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Who are you voting for today?

see pg. 3

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013 An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 110th year, issue 43 News, page 6

Lifestyles, page 2

Opinions, page 3

Sports, page 5

THE

Study Break, page 4

TUESDAY MORNING TAKEAWAYS

Thomas’ turnovers hold offense back

ON FAD DIETS

Five lifestyles writers took on fad diet challenges for one week. See how they did.

ATKINS

JUICE

VEGAN

KEVIN DICKEL/ SPPS

Logan Thomas’ four turnovers hampered Tech’s offense. MADELINE GORDON

CHELSEA GILES

SARA LEPLEY

lifestyles editor

lifestyles editor

lifestyles staff writer

My week on the Atkins Diet pretty much turned me into Regina George from “Mean Girls.” I found myself constantly asking stupid questions like “Is butter a carb?” and I experienced a shift in demeanor, as I was extremely irritable and oftentimes downright mean. The concept of the Atkins Diet is basically to cut out carbohydrates from your diet —limiting them to 15-20 grams a day.

Did you know that cheese holds our lives together? Yep. The sun would not rise if we did not have the gluey substance to string our days together. At least, that’s how I felt in my week of veganism. I never realized how dependent my diet was on dairy products until I wasn’t allowed to have them. I started off excited and anxious to embrace this pure diet until I got home the first night totally unprepared for this shift

Want to know how I lost four pounds in two days? It was simple, really. All it took was a few headaches, a rather high grocery bill and one embarrassing tumble outside of Squires. Oh yeah, and I gained it all back by Monday. As someone who is passionate about health, a juice cleanse — the poster-child for yo-yo diets — contradicts everything I stand for.

see ATKINS / page two

see VEGAN / page two

see JUICE / page two

JACOB EMERT sports editor

After an embarassing home loss against Duke, members of the Virginia Tech football team claimed they’d be ready for a road game against Boston College. Yet, thanks to a bevy of turnovers and a complete lack of a running game, the Hokies fell to the Eagles 34-27 in another costly defeat. Shooting yourself in the foot A week after a four-interception performance by

Virginia Tech quarterback Logan Thomas contributed to a 13-10 loss to Duke, the senior quarterback tossed two interceptions and lost two fumbles in a losing effort against Boston College. With the game tied at 20 midway through the fourth quarter, Thomas and the Hokies’ offense began what could have been a gamewinning drive at their own 25-yard line. Facing a third down blitz, Thomas was forced to retreat before he finished his primary drop. see TMT / page five

Crisis hotline offers support, empathy Group brings fairABBEY WILLIAMS lifestyles staff writer

BEN WEIDLICH / SPPS

Volunteers work around the clock to assist callers in need.

Over 40 years ago, a group of students started their own drop-in counseling center in a Virginia Tech dorm room. Today, the spirit of their work remains present in the New River Valley area with Raft, a crisis hotline based in Blacksburg. “We want to listen,” said Holly Smith, manager and clinical supervisor at Raft. “We are here for students calling for any type of help, whether it be anxiety, relationship problems, depression or anything.” The Raft hotline serves as part of a larger resource, the New River Valley Community Services (NRVCS), which reaches the counties of Montgomery,

Floyd, Giles, Pulaski and the city of Radford. “We have over 60 programs, 600 employees and are located at seven or eight sites,” Smith said. “Raft is a small part of the overall agency, but yet it’s the gateway into a lot of our other services. We’re the fi rst point of contact.” The NRVCS provides a variety of mental heath services, including counseling, support groups, in-home treatment and substance abuse support. Raft often functions as an entrance into these other programs, as well as a triaging center for the emergency services department. “Raft is a very big referral source for people calling to find other types of help,” see RAFT / page six

trade apparel to Tech LEAH KOMADA news reporter

United Students Against Sweatshops (USAS) is new to Tech’s campus but has already made prominent efforts to bring fair-trade apparel to the university. Almost four years ago, students within Oxfam at Virginia Tech began pressuring the campus bookstore to source from Alta Gracia, a fair-trade apparel company located in the Dominican Republic that supplies college apparel to universities across the United States. They succeeded in doing

info on the go USAS brought $70,000 worth of fair-trade apparel to the bookstore last year. so last year and brought $70,000 worth of Alta Gracia apparel to the bookstore mid-fall. Because of the initiative to bring fair trade apparel to the bookstore, USAS was born. see GROUP / page six

BREAKING DOWN THE BALLOT The Collegiate Times conducted a poll to see how readers would be voting in today’s election. The poll, which was advertised through social media and a QR code in the paper, was open from Oct. 30 to Nov. 4. With 167 responses, the results are just a small sample of the community.

yes no

78% 22%

NEWS

STUDY BREAK

Terry McAuliffe, 48% Robert Sarvis, 28%

Ralph S. Northam, 68% E.W. Jackson, 15%

Ken Cuccinelli, 19%

Other, 8%

Other, 5%

Abstain, 9%

SPORTS Bored in class? Check out today’s sudoku.

See what the weather holds for the first week of November see page 6

ONLINE The women’s soccer team scored a big win in the quarterfinals of the ACC Tournament. Read about how they did it.

Curious about what kept the police busy this weekend? see page 2 see page 4

For whom will you be voting in the race for the Virginia lieutenant governor?

For whom will you be voting in the race for the Virginia governor?

Will you be voting in or have you already submitted a ballot for the 2013 Virginia gubernatorial election?

see page 5

For updates throughout the day. www.collegiatetimes.com

ctlifestyles CollegiateTimes @collegiatetimes


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lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

November 5, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

Atkins: High protein, low-carb, no fun

NO CAFFEINE

VEGETARIAN

NICK SMIRNIOTOPOULOS

JESSICA GROVES

multimedia editor

lifestyles staff writer

I only started drinking coffee a little over a year ago. I tried it several times before and never liked it — the bitter taste made my tongue shrivel up. However, once I drank the first cup that made me say, “Hey, that’s not bad,” it wasn’t long until I became a regular coffee drinker. For a while, I drank a cup every now and then, but for the last few months, I’ve been drinking two cups a day. I never really thought I needed it, but how can you truly tell if you never stop drinking it? So I did just that. I set out to give it up for a week to see if I could do it. The first day I woke up from about six hours of sleep and started to feel a throbbing headache. “Here we go,” I thought. Caffeine withdrawal symptoms can include chills, depressed mood, difficulty concentrating, headaches and insomnia, according to About.com. Around 50 percent of people experience caffeine withdrawal symptoms, with 13 percent of these being severe. While I guess my morning headache would probably put me in that 50 percent of people affected, this was really the only symptom I experienced — and it was short-lived. After waking up and reorienting myself, having some water and a light breakfast, my headache went away for the most part and I experienced no other extraneous symptoms throughout the day. Ironically, during a week where I wanted to be more health-conscious in anticipation for the potential side effects, I got very little sleep. I had nights where I got maybe five or six hours and definitely craved a nice cup of Joe when I awoke. But once I fought that desire, I experienced very few physiological effects, apart from the minor headache during the mornings. Giving up coffee for an entire week with few harmful effects made me wonder why I feel the need to drink it every day. I started investigating some of the health claims behind coffee, and while there are some controversial opinions on both sides of the spectrum, there are some things that are worth considering. According to Dr. Mark Hyman, practicing physician and founder of The UltraWellness Center, caffeine increases your stress hormones and inflammation. In addition, more habitual coffee drinkers may experience decreased insulin sensitivity, which is one of the main marks of diabetes. Hyman also addresses the issue I was most concerned with: the possibility of addiction. “Addiction is often an issue with coffee drinkers and makes it really difficult to rely on the body’s natural source of energy,” Hyman said in a Huffington Post article. That being said, there has also been research indicating some beneficial effects of coffee, like increased alertness and performance, and its potential antioxidant capacity. While health science may not give us a clear-cut answer as to what the best decision is, my experience giving up coffee has given me to confidence to take a step back and lower my dependence on the all too popular beverage.

LIFESTYLES

When I began my week as a vegetarian, I wasn’t expecting much difficulty. As a senior without a dining plan, I buy my groceries at the farmer’s market or the grocery store. With so many options available to me, I thought vegetarianism was supposed to be a no-brainer. I was both right and wrong. For a little more than a week, I refrained from eating meat, including fish. However, I included eggs and dairy products in my diet, which is officially known as an ovo-lacto vegetarian diet. My usual diet occasionally includes meat but is mostly vegetarian, so I didn’t have much difficulty going without meat. I made a point to order a couple of delivery meals to experience being limited by vegetarian choices in restaurants. I was expecting to be severely limited by the Blacksburg’s restaurants menus, but I was wrong again. Many restaurants offer vegetarian meals. I enjoyed an eggplant parmesan spaghetti dinner with garlic bread from Roma’s Pizza that made me forget all about my worries. Shopping and cooking were even easier. My method was simple: I didn’t put meat in my grocery cart. Financially, this saved me about $15, which can buy you a lot of fruit and vegetables. A pound of ground beef, for example, can cost around $7. A pound of apples, in comparison, costs around $1. I may not have gone home with seven pounds of apples, but the benefit is obvious. As a student with a part-time dining hall job and bills to pay, the extra money was a welcome perk. However, in some ways, my week as a vegetarian was not effortless. It may have been easy for me to stick to a routine that excluded meat from my plate, but that required me to think about alternatives and focus more on dinners than any other meal I prepared. Without meat, my dinners easily shifted to starch-heavy plates of spaghetti, potatoes, soups and side vegetables. I didn’t lose a lot of vitamins and minerals, but I felt like I had a creative block in the kitchen. I sometimes resorted to searching web sites like Pinterest for meal ideas when I got tired of eating pasta-based dishes. I also paid attention to my body’s response to the shift in consumption. During that week, I felt hungrier in the mornings than I usually do, especially after a large fruit salad dinner. Although it seems counterintuitive, once I did eat, I felt more energized and light throughout the day. My biggest takeaway from the temporary vegetarian experience was that being less dependent on meat is a good thing. Even though local grocery stores and farmers offer healthy, humane alternatives to factory-farmed meat, I still want to make a smaller impact on the meat industry. More important than that, taking a break from eating meat of all kinds has helped me to remember self-control. I don’t have to rely on meat to make a meal good, and I don’t take eating meat for granted as much as I did before. Food, like social media and television shows, can become obsessions in our lives. Taking a break to remind myself of what’s important was the most delicious part of my week, and I definitely recommend the challenge.

from page one

This includes not only bread, bagels and the majority of processed foods, but also some fruits and vegetables. The Atkins Diet has primarily faded away in the last 10 years due to the cloud of controversy that continually surrounds it — that cloud being the many studies that suggest Atkins is not healthy or safe in the long run. In fact, according to the American Dietetic Association, people need a minimum of around 150 grams of carbohydrates for our bodies to function efficiently. In addition, according to WebMD.com, it may actually promote heart disease. But when Kim Kardashian announced that she was using the questionable diet to shed her baby weight, Atkins was brought back into the spotlight and is enjoying a renewed popularity. Although Kim has numerous personal trainers and chefs at her

disposal, I decided to see what it would be like for a regular person to follow this strict diet plan. The first thing I learned was that I am not as knowledgeable about nutrition as I thought I was. My very limited understanding of carbs was that they were basically anything sold in boxes like processed food, bread or dessert. How wrong I was. My first dinner on the Atkins Diet was a piece of rotisserie chicken from Owens with a side of pinto beans and collards. I also grabbed a skim milk carton instead of my usual Diet Coke. After eating, I felt satisfied and empowered that I could make it through this week after all — that is until I looked up the nutritional value. All together, this seemingly healthy meal was 132 grams of carbohydrates — 112 grams over my daily limit. I never would have guessed that a cup of pinto beans would be 121 grams and that 8 ounces of skim milk would

be 12 grams of carbohydrates. Although it was much more healthy than what I usually eat, that dinner wasn’t a success according to Atkins. After that, I decided to look up carb values before eating. The daily menu on dining.vt.edu became essential to my survival, as they have all the nutritional values from every dining hall on their website. Throughout the week, I stayed within a small range of options. But essentially, I ate steamed eggs from Turner Place almost every morning, a salad with nothing but chicken for lunch and rotisserie chicken for dinner every night. When I finally mastered limiting my carbs to 15-20 grams a day (let’s be real, I always used the full 20), I was constantly tired. Although my meals left me full due to the high amounts of protein I was eating, something about not eating carbs made me feel like I was stuck in molasses.

Vegan: Living without dairy difficult for diet from page one

in lifestyle, and found myself staring down a new gallon of milk, seven eggs, cheddar cheese and bread. Breathing deeply and trying to stay positive, I opened the cabinet knowing I had a variety of soups saved up. I reached for loaded potato then sighed when I remembered cream is way off limits, then, just to rub it in my face, I saw in a depressing small print the words “with bacon” on the label. I work in a vegetarian restaurant, so I appreciate the powerful flavors of meatless dishes. I assumed cutting out other animal products wouldn’t be that big of deal. The first few days were a success if we can erase the couple of “oops” lines I wrote in my food journal. Oops! Bite of cookie from bake sale. Oops! Bite of extra pancake. Oops! Didn’t know sourdough bread had eggs in it. Oops! Cappuccinos are made with milk, stupid.

Overall, after my vegan meals, I was fully satisfied but not in a food coma, which was energizing. I would be hungry again earlier than usual, but I was eating smaller amounts more consistently instead of lasting on one huge meal a day with the help of a lot of coffee. The most challenging part for me was going out to eat. Few restaurants offer vegan options on their menu (shout–out to Gillie’s and Moe’s for serving tofu). If I learned one major lesson from this week, it was if anyone decides to go vegan, don’t go to IHOP. Don’t you dare put yourself through the misery of eggs and pancakes dancing in front of you on the menu. It’s a rude tease. That’s when I decided to try to cook vegan. Hands-down, I should have been doing that from the start. It was much easier to serve up a delicious vegan meal when I was in control of the ingredients.

The grocery store hunt for vegan products was fun. That was when I gained a whole new respect for people with allergies or strict diets. Reading every list of ingredients was tedious but enlightening for my health senses. I rarely ask what is in the food I eat, because I like to be open-minded and experimental with dishes and flavors that I try. Life lesson of veganism — consider what you’re putting in your body and question how that food will affect your overall being. Learning more about veganism is on my list of things to do... but for now, it will probably remain there until I’m ready to embrace it again. Am I being naive? Yes. But hey, you try giving up cheese for a week and see if you wouldn’t do the same. After a full week of craving bread and cake, I only lost one pound. Needless to say, I thought this impossible feat of cutting out my morning bagel and other favorite foods would warrant a higher weight loss.

Juice: Fast weight loss comes at a price Juice cleanses are like Internet pop-ups that read, “Congratulations! You have won $100,000!” You may have heard all the warnings that clicking on it is simply an invitation for viruses, but isn’t there a tiny teeny voice within you that wonders, “Maybe I really did win?” Part of me wondered if the warnings against juice diets were in vain. What if I was missing out on a great way to lose weight? Besides, who can resist quick, easy and effective? I started by researching some diet plans. Since I do not own a blender, my selection was limited. I settled for a quasi-juice cleanse by drinking only Naked juice, all natural Ginger-lemon juice, plain chicken broth (yes, plain) and copious amounts of tea and coffee. Because an overwhelming amount of the juice diets demanded that participants eat at least one solid

thing at night, both nights I had half a cup of steamed broccoli, and they were glorious. I did notice the lack of solid food, but I still thought that it wasn’t so bad. Toward the middle of the first day, however, I felt light-headed and cranky. By the afternoon, I was ready to collapse on my bed. The second day, I still felt fatigued, only now I also had a stomach ache to contend with. And the chicken broth I splurged on (organic doesn’t come cheap) tasted like nothing. For the days following the cleanse, I ate moderately healthy (mostly fruits, vegetables and lean protein, but also the most delicious chocolate chip waffle you could ever imagine); I did not want to shock my system with junk food or “undo” the effects of the diet. Stepping on the scale Monday morning, it stunned me that I gained every pound back. I do not, however, regret doing the cleanse.

from page one

While “juicing,” I learned something about myself. I realized that by denying my body calories, I denied it the strength I needed to perform well in school. I could not concentrate in class because I felt too distracted by hunger. I could not finish all of my homework, because by 10 p.m. I was zonked and ready for bed. This prevented me from having enough energy and mental alertness to focus on academics and extracurricular activities. As nice as it would be to shrink my body, I would rather work on growing my brain. If you want to lose weight, you need to do it in a way that you still nourish your body. Dieting should never take away from your academics, friendships or any other important aspect of your life. As the old adage goes, moderation is key. Also, you probably shouldn’t click on that “congratulations” pop-up.

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

status

Oct. 12 - 25

1:00 PM - 4:07 PM

Larceny of a bicycle

Outside West Ambler Johnston

Inactive

Oct. 19

12:20 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol X 5

East Pritchard Hall

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct

Oct. 31 - Nov. 1

5:00 PM - 6:48 AM

Vandalism to a window

Lane Hall

Inactive

Nov. 2

12:45 AM - 2:00 AM

Sexual Battery

Slusher Wing

Active

Nov. 2

1:19 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol X 3

Alumni Mall

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Nov. 2

9:15 PM

Underage Possession of Alcohol X 7

Vawter Hall

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Nov. 2

10:31 PM

Underage Possession of Alcohol X 4

Barringer Hall

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Nov. 3

12:08 AM

Unauthorized Climbing

Cassell Coliseum

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Nov. 3

12:28 AM

Appear Intoxicated in Public/Underage Possession of Alcohol

Outside GLC

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Nov. 3

1:10 AM

Appear Intoxicated in Public/Simple Assault

Draper Road

Cleared by Arrest

Nov. 3

1:28 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol

Slusher Wing

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Nov. 3

1:35 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol X 4

Vawter Hall

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Nov. 3

1:49 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol

Miles Hall

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct


OPINIONS

opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com

November 5, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

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The Collegiate Times is an independent studentrun newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff

KEVIN DICKEL / COLLEGIATE TIMES

Which candidate are you voting for? Three opinions writers weighed in on the candidate they will be voting for in the Virginia gubernatorial elections taking place today.

Cuccinelli is the right choice for governor

Sarvis would be a welcome change for state

McAuliffe will best represent people of VA

T

don’t currently, and will never belong to a particular political party. I agree with George Washington’s opinions on such political groups and feel that the costs of such political unification greatly outweigh the benefits. The issues are the most significant aspects of elections and are the premise on which we should cast our votes. And it is important to do the necessary background research in order to make the best decision. After reading through a plethora of articles, watching the debates and learning about both Terry McAuliffe and Ken Cuccinelli, I felt that neither of these candidates possessed the skills or personal integrity that is required for public office. With McAuliffe saturating television with issueless attack ads against Cuccinelli, who recently referred to McAuliffe as a New York Jew even though he’s Roman Catholic, this governor’s race has turned into a pure mud-slinging contest. A Quinnipiac poll released last Wednesday revealed that 70 percent of voters voting for third-party candidate Robert Sarvis are doing so because they dislike the other candidates, which is exactly why I’ll be voting for Sarvis as well. It is often considered throwing away your vote when you vote for a third-party candidate because the chances of actually winning are highly unlikely. However, this is just a tactic employed by both parties to get you to choose them instead. In fact, Sarvis’ platforms are a mix of both the Republican and Democratic stances. According to his website, Sarvis is a proponent of marijuana legalization, gun rights and recognition of samesex marriages in the state of Virginia. He is the epitomy of compromise, and would be a welcome breath of fresh air in a partisan-ridden political environment. You may disagree and feel that it’s a waste of a vote and that the only thing that third party votes accomplish is pulling away votes from your preferred political party. But how is voting for a third-party after researching any worse than walking into the polling place having done no research and voting a straight party line? The only way you can waste a vote is by not voting at all, or by doing some tongue-in-cheek write-in. Each vote counts in the sense that it is one less person they can say supported them and their platform, and as these third-party votes pile up, that’s an ever-increasing percentage of people that are saying they disagree with all other options. I could just not vote, but that wouldn’t accomplish anything. My voice, no matter how small it may be, would not be heard, and that defeats the purpose of the representative democracy system we have in the U.S. Votes mean everything in an election, and the fewer votes each party gets, the more it will make them scrutinize and reevaluate their positions. Talking about things on Facebook, or Twitter, or complaining in your Intro to Political Science class does not gain attention. Political candidates can only be affected by two things: votes and money, and since most college students don’t have the disposable income to donate vast sums of money under the guise of free speech, we must resort to our votes. I implore other disheartened voters, people who are so unsatisfied with what we are given as options that they are not even going to vote, to vote third party. Change does not happen through inaction.

On 

MARCUS WILLIAMS - regular columnist - senior - economics

ALEX HILL - regular columnist - sophomore - political science/English

here’s much to be said about this year’s gubernatorial election – many people are “choosing between the lesser of two evils” in deciding to vote for Ken Cuccinelli or Terry McAuliffe. While the public has been bombarded with negative campaigning on both sides, it’s important to remember the key issue – who will ultimately be the best option for Virginia. Cuccinelli’s experience within state-level government stands out against McAuliffe’s experience. While Cuccinelli has served Virginia as a state senator and as sitting attorney general, McAuliffe brings little experience to the table. This experience and familiarity with state issues stands out from McAuliffe’s idea of big government and his out-of-touch attitude within state affairs. Their respective stances on several issues emphasize these differences. A key difference between these two candidates lies in how they view overreach by the federal government. While Cuccinelli has strongly opposed the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, predicting its unreliability and high fees, McAuliffe has been a supporter of extending it within the state to the point where his proposed policies all center on funding from healthcare expansion, most specifically money gained from Medicaid expansion. At a time when many Virginians are opposed to the Affordable Care Act, McAuliffe’s plan to fund his programs with money from health care expansion just doesn’t make sense. As governor, Cuccinelli plans on opposing this kind of federal government overreach, something that McAuliffe seeks to embrace. Another major issue that the two candidates have is their approach to southwest Virginia’s coal industry. McAuliffe has stated that should he have it his way, Virginia would never open another coal plant again, seeking instead to replace the industry with alternative job markets. Cuccinelli, on the other hand, seeks to keep the coal industry of southwest Virginia and to fight federal governmental regulations that would mandate closure of coal plants. Cuccinelli understands that in southwest Virginia, the coal industry is an integral part of the community, providing jobs to thousands of families who would otherwise lack opportunities for employment. With the coal industry currently in a state of sharp decline, Cuccinelli seeks to supply jobs to an area of the state in desperate need, while McAuliffe wants them all to find other jobs. Cuccinelli’s experience at state level politics and his familiarity with the needs of his constituents set him apart from McAuliffe. McAuliffe’s plan for Virginia includes federal oversight and eliminating jobs to satisfy the higher-ups in Washington. Cuccinelli remains the only candidate in this election to prove that he will stand up to the federal government for the good of the state — a quality Virginia desperately needs. When voting in this election, remember this distinction and cast your ballot for the candidate that represents our state’s best interests. TINNY SONG - regular columnist - junior - political science - intern for the Republican Victory Party

Nov. 5, I will be casting my vote for the next governor of Virginia, and I am proud to say that it will be for Terry McAuliffe. McAuliffe’s campaign platform is “putting jobs first.” If he were elected the next governor, one of his top priorities would be to strengthen Virginia’s economy and make our state one of the most innovative in the union. As a college student, being able to enter a prosperous workforce and obtain a job is of the utmost importance. McAuliffe’s plan to create jobs and numerous occupational opportunities is one of the main reasons why younger citizen’s votes should be for him. McAuliffe also understands that a strong educational system is the foundation of a productive and functional society. Under his leadership, the Virginia Standards of Learning (SOL) tests would go through great reform. No longer would educators be teaching to a test, so the children could actually obtain the information and be evaluated on progress-based data. Community colleges are another area of focus for McAuliffe. Three out of five students seeking a higher education in Virginia are educated in a community college. However, in the past decade, state support for Virginia’s 23 community colleges has declined despite the growth in student enrollment. McAuliffe fully believes in the importance of these institutions and will strive for the colleges to continue in assisting students succeed. In addition, McAuliffe believes that women are able to make their own health care decisions without interference from Richmond or Washington. And you know what, he is absolutely correct. Contrary to what many of our elderly-male political leaders like to think, women are more than capable to choose what they can do with their bodies. We live in what is suppose to be one of the most advanced countries in the world, yet the rights of women continue to be debated by the male gender. Cuccinelli opposes abortion in the case of rape, incest and the health of the woman, and as attorney general has done everything in his power to limit women’s ability to get abortions and obtain birth control by eliminating funding for Planned Parenthood clinics. Also, Cuccinelli was one of only three attorney generals in the country to refuse to sign a bipartisan letter urging Congress to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act. After all, isn’t Virginia supposed to be for lovers? This is a place for people who are open to new experiences and don’t discriminate against those who have different passions. It’s our state’s creed, and the fact that Cuccinelli’s policies are in direct contradiction of that should be a red flag to voters. McAuliffe has received endorsements from President Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and former Secretary of State and Senator Hillary Clinton – along with many others. Like these leaders and fellow citizens across the state, I stand behind McAuliffe and believe he is the best candidate for governor of Virginia.

Editor in Chief: Priscilla Alvarez Managing Editor: Danielle Buynak Art Director: Kevin Dickel Design Editors: Brad Klodowski, Andrea Ledesma Public Editor: Andrew Kulak Web Editor: James O’Hara Multimedia Editor: Nick Smirniotopoulos News Editors: Cameron Austin, Dean Seal News Reporters: Melissa Draudt, Leslie McCrea News Staff Writers: Kelly Cline, Josh Higgins, Matt Minor Lifestyles Editors: Chelsea Giles, Madeline Gordon Opinions Editors: David Levitt, Sharath Reddy Sports Editors: Jacob Emert, Alex Koma Sports Media Manager: Mike Platania Assistant Photo Editor: Ben Wiedlich Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: James Dean Seal Circulation Manager: Keith Bardsley College Media Solutions Ad Director: Michelle Sutherland Account Executives: Taylor Moran, Stephanie Morris, Danielle Pedra Inside Sales Manager: Amanda Gawne Assistant Account Executives: Catie Stockdale Jordan Williams, Emily Daugherty, Emily Reina, Becca Schwartz Creative Director: Diana Bayless Creative Staff: Mariah Jones, Samantha Keck, Kitty Schaffernoth, Seden Craig. Katherine Miller

Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2013. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


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November 5, 2013

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Today’s Birthday Horoscope: Venus enters Capricorn today, heralding a year in which discipline applied toward areas of passion produces remarkable results. Begin pursuit of an ambition. Use Mercury’s retrograde to craft solid financial plans and infrastructure. Your people are your greatest wealth, and partnership your greatest key. Practice your art with talented friends. Grow the love.

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66 Show closers, perhaps 67 Balmoral attraction

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By Frank Virzi

11/5/13

ACROSS 1 Stands 7 Load in a basket 11 Label 14 Busts 15 Potent introduction? 16 Nabokov novel 17 Source of mints, at times 19 With “on” and 59Across, a hint to the theme hidden in three places in this puzzle 20 7-Across destination, eventually

for the week of November 5th to 8th

Gronlandic Edit- Of Montreal Cruel- St. Vincent No Children- The Mountain Goats Clair de Lune- Flight Facilities Wake Up- Arcade Fire

listen up

21 New York City’s __ River 22 Chowderhead 23 They often accompany stretches 25 “I Loves You, Porgy” and others 26 House on TV, e.g. 30 Poker star Hansen 31 River from the Cantabrian Mountains 32 Invasion leaders of the ’60s 39 It prohibits illegal search and seizure 41 The recent past

42 Huit + trois 43 __-Aztecan languages 44 Buyer, in legal usage 46 Love 49 Roundup need 52 Zoom 53 Sub 54 Once and again 59 See 19-Across 60 Subject of a 1922 archaeological discovery 62 Santa __ winds 63 One who often doesn’t pick up? 64 Some chickens 65 Craving

DOWN 1 Start of a tots’ song 2 1922 physics Nobelist 3 “__, old chap!” 4 Taj Mahal topper 5 Developmental stage 6 Prescott-toTempe dir. 7 Smith attendee 8 Round up 9 Hissy fit 10 Went underground 11 Attraction near U.S. 395 12 Go with the flow 13 Jenga and jacks 18 Remote letters 22 Broom alternative 24 Prefix with -pod 25 Pair 26 Challenge 27 Clarinet cousin 28 French vineyards 29 Agony 30 Blues and others 33 It’s cut and dried 34 Morph ending 35 Emmy-winning Arthur 36 Provided temporarily 37 Auto designer Ferrari 38 Prank ending

40 Head of Québec 45 Lepidopterous opponent of Godzilla 46 Orderly grouping 47 “Tell It to My Heart” singer Taylor 48 Expanse with crests 49 Reveal 50 Most Syrians 51 Cain was the first

53 Dance with flowing gestures 55 Distance 56 “__ a man with seven wives” 57 Forearm exercise 58 Start of Massachusetts’s motto 60 Medicine amt. 61 “Original, crispy or grilled?” co.

Friday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

11/1/13

WORDSEARCH: Names that Start with A Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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Aries (March 21-April 19) Participate socially this month, and get lost in fascinating philosophical conversation. Others are looking to you for a decision. Once you commit you’ll ind freedom, and release. And others can make their own. Perform an anonymous good deed.

underestimate the power of cookies. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Be careful. For four weeks, work gets exceptionally fun. Don’t get distracted while chopping. What could thrive in such a creative environment? Make a mess and ind out. Spend time in contemplation. Keep it practical.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Travel looks tempting, but postpone until tomorrow, if possible (or just dance with some surprises). Ignore someone who says you’ll fail, and make a list of goals. Plan actions and strategies to support your team.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Luscious romance takes center stage. Dance your way into the spotlight. Others give you support in your career, but you have to be willing to receive it. Postpone travel for now.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) Don’t let obstacles slow you down. Practice with your teammate to break records. Get old business handled. The next month is good for saving money and handling inances. Go for fast, fun productivity.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Opposition to your ideas could arise. They probably have a good reason. Try their shoes on, and walk a mile, before responding. At least you’ll get some exercise and learn something new. Make your own choices.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) Female magnetism pays a big role in today’s successes. Strengthen partnerships this month. Costs may be higher than expected. Proceed with caution, but you can handle it. Compromise, delegate and don’t

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You’re even smarter than usual. A con lict of interests shows up at your door. Try to understand other people’s feelings and it goes easier. Get outside perspectives. Keep your inances ethical.

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Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) At irst, the task may seem impossible. Looking at it more closely or from a different angle reveals new data. Gather new income now. You ind your comfort zone, and con idence soars. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Don’t throw money at the problem or you could very well make it worse. Worrying about it won’t take you anywhere. Use patience and brains. De ine how you’d like it to go. Someone inds that very romantic. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Finish old jobs and new ones lourish and spark over the next month. Pad the schedule for setbacks. Decline an expensive invitation. Listen to a wise relative or a realistic friend. Spice your creation with subtlety. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)Imagine yourself in an earlier time. You’re especially popular, but your social life could cause a problem at home. Find the perfect balance by communicating your passion and acknowledging your support team.

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SPORTS

sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com

November 5, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

5

TMT: Lack of run game sinks offense

GET TURNED ON

Pound the rock Going into Saturday’s matchup in Chestnut Hill, much was made about Boston College’s physical style of play, centered on their running attack. That ground-and-pound offense was on full display, as Eagles’ running back Andre Williams rushed for 166 yards on 33 carries — just over five yards a try — against Tech’s defense. While Boston College’s offense was able to control the game through the run by piling up 201 yards, Tech’s was not. “It definitely hurts when you’re not consistent running the football,” Beamer said. “It gets back to not just one group but a little bit of everything. It definitely makes it tougher.” Eliminating rushes by Thomas, the Hokies ran the ball nine times for 19 yards on Saturday. “We’ve got to run our quarterback,” Beamer said. “That’s a fact with this football team.” Perhaps the greatest example of their inability to run the ball with any sort of positive outcome came midway through the third quarter, after a 69-yard connection between Thomas and Stanford left the Hokies on the one-yard line with a fresh set of downs. On first down, Thomas received a shotgun snap and handed off to Edmunds, who was lined up behind him in the pistol, for a run to the left side. The run blocking was non-existent and Eagles defenders got to Edmunds before he could get back to the line of scrimmage. On second down, again out

CHEN JIANG / SPPS

Logan Thomas (3) threw two interceptions and fumbled the ball twice against Boston College, allowing the Eagles to score 17 points. of shotgun, Thomas looked right on a play-action roll out, but with no open receiver, he tucked, ran left, tried to dive for the endzone and came up just short. A fumbled center-quarterback exchange squandered whatever chance the Hokies’ third-down play had. Fourth down: Thomas faked to Edmunds out of the backfield and found a wide open Kalvin Cline, who had released from his tight end position, in the back of the endzone for a touchdown.

When first-year offensive coordinator Scot Loeffler came to Tech, he brought with him a determination to establish a formidable rushing attack. For a variety of reasons — troubles on the offensive line, running backs misreading holes, wide receivers failing to block on the outside — this has not come to fruition. With a first-and-goal from the one-yard line, a 6-foot-6-inch quarterback under center and a proven bruiser in the backfield, the Hokies’ only success came through the air on fourth down. “Being able to keep the defense

off balance and being able to mix it up (makes) a lot of difference for your quarterback,” Beamer said.

Kicking game The brilliant performance of placekicker Cody Journell was often lost amidst the depression of this defeat. Journell, who has faced his share of adversity lately, was two-for-two on Saturday with a pair of field goals from 45-plus yards out. The redshirt senior made his first-ever kick from 50-plus

yards as he nailed a 56-yarder through the uprights to give Tech a three-point lead heading into the half. The field goal was the longest one made during coach Frank Beamer’s tenure. The Ripplemead, Va. native made a 47-yard kick in the opening minutes of the fourth quarter to give the Hokies a 20-17 lead. Journell was named the ACC’s Specialist of the Week.

@JacobEmert

Women’s soccer wins ACC quarterfinal VTTV

WWW.VTTV.VT.EDU

Then he made an ill-advised pass, lofting the ball over the middle off his back foot into a hoard of Eagles defenders. The pass was easily intercepted and returned for a touchdown. The second of Thomas’ two interceptions on the day squandered the chance for the Hokies to take a lead late in the fourth quarter; they wouldn’t hold or share the lead again. Given the timing and the result, it was arguably the worst decision he’s made since taking over as starting quarterback in 2011. “Some days when you’re out there competing at a high level, some days are better than others,” said head coach Frank Beamer. “He had a rough outing. But as far as what he’s all about and him being our quarterback, that’s not in question.” His first interception came on the first play inside Eagles’ territory in the second half. Thomas took the shotgun snap and tried to lead receiver Demitri Knowles on a six-yard crossing route over the middle. Knowles threw one hand in the air, deflected the ball up and allowed a simple Eagles interception. “Sometimes it’s us not making the catch and then the ball gets intercepted,” said receiver Josh Stanford. “Sometimes it’s us not making a play on the ball or batting it down. Sometimes it’s us running the wrong routes. Sometimes we’re not running the routes, either we mess up or don’t get open, which forces the quarterback to make other reads that he shouldn’t have made had we run the appropriate routes.” Three plays later, Boston College, which returned the interception inside Tech’s red zone, was forced to settle for a field goal. Tech’s defense was tossed on the field in the shadow of its own goal posts and held strong. But because of forces outside of their control, the Eagles tied the game. The senior quarterback is 14-0 as a starter in games in which he hasn’t thrown an interception. Including the pick-six in the fourth quarter, Boston College

benefitted to the tune of 17 points from Hokies’ turnovers. “That’s the biggest measure of winning and losing a game is turnovers,” Thomas said. “You’ve just got to try to limit them.” Even with a defense as stout as Tech’s, the margin for error with an offense as inconsistent as the Hokies’ is too small to turn the ball over four times in a game and win. “You take out about five plays out of that game, and it’s a totally different ball game,” Beamer said.

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The Virginia Tech women’s soccer team defeated the Notre Dame Fighting Irish 2-1 in a dramatic double overtime game in their second meeting of the season in the ACC Tournament quarterfinal match this past Sunday. This victory marks the Hokies’ first in the ACC Tournament since 2009. “We have won games in the past, but last year we didn’t make the tournament, so making the tournament and winning the first round is tremendous,” said head coach Chugger Adair. Senior keeper Dayle Colpitts ended the match with six saves and the Hokies moved to 3-0-2 in overtime matches this season. Unlike their last meeting when Tech barely walked away with a win, both teams started off strong, as each squad had 15 shots in just the first 31 minutes of the game. “I think that we need to be sharper around the goal and stick those away,” Adair said. “I would be discouraged if we weren’t creating chances but we are creating chances we just need to finish them.” Both teams had multiple opportunities, but Notre Dame was the first to strike in the 28th minute. Notre Dame’s leading scorer, Lauren Bohaboy, slid past a Hokie defender and kicked the ball past Colpitts to give the Fighting Irish a 1-0 lead. The rest of the half remained uneventful and the Hokies did not come back to tie up the game until the 57th minute. Jodie Zelenky played a long ball to freshman Candace Cephers in a crowded box. Cephers gained possession of the ball and

ZACK WAJSGRAS / SPPS

Candace Cephers (18) scored a goal to tie the game for the Hokies before the squad triumphed 2-1. slipped it past the crowd for the freshman’s first collegiate goal of her career. Throughout the remainder of the game, both teams became increasingly physical, with five yellow cards and one red card for the Fighting Irish. Notre Dame defender Elizabeth Tucker had already been issued a yellow card, but after Tech freshman Murielle Tiernan grabbed the ball in the midfield, the defender grabbed the forward’s jersey to try and stop her and was immediately ejected from the game. “It gave us an advantage,” said senior forward Jazmine Reeves. “It just meant that they weren’t as dangerous. They had one less person going forward, so it was good.” With the Fighting Irish down

10 players, the Hokies went into attack mode, creating multiple opportunities that they failed to act upon. “It’s very frustrating, especially in a game like this when so much is on the line with it being a knockout round, but the good news is that we are creating those chances and hopefully that will start working for us,” Reeves said. The game eventually went into double overtime and almost went into penalty kicks. But Reeves got her head on the ball after a second corner kick attempt by the Hokies with 1:13 left to play. “We had a corner, which we had been having corners all game. (Kelsey) Loupee sent a great ball in and I headed the ball,” Reeves said. “I thought it went past the near post and it

went right between the defender and the post and I wasn’t even sure it was a goal at first.” This score was Reeves’ eighth this season, tying her for the team lead with Tiernan and sophomore Ashley Meier. It was her first goal since the Hokies’ 2-0 victory over Maryland in September. “It was amazing to get a goal, especially at a time like that,” Reeves said. “Overtime goals are always so exciting, but I am just happy for the team. It doesn’t matter who scores.” The Hokies will move forward to the ACC Tournament semifinal to face Virginia this Friday at 5:30 p.m.

@CTSportsTalk


6

newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

November 5, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

NEWS

Raft: Volunteers offer counseling Group: Students work to fight unethical labor from page one

BEN WEIDLICH / SPPS

Raft Crisis Hotline offers counseling services like suicide and crisis intervention as well as substance abuse referrals to the community. from page one

Smith said. “If we can’t directly handle it on the phone with you, we can refer you to who can.” The hotline is staffed with over 50 active volunteers, including both students and community members. However, Smith hopes to encourage more local citizens to become involved. “We currently have mostly student volunteers and that’s a place we’d like to reach out to more, to have volunteers of all ages,” Smith said. “Calls defi nitely increase with the holiday season, and that’s the time we’re least

staffed because students are on their own winter breaks. We would like to have people that are here in the area help cover those times of the year.” All Raft volunteers complete an 8 to 10 week training program, which emphasizes active listening skills and crisis assessment. Kelsey O’Hara, a 2012 Tech graduate and volunteer at Raft , believes the hotline provides an opportunity for volunteers to experience real-life work in the mental health field. “As an undergrad psychology student, I was interested in counseling,” O’Hara said. “Although Raft isn’t

professional counselors, it’s defi nitely a foray into that area and it inspired me to go into the health field.” Volunteer applications are accepted all throughout the year and training is done once a semester with the next training sessions beginning in February. In addition to accepting volunteers, Smith and O’Hara are working to increase fundraising for Raft by reaching out to student organizations on campus. Whether it be test anxiety, feelings of depression, or something more, Raft serves as a beacon of support for

anyone in need. “Students don’t have to be suicidal or in crisis to take advantage of Raft ,” Smith said. “They should never feel like they’re burdening by seeking help.” Raft can be contacted at 540-961-8400. The hotline operates 24 hours on the weekends, and from 4 p.m. to 8 a.m. Monday through Friday. “There’s always hope,” Smith said. “There’s always someone willing to listen, and there’s a strength in asking for support.”

@AbbeyWilliamsVT

Th is semester, the student organization began their campaign, in conjunction with almost 100 other USAS groups at various universities, calling on Virginia Tech to incorporate the Bangladesh Fire and Factory Safety Accord into its licensee code of conduct. This would pressure corporations to improve their practices and ensure that Hokie apparel is not produced in any risky or dangerous Bangladeshi factories. To see whether Tech complied with this accord, USAS delivered a letter to President Steger asking that the university put the code of conduct for licensees online, in a public setting. “We want the code of conduct to include a clause that all apparel companies we buy from will be signed to the Bangladesh Fire and Factory Safety Accord,” said Kevin Sharp, USAS media director. “This means that the companies manufacturing in Bangladesh are up to standards and are safe for workers.” In response to the letter, the group received word that the university was looking into the matter and that the code of conduct had been published on Tech’s website. A few weeks later, USAS dropped off another letter, giving the university a deadline by which they wanted to see a validated response regarding the amendment of the code to include the Bangladesh Fire and Factory Safety Accord.

“We were given another response saying that they had looked into it and were talking with the Worker’s Rights Consortium (WRC), which is an independent monitoring organization that supports workers in the industry by protecting their rights in the workplace,” Sharp said. Since then, the WRC has released a statement advising that affi liate universities, including Tech, require companies that produce apparel to sign on to the Bangladesh Fire and Factory Safety Accord. “We are following the Worker’s Rights Consortium’s progress with educating companies sourcing materials in Bangladesh,” said Larry Hincker, associate vice president of university relations. “Knights Apparel, one of the largest licensees of (Tech) merchandise, recently signed the accord.” The university’s licensing company, Collegiate Licensing Corporation (CLC), will be hosting a meeting later this month with the WRC to discuss, with other collegiate licensees, the conditions in Bangladesh and those stated in the Fire and Safety Accord. “We are pleased that WRC is working with CLC to reach out to licensees and help them evaluate the accord,” said Hincker. “We believe this measured approach is prudent at this time.”

@LCKomada

weather watch JAMES MORROW @WxBONE

After a cool but pleasant start to the work week, warmer temperatures and rain move in by midweek. It won’t hang around for long, as clear skies look to round out the weekend. Blacksburg suffered through another frozen morning on Tuesday. Campus will slowly thaw out as the morning continues with partly sunny skies. Clouds will slowly build throughout the day, as our high temperature looks to reach 54 in the afternoon. Clouds will hang around overnight, keeping us above freezing. Wednesday starts out pleasant with mostly sunny skies. Clouds will hold off until the midafternoon with highs reaching the 60 degree mark. Clouds will once again slowly take over into the evening as a cold front approaches the region. A few showers will move in just after sunset and persist overnight. Lows look to only drop into the mid-40s. The heaviest showers will move in during the day on Thursday as the front presses through the area. Rain will come down in a hurry, but only last a short amount of time. Skies should begin to clear just after sunset. Lows will drop into the mid-30s. The remainder of the week and into the weekend looks sunny and dry. Temperatures will hang out in the 50s during the day, while dipping to near freezing at night. The next chance for rain comes early next week. JAMES MORROW James Morrow is CT’s news weather correspondent. He is a senior Meteorology major and a Hokie Storm Chaser. He currently serves as the Meteorology Club President and is the Chief Meteorologist at WUVT 90.7 FM Blacksburg.


Tuesday, November 5, 2013 Print Edition