” Grossman said. “That’s when I first started recording conversations with people about the creative process. It was a way for me to get to know the community here. A lot of people in the piece are teaching at Tech.” Nick Allen, a junior English major, recently visited the exhibit. “The piece was very cool and almost overwhelming,” Allen said. “It can definitely reinvigorate your sense of

PHOTOGRAPHER / SPPS

Viewers observe Joan Grossman’s film, “This Edge I Have To Jump,” at the new Cube theater. wonder. I think it’s impor- visual effects. While voices world and get it distributed. tant to approach it primarily of interviewees make up a It’s a pretty long and hard as an experience holistically majority of the piece, some process and not every idea will and then perhaps try to make of the accompanying sound fly.” sense of the dialogue.” is also generated by the voices Despite any difficulties, Although the piece features and the remainder is musi- Grossman is currently worktestimonies from over 20 peo- cal interludes reflecting on the ing on several different projple, Grossman did not collect visual motifs, Grossman said. ects, including a documentary their stories in typical interThe visiting professor artist about jazz in Vietnam, as well view fashion. believes her two fields of work as preparing to teach a course “I was more conversant, have proven to work harmoni- next semester about her expeto try to evoke stories and ously. rience composing with four thoughts that were unguard“It’s interesting that teaching screens. ed,” Grossman said. “The peo- forces you to stay on top of In addition, Grossman is ple in the piece speak so inter- your game,” Grossman said. considering reworking “This estingly and so differently, it “When I’m teaching, it’s forc- Edge I Have to Jump” to have just opens up a whole kind ing me to really think about possibilities at other venues or of kaleidoscopic view of what how you do this work and in different renditions. creative process can be.” what are the challenges and All in all, Grossman said she The exhibit features several what are the techniques. It hopes the exhibit is accessible unique aspects exclusive to helps my work to teach. It and engaging for students and digital art. One is a 45-minute helps me to stay clear and community members alike. piece, which runs continuous- articulate on what this work is “I would really hope that ly throughout the day. and why I do it.” the piece helps people reflect “It doesn’t stop or start,” However, Grossman on their own creative proGrossman said. “It’s not like a acknowledges that her unique cess in one way or another,” movie. You can come in at any spectrum of art comes with its Grossman said. “Creative propoint and leave at any point, own unique challenges. cess isn’t just about making and it’s very fluid in that sense. “In this field, digital media, art. It can be about making There are definitely a lot of there are so many ongoing food, gardening — so many people that linger for a while changes,” Grossman said. different things. It can be as but then there are some that “Technology and the way simple as how you experience just come in for a few minutes people watch media now, it’s the world.” and take a look and then wan- constantly changing. It’s very der out.” difficult to be able to produce “This Edge I Have to Jump” a documentary or anything also showcases intricate and similar from beginning to end @AbbeyWilliamsVT unique mixings of audio with and actually get it out into the

watch: Ender’s Game Despite the books’ popularity, the movie version doesn’t meet expectations

A

fter decades of speculation about a fi lm adaptation, “Ender’s Game” was finally released last weekend. “Ender’s Game” is based on the classic sci-fi book series by Orson Scott Card. The fi lm is a fusion of “Ender’s Game” and “Ender’s Shadow,” two books from the series that tell the same story from different perspectives. The story follows a young boy, Ender Wiggin (Asa Butterfield), who lives in a future Earth that has been violently attacked by “formics,” a race of aliens. Ender, shown to be unusually gifted, is sent to military school to be trained to defend the Earth. At the Battle School, Ender meets several other children who show promise, most notably Petra (Hailee Steinfeld), Bean (Aramis Knight) and a soon-to-be rival, Bonzo (Moises Arias). Ender quickly displays his extraordinary strategic skill and repeatedly impresses the officer instructors, including Colonel Graff (Harrison Ford) and Major Gwen Anderson (Viola Davis). Eventually, Ender and his friends work together to annihilate the “formics” in a huge simulation for their graduation test — only to discover that things are not quite what they seemed. This is not the first highprofi le role for Butterfield, despite being only 16 years

old. He burst onto the scene in 2008 with a starring role in the heartbreaking Holocaust film “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.” Butterfield is talented and brings more skill to the screen than most young actors. His co-stars are also a generally talented group: Steinfeld wowed in 2010’s “True Grit,” while Viola Davis, Harrison Ford and Ben Kingsley add starpower to the film. Unfortunately, the script (and the movie as a whole) is only superficial, at best. The sense of urgency feels constructed, the relationships hollow and the big twist at the end is utterly predictable. The lack of developed personalities for characters, other than Ender, and an overall lack of chemistry are really what sink this fi lm. Visually, the film is solid but nothing original. “Ender’s Game” is working with massive space landscapes and larger-than-life battles, but there’s something detached about it. It simply doesn’t feel real. The biggest story about “Ender’s Game” coming out of this weekend was not that it managed to win the U.S. box office or even its mediocre reviews. Rather, the big story was the effects the personal views of author Orson Scott Card would have on the movie’s box office success. Card is infamous for his

antiquated views on homosexuality and stance against same-sex marriage. This prompted several major organizations, from GLAAD to Geeks Out, to publically condemn Card and encourage boycotting of the movie. Despite the boycott and underwhelming adaptation, “Ender’s Game” managed to win the weekend with

a decent, although not too impressive sum, while certainly losing on the public relations front. Still haven’t seen “Gravity?” Read why you must see it now. KATIE WHITE - regular columnist - junior - history major

ABBY JETMUNDSEN/ SPPS

Lani Fu, Tom Fenninger and Sanam Hashemi perform in the play “Three Sisters,” an interpretation of Chekhov’s original script. from page one

I like David as a director and I like working with him,” said senior cast member, Lani Fu. Johnson has been one of Fu’s favorite professors for the past four years, she said. Fu, who plays Masha, the middle sister, said she believes the script choice was superb because of its contemporary translation, which lifts the heavy and depressing elements and makes the play easier for the audiences to relate to and understand. “I think that the music chosen really adds to the play, especially when there’s moments or sections that kind of tend to be slower,” Fu said. “The music helps put it in a context that’s more interesting and vibrant.” Matt Schott, also a senior, plays Andre, the brother, and said he believes this translation of “Three Sisters” is not about big, flashy set pieces, but more about character relationships. “I’m sort of like the male epitome of the sadness the sisters incur,” Schott said. “They all have dreams, hopes and aspirations, and I have similar ones at the beginning of the show that are gradually squashed as the show goes on. I’m responsible for a lot of the hardships (the sisters) endure.” Fu’s character is also the main sister and she describes herself in comparison to the other sisters as more of a romantic, but not a romantic in a girly way. “I’ve had to put a lot of work into this, and I think

that doing Chekhov is really hard to do right,” Fu said. “I’ve definitely been in shows here that have been psychologically and emotionally taxing on me. I wouldn’t say, just for me, (“Th ree Sisters”) is the hardest thing, but it’s a really great acting challenge.” Fu has been in nearly seven productions at Tech since her freshman year, but “Th ree Sisters” will be her last as a senior. “I’m happy that I got to work on a show with a really big cast for my last show, because I love the people that I work with in my department and getting a chance to be with as many of them as possible one last time is really nice,” Fu said. Schott, who worked with Johnson two years ago in “A Servant of Two Masters,” said the overall experience with Johnson and the cast of “Three Sisters” has been rewarding. “(Johnson’s) wonderfully talented,” Schott said. “He does a wonderful job of actor coaching and helping us sort of define these moments and making them real and believable.” Although Johnson said it varies his favorite part about being a director right now is working with the students and watching their discoveries. “The way the play opens up and actually working on it, I get a sense of the extraordinary craft of this playwright that the play is subtly and beautifully constructed,” Johnson said.

@kspinz


6

sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com

November 12, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

SPORTS

Women’s soccer falls in ACC title game, earns No.1 seed BROOKS AKER sports reporter

The Virginia Tech women’s soccer team traveled to Cary, N.C., for ACC Tournament play and came away with a monumental win, despite a loss in the title game to tournament champion, thirdranked Florida State. The Hokies became the first team to defeat top-ranked Virginia this season in the first semifinal match on Friday. Tech jumped out to a quick 1-0 lead courtesy of a goal by first team All-ACC performer Jazmine Reeves. When the Cavaliers answered to tie it at one goal apiece, Reeves responded with a goal on a breakaway just 53 seconds later to regain the lead. The Hokies never trailed in the game, as they took a 3-1 lead less than five minutes into the second half on a header with freshman Murielle Tiernan. The Hokies extended their lead to 4-1 on a header by junior Katie Yensen, assisted by junior Kelsey Loupee with her second assist of the match. The final score of 4-2 netted the Hokies their first win over the Cavaliers since 2009. It was also Tech’s first win in the ACC Tournament semifinals since 2008. The Hokies and Cavaliers had met eight days prior in Charlottesville, Va., for the regular season finale that saw Virginia shut out the Hokies

2-0. But the Hokies made sure that Friday would not be a repeat of that match. “I’m proud of them tonight, to score four goals against the number one team in the country,” said head coach Chugger Adair. “We were at UVa and there were a few shots on goal, but the stats men do it as they do it. I thought we earned more out of that game than it showed, but we were definitely more effective going forward. We talked about getting numbers forward and not just relying on one person in the attack and trying to get supporting help in the attacking third around the ball.” The Hokies played like an inspired group from the opening kick. They set the tone early and Adair noticed. “I am so proud of this team,” said Adair, who revealed that a pregame message from veteran Hokies football coach Frank Beamer helped inspire his troops. “I think they did a great job tonight. They played with heart, passion and commitment. I am extremely excited for the team and proud for the team as well. They stepped up to the plate against a very good UVa team.” The Hokies faced Florida State in the championship match on Sunday afternoon, but were stymied for much of the match by the outstanding Seminoles defense. Florida State posted its 12th shutout of the season against Virginia Tech in the fi nal

match and made a late, first half goal by junior Dagny Brynjarsdottir for the 1-0 win. Despite the scoreless fi nish for the Hokies, Adair was mostly pleased with their play. “I thought the girls played hard,” Adair said. “In the first half, we weren’t as sharp or intense as we wanted to be. In the second half we were a better team, we just didn’t come out of the chute as strong as we would like. Florida State was a very good side. They showed some of the experience in the final tonight.” Senior forward Reeves echoed the sentiment of her coach, particularly about the Seminoles’ play. “Their defense is very organized,” Reeves said. “Their back line is very tough and physical. We didn’t bring our best game today and we didn’t attack as well as we could, but I have to give credit to them. Their back line did a good job today, and unfortunately it wasn’t our day.” The tournament officials also took note of the Seminoles’ defense, as they placed three defenders and goalkeeper Kelsey Wys on the ACC AllTournament team, in addition to Brynjarsdottir. Senior defender Kassey Kallman was named tournament MVP for her efforts for the Seminoles a week after being named ACC Defensive Player of the Year. Reeves, Tiernan, Loupee and Yensen were also named

TREVOR WHITE / SPPS

Jazmine Reeves (5) helped the Hokies beat undeafeated Virginia in the first round of the ACC tournament. to the ACC All-Tournament team for their performances. The Hokies were selected as a No. 1 seed for the NCAA Tournament on Monday afternoon and will host up to four games. Florida State head coach Mark Krikorian believes the Hokies are worthy of the honor. “I thought it was a heck of a final — two very good teams going out there and compet-

ing at a pretty high level,” Krikorian said. “I think both teams were probably carrying a little bit of fatigue into the game from Friday (night’s semifinals), but for the most part you couldn’t see it.” The ACC grabbed all four No. 1 seeds when the bracket was released on Monday afternoon. It was the Hokies; first ever selection as a top seed. “Credit to Virginia Tech,”

Krikorian said. ���They are a heck of a team and competitive as can be.” The Hokies are back in action on Friday at 5 p.m. at Thompson Field when they host UMBC in the first round of the tournament.

@BrooksAker

TMT: Thomas avoids mistakes, defense yields big plays from page one

“It’s exciting because after the first couple, you kind of see a sparkle in Trey’s eyes,” said center David Wang. “And it kind of gets us going too because when we see the backfield excited, it means that they’re actually seeing holes and seeing lanes to run through, and that gets us excited and it gives us an extra boost of energy as well.” Rather than relying on the read option and inverted veer plays that call for frequent runs by the quarterback, Loeffler started calling for inside runs out of the pistol formation. The last time he made any significant use of these types of plays was against Alabama, helping Edmunds run for 135 yards and a score. While Edmunds ran well all night long, averaging 5.3 yards per carry, his physicality was particularly valuable in the red zone. Coming into the game, the Hokies had converted just 15 of 28 chances inside the 20-yard line for touchdowns, earning a red zone efficiency rate of 53 percent that placed them among the worst teams in the country. Against Miami, Edmunds personally helped Tech go four for five on the goal line, with scores of 10 yards, 2 yards, 4 yards and 1 yard. The last time a Tech running back earned four touchdowns came in 2009, courtesy of Ryan Williams. The offensive line’s improved performance deserves equal credit for the running game’s renewed success. Right tackle Laurence Gibson returned to the starting line-

up for the fi rst time since the Western Carolina game in relief of the injured Brent Benedict, and led a group that bullied Miami’s defensive line all night long. “It gave us that extra little bit,” Thomas said. “I can’t remember the last time I saw that effort of those guys blocking.” Thomas still failed to keep his eyes downfield at times, leading to some poorly timed scrambles, but the running game’s success largely helped him focus on the passing game. Spreading the Ball Around Thanks to the success of Edmunds and Coleman on the ground, Thomas rebounded in a big way against the Hurricanes. “I told our team, we can all learn from Logan,” Beamer said. “Because the week before he played a great football game except for a couple plays. But the flack and what he went through last week, he didn’t panic, he kept his focus straight ahead and came back and played a really great football game.” Not only did he fail to turn the ball over, but he also completed 25 of his 31 passes for 366 yards and two touchdowns, marking the first time a quarterback has ever thrown for 300 yards in back-to-back games under Frank Beamer. “I’ll always have Logan’s back,” Wang said. “He played phenomenally.” He completed passes to eight different receivers on the night, focusing particularly on Joshua Stanford and Willie Byrn. The pair each went over 100 yards receiving — the first

time two Tech receivers have done so in the same game since 2010. Despite the soggy conditions, Thomas was able to accurately find the duo all night long. Stanford was masterful running across the middle or on post routes, while Byrn consistently evaded defenders in the slot. After Stanford caught six passes for 171 yards against Boston College last week, he’s been singled out for praise by coaches for his recent proficiency. “That guy has come a long, long way, and I think it’s confidence,” Beamer said. “Really happy for him and us, because we needed it.” Redshirt senior D.J. Coles also got in on the action. He only caught three passes, but each went for a big gain, as he tallied receptions of 24, 14 and 30 yards while providing physical run blocking on the outside. Perhaps most importantly, Thomas looked comfortable and secure in the pocket. Thanks to the improved running game, he didn’t have to force the type of throws he did against Boston College and Duke, and his receivers made some tough catches in difficult conditions. Giving Up the Big Play Surprisingly, it was the Hokies’ third-ranked defense that was the problematic unit against the Hurricanes. Tech managed to hold Miami to a paltry 28 yards on the ground, 111 yards less than their weekly average, but gave up some big plays in the passing game. Two of Miami’s four scores

CHEN JIANG / SPPS

Trey Edmunds (14) ran for four touchdowns against Miami, the first time a Tech running back has done so since 2009, helping the Hokies’ offense to their best performance of the season last Saturday. came off of an 81-yard catch and run by Stacy Coley and an 84-yard reception by Allen Hurns. On the first play, a variety of Hokie defenders had a chance to bring Coley down, but they took bad angles to the ball, allowing Coley to run for a score untouched. Hurns was able to score on the other big play thanks to freshman cornerback Brandon Facyson misjudging his read of the throw while trying to make an interception. Much like with Andre Williams’ 62-yard touch-

down against Boston College last week, the defense largely played well, with the exception of the long runs. The unit’s depth was tested once again, with Kyle Fuller leaving in the second half and Antone Exum injuring his left ankle. Defensive coordinator Bud Foster can take solace in the way the defense relentlessly pressured Miami quarterback Stephen Morris, sacking him three times and earning 10 quarterback hits. Now, the team returns to Blacksburg for its final home

game against Maryland. “We had a really good victory,” Beamer said. “It won’t mean much if we don’t finish this thing off.” Although the coaches will certainly be focused on stopping Stefon Diggs with the depleted secondary and repeating that dominant offensive performance, there’s no doubt that spirits are high in the Tech locker room right now.

@AlexKomaVT

Give the gift of memories!


Tuesday, November 12, 2013 Print Edition