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Thursday, October 31, 2013

An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

COLLEGIATE TIMES

110th year, issue 41 News, page 2

Lifestyles Lifestyles,, page 4

Opinions Opinions,, page 5

Sports Sports,, page 7

Study Break Break,, page 6

Skipper celebrates 50 years of service BY EMILY HUGHES | news staff writer

T

he blast from the Corps of Cadets' cannon, Skipper, can be heard reverberating around Lane Stadium when the Hokies score during home football games. For half a century, Skipper has remained a staple of Corps of Cadets tradition. To celebrate this milestone, a free 50th anniversary event will be held on Oct. 31 in Burruss Hall at 3:30 p.m. The event will include a presentation in the Burruss Hall auditorium followed by a demonstration on the Drillfield. The Corps of Cadets' marching band, the Highty-Tighties, will also perform. “The Skipper holds a special place in the history of the Corps and the university, and we are delighted that it will be celebrated in such a special way,” Major General Randal Fullhart said. Skipper was born in 1963 through the efforts of three cadets: George Fox, Alton “Butch” Harper and Homer “Sonny” Hickam—the last of whom is

ICAT innovates at the nexus CHELSEA GILES lifestyles editor

Hold out your phone. Now ask yourself, “what does it take to make this?” Consider all of the layers of design, engineering, math, technology and more it required to create such an interactive and functional gadget, one that has transformed the way people communicate. Benjamin Knapp, the director of the Institute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology (ICAT), said this is how he explains why ICAT is essential to how we approach research and innovation in the future. ICAT was founded two years ago and was housed in STUDIONE in Collegiate Square. Now, the institute has DANNY DUANGPHACHANH / SPPS

ICAT designed spooky virtual Halloween displays for Tech or Treat.

noted for his biography 'Rocket Boys' that inspired the film October Sky. In those days, Tech was more commonly called the Virginia Polytechnic Institute (VPI). The cadets were inspired to challenge the cannon “Little John” from Virginia Military Institute, enlisting the help of mechanical engineering students to build a wooden barrel mold that preceded the eventual brass one. “(Harper) found out that the Virginia state government had given VMI some old cannon and that we could probably get one, too,” Hickam wrote in an article entitled “The Birth of Skipper,” published in the summer 2000 edition of the Virginia Tech Magazine. “Our VPI administration wasn’t interested, however, so Butch decided that—by God—we’d make our own.” see SKIPPER / page three

Developers confident in future of ‘robo jellyfish’

BEN WEIDLICH / SPPS

A robotic jellyfish prototype was given a test run at War Memorial Hall last April, and performed well. see ICAT / page two

KYLE BARGER

Town wins ‘green’ award AASTHA BATRA news staff writer

In the race towards sustainability and a healthier environment, Blacksburg recently won “Gold” in the Green Government Challenge hosted by the Virginia Municipal League, earning 160 “green points” out of the maximum 200 and securing the certification of “Green Government.”

NEWS

The award was presented at the annual VML conference in Arlington, Va. on Oct. 15. The VML Green Government Challenge was a competition held among local governments in Virginia in an effort to promote a healthier environment, safer living, and the preservation of natural resources and landscapes. It required the implementation of environmental policies and actions

see GREEN page two

LIFESTYLES

A team of mechanical engineers at Virginia Tech has been in the process of designing an autonomous robotic jellyfish for the past five and a half years. While the funding for the assignment is drawing to a close, by no means does that signal the end of the road for the developers. The United States Navy gave Tech, along with other universities such as UCLA and California Institute of Technology, a grant to design an underwater robot in the

see page 8

form of a jellyfish. Tech has received three extensions on the initial 3-year grant and is looking for financial aid to further support the project. “I don’t think it’s that big of a concern to be honest,” said Colin Stewart, a graduate student in mechanical engineering whose role on the project is to compute the swimming motion of the jellyfish. “I think that we have a few sources that are pretty solid.” A couple of the sources include the Navy once again, as well as the National Science Foundation. Even though finances are now in question, it hasn’t stopped the team

SPORTS Check out where author and Twitter sensation Mandy Hale, “The Single Woman,” is hosting events this weekend.

Time for crime: check out the Crime Blotter. see page 2 See our photo essay about Skipper, Tech’s iconic game cannon, turning 50 today. see page 3

that would protect the environment and reduce carbon emissions. The “green points” were awarded when up to 30 policies and actions in different categories were adopted and implemented. “We got points for establishing an electronics recycling program with Virginia Tech so that the people in the

news staff writer

see ROBO / page two

ONLINE Hokies secondary looks to get healthy, offensive line shows slight improvement.

see page 7

from continuing its research. “I’m still working on the robots, and as far as I know, there’s no end date as to when we are going to stop doing that,” said Alex Villanueva, a postdoctoral student in mechanical engineering, who works with the robot design aspect of the project. The Navy’s hope is to receive a product that uses little energy, handles abuse from the environment and has the ability to remain in the ocean for weeks or months at a time without receiving attention from other researchers.

Volleyball heads down south for a pair of ACC matches.

Voting next Tuesday? We want to know. Take our survey!


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newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 31, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

NEWS

Green: Council champions future sustainability efforts from page one

community have a place to recycle their household electronics which end up in landfills which ends up in the water supply,” said Carol Davis, Blacksburg’s sustainability manager. “People can take them to the money or use it for other programs.” Other town council members agree that Blacksburg has done a lot in the past and is currently working hard to focus on sustainability and promote a healthier environment. “We have hybrid buses, we have put public recycling bins downtown and we are working on energy efficiency in our buildings,” said council member Susan Anderson. “We want

every new building or every building renovation as a town building to be lead certified. And again, it’s our staff that makes those things happen but our town council supports that.” Furthermore, Sustainable Blacksburg, a non-profit community organization focused on reducing Blacksburg’s environmental impact, has played a big role through education and outreach programs. “Sustainable Blacksburg has been a great partner and resource to us,” Davis said. “They helped us get the word out with their community groups. Sustainable Blacksburg has a partnership with us to find initiative that we all want to advance and host various

Robo: Funding still uncertain from page one

Currently, similar marine research requires an entire team working with the robot, staying in the area until the research is complete, bringing it back for maintenance and then repeating the sequence. “The whole vision of our project is to develop something that is cheap to produce, it’s cheap to operate and it lasts for a long period of time,” said Villanueva. The robot will have a wide range of applications, from military surveillance to the observation of migratory patterns of marine life to purifying ocean water after oil spills. According to Villanueva, early difficulties the team faced included discovering how the natural animal maneuvered and figuring out how to replicate that movement in the form of a robot. “A jellyfish is very simple, but there’s also very little known, at least at that point, as to how it (swims),” he said. Stewart said similar problems arose when he fi rst attempted to model the movement of a jellyfish from a mathematical standpoint. However, after the initial struggles, the project has gotten off of the ground with successful results. “The ones recently we’ve been making are a lot more lifelike,” Stewart said. “The latest ones have just looked better, swam better, (have) been more efficient. We’re getting close to the natural animal itself as far as how fast they swim.” Project achievements have included the design and creation of multiple types of jellyfish robots, including a 5-foot 7 inch 170 pound machine called Cyro which

is the largest jellyfish robot ever made. “Every robot we did, we’re basically achieving something with that robot that hadn’t been done before,” Villanueva said.

A jellyfish is very simple, but there’s also very little known, at least at that point, as to how it (swims).” Alex Villanueva, Postdoctoral student in mechanical engineering

The team has received praises from the Navy as well. “We’ve gotten a lot of positive feedback, a lot of interaction with some of the guys in the Navy who’ve offered us suggestions,” Stewart said. “They’ve been really impressed.” According to Stewart, the Navy categorizes its research projects into three different tiers. The first is the basic research level, which is where Tech’s jellyfish project currently resides. In the second level, the project is taken closer to deployment by applying various assessments such as failure tests. Lastly, improvements are made in order to complete the product. While the jellyfish team has a long path to travel before its robot can be deployed, progress thus far has been clear and well received, leaving the team optimistic for the future.

@KyleB_VT

events on that.” Seven other communities ranked higher than Blacksburg, prompting an increased fervor for Davis. “It brings out friendly competition. They got a better score and it motivates us to think what we can do to catch up to Charlottesville (Va.),” Davis said. “It encourages us to reach out to them.” But this is just a small milestone in Blacksburg’s indefinite quest to become more sustainable. Blacksburg has started using a new self-assessment tool called STAR Community Index, a national consensus-based rating system for community sustainability. “We are working on envi-

ronmental policy planning and seeing where we should self-score ourselves and figure out where we want to go from there,” Davis said. Additionally, Davis and her team are working on the Climate Action Plan, which will focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The project kicked off in 2007 and is currently in the research and development phase. “We are finalizing data on it and hoping to get it approved by town council in the spring. The plan is only as good as it is embraced and implemented by the community. We want to get moving,” Davis said. The Climate Action Plan will look at how much each sector of the community contributes

to the greenhouse gases that are being produced. Residents are a large source of energy use, especially through heating and cooling. There are, however, some threats that could prevent total sustainability in Blacksburg. For example, many of the town’s energy resources come from coal — which is not sustainable. “We have a pretty good solar potential, which are untapped sources. We could expand our renewable resource portfolio. Solar is our best resource for this area,” Davis said. “There is great potential to expand solar energy in this region. There is a lot of interest in how we can expand solar energy for the whole New River Valley

region.” Overall, many town council members agreed that sustainability is a complex process. “The town can ratify a climate action plan, but they don’t have the authority to make sure people drive less. They can only educate the public and provide incentives to homeowners or business owners,” Davis said. “The hurdle is if the financial investments can be made. Where does the money come from? How do those things happen? There are questions about what it takes for people to adopt a certain behavior.”

@CollegiateTimes

ICAT: Art center houses research studios from page one

relocated into the new Center for the Arts building where there are a variety of state-ofthe-art studios, workshop spaces and the CUBE theatre to host its research and events. “It’s an incredibly complicated building, and one of the cool things about this building is that you can move data and video and audio from anywhere to anywhere,” Knapp said. “A theme is everything is movable.” This flexibility and adaptability is a key design for ICAT’s particular interest in crossing academic lines through transdisciplinary research. ICAT is one of seven research institutes that stretch across the colleges on campus. It collaborates with and engages so many groups and areas that it can be difficult to clearly state what they do. Knapp narrowed down all of their efforts into three primary goals. ICAT aims to prepare all students from primary to university levels to succeed in a work world where the STEM education areas collaborate in a cohesive and diverse way with grants received both nationally and internationally. It also promotes transdisciplinary research that knows no bounds from engineering to art to innovate future knowledge and work. And lastly, ICAT organizes events, classes and workshops to engage all ages in the creative process where participants can turn their own ideas into art. A majority of their research focuses on K-12 education, which has been the inspiration for many of their community events. The Children’s Museum of Blacksburg has partnered with ICAT since the institute’s beginnings to support and help organize various community events such as “Dino Dig” and the “Cardboard Challenge” to engage children in creative technological environments. Janine Kniola, founder and board member of the Children’s Museum of Blacksburg, said the museum’s mission is to sup-

port and engage children in the exploration of science, technology, the arts and regional heritage, so naturally, they are a perfect fit for ICAT. The Children’s Museum’s most recent collaboration with the institute was “Tech or Treat,” which they supported with a fall art display created by children in a workshop as well as providing volunteers to guide children through the festive displays and activities. Kniola said the two organizations are interconnected to help children become creative and dynamic thinkers in more than just in the realm of art. “It’s not just about the artistic aspect or musical aspect, it’s also connected to science and math and the other STEM subjects,” Kniola said. “We’re not just being creative. We’re being innovative and helping children enhance their learning experience.” Knapp also said the focus on creative learning at a young age results in a more inventive future generation of students and thinkers. “If you look at the arc of ICAT, it wouldn’t make sense not to include K-12, because if we’re looking at the inflow of students that have this creativity and this understanding of all the different disciplines and how to bring them together, we want to have them feed Virginia Tech and the students here and the collaborative projects here,” Knapp said. “And then finally, what’s the output? The output is entrepreneurs and innovators.” And for current college students who may not have had these transformative types of learning experiences in elementary school, Knapp encourages them to begin thinking differently and see the value in the type of approach ICAT takes. Knapp referred to a recent IBM survey of Fortune 500 companies who were asked what they look for in college graduates, and the results broke the stereotype that they only hire mathematicians and engineers. “Of course, they said ‘We want people to think outside of the box, be creative, to be able to work in interdisciplinary

DANNY DUANGPHACHANH / SPPS

The Center was open yesterday for Tech-or-Treat, an interactive Halloween exhibit that was a collaboration between ICAT and artists. teams.’ These are things companies are really looking for when you graduate,” Knapp said. To implement and practice this type of overlapping and seemingly futuristic type of curriculum, ICAT needs studio spaces to compliment and support their work. Ruth Waalkes, associate provost for the arts and executive director of the Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech, said ICAT was incorporated into the design for the Center after visionary planners proposed the research element in the planning process. “It’s really unique in the country. If you look at programs similar to ours or other centers like this, I don’t think there’s one that has a research institute embedded in its facility,” Waalkes said. “I think people will be inspired by the space, and it will open a lot of possibilities for creative people.” The combination of research and performance, Knapp said, reflects the entire purpose of ICAT as a nexus— an interesting space of interconnection where different sides of a spec-

trum can be intertwined. He said the Center nurtures the relationship between performance of human interaction with the technical implementation to make it come to life. It’s an unexplored gray area they are excited to dive into. “We really focus on the areas between human and technology and how these things will coexist, when will they co-exist, when should they should not,” Knapp said. But as a considerably young institute still settling down in its new high-tech facility, ICAT’s possibilities and research have only just begun. Knapp said the partnership between the institute and the Center will only continue to develop and advance with time. “I think it will be transformative, but transformative does imply something that happens over the course of time,” Knapp said. “We’re just beginning to explore that.”

@gilesreporting

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

status

Dec. 31, 2013 Sept. 9, 2012

9:00 AM - 10:09 AM

Follow up to Fraud

University Bookstore

Inactive

Sept. 15

3:00 PM - 10:30 PM

Follow up to Larceny of bicycle and lock

Outside of Hahn Basketball Facility

Inactive

Sept. 23-24

7:00 PM - 12:00 PM

Follow up to Larceny of bicycle and lock

Outside Barringer Hall

Inactive

Sept. 25-26

9:05 PM - 9:00 AM

Follow up to Larceny of bicycle and lock

Special Purposes Housing

Inactive

Sept. 27-30

5:00 PM - 8:27 AM

Follow up to Burglary/Breaking and Entering

Center for the Arts

Inactive

Sept. 27-30

5:00 PM - 8:27 AM

Follow up to Burglary/Breaking and Entering

Center for the Arts

Inactive

Sept. 27-30

5:00 PM - 8:27 AM

Follow up to Burglary/Breaking and Entering

Center for the Arts

Inactive

Sept. 27-30

5:00 PM - 8:27 AM

Follow up to Burglary/Breaking and Entering

Center for the Arts

Inactive

Oct. 3

7:50 PM

Follow up to Trespassing

Innovation Drive

Inactive

Oct. 17

3:04 AM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public

East Eggleston

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct

Oct. 27

1:37 AM

Simple Assault

Barringer Hall

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct

Oct. 22-24

12:00 PM - 8:00 AM

Burglary

Torgersen Hall

Active

Oct. 25-29

4:00 PM - 9:00 AM

Burglary

Torgersen Hall

Active

Oct 25 - 29

4:00 PM - 9:00 AM

Burglary

Torgersen Hall

Active

Oct. 28

2:04 PM

Harassment

Hancock Hall

Active

Oct. 29

4:00 AM - 4:30 AM

Vandalism/Destruction of Property

Pritchard Hall

Active

Oct. 29

9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

Vandalism/Destruction of Property

Drillfield Drive

Active


NEWS

newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 31, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

3

Skipper: An icon of Tech Gameday from page one

CHEN JIANG / SPPS

Two cadets push the Skipper cannon into Lane Stadium from the south endzone. This is no easy feat, as the Skipper cannon weighs 1000 lbs.

Donations from within the Corps — including scraps of brass for the body — helped facilitate the cannon’s construction. A foundry in Roanoke used these scraps, along with those donated by Hickam’s father, to create the cannon that would eventually be named Skipper, in honor of the President John F. Kennedy, who had died that year. The cadets later found that some of their brass shell casings were not empty, as they’d suspected, so a series of small explosions erupted from the vat during the melting process. Th is didn’t halt the creation of the cannon, however. A carriage was created to house it, and its grandeur was tested when cadets filled the barrel with gunpowderfilled condiment bottles and set them off. The Corps was

prepared to stun VMI by unveiling their new creation at the showdown football game known as the “Military Classic of the South.” At the Thanksgiving game, VMI was shocked into silence. “What a blast! The enclosed stadium concentrated the sound, and football players nearby were practically bowled over by it,” Hickam wrote. “The VMI Corps stopped cheering and just gaped at us. We had a winner.” Thus a fifty-year tradition was initiated. The university’s commemoration in Burruss Hall on Thursday will honor that history. “We hope that many people will join us on the 31st,” Major Fullhart said.

@CollegiateTimes

CHEN JIANG / SPPS

Cadet Artillery Corporal Matthew Whitford measures black powder. CHEN JIANG / SPPS

Cadet Artillery Sergeant Jeremy Boone checks the Skipper’s barrel for any residue. Cleaning occurs regularly to keep Skipper in firing shape.

CHEN JIANG / SPPS

CHEN JIANG / SPPS

A truck tows the Skipper down Sterret St. before last Saturday’s game against Duke. A group of cadets follow to bring Skipper into the stadium.

Telemachos Manos stands by the Skipper during final preparations.


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lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 31, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

he she

SAID

LIFESTYLES

College students plan weeks ahead for Halloween, but our columnists don’t expect much for this year.

He said: Don’t waste money on Halloween hype

P

erhaps I had some sort of traumatic experience as a child that I’ve since forgotten, but I am completely apaKEVIN DICKEL / SPPS thetic toward dressing up for Halloween. There’s nothing special about this weekend. The parties are exactly the same as any other weekend, except for half the people are dressed in similar clothing to the main character from a popular ply retire it after one night movie or television show is depressing. and the other half are slutSo, in the true spirit of ty versions of public serlow-effort costumes, I’ve vice employees. come up with a short list I skipped out on my first of options for this year. college Halloween to go to “Sweats girl” — for which Jon Stewart and Stephen I dress in my best pair of Colbert’s Rally to Restore sweatpants and sweatshirt, Sanity and/or Fear, which making sure that they was one of the best decimatch enough so that it sions I have ever made, looks like it is all part of right up there with decidthe same piece of clothing to never go to D2 again ing. “Legging ninja” — after my second week of where I match a pair of school. black leggings with black The last two years, I’ve socks and a long sleeve dressed up for parties, black shirt and call it a

She said: Forget cute or unique, go out in comfort B eing the crafty, creative type, Halloween is the one time of the year that I get to take myself on as a project, using my everyday wardrobe to make a homemade costume. Not that storebought “barely PG-13 fairy” and “sexy firewoman” aren’t great costumes; I’d just prefer to make them myself. You see, Halloween poses the unique challenge of both portraying a character or thing no one else will think of and making said thing look somewhat attractive. But it wasn’t always this way. I think back to my glory days of middle school when I padded a dress with pillows on both sides, stuffed two balls of yarn down my shirt, wore a wig and topped it off with entirely too much lipstick, not caring in the slightest if I looked cute. Being an old lady for Halloween was an interesting experience, as I didn’t have to think about making any part of my ensemble even remotely attractive. It wasn’t exactly comfortable either (just imagine having to hold up two yarn ball breasts while pushing

up glasses and trying not to trip over a floor length dress), but I felt accomplished in the completeness of my costume.

You see, Halloween poses the unique challenge of both portraying a character or thing no one else will think of, and making said thing look somewhat attractive.”

Flash forward to college. My last few years of costuming have proved successful, with such outfits as flight attendant, dead bride and disco ball all receiving good ratings on the cuteto-unique scale. But this year I’m considering giving up. Halloween is great and all, but the pressure of making a costume is too much. I have plenty of great ideas, (Vivian a la “Pretty Woman,” biker chick, Lady Liberty — do not steal these) but the thought of putting all that effort into making a costume to sim-

because while you don’t suffer from bodily harm for dressing incorrectly like you do during St. Patrick’s Day, not subscribing to the holiday is still frowned upon. However, I strictly made sure to only use items that I already own.

What I’ll never understand are people who actually pay money for a costume or for items to make their own costume.”

What I’ll never understand are people who actually pay money for a costume or for items to make their own costumes. I’ve had friends decline food or drinks out because they are “broke,” then turn around and drop $30 on a Halloween costume they wear for at most three nights, but more likely just one, because wearing the same costume

day. Or a personal favorite, “just got out of the shower,” where I put my hair up in a towel and don a bathrobe and slippers and carry a loofah. While all these options may not score well on aforementioned cute-to-unique scale, they will certainly win me comfort points, which will most likely be worth it in the long run. I’ll see you downtown. DANIELLE BUYNAK -managing editor -senior -English

Good times creeping down your antenna?

twice is also frowned upon. I get dressing up as a kid. When you wear that Superman costume that your mom bought at the store, you feel like you may actually be Superman, at least for that night. Plus, there’s a clear reward— candy. But what is the motivation now? Someone will be so impressed by your incredibly realistic Bender costume that they will want to go home with you immediately because of it? Is that really the endgame here? Perhaps I’m being too harsh; I’m all for partying and having a good time and if you need Halloween as a framing device for that, then godspeed. Just don’t expect me to put any effort into it. JAMES O’HARA - web editor - senior - computer science


OPINIONS

opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 31, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

5

The Collegiate Times is an independent studentrun newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Priscilla Alvarez Managing Editor: Danielle Buynak Art Director: Kevin Dickel Design Editors: Brad Klodowski, Andrea Ledesma Public Editor: Andrew Kulak Web Editor: James O’Hara Multimedia Editor: Nick Smirniotopoulos News Editors: Cameron Austin, Dean Seal News Reporters: Melissa Draudt, Leslie McCrea News Staff Writers: Kelly Cline, Josh Higgins, Matt Minor Lifestyles Editors: Chelsea Giles, Madeline Gordon Opinions Editors: David Levitt, Sharath Reddy Sports Editors: Jacob Emert, Alex Koma Sports Media Manager: Mike Platania Assistant Photo Editor: Ben Wiedlich Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: James Dean Seal Circulation Manager: Keith Bardsley MCT CAMPUS

Pokemon sequels continue to improve A

couple of weeks ago, many people around the world were excited for the long awaited release of Pokemon X and Y for the Nintendo 3DS. According to entertainment website neontommy.com, the sixth generation of Pokemon games sold at a rate of over 70 percent in the first two days of sales. Some might wonder about the significance of the Pokemon video game franchise, and there is one word that can be used to describe this “epidemic”: nostalgia. However, though nostalgia may be the reason to purchase new installments of the Pokemon saga, the wellplanned and executed evolution of the series will keep you playing — something many game sequels get terribly wrong. If you were born in the 90s, there was a pretty high chance that you owned one of the original Pokemon games that were released in 1998 for the Game Boy and Game Boy Color. When I was five years old, I received a Game Boy Color and Pokemon Red Version for

Christmas. There is no other Christmas gift I remember from my childhood more than that game.

...the well-planned and executed evolution of the series will keep you playing - something many game sequels get terribly wrong.”

Since the release of the original trio of games, there have been five more generations of colored versions of the Pokemon game including the newest one. I have owned, to this day, a game out of every generation except for the newest one. Some say the game has not changed a bit and that all you do is run around, catch Pokemon, battle gyms and take on the Elite Four. These are major motifs for any player of these games, but the way you play

has changed immensely over the years. As we have grown up over the years into mature adults, the Pokemon gaming franchise has grown with us. I remember when I was six years old, and to trade Pokemon with a friend, you had to use a tiny cable called a GameLink. The newer Pokemon games allow WiFi and infrared trading. This technological innovation synergizes with the game, making it work better. All too often games in an evolutionary stage try to use new technology because they feel they have to in order to stay relevant or because the developers believe just having it will make the game sell better. This was exemplified by “Test Drive Unlimited 2,” which had a failed attempt at an online multiplayer feature that caused the overall quality of the game to plummet. There is also the practice of EV training, which is a strategic method to train your Pokemon against opposing wild Pokemon that will boost certain statistics. For example, if you want to boost the

speed stat of your Pokemon in Pokemon Black, get ready to battle several Basculin. This fact shows that the franchise is not just child’s play any longer. However, despite the added opportunities and strategic planning involved in the game, it still proves to be the same fun, child-like addiction it once did. When I pick up a Pokemon game for the first time, I still play for hours, like most that still want to cling to one of the few socially acceptable ties to childhood. Unfortunately, my funds are insufficient to buy the game now, so I will wait for Christmas to ask for the game once again. And in a gaming world where “Duke Nukem Forever” soiled any nostalgic tie to the franchise, when I open the new Pokemon up under my family’s Christmas tree, I will still be as exuberant as I was when I received my first copy 14 years ago. RYAN TURK - regular columnist - sophomore - BIT

Cuccinelli remains best choice for office

D

uring last Thursday’s gubernatorial debate at the Haymarket Theater both Ken Cuccinelli and Terry McAuliffe had the opportunity to speak to each other and to Virginia voters, hoping to sway the undecided and promote themselves. While each candidate had their highs and lows, Cuccinelli ultimately seemed more prepared for the responsibility of governor. A major point of emphasis for current sitting state Attorney General Cuccinelli was his experience at state-level politics. Cuccinelli pointed out that while he has served Virginia for several years as a state senator and as attorney general, McAuliffe has never worked at the state level in politics or done much to help Virginia either. This disparity of experience was highlighted in the debate as the candidates presented their plan for stimulating

Virginia’s economy. Cuccinelli presented a plan that would create 58,000 jobs by lowering personal and corporate income tax rates, as well as cutting government spending. McAuliffe, responding to how he would fi x the economy, said he would do so by “creating jobs and diversifying the economy” while not providing the specifics of a plan. When later discussing government programs such as research and development, McAuliffe was asked how he intended to fund his programs. He stated that he would derive his money through the federal Medicaid program. Here’s some news for McAuliffe — that money isn’t guaranteed. While Cuccinelli’s plan centers around making cuts to the budget and generating revenue through specific sources, McAuliffe’s plan relies on a complete uncertainty. When

the reality of the nonexistent Medicaid money was exposed during the debate, McAuliffe fired back by saying, “I’m not going to make promises with money I don’t

While Ken’s plan centers around making cuts to the budget and generating revenue through specific sources, Terry’s plan relies upon a complete uncertainty.”

have.” Fair enough, but you can’t base an economic plan on unstable money. This difference between the two candidates is a major focal point of Cuccinelli’s campaign, and rightly so. While Cuccinelli has set forth a specif-

ic economic agenda, McAuliffe spoke in generalities and hypotheticals. Both candidates want to create jobs, but it’s like Cuccinelli said during the debate — “I like puppies. But I don’t bring a puppy home if I don’t have a plan to take care of that puppy. (McAuliffe is) all puppy, no plans.” Many voters have turned away from Cuccinelli due to accusations of his extreme social views, specifically with reproductive rights and gay marriage. But Cuccinelli has proven throughout the campaign that he is the more qualified and prepared candidate for governor, something that was highlighted in his performance during the debate. TINNY SONG - regular columnist - junior - political science

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October 31, 2013

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10/31/13 43 JFK alternative in NYC 46 Certain stove filler 47 In a convincing way 48 Palmer with an army 50 Show about Capote 52 Avenues of access 53 Strains credulity 58 Rock’s partner 59 “... never see __ lovely as ...”: Kilmer 60 Build a tree house

DOWN 1 Obstinate beast 2 Dolt 3 Alaska’s 907, e.g. 4 Clairvoyant 5 Where Moscow is 6 Dowdy dresser 7 Author Ephron 8 Racetrack 9 Tattle 10 Sketched 11 Welcome, as a new year 12 Moniker for Mussolini 13 Hit with a pitch, in a way 21 Academic inst. 22 Seeped 23 Kwik-E-Mart proprietor on “The Simpsons” 27 “And” or “or,” e.g.: Abbr. 28 Overly enthusiastic 29 “I’m all for that!”

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Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

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10/30/13

WORDSEARCH: Snacks Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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Color It Out: Using Art as an Expressive Outlet (Art supplies will be provided.) Amber Wenderlich, N.A., Staff Counselor Wagging Tails: Spend an Hour with Trained Therapy Dogs! Trent Davis, Ph.D., Licensed Professional Counselor

Aries (March 21-April 19) Sometimes it’s easy to get distracted from what’s important. Focus on what and whom you love. De initely no gambling. Beat around the bush a bit if you must, but say what you have to say. Grow partnership and friendship. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Put your heads together. Focus your creative energy on practical ideas to make money. Cut expenses. Plan now and expand later. Get inventive and come up with a clever costume for free. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Who said being in love was easy? Make every move count and increase the quality of your relationship. Sometimes you really have to listen. Enjoy the festivities without taking expensive risks. Leave your wallet at home and go play. Cancer (June 21-July 22) There’s another rush job coming in. It’s better to give each step it’s due than to hurry. Patience is a virtue, especially now. Turn your attention towards the comforts of home. You can make it work.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You’re entering a learning phase. Study and research get fun. Kids have the best ideas. Create, build and network. Don’t buy the next round for the gang. Enjoy moderation. A female helps you ind harmony. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Start getting practical. Scratch out what you can’t afford, and what you don’t really need. You’re especially powerful around inances now. Scale a big idea to it, and avoid stepping on toes. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Energy surges are predictable. Make good use of them, rather than getting shocked. Take on a leadership role. You may have to revise your routine once you get the facts. Stay lexible and adaptable. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Clean up old messes. Heed a practical person’s warning, and consider potential outcomes. Women affect your future, whether you like it or not. Provide power tools. Work together for common bene it.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) You’re entering a party phase, which could interfere with work, which in turn could interfere with romance. Offer help to someone in need. Aim for the perfect balance in your schedule. Stay in communication. Rest when you have downtime. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) The next two days are good for decisions. Devote yourself to the process fully. There will be time for fun and games later. Watch out for strings attached. Try to stay objective. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) There may be dark paths or even zombies. Fortress walls could spring out of nowhere. Stay lexible, and balance studies with fun. There are plenty of sweet distractions. Quick action now wins entry in. It’s your choice which direction. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) A lack of funds could threaten the plan. Listen to all considerations, then reappraise. Build your character. Creativity with the details adds the perfect touch. Consider the impact, reaction and your response. The more you enjoy it, the better the

results.


SPORTS

sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 31, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

Fuller, Facyson on the mend JACOB EMERT sports editor

Getting the gang back together Perhaps for the first time this season, Virginia Tech’s enormously talented cornerbacks unit will all be healthy and playing in the same game. Just as Antone Exum rejoined the secondary against Duke, the Hokies lost senior Kyle Fuller and true freshman Brandon Facyson. Fuller — recently named a semifinalist for both the Chuck Bednarik Award, given to the nation’s most outstanding defensive player, and the Jim Thorpe Award, given to the country’s best defensive back — was limited to special teams in the loss to Duke after suffering a groin injury, but practiced at close to full speed Tuesday. Facyson missed the whole week of practice leading up to the Duke game after suffering a concussion from banging the back of his head against the ground during a practice. He was in a blue, limited contact jersey Tuesday, but practiced unrestricted Wednesday. He feels he is making positive progress from where he was a week ago. “I think the first day, (team doctors) asked me what day it was, and I didn’t know until the next day I was three days off.” Facyson said. “I feel good — no headaches, no anything like that, so I’m going to check with the doctor today and see about getting cleared tomorrow.” In Facyson and Fuller’s absence, Kendall Fuller, another standout true fresh-

7

Hokies hit road, look to gain ground in ACC

CHEN JIANG / SPPS

Kyle Fuller (11) picks up a block from Dadi Nicolas (90) during an interception return against Duke. man cornerback, recorded three interceptions to put him in a tie for the most in the nation. If the Hokies do have the four cornerbacks all healthy and ready to play, the decision falls upon secondary coach Torrian Gray to figure out how to distribute the playing time. Until he knows more about the status of his players, though, he’s not focusing on that. “The beautiful thing is you’ve got all these talented guys and the difficult part is obviously playing them all. But right now Kyle’s not 100 percent, Brandon’s been out,” Gray said. “So I’m not sure how healthy everybody is yet.” Slight improvements up front Four interceptions, two missed field goals and 14

MOM WANTS YOU TO BE IN THE YEARBOOK

failed attempts (out of 18) on third down made sure the Hokies offense experienced little success in terms of points. However, the offense saw some patches of success. They ran the ball for 173 yards, more than 3.8 per attempt. The success offered promise for what potential this team has when all units cohesively work together. “I do think we took a step forward in this game. We still have a long way to go and we left a lot of yards on the field,” said offensive line coach Jeff Grimes. “Just a couple little things in terms of technique, whether it be by one of the lineman, a tight end, a full back, the back not seeing it exactly right or a receiver on a perimeter block, just a little bit off from being in position where we could have had a whole lot more yards I think.” Grimes also thought his unit’s pass blocking was better, but was disappointed about how the fundamentals collapsed when the game was on the line. “I think we did a really nice job on Saturday for the most part. I felt like Pitt was prob-

ably our worst day in pass protection and we worked really hard on it the last couple weeks and I thought the guys did a nice job in this last game,” Grimes said. “The one thing that disappointed me in the last game was in the fourth quarter, we didn’t give up any sacks but there was a couple times we gave up some pressures that was just a matter of a later focus on technique right there at the end. “I hit the guys hard today in a couple of drills and made them really work when they were tired and really just try to drive home the point that when you’re tired, it’s when you got to rely on your technique and focus on it the most, otherwise you’ll be in that position in the fourth quarter, and you’re tired, and your legs want to give out, and if you don’t force yourself to do it exactly right, then you’ll be in position to give up a sack or pressure when it counts the most.” Duke didn’t record a sack on Thomas, but the Blue Devils had four quarterback hurries on the afternoon.

@JacobEmert

TREVOR WHITE / SPPS

Kenedy McGrath (2) returns the ball to the University of Virginia side.

WILL GROOMS sports staff writer

The Virginia Tech volleyball team captured its 18th win of the season against Notre Dame on Friday, following consecutive conference losses to North Carolina and Virginia. The Hokies squeaked by the Irish, defeating them in four sets by a combined score of just 98-89. Freshman outside hitter Lindsey Owens — averaging a conference-best .46 aces per set — led the way offensively with a season high 17 kills. She attributes her scoring prowess to the team effort on the Hokies’ side of the net. “We came in with a different mindset overall as a team after the loss last week,” Owens said. “Everyone was able to take care of their individual job and that allowed me to do my job.” Leading the assistance was Jordan Fish, who tallied 51 assists in the winning effort. Through her body of work, the junior setter increased her assist per set total to 11.1 — cracking the national top 30. The distinction of being in the top 20 percent of the country’s Division I setters is important to Fish, however, she owes a lot of her success to the contributions from her teammates. “It feels good and it’s a lot of hard work paying off,” Fish said. “When the defense plays well, I play well, and when I play well, the hitters play well.” The Hokies received contributions from all over the place, including Kathryn Caine who equaled a career best with 16 kills in the win against the Irish. The junior credits her elevation in offensive production to increased concentration and fundamental execution.

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“My main focus was to be smart when I swung,” Caine said. “I was just focusing on (raising) my elbow as high as it could go, attacking the seam and mainly making good decisions.” With the win Tech now sits at fifth in the conference at 6-4, with a pivotal two-game conference road trip this weekend. The Hokies will travel to Clemson for a Friday night matchup and continue on to Georgia Tech for a Sunday matinee. The Tigers and Yellow Jackets sit at nine and 14 respectively in the conference standings, but no one in maroon and orange is taking either opponent for granted. The Hokies are especially aware of Clemson’s star senior outside hitter, Moneshia Simmons, who leads the conference in kills per set at an impressive 4.72. “(Simmons) is just someone we’re going to have to try to contain rather than stopping,” said head coach Chris Riley. “Clemson is a good solid group, they play good defense, and it’s a tough place to play.” These are two games that are desperately needed as the Hokies hold a slim lead, by a game or less, over four teams in the conference — including Clemson. “Both games this weekend are must-win games,” Caine said. “We’re on track to make the tournament right now, but we can’t have any more bad losses like last week.” Coach Riley sees things differently. “Every team that’s ahead of us we still have to play again,” Riley said. “I wouldn’t say they’re must-win games, but obviously it helps us significantly by beating both of these teams.” Clemson has several notable conference wins to its name, including a four set win against Maryland and a three-set win against Notre Dame. It took the Hokies five sets to beat the Terps and four sets to beat the Irish. Georgia Tech, on the other hand, has had a miserable start to its conference season. In six out of 10 conference matchups, the Yellow Jackets have not managed to win a single set, getting shutout 3-0 each time. Despite the showing, however, Georgia Tech managed to notch a signature win against 18th ranked Florida State in a four set domination. “In this league, anybody can beat anybody at any time,” Riley said. “If you look at the numbers, it looks like we should do well, but we still have to go play the games.”

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8

lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 31, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

LIFESTYLES

Inspirational author hosts event for single ladies KATRINA SPINNERWILSON lifestyles staff writer

Single at 34 and devoted to providing positive messages for women worldwide, Mandy Hale became an author after she was discovered by a publisher who noticed Hale’s inspirational Twitter account, TheSingleWoman, was followed by celebrity, Kim Kardashian. Hale began writing about single women four years ago when she came out of an unhealthy relationship and was determined to get back to a happy and healthy lifestyle. “I think just writing my stories and sharing my heart with people, I’m hoping was beneficial for other women to read, but also for me, because when you’re writing a book you’re able to step back and see things from a very interesting perspective that lead to that,” Hale said. Hale self-published an e-book in 2012, and her first published book, “The Single Woman: Life, Love and a Dash of Sass,” was released in bookstores Aug. 6 this year. “There’s so much telling us women what we’re not,” Hale said. “I wanted my book to be the things filling the gap. I wanted to give women permission to see themselves, love themselves and appreciate what they have instead of how far they have to go.” This weekend, Hale will host a weekend of events at the Greenbrier resort in White Sulfur Springs, W.Va., which will include a meet and greet, book reading and signing. Stephanie Yeager, currently in charge of social media at the Greenbrier, discovered Hale through her Twitter account when she was Nicholas Sparks’ assistant. After Yeager reached out to Hale on Twitter, the two continued to stay in touch, which led to Hale’s upcoming opportunity at the Greenbrier. “(Mandy)’s very outgoing and very motivated,” Yeager said. “She’s definitely a caring person. She will take the time to respond to every single person who tweets her.” Through social media, Yeager and the Greenbrier have received a lot of feedback for this weekend’s events. Yeager said she believes people not only connect with Hale, but can walk away with information that will benefit them. Hale said it would be a honor

to meet and interact with Virginia Tech ladies to share advice and listen to their stories. Hale will also preview her next book, which will be released in March titled, “I’ve Never Been To Vegas but My Luggage Has.” “It’s a look at how on the way to happily ever after, the journey can be just as meaningful as the destination,” Hale said. This weekend, the Greenbrier will also host its first Rejuvenation Yoga Retreat, which was arranged purposively to coincide with Hale’s events for a girl’s weekend. “I think everyone’s kind of viewing it as a fun girl-getaway, and it worked out perfectly to tie in the book and share my message with the ladies who are already going to be there,” Hale said. “The heart of my message is also taking care of yourself, being healthy and loving yourself. Get away from the craziness of life and rejuvenate.” Sara Eppes, Leisure Sales Manager for the Greenbrier, works at the Greenbrier’s D.C. office in an effort to attract people from that area to the resort based on people’s interests. “When we were in discussion about the yoga retreat and thinking about our demographics and what kind of people were going to drive, Mandy Hale popped up,” Eppes said. “It is a yoga retreat, but it is a girlfriend retreat to get rejuvenated and relax.” Eppes said she believes Hale was of great assistance on the social media site by letting followers know of the Rejuvenation Yoga Retreat. The tickets for the retreat sold out in a month and a half and the Greenbrier is expecting 130 people to attend. “What (Hale’s) brand speaks about and the yoga event for women go hand-in-hand and compliment each other,” Eppes said. “We’re hoping we will be able to partner with her again.” While Hale has one book published and another on its way shortly, she plans to continue writing books in the future. “I just hope to always be in the position to inspire all women and, in particular, single woman,” Hale said. “I think the audience is so broad and the need is so great, because there’s no one really out there infusing positivity

I think the audience is so broad and the need so great, because there’s no one really out there infusing positivity into the lives of single women.” Mandy Hale “The Single Woman”

into the lives of single women.” Hale said she certainly hopes to get married and have children someday and thinks her audience will be able to grow and evolve with her. “I think Mandy, today with social media, has such a huge fan-base,” Yeager said. “People relate her to ‘The girl on Twitter.’ Tons of celebrities follow her and retweet her, which has made her big.” Hale has received a vast amount of worldwide attention through her blog, Facebook and Twitter, but at the end of the day, she is just a normal single woman sharing her experiences. “Power of a platform can never be underestimated. Every major opportunity that has come my way has been a result of my Twitter page,” Hale said. “It literally empowers people to become and do what they want to do.” Hale continues to be influenced each and every day by icons such as Oprah and Greg Behrendt, the author of “He’s Just Not That Into You.”

“There’s a million different people and their words who influence me on a daily basis, but the heart of it is my hope that I take every bit of information from the books I’ve read and quotes and translate it into encouraging women to walk bravely and living life to the fullest,” Hale said. “Not focusing on finding a great man, but focusing on becoming a great woman, and the rest will take care of itself.”

@kspinz

COURTESY OF MANDY HALE

Mandy Hale, author of “The Single Woman: Life, Love, and a Dash of Sass,” is inspired by icons like Oprah and Greg Behrendt, but celebrities, including Kim Kardashian, follow her inspirational tweets encouraging women to confidently pursue life goals and be healthy.

Thursday, October 31, 2013 Print Edition  

Thursday, October 31, 2013 Print Edition of The Collegiate Times

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