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join the conversation see page 2 Tuesday, October 29, 2013

An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 110th year, issue 39

News, page 3

TUESDAY MORNING TAKEAWAYS

Offensive miscues humble the Hokies

Lifestyles, page 2

Opinions, page 5

Sports, page 7

Study Break, page 6

Clinton campaigns for McAuliffe in Owens Hall BY CAMERON AUSTIN | news editor

BEN WEIDLICH / SPPS

J.C. Coleman (4) falls just short of the goal line against Duke. ALEX KOMA sports editor

A bye week can be rejuvenating or disruptive for a football team — and the Hokies seemed all out of sorts against Duke after their week off. While the defense remained excellent, the offense sputtered after playing well in the team’s last three games.

Sustaining Drives Tech’s offense only put 10 points on the board, but the Hokies outgained the Blue Devils by 189 yards and held onto the ball for nearly 40 minutes. The offense certainly had no trouble moving the ball at times, but drives regularly

stalled at increasingly inopportune moments to hinder the Hokies. Tech ultimately had five different drives that put the team in Duke territory but didn’t produce any points. Whether it was failed fourth-down conversions or missed field goals, the Hokies just seemed to struggle when it mattered the most. “It’s just small miscues in the run game, pass game,” said quarterback Logan Thomas. “They’ll halt a drive at any time, especially (in the opponent’s territory), it’s even more minute, so you’ve just got to make the plays when they present themselves.” see TMT / page seven

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

Clinton continued his four-day, nine-stop tour with democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe. The two have been friends for years.

The former president and good friend of Terry McAuliffe emphasized the importance of voting in this election

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hough he’s been out of office for over a decade, students and local community members stood in line for hours to hear former president Bill Clinton speak to a crowd in Owens Hall on Monday alongside democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe. Clinton, who is on a fourday, nine-stop tour through the commonwealth, spoke to a crowded room about the

importance of getting out and voting for his longtime friend, McAuliffe. “The decision you will make in Virginia in eight days is profoundly important to you and your future and the future of this state,” Clinton said. “It is also important to America. We have to send the signal that we have chosen creative cooperation over constant conflict.” KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS see CLINTON / page three

McAuliffe and Clinton greet supporters in Owens Hall on Monday.

Program simplifies B.A.R.C. club pairs dogs with students internship process MAURA MAZUROWSKI news staff writer

SEAN PILLI news staff writer

Founded in 2012 by the Virginia Space Grant Consortium (VGSC), the Commonwealth STEM Industr y Internship Program (CSIIP) has already helped many STEM students — those who major in science, engineering, technology and math — get valuable experience finding internships with an approach that is easy for students and companies alike. A STEM student only needs to send one comprehensive application to the CSIIP’s online application system and multiple participating Virginia companies

NEWS

can view it for possible summer internships. In addition, there is no cost for students, academic advisors or companies utilizing the CSIIP’s services. According to Mary Sandy, director of the VGSC, the CSIIP has already grown since its pilot year. “This year we have begun offering paid internships in the spring and fall semesters too, making this a yearround program,” Sandy said. Over 90 Virginia companies participate in the CSIIP program, giving STEM students a wide variety of internships to be eligible for. Courtesy of Sarah Greenway see INTERNSHIP / page three

The Hokie Bird cuddles up with members of the B.A.R.C. club.

LIFESTYLES

Judging by the crime blotter, this weekend proved to be a busy one for VTPD. see page 8

SPORTS Check out where Cold War Kids are playing tonight and what their vocalist said about the band’s changing sound.

President Clinton stumped for McAuliffe on campus yesterday. see page 3 see page 4

Students who are homesick for their furry friends have a new club to make them feel at ease. B.A.R.C stands for Bonding with Animals through Recreation on Campus, and is a student-run club at Virginia Tech working in partnership with the veterinary staff at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine. “Erin Heller, the founder (of B.A.R.C.), noticed that the dogs at the veterinary school didn’t get a whole lot of walking time,” Sarah Greenway, vice president of the club, said. “The club was started to take the dogs out to exercise and to allow them to socialize on a more regular basis.” All 36 dogs in the program live at the veterinary school on campus. Before B.A.R.C., dogs were assigned to first-year vet-

see DOGS / page three

ONLINE The women’s soccer team rebounded from a tough loss to Florida State to beat Miami on Senior Day. Find out how they did it.

see page 7

erinary students to be taken out at least three times a week. “Between our club members and the vet students, they now get out once or twice a day,” Greenway said. Although B.A.R.C. is based through the veterinary school, any student interested can become a member. “We have members that are in majors from all of the schools at Virginia Tech,” Greenway said. For prospective students of the veterinary school, B.A.R.C. is a great way to become familiar with the program. Being a part of the club allows members to interact with staff and to “get (their) foot in the door with the school,” Greenway said. In addition to exercising the dogs, Greenway added that members assist in training them to “make them more adoptable.”

For updates throughout the day. www.collegiatetimes.com

ctlifestyles CollegiateTimes @collegiatetimes


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lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 29, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

LIFESTYLES

Second Languages expand opportunities NICK SMIRNIOTOPOULOS | multimedia editor

In

our increasingly globalized world, learning a second language is becoming more In order to meet the needs of this growing market demand, bilingual workers are paid 5 to 20 important than in the past— and employers are recognizing that. percent more per hour than monolingual workers, according to Salary.com. Businesses are moving more offices overseas, which increases the need for bilingual Students and faculty at Virginia Tech are catching on to this trend, as more opportunities are workers. However, even in the U.S., the need is rising. being offered to learn a second language for free, to complement a regular course load. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, more than 37 million Americans (approximately 12 Here are some of the free programs available through Tech that focus on second language percent of the population) speak Spanish at home. learning.

La Hora Hispanica La Hora Hispanica Wednesdays 5:30-6:30 p.m. El Rodeo Restaurant, North Main Street

COURTESY OF AMANDA SALINAS

Sara Hanson (left) practices Spanish with a friend at El Rod’s Mexican restaurant.

The Spanish Department has about 500 students in their program, and professors have been making adjustments to meet those demands. One of those adjustments, which has been around for several years, is La Hora Hispanica, an informal conversation hour that encourages students to practice their Spanish-speaking skills. Amanda Salinas, a senior food science and technology major, had never taken a Spanish class at Tech before, but her Bolivian background made her want to learn and practice more. “Conversation is where you really learn,” Salinas said. “If you just study the grammar and the teacher just speaks at you, you’re never going to learn. You’re never going to become fluent.” Last spring, Salinas studied abroad in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where she was able to practice her

Spanish for about four months. When she returned, she was given the opportunity to lead the conversation hour. “The goal of (La Hora Hispanica) is to better your Spanish-speaking skills, but also to be in an environment where you talk to peers and make friends,” she said. The group changed its meeting place to El Rodeo Mexican Restaurant to keep the atmosphere small and intimate, according to Salinas. While the group was much larger at the beginning of the semester with almost 20 students attending, it’s lessened to about eight regular attendees. For Salinas, learning a second language is not just a new skill, but also a way to gain a leg up on competition in the working world. “It opens so many doors,” she said. “There’s a saying, ‘However many languages you know is how many worlds you live in.’ It’s so true.” Salinas said she hopes to use her Spanish to work in South America at a food science and technology company after graduation.

Russian Conversation Hour Russian Conversation Hour Wednesdays 3-4 p.m. Major Williams Hall, 2nd Floor Atrium There are almost 300 million native and non-native Russian speakers in the world, which makes it the fi ft h most widely spoken language. Russian is one of the dozen languages offered through the Virginia Tech Foreign Languages and Literatures Department. The department is trying to increase interest and assist language comprehension by offering a weekly conversation hour. Yuliya Minkova, assistant professor of Russian, grew up in Russia learning English as a foreign language. When she arrived in the U.S. to study accounting, she was frustrated with how difficult it was to speak.

“Russian has lots and lots of grammar — the way Russians approach foreign languages is through grammar,” Minkova said. “When I got here, it wasn’t really helping, because it took me about 15 minutes to ask a question and I couldn’t understand anything that people were telling me.” It took a while, but Minkova began speaking English conversationally. Her experience taught her the importance of having a welcoming atmosphere where students don’t have to worry about making grammar mistakes, which is what she aims to do with the Russian conversation hour. This is the first year that the conversation hour is run by the department. Last year it was run by the students in the Russian club, which, according to Minkova, meant that other things usually took priority. “The conversation hour is like a supplement to the classes they’re taking, but we don’t teach it like that,” Minkova

said. “There’s no rules — you just come in and try to speak Russian.” In its first year, the hour has about four regular attendees, but Minkova hopes that the opportunity will stretch beyond the students to the greater community. According to Minkova, learning Russian can be useful because it’s spoken widely across Eastern Europe and is a critical language as declared by the U.S. State Department. It can open up research and business opportunities in various disciplines. But more than the tangible results, Minkova thinks that learning a new language opens people up to “a new way of thinking.” “It’s important to be open to different peoples and cultures,” Minkova said. “It’s great to have an open mind. People think in different ways, but they’re still human.”

Free Turkish Lessons Free Turkish Lessons Wednesdays 6-7 p.m. Whittemore Hall, Room 257 Haktan Suren left Turkey several years ago to study for a graduate degree at Tech. But while he’s here in the U.S., he wants to do more than just get his PhD in genetics, bioinformatics and computer biology — he wants to exchange cultures. Four years ago, Suren and several other international students started the Intercultural Understanding Club, which Suren now serves as president. “The goal of the club is to bridge the dialogue between people who come from different backgrounds,” Suren said. “We do different activities for the community, faculty and students.” One of these activities is teaching Turkish, which has been offered since the club’s inception. “I thought, ‘What can I do by myself for the club?’” Suren said. “Well, I could teach Turkish.” When it started, the lessons were really more of a culture class. They had Turkish tea and pastries and learned a few words. However, demand for the class increased steadily each year, and at its peak it reached approximately 45 people. Suren decided to make the class more serious, as more faculty and students were interested in

learning the language. According to Suren, they are working on turning the class into an accredited course through the university. “They want to learn Turkish because it’s a different language and it’s offered for free,” he said. “Some people have conversation partners who speak Turkish and others want to study abroad there.” Tech took a team of six faculty members to Turkey this summer to do research, many of whom are currently taking the class with aspirations of returning. Turkish is widely spoken not just in Turkey, but in Central Asia and parts of Europe such as Germany. While it used to be a U.S. State Department critical language, it was recently taken off the list. Suren said Turkey has become a model for the Middle East because of its secular, democratic government and its booming G-20 economy. Learning the language could present many potential career opportunities through international relations and foreign investment, he said. The goal of the free class goes beyond business opportunities, though. “The goal is to introduce my culture and learn about their culture,” he said. “It’s not so much about teaching Turkish. I learn and they learn. It’s a mutual thing.”

NICK SMIRNIOTOPOULOS / COLLEGIATE TIMES

Haktan Suren teaches weekly Turkish lessons to bridge cultures at Virginia Tech.

Interested in a foreign language degree? While the independent conversation groups engage students outside of the classroom, the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures at Virginia Tech offers majors, minors and additional courses in various languages for undergraduate students.

Majors

Minor

Additional Courses

Classical Studies French German Spanish Russian

Classical Languages Classical Studies French and Business French German Latin Russian

Arabic Mandarin Chinese Ancient and Modern Greek Hebrew Italian Japanese


NEWS

newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 29, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

Clinton: Grassroots effort propels campaign

weather watch JAMES MORROW weather reporter

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

Clinton greets a crowd of supporters in Owens Banquet Hall on Monday morning after delivering a brief speech in support of Democratic candidate Terry McAuliffe. from page one

The campaign stop comes just four days after the third and final debate took place in Squires Haymarket Theatre between McAuliffe and Republican Ken Cuccinelli. According to a newly released Washington Post/Abt SRBI poll, McAuliffe’s lead has reached double digits with the latest numbers showing McAuliffe ahead 12 points over Cuccinelli. Speaking to his volunteers on the campaign, McAuliffe applauded the effort of students and community members who had helped make his campaign successful, saying, “Even

with a million (dollars) spent on TV ads, we know it was the grassroots energy and turn out that mattered the most.” Organizers turned away a large number of people hoping to attend the event, citing fire marshal’s orders to prevent overcrowding and safety hazards. As Clinton took the stage, McAuliffe commended his ability as a president to “show America what can happen when we focus on the economy and work with both parties.” Clinton publicly endorsed McAuliffe at the event, citing several reasons why he felt compelled to give him his support. The two politi-

cians have been friends since before Clinton’s presidency, and Clinton mentioned their family’s frequent vacations together. “I love the guy. I’d be here if he was 50 points behind in the polls,” Clinton said. Addressing the students, Clinton praised the innovation and advances that are being made among college students in higher education, stating “I’ve got more yesterdays than tomorrows but … I wish I was your age. I’d like to see what’s going to happen.” Clinton, who is known for his bipartisanship, touted the need for current politicians to reach across

party lines and find solutions for the problems facing the country. “We have to send a signal that we are a part of the same community, and not have one set of rules for one crowd and another set for another crowd,” Clinton said. After the campaign stop in Blacksburg, McAuliffe and Clinton headed to Northern Virginia to campaign in Herndon, but will be returning to Roanoke on Wednesday to finish out their tour together.

@CameronOAustin

Dogs: Membership grows as word spreads from page one

Every spring, the dogs that have lived at the veterinary school for a minimum of three years are put up for adoption, many of which have been taken home by members of B.A.R.C. Becoming a member of the

club is simple: “All you have to do is attend a training session,” Greenway explained. There, prospective members learn the basics of where the dogs live, how to apply their harnesses, where to walk them and more. The two requirements necessary to be a part of the

club are that each member must take part in a social or service event and walk a dog at least five times every semester. If these constraints are not met, members must go through the training process all over again to be reinstated. Greenway states that by

keeping the club at a low-level of commitment, B.A.R.C. enables students to take part in other organizations on campus, yet still be able to interact with the dogs. “It’s a great deal,” she said, “especially for animal lovers missing their dogs back home.” Club membership contin-

ues to increase significantly, growing from 35 to 155 members this year alone. “That number gets bigger every week,” Greenway said.

After a week of cold temperatures in the New River Valley, drastic changes are under way. Warmer and wetter conditions will take over early in the week, leading to an unfortunately wet Halloween as a front approaches the area late in the week. Any leaves that survived the freezing conditions last week will face an even bigger hurdle in the coming days. Cloudy skies with constant rain chances will persist throughout the majority of the week as storm systems push their way through the region. The sun may make an appearance on Tuesday before cloud cover increases in the early evening. Highs will stretch to 62 in the afternoon. Low temperatures will stay in the mid 40s with a chance of a few overnight showers. Chances of a passing shower continue into Wednesday. Highs will approach 70 during the day under mostly cloudy skies. Rain showers will increase Thursday as a cold front attempts to disrupt Halloween festivities. Rain will pick up just after sunset Halloween night and continue during the day Friday. Temperatures will drop quickly once the front pushes through Friday night into Saturday. Highs this weekend will only be in the 50s, while low temperatures once again drop to near freezing. This Sunday marks the end of daylight saving time. Be sure to turn your clocks back an hour before heading to sleep Saturday night!

@MauraMazurowski

Internship: Program pairs students with Va employers from page one

According to Sandy, because the CSIIP’s application system has spread quickly by word of mouth since last year, they are projected to have more participating companies this year. “About 1,200 students have registered with CSIIP. Of those, about 500 have completed their application, passed our review processes and are in the

CSIIP database,” Sandy said. Sandy said they expect to place over 150 interns this year — almost triple what they placed this last summer. A new feature of the CSIIP program allows students to send their applications directly to a number of companies in which they have a particular interest. Sandy stressed that students should start applying now for summer intern-

ships. “A number of companies, particularly the larger one(s), make summer intern selection in the December time frame,” Sandy said. Sandy also made it clear that “everything is done through the system, not outside of it,” and if students were to contact companies listed in the CSIIP database on their own “it would disqualify them” from using the CSIIP application system because they are not following the rules of the

system. The CSIIP has made it clear on their website, CSIIP.org, that companies will make selections, interview and hire students directly. The companies that hire students will decide their hourly pay, but the CSIIP set a minimum hourly rate of $10-15. After a STEM student’s internship is completed, the CSIIP has them fill out a post-internship survey. Sandy noted that “without exception,” students and

supervisors had extremely positive experiences. “CSIIP is just one of many Virginia Space Grant Consortium program(s) and represents a wonderful opportunity for undergraduate students to find paid STEM internship opportunities at hundreds of companies throughout Virginia,” Sandy said.

@CollegiateTimes

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JAMES MARROW James Morrow is CT’s news weather correspondent. He is a senior Meteorology major and a Hokie Storm Chaser. He currently serves as the Meteorology Club President and is the Chief Meteorologist at WUVT 90.7 FM Blacksburg.


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lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 29, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

listen:

LIFESTYLES Cold War Kids

similar

sounds

Like the Cold War Kids? Check out these albums.

DIIV Oshin (2012)

Fiona Apple The Idler Wheel... (2012)

Foxygen We Are the 21st Century Ambassadors of Peace and Magic (2013)

COURTESY OF COLD WAR KIDS

Cold War Kids is touring to promote their most recent album “Dear Miss Lonelyhearts” and their EP “Tuxedos,” which released in September.

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hey say traveling around the world can be an eye-opening experience, that seeing things from a different perspective can illuminate refreshing realities. For the Long Beach, Calif. indie rock band, Cold War Kids, this aphorism provided an identity. Bassist Matt Maust took a trip to Eastern Europe back during the band’s beginning stages. He traveled to Budapest, and while there, he noticed statues of old Communist leaders, fractured and beginning to crumble. He drew from this a symbolic understanding that he and his fellow musicians were all children of a communist age, and thus Cold War Kids came into existence in 2004. Maust and his fellow bandmates, drummer Matt Aveiro, former Modest Mouse guitar-

ist Dan Gallucci and vocalist Nathan Willett, collaborate to produce a sound of their own. The band’s bluesy, indie rock feel is openly summoned from the internalization and influence of several artists that have come before them. “We’re inspired by a lot of blues. So many different bands: Velvet Underground, Nina Simone,” frontman Nathan Willett said. “A lot of groups that were way before our time.” The band has released four studio albums, all of them under the labels V2 and Downtown Records. The band’s most recent album is the April release of “Dear Miss Lonelyhearts.” The album is a shift in style for Cold War Kids, moving away from the minimalistic production of albums past and presenting a more synthetic sound.

“You have to make choices about certain things that are really essential to your band,” Willett said. “Like your raw sound — how can you expand on it? How can you take it in a different direction while being true to how it started? It’s always a hard thing. I think we’ve consciously taken steps forward that feel right in the moment, that are kind of impossible to explain.” This developmental mindset has led the band to produce music of mixed perception. The online independent music powerhouse, Pitchfork, upended their 2011 LP “Mine Is Yours,” reviewing the album as a disappointing 3.9 out of 10. Willett said responding to and growing from the criticism is all part of the process. “Since the first record, we’ve dealt with criticism. I think

(“Mine Is Yours”) and really every record we’ve done has been very much for ourselves trying to explore musically what we can find,” he said. “We were trying to break out of the things that we’d started with: bluesy, more raw sound, and trying to find something new.”

The album is a shift in style for Cold War Kids, moving away from the minimalistic production of albums past and presenting a more synthetic sound.”

Willett said besides any criticism, the band’s biggest challenges have been figuring out how to live a sustainable life around constant touring

King Krule 6 Feet Beneath the Moon (2013) and maintaining a sense of shared vision. To date, Cold War Kids have sold over 500,000 album copies and over 1 million combined singles. Their popularity is commonly attributed to the unique tone of Willett’s voice. His situation is often compared to that of Dave Long of Dirty Projectors. The band’s frontman said he doesn’t think much about how important his voice has been to the band’s success, but it keeps him motivated to hear the positive feedback. “For the fi rst couple of records I didn’t really think about it as much. But in talking to different people and seeing it, it’s amazing,” he said. “It’s probably one of the coolest surprises for me in being a musician to have a voice that people

recognize right away. I’m very encouraged by hearing that.” Cold War Kids are currently touring with their new album and the recently released extended play (EP), “Tuxedos.” They played at the National Theater in Richmond this Saturday and will perform at the Jefferson Theater in Charlottesville Oct. 29 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $23 at the door. Willett said he and his band mates have been spending their California days away from touring and listening to Frank Ocean’s 2012 LP “Channel Orange” and King Krule’s August release and debut album “6 Feet Beneath the Moon.” STEVEN BURNESON - music columnist - sophomore - communication


OPINIONS

opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 29, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

5

The Collegiate Times is an independent studentrun newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Priscilla Alvarez Managing Editor: Danielle Buynak Art Director: Kevin Dickel Design Editors: Brad Klodowski, Andrea Ledesma Public Editor: Andrew Kulak Web Editor: James O’Hara Multimedia Editor: Nick Smirniotopoulos News Editors: Cameron Austin, Dean Seal News Reporters: Melissa Draudt, Leslie McCrea News Staff Writers: Kelly Cline, Josh Higgins, Matt Minor Lifestyles Editors: Chelsea Giles, Madeleine Gordon Opinions Editors: David Levitt, Sharath Reddy Sports Editors: Jacob Emert, Alex Koma Sports Media Manager: Mike Platania Assistant Photo Editor: Ben Wiedlich Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: James Dean Seal Circulation Manager: Keith Bardsley MCT CAMPUS

Bangladeshi workers deserve better conditions H

ow much would you guess the person who made the shirt you’re wearing right now was paid an hour? A living wage? Less? A dollar or two, maybe? If it was made in Bangladesh — and as the world’s secondlargest exporter of apparel, there’s a good chance it was — that worker probably only made about 21 cents an hour, which is Bangladesh’s current minimum wage. But a less-than-living wage isn’t the only obstacle faced by garment workers in Bangladesh. According to the International Labor Right Forum, more than 700 garment workers have died in factory fires since 2005. In many cases, the culprit — flammable chemicals and fabrics, overcrowding or illegally locked exits — could have easily been avoided if safety precautions were more strictly enforced. Historically in the

U.S., for example, such disasters were commonplace until reforms aimed at eliminating them were introduced. But when presented with the opportunity to sign an accord that would impose similar life-saving reforms abroad, many U.S. companies chose not to do so. The Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh (also known as the Bangladesh Safety Act) requires its signatories to conduct independent inspections of factories and address any safety and structural problems discovered. Perhaps most importantly, it allows employees the right to refuse dangerous work. But without the sanction of many American companies, its effect is severely limited. Many companies, including Walmart and Gap, cited unnecessary requirements indirectly related to fire safety in the accord, and stated

that they would handle regulations themselves. While more than a dozen European retailers signed the accord, only two U.S. companies — Abercrombie & Fitch and PVH Corporation, which is parent company to Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger — chose to sign.

When presented with the opportunity to sign an accord that would impose similar life-saving reforms abroad, many U.S. companies chose not to do so.”

Considering companies like Walmart will make billions of dollars from Bangladeshi imports, their refusal to sign the agreement is inexcusable.

In some factories, garment workers may be docked a full day’s pay for arriving late, they must request permission to use the bathroom and they do not have access to safe drinking water. Further, they have no right to organize against these conditions. But for the companies that did sign, the accord is just the tip of the iceberg. While it includes provisions for building safety reforms, it doesn’t address Bangladesh’s deplorable minimum wage or the reports of physical abuse like the ones that accompanied the investigation of a 2006 factory fire that killed 84 workers. Many of the workers were young girls between the ages of 12 and 15, and were paid seven cents an hour, according to a report by the Institute for Global Labour and Human Rights. Consumers are part of the problem and may deserve

some of the blame as well. With clothing prices at their current historical low, manufacturers face intense pressure to keep their prices low. But the fact remains that if working conditions and wages are to be improved, such low prices will be a thing of the past. Choosing to accept this as a consumer might make retailers a lot more willing to sign agreements like the Bangladesh Safety Act. So how much are you willing to pay for the shirt you’re wearing right now? Until it equals the cost of safer working conditions and a living wage, deadly factory fires and miniscule pay will remain a horrifying reality for Bangladeshi garment workers. ASHLEY ADAMS - regular columnist - junior - communication

Cuccinelli alienates Video games wrongfully environmental voters objectify female characters

C

limate change deniers are the bane of my existence. And as it happens, one of them is running for governor of Virginia this term. I won’t claim to be an expert on politics, the creation of jobs or health insurance, but when someone in power doesn’t even acknowledge the existence of a worldwide problem, I feel an obligation to say something. Even though 99 percent of scientists agree that climate change is real and caused by humans, Ken Cuccinelli still disagrees. The climate problem can absolutely be the subject of political conversation and would be a welcome topic in debates — but the fact that its existence is still being debated is just ridiculous. In 2011, Cuccinelli attempted to force a professor at the University of Virginia to turn over his research on climate change, claiming that the research was fraudulent. That same professor has now left the commonwealth and does his research at Penn State. Cuccinelli also sued the Environmental Protection Agency for ruling that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions were a threat to the health of humans and animals. In his defense, it is the job of the Attorney General to investigate these claims and to make inquiries into research that will affect the public; however, after the amount of research

done by our country and others, Cuccinelli would do well to accept the inevitable truth that he fought so hard to deny — climate change is science, not politics. Even so, at the debate on Thursday, climate change was briefly touched on and neither candidate gave a defi nitive plan on what they wanted done about it. So, not only is climate change being denied by one candidate, the other candidate didn’t know how to approach it either. Walking into the debate, members of the student body were holding up signs that demanded conversation about climate change, so I ask: what’s the point of holding a debate at a school when candidates don’t address what the students want to hear? This is not a pro-McAuliffe view. It’s an anti-climate-denier assertion. It seems that McAuliffe is ahead in the polls because his opponent is so radical that many refuse to vote for him, not because they necessarily support the Democrat. But when presented with two evils, why not vote for the lesser? I’ve got a few days though; maybe I’ll just vote for Sarvis. He seems harmless. MICHELE NEWBY - regular columnist - sophomore - English

A

vid gamer or not, the release of Grand Theft Auto V has created such waves that everyone is seemingly aware of it. But one part of the game that not as many seem to be aware of is its treatment of the female characters — one of the factors stopping many game reviewers from giving GTAV a perfect score. However, this is sadly a trend that is common across many video games, but one that is also trickling into real life. A new study from Stanford University proved that the negative treatment and sexualization of female avatars in video games can actually negatively affect women outside of the game. “Women may be at risk for experiencing self-objectification and developing greater rape myth acceptance,” the researchers said in their conclusion. “These attitudes may influence their behaviors both on and offline.” In the study’s experiment, women were found to be more self-conscious of their bodies after playing video games with renderings of their own faces displayed over the sexualized avatars. The sexualization of avatars affects men as well.

Another study, mentioned as evidence in the Stanford study, found that men who play video games that contain objectified female characters “indicated a greater likelihood of sexually harassing women” than men who did not play those games.

Women were found to be more selfconscious of their bodies after playing video games with renderings of their own faces displayed over the sexualized avatars.”

The article also notes that 31 percent of girls age 8 to 18 play video games on any given day, but a study by the Entertainment Soft ware Association puts the total of female gamers overall, not just between the ages of 8 and 18, at 45 percent. For an industry whose consumers are almost half women, why is there such a disparity between sexualized male characters and sexualized female characters? And why is it happening at all? Some proponents

may argue that sexualized female characters are a necessary part of some games in order to keep them realistic or to increase sales to the male demographic. But female characters do not need to be unnecessarily sexualized in order to make a game sell or be fun to play. For an industry where almost half of its consumers are women, it seems detrimental to trivialize female roles in games to only that of sex objects — even when those females are the main characters. Games like “Portal” have incredible levels of popularity and both the lead character and main villain are women. Even though this is a new study, the results follow a logical thought process and should not be ignored. Female characters in video games need to change to respond not only to the amount of female consumers that video games have, but also because it’s ridiculous that women are still being represented in this way. AMY RIEGER - regular columnist - sophomore - communication - @fuzzyorangesock

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October 29, 2013

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Today’s Birthday Horoscope: Today’s Birthday. This year your talents and inventive mojo lower. Creativity lourishes, so capture it, re ine and polish. Express your love and share it. Springtime enchants someone to you with fun. Summer travel for a project leads to autumn pro its. Get a big break. Your work is getting attention. You’re beloved.

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By Lila Cherry

10/29/13

ACROSS 1 Fight-stopping calls, briefly 5 Discourteous 9 Ireland patron, for short 14 10 million centuries 15 Soon, to the bard 16 Chicago airport 17 Backstage 20 The second story, vis-à-vis the first 21 Tough Japanese dogs 22 Coll. football’s Seminoles 23 Over, to Oskar 24 Got married 29 Wee lie

for the week of October 29 to November 1

Don’t Think You Wanna- Sleater-Kinney Run the World (Girls)- Beyonce Bitch Theme- Bratmobile Smile- Lily Allen Rebel Girl- Bikini Kill

listen up

32 Forster’s “A Passage to __” 33 Off one’s rocker 34 Dashboard gadget prefix with meter 35 Robin’s Marian, for one 36 Market express lane units 38 Car 39 North Pole helper 40 Muscle pain 41 Desi who married 60-Across 42 Sneaky 43 Forefront, as of technology 46 USA or Mex., e.g.

47 “Do __ favor ...” 48 Blood deficiency that causes weakness 51 Embodiments 56 Returning to popularity, or what you’d have been doing if you followed the sequence formed by the first words of 17-, 24- and 43-Across 58 Informal bridge bid 59 Activist Parks 60 Ball of Hollywood 61 Praise

DOWN 1 “Forbidden” cologne brand 2 Hang on to 3 Partners of aahs 4 Fit of agitation 5 Pungent salad veggie 6 Fictitious 7 Cries from Homer Simpson 8 Opposite of WSW 9 Plugging-in places 10 “... all snug in __ beds” 11 Cool off, dogstyle 12 Locale 13 “__ of the D’Urbervilles” 18 USA/Mex./Can. pact 19 Wooden shoes 23 E pluribus __ 24 Los Angeles daily 25 Counting everything 26 Spiritually enlighten 27 Completed 28 Kicked with a bent leg 29 No longer lost 30 Luggage attachment 31 Hooch 36 Swelling treatment 37 “__ she blows!” 38 Exist 40 White whales, e.g.

41 Colorful marble 44 Levy, as a tax 45 Upscale retailer __ Marcus 46 __ acid 48 Unrestrained way to run 49 Half of Mork’s sign-off 50 Barely made, with “out” 51 Environmental sci.

52 Beatles nonsense syllables 53 Manhandle 54 Caesar’s “Behold!” 55 “The __ the limit!” 57 Neighbor of Braz.

Friday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

10/25/13

WORDSEARCH: Languages Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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1 Mandarin L U G U A W 2 Spanish L A E J H V 3 English 4 Arabic F Q R I Q F 5 French V X M O C A 6 Japanese E F A M N Z 7 Korean N T N T L K 8 Dutch K L A U S O 9 Russian 10 Wu S I S W L R 11 Bengali M E F U R E 12 Telugu L N K D F A 13 Persian S Y B Y F N 14 Italian W I J E C Z 15 German S Y N N W X 16 Thai

Aries (March 21-April 19) Commit to your objectives. A new project demands more attention. Put your heads together. Save some energy for a signi icant other. Romance still reigns. Taurus (April 20-May 20) You may have to modify the dream slightly to it reality or modify reality to it the dream. More research is required. Think about what worked before and what didn’t. Your nerves will become less frazzled soon. Keep the focus on fun. Gemini (May 21-June 20) The gentle approach works best now. Things aren’t what they seem. Ask your partner or an expert for a second opinion. You get extra pay for your clever idea. Clean up a closet and ind a treasure. Bring it home. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Your ability to concentrate gets marvelously enhanced; double-check your data anyway, just in case. Hold on to what you have. It’s easier to get it than to keep it. Avoid shopping or gambling.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You’re entering a two-day moneymaking phase but also a potential spending spree. Think twice before you buy. Do you really need that? Let your conscience be your guide. Your friends count on you. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) When you’re hot, you’re hot. Action depends on your will power. Consult a professional or an impartial person to sort out confusion at work. Others move more quickly. You’re the star. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Stay humble and focused on strategy. A new romance begins, but don’t abandon family for new friends. Take it slow and wait to see what develops. There’s no winning an argument right now, so change the subject. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) New opportunities arise. It could seem scary to expand your personal boundaries, but friends and family are really there for you. There’s a lot to be learned, and still time to “chillax” at home. Think it all over, and get organized.

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Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) There’s still some confusion or indecision, but you can clear it up and ind the way. Career matters are in the forefront now. Keep your frugal common sense. You have plenty of work to do. Involve the group. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Travel conditions are excellent. Take regular breaks to stay rested. Heed wise words from a loving woman. Dig deeper and ind the treasure. However, don’t shop until the check clears. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Work on being practical and increasing comfort, for you and the family. Wrap up old business, especially on the inancial front, so you can move on. Expend more energy than money. Offer encouragement. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Consult with best friends, especially those great at preparing a good strategy. Don’t sing victory until you’ve crossed the inish line. Continue focusing on the steps necessary to get there without losing the big picture.


SPORTS

sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 29, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

7

TMT: Passing game collapses, rushing attack rebounds from page one

Frank Beamer responded to the offense’s sluggishness by becoming increasingly aggressive on fourth downs. Tech kept the offense on the field on the final down six times, converting four of them. Those are the highest totals in both categories since the team’s 30-17 loss to West Virginia in 1997. It might seem surprising for Beamer — traditionally a conservative in-game coach — to make so many gambles on fourth down, but the offense’s ineptitude forced his hand. The unit converted on just four of its 18 third downs. “I think we’ll look back and see where we could’ve made a lot more plays,” Beamer said. “But, when you say that, Duke played well, they kind of undercut us on a couple balls, their defensive backs hung in there and played well. I don’t take anything away from them.” Part of this aggressiveness also likely stemmed from kicker Cody Journell’s issues. He connected on four of his five attempts against Pittsburgh, but he only hit 40 percent of his kicks in the entire month of September. The redshirt senior was similarly shaky against Duke, making a 42-yard try but missing his attempts from both 45 and 40 yards out. “I’m concerned any time a guy as steady as Cody misses two, but we’ll look at it,” Beamer said. The team has expressed confidence in Journell, but there’s no doubt that every member of the squad is acutely aware of the value of the six points he failed to produce. “I never lose faith in him, and I don’t expect the guys to lose faith in me after the turnovers I had today,” Thomas said. “We’re a pretty close knit group and we’ve got each other’s backs.”

Passing Problems After his performance against the Blue Devils, Thomas has faced a similar

level of scrutiny as Journell. The redshirt senior threw for 753 yards and five touchdowns over the team’s last three games and didn’t throw a single interception. Yet against Duke, Thomas displayed many of the same negative characteristics that got him in trouble in 2012. He threw for a career-high four interceptions in the game, regularly forcing balls into impossibly tight windows and overthrowing receivers. “It was probably a couple bad decisions,” Thomas said. “The first one was an overthrow, the second one I was scrambling and I probably should’ve thrown it away. The third one got tipped, the fourth one got tipped.” It’s not as if the quarterback was abysmal for the whole game; on some drives, he looked deadly accurate. On the team’s lone touchdown drive, he threw a perfect deep ball to Demitri Knowles that went for a 56-yard gain, and also hit D.J. Coles on a 12-yard crossing route to put the Hokies on the five-yard KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS line. D.J. Coles (18) was part of a Hokies passing game that took a huge step backward against Duke, contributing to the team’s 13-10 loss. “I felt like the momentum had turned,” Knowles said. But it wasn’t enough, as the game right there,” Beamer on the season, but the coaches coaches called for three aren’t celebrating quite yet. straight runs by the redshirt staff continues to struggle to For a brief moment, Thomas’ said. Thomas accounted for 101 freshman on the team’s sec- find the appropriate rotation performance made it seem To make matters worse, like it had. receiver Willie Byrn was yards and a touchdown on the ond drive of the second quar- of the team’s backs. On the team’s next drive, wide open on the play, yet ground, as the staff quickly ter, and he responded with 22 “This group will come he completed three of his five Thomas failed to notice him. realized that he was the only yards on the three carries. together,” said offensive coorBut he could only muster dinator Scot Loeffler. “We passes to put the team on It was one of several times part of the running game one yard on his next play improved in running, but Duke’s 25-yard line. Journell on the day that the quarter- working consistently. “That’s kind of our best play later in the drive, and the with turnovers it’s tough to made his lone field goal and back didn’t see his uncovered suddenly the Hokies were receivers or didn’t throw to with him running the foot- staff turned to Coleman as the win games.” ball,” Beamer said. “He’s a offense neared the end zone. only down by three points. Now, the team is searchthem in time. The sophomore delivered ing for offensive answers But after a Kendall Fuller “You just can’t have those load and he’s tough and that’s with a five-yard run to put the before next week’s matchinterception handed the ball setbacks,” Byrn said. “You can why we go to him.” However, while some of ball on Duke’s one-yard line, up with Boston College. to the offense on Duke’s have them every once in a 43-yard line, Thomas could while, and make incredible Thomas’ runs were designed but lost a yard when the team Finding some will make the only complete one of his four plays to overcome them, but — the coaches called his handed him the ball again. trip to Massachusetts, and Then, after an illegal motion the whole season, go a lot attempts. The drive stalled on a lot of the time, if you turn number seven times in shortthe 23-yard line and Journell the ball over and if you have yardage situations alone — penalty on Coles negated smoother. missed once again. “It’s just time to bounce back execution problems, the other many of his runs stemmed the receiver’s catch in the from his inability to make end zone, Thomas threw an and come out of it even stronWith one last chance for a team’s going to beat you.” plays down the field. interception to end the drive, ger,” Thomas said. “There’s a drive with five minutes left in Running Ups and Downs “Most of them were scram- squandering the running lot of things we could’ve done the fourth quarter, Thomas The coaching staff used bles,” Thomas said. game’s momentum. promptly tried to force a ball better, I just need to make Running backs Trey “Deep down I feel like we sure from now on that I’m into tight coverage and had the bye week to examine the it intercepted on his very first offense’s foundering running Edmunds and J.C. Coleman really should’ve had that doing my fair part and setting game, and managed to find also combined to run for 74 game,” Coleman said. “We an example.” throw. “We score, and then we some answers against the Blue total yards, but neither found put an emphasis on the runany consistent success. ning game during the bye come back and throw an Devils. Tech ran for 173 total yards, Edmunds in particular week and it showed a little interception and that’s kind @AlexKomaVT of a diagram of the football the team’s third highest total looked good in spurts. The bit.”

Women’s soccer rebounds to beat Miami BRITTANY KEUP

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In their last home game of the regular season, the Virginia Tech women’s soccer team beat ACC rival Miami 1-0 this past Sunday. After a loss to No. 3 Florida State, the Hokies entered the game against the Hurricanes looking for a win to get home field advantage in the quarterfi nals of the ACC Tournament next Sunday. By getting the win, the team earned the three points it needed to secure the third seed in the conference. “This is important because it secures our home-field advantage through the first round, so that’s a huge bonus for the goals,” said head coach Chugger Adair. “They’ve worked hard and we will be home next Sunday, so that’s important.” With the win, the Hokies move to 14-2-2 on the season and 9-2-1 in the ACC, bolstering what has already been a great season. But the team is wary of resting on its laurels. “I think we are going to have to have a solid 90 minutes and play much better than we did (against Miami) to be honest,” Adair said. “We have to be a little bit more organized and a bit more determined and smarter.” The team also celebrated Senior Day, holding a ceremony for its eight departing seniors, including key forward Jazmine Reeves. “It’s our Senior Day, so this was a big day for us. We wanted to come out here and put on a great game for our fans, our family and play for ourselves, which I think we did today,” Reeves said. With an early goal in the

365 Squires Student Center • 231-9870

ZACK WAJSGRAS / SPPS

Jazmine Reeves (5) is one of the women’s soccer team’s departing senior players that was honored. 14th minute by freshman Murielle Tiernan, the Hokies proved themselves in that hard-fought win against the Hurricanes. In the first 10 minutes of the first half, the Hokies had many opportunities, with two shots and two corner kicks. On their third corner kick, junior Jodie Zelenky kicked a ball from the left side that found Tiernan, who took a single touch to hit the back of the net for the early 1-0 lead for the Hokies. “It was set up on a corner and they had people marking me and Jazmine so I kind of popped back and Jodie put a great ball in,” Tiernan said. “The ball just landed right on my foot and hit it towards the

near post.” For the rest of the first half, Tech had most of the possession and many missed opportunities, constantly keeping the Hurricanes on the defensive with seven shots and seven corner kicks. “We still need to work on fi nishing,” Adair said. “Some of the decisions in the attacking third weren’t good enough. I think we had breaks that turned into bad chances instead of goals or good chances. It’s something we will work on.” In the second half, the teams were closely matched as the Hurricanes tried to strike back, outshooting the Hokies 10-9. However, two big saves

from senior Dayle Colpitts helped keep Miami off the board. Despite their many opportunities, the Hokies failed to capitalize in the second half. Tiernan had four total shots and seven other Hokies had at least one shot on goal. While the team struggled to finish late in the game, the Hokies still earned the big ACC win. The team travels to Charlottesville Thursday to end the regular season with a rivalry game against the topranked Virginia Cavaliers. Kickoff is slated for 7 p.m.

@CTSportsTalk


8

newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 29, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

NEWS

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

status

Aug. 22-23

8:00 AM - 8:30 AM

Follow up to Larceny of money

University Bookstore

Inactive

Sept. 29

7:00 PM

Follow up to Larceny of a laptop computer

Bookstore Parking Lot

Inactive

Oct. 9

12:00 AM

Destruction of Property

West Ambler Johnston

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct

Oct. 24 - 25

6:00 PM - 12:00 PM

Larceny of a bicycle

Outside Theatre 101

Active

Oct. 24

6:00 AM - 11:00 PM

Larceny of a card reader

Newman Library

Inactive

Oct. 26

12:14 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol

West Ambler Johnston

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Oct. 25

2:07 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol X 2

New Hall East

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Oct. 26

2:44 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public/Underage Possession of Alcohol

Perry Street

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

3:10 PM

Larceny of water

Lane Stadium

Inactive Referred to Student Conduct

Oct. 26

3:20 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Oct. 26

3:30 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public/Underage Possession of Alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

3:50 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

3:55 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

4:00 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public/Underage Possession of Alcohol/ Possession of Fake ID

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

4:21 PM

Disorderly Conduct

Lane Stadium

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Oct. 26

4:20 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Oct. 26

4:31 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

4:52 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public/Underage Possession of Alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

4:58 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

4:50 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public/Underage Possession of Alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

4:50 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public/Underage Possession of Alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

5:05 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

5:18 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

5:20 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

5:30 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public/Underage Possession of Alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

5:35 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

5:40 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public/Underage Possession of Alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

5:50 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public

East Ambler Johnston

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

5:55 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public/Underage Possession of Alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

5:56 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

6:15 PM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public/Underage Possession of Alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 26

6:50 PM

Disorderly Conduct

Lane Stadium

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Oct. 26

3:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Larceny of a purse

Lane Stadium

Inactive

Oct. 26

1:06 AM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public/Underage Possession of Alcohol

Alumni Mall

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Oct. 26

1:15 AM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public/Underage Possession of Alcohol X2

Pritchard Hall

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Oct. 27

12:26 AM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public

Outside Harper Hall

Cleared by Arrest


Tuesday, October 29, 2013 Print Edition