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How did FSU’s big win hurt the ACC? see page 5

An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

COLLEGIATETIMES 110th year, issue 35

News, page 2

Lifestyles, page 5

Opinions, page 3

Sports, page 5

Dare to step into St. Albans BY MEGAN BURPO | lifestyles staff writer

I

magine spending the night in an abandoned insane asylum. But this isn’t a movie. It isn’t even just a Halloween trick. It’s St. Alban’s Sanatorium, home to ghost tours, haunted houses and zombie simulations. The house has a long life enclosed in its four walls and neighboring riverbanks that is rich in history and paranormal activity. St. Albans was first home to the Powhatan, Shawnee and Cherokee Indians, and is also the site of the 1775 Draper’s Meadow Massacre. In 1892, St. Albans Lutheran Boy’s school was formed, and eventually the house was converted into a hospital for the mentally ill in 1916. Administrator of St. Albans, Jessica Wright, has been working at St. Albans for two years and was a volunteer for a year beforehand. “We do what we do to keep the building running and the history alive,” Wright said. “Good or bad memories, every person that passes through here works to honor

the past.” Wright and her family have been a part of the Mountain Ridge Paranormal Research Society for the past eight years and have always held paranormal activity at the center of their lives. St.Albans became a place to investigate paranormal activity in 2011, when a team of investigators set out to prove the house’s worth and rich history. When the house first opened, controversy was stirred at the thought of using an old insane asylum to run a haunted house. However, Wright explained that no harm was intended and any publication of the house’s old occupation was simply a marketing strategy. “I knew nothing about business; I ran a daycare before this and worked as a volunteer,” Wright said. “All I knew was that this was the last chance we had to prove ourselves and this house, so I did anything I could to be noticed.” see HOUSE / page six

lifestyles editor

CAMERON AUSTIN / COLLEGIATE TIMES St. Albans Sanatorium is open for the Halloween season for historical, photography and haunted house tours.

more info The ghost hunts at St. Albans are private paranormal investigations open to groups of 10 or more and cost $60 per person. The hunts start at 8 p.m. and last through the night until 4 a.m.

DEAN SEAL

NEWS

So

news staff writer

r. te D a g uth

map key proposed construction sites main roads campus

the public input meeting, VDOT Project Manager Phillip Hammack said that most of the comments had been very positive, with most attendees simply being content with a plan that would eliminate

New showerheads expected to save millions of gallons CARMEN LODATO

Proposed Southgate Construction

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Future Hokies and Blacksburg residents may not have to suffer through game-day traffic congestion that typically plagues U.S. 460. The Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) held a public input meeting on Monday night for their latest project to replace the existing intersection of U.S. 460 and Southgate Drive with a more efficient interchange. VDOT is calling the new interchange the Southgate Connector, and while plans were developed for it in 2011, the need for improvements to the existing intersection has been a regional priority since 2002. The project is estimated to cost $46.7 million, is expected to begin in 2015 and will require roughly 24-30 months of construction. The project is intended to improve safety at this .925-mile section of the U.S. 460 bypass while reducing the traffic congestion that typically builds up at the intersection due to its traffic lights and reduced speed limit. With dozens of community members attending

the current traffic pattern caused by the traffic light at the intersection. Public input from the meeting will play a role in redesigns to the project. see SOUTHGATE / page two

LIFESTYLES

Virginia Tech took another stride toward sustainability this summer when Housing and Residence Life replaced 266 showerheads in 21 residence halls. Traditional showerheads were replaced with more energy and water efficient models that use 2.5 gallons of water per minute, compared to the 3.5 gallons that previous traditional models used. Before this summer, a limited number of low-flow models were installed in a few residence halls. A student in Slusher Hall noticed these low-flow showerheads and submitted a proposal to Green RFP, a program that takes student sustainability projects and puts them into action. The proposal was originally only for Slusher Hall, but was later extended to more residence halls. “After we looked at the cost of putting the showerheads in Slusher we asked what was required to extend this idea to other buildings, and other residence halls,” said Denny Cochrane, sustainability program manager. Thousands of students

The new showerheads will cut the universities water bill down $45,000. living in residence halls may not have noticed the small change, but it’s slated to save about 23 million gallons of water. This initiative will also cut down the university’s water bill by $45,000 a year. “We wanted to install these showerheads across the whole outfit to reduce water consumption,” said Tim Gift, associate director for facilities management. The new showerheads are longer and sit lower— a negative point for taller students. “We’ve gotten some negative feedback on how low they are, especially in some of the older buildings where the showerheads are situated lower on the wall,” Gift said. Installation of new showerheads went smoothly and wrapped up before students returned to campus this fall.

In the event of a zombie apocalypse, don’t lose your head — literally and figuratively. Thinking clearly is imperative to surBROOKS vival, said Max Brooks, the best-selling author of 2003’s “Zombie Survival Guide” and 2009’s “World War Z.” Brooks is making a stop in Blacksburg to share his wealth of knowledge on the fictional but real-world applicable topic. He will be presenting “10 Lessons for Surviving a Zombie Attack” tonight at 7:30 in the Haymarket Theatre in Squires Student Center. Brooks, who majored in history at Pitzer College, started his career in comedy as a writer for Saturday Night Live (SNL) but soon realized his passion for more serious writing and the living dead.

Well the truth is, the images that I came up with don’t haunt me half as much as the research.” Max Brooks “World War Z” author

Around the time of Y2K, when survival guides were flying off the shelf, Brooks noticed an absence of zombie “how-to” manuals. That’s when he set out to answer his own questions about a potential undead epidemic with a detailed, wellresearched zombie survival guide. His novel “World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War” was a follow-up to his “Zombie Survival Guide” and offers a picture of how the world would react. The novels, which Brooks said he wrote out of fear of the undead and the unknown, were not only a huge success in the book industry, but they were a personal success for Brooks. The Collegiate Times spoke with Brooks about his best-selling novels, his future plans and what he thought of Brad Pitt’s take on “World War Z.” Collegiate Times: Where did you get the idea for “World War Z?” Brooks: That came about a year after “Zombie Survival Guide” was published. I wanted to write another zombie story, but every zombie story I had ever seen were all sort of basic, small group survival stories — all basically the same story … Those stories are great, but I had a lot of questions that nobody was answering. see ZOMBIE/ page two

ONLINE Women’s soccer won a nailbiter against Wake Forest before sailing past Pitt.

Some students spent their fall break getting doused in colored corn starch. see page 2 see page 6

info on the go

SPORTS Check out last-minute and affordable Halloween costume ideas and decorations inspired by Pinterest.

When will Blacksburg see snow? It may be sooner than you think. see page 2

‘World War Z’ author shares how to survive zombie attack MADELEINE GORDON

Construction proposed to Southgate entrance news editor

Study Break, page 4

see page 5

Check online for a video of last weekend’s Bug Fest www.collegiatetimes.com


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newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 22, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

Southgate: Changes will alleviate traffic from page one

“The main thing is to share information with the public and elicit some input from them,” said Hammack. “Sometimes we get really good input because folks that come here (live here), they use it, they know it. Sometimes there are things that we miss.” The intersection is currently defined as being at-grade, meaning that the intersection aligns at the same height (or grade), thus requiring a traffic management device for the intersection to function — in this case, a traffic light on all three sides of the intersection. The project intends to replace this intersection with a grade-separated interchange, meaning the junction for U.S. 460 and Southgate Drive would be separated by their heights, thereby allowing traffic to flow more smoothly and with minimized interruption through the interchange. The proposed grade separation would be a diverging diamond interchange, a relatively new interchange that has just started to be developed and applied in the past five years. The project will create two bridges running across U.S. 460. In order to complete the project, portions of Southgate Drive will be relocated, along with portions of the Huckleberry Trail. Laura Mehiel, an AMT Engineering Services project engineer involved in the new interchange, noted that most of the input she had heard while talking with the community revolved around changes to the Huckleberry Trail, with most observers

showing excitement over the redesigned portion of the trail. With the proposed changes, Southgate Drive would be a four-lane section with 12-foot lanes, a raised median and curbs. The new section of the Huckleberry Trail would have a 10-foot paved path with a graded crossing at the U.S. 460 bypass. Additionally, roundabouts would be created for Southgate Drive’s intersections with Research Center Drive and Duck Pond Drive. Since 2009, the .925-mile stretch of U.S. 460 has seen 110 total crashes, according to VDOT’s analysis, with 27 of them resulting in injuries. VDOT expects this number to decrease as a result of the new interchange. After the Commonwealth Transportation Board approved the location of the project last July, VDOT worked with the Federal Highway Administration on an environmental assessment of the new interchange. The assessment forecasted that traffic demands for the interchange would increase by 84 percent, one of the many factors that justify a more expedient traffic junction. After the comment period ends at the end of October, Hammack says public input will be collected and considered, and they aim for the design to be approved by January 2014. From there, VDOTs anticipates to acquire the right of way to construct in the area by February 2014, and to begin advertising for construction services by the following December.

@JDeanSeal

NEWS

Zombie: Future holds vampires

Max Brooks thoroughly researches military strategies, maps, cultural differences and more to add realistic dimensions to his work. from page one

So just like the “Zombie Survival Guide,” I settled down to answer my own questions. CT: How did you go about doing the research to answer those questions? Brooks: Let’s just say that if the FBI ever raided my office in New York City, it looked like a terrorist cell. There was nothing in there but a desk and just tons and tons of books on weapons, world militaries, maps, tons of maps, the Quran. The only time I did Internet research, I used firsthand sources. The other 50 percent of the research was done by just talking to people. For every fake interview that I had in the

book, I did a real one. CT: A lot of the imagery in “World War Z” is very graphic and can be considered gory. How did you come up with those images and did they ever haunt you after writing them? Brooks: Well the truth is, the images that I came up with don’t haunt me half as much as the research. Because in reality, there’s nothing the zombies can do to us that we haven’t already done to each other. I based my zombie virus really on the AIDS virus. Because quite frankly, I’m not interested in the science of AIDS. I’m much more interested in the global reaction to AIDS. I’m interested in how the population reacts, how we react as individuals, as a society and as a planet. I find that much more terrifying and interesting than

the vampires (and zombies) themselves. CT: How did you think the “World War Z” movie turned out? Brooks: I think it was a very interesting, exciting summer blockbuster that just happened to have the title of the book I once wrote. The truth is, it was easier to watch than I thought, because it had so little to do with the book. I didn’t watch my book being turned into a movie. I just watched a movie that happened to have the same title as my book. So, in a strange way, that made it easier. CT: What was your initial reaction when you heard that “World War Z” was going to be made into a movie?

Paint the town RAD

Brooks: My initial reaction was the same reaction that my grandfather had when he heard that my mother was pregnant — “I’ll believe it when I see it.” I grew up in Hollywood. I grew up with movies. Movies are not a big deal to me. Both my parents (Mel Brooks and Anne Bancroft) have made movies. Hollywood holds no luster for me. Dyslexia almost destroyed me. It was a real fight. I had to fight everyday from first grade to god knows when, just to pass. So for a dyslexic kid to walk into Barnes and Noble and see his name on a book, there is no greater feeling of pride than that.

@mlg757

weather watch JAMES MORROW weather reporter

Cold conditions have made their home in Blacksburg the past few nights. The first frost of the season impacted the area last weekend, with more freezing conditions expected to come. Rain chances increase into midweek with the possibility of a few snow flurries by Wednesday night. The fall transition has accelerated here in the New River Valley over the past week. Peak season to see the fall foliage is in full swing, but with freezing temperatures already occurring, the leaves won’t be around for long. Temperatures today will struggle to reach 60 under mostly cloudy skies. Rain chances begin to increase through the afternoon as a cold front pushes into the area. The low overnight will only fall to 40 degrees.

PHOTOGRAPHER / SPPS

Thousands of people participated in the 2nd annual Color Me RAD run in Blacksburg this Sunday through Tech’s campus. Participants were greeted at the finish line with corn starch color bombs, leaving a colorful cloud of dust surrounding the race area.

A quick-moving system will push through the area on Wednesday, giving us a better shot at seeing rain. The cloud cover and rain showers will keep the afternoon temperatures around 50 degrees. Rain will let up toward sunset. The first chance at seeing a snowflake will come Wednesday evening as the system pushes away from the area. Lows at night will barely reach freezing, giving us a very slight chance of non-accumulating snow. The remainder of the week looks rather cool. Temperatures will not break the 50 degree mark during the day, while lows dip to around freezing each night. This trend will continue into the weekend and could last into early next week.

@wxBONE

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

status

Oct. 5

11:30 PM

Underage Possession of Alcohol X 3

Cochrane

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct

Oct. 18

12:03 AM - 1:00 AM

Vandalism/Destruction of Property

Prices Fork Research

Inactive

Oct. 17-18

5:00 PM - 3:10 PM

Vandalism/Destruction of Property

Lane Hall

Inactive

Oct. 18

10:53 PM

Underage Possession of Alcohol

Barringer Hall

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Oct. 19

1:18 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol

West Ambler Johnston

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 19

2:10 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol

College Avenue

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 19

11:47 PM

Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol

Otey Street

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 20

12:04 AM

Possession of Marijuana/Possession of Drug Paraphernalia/Trespassing

Squires Lot

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 20

2:00 AM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public/Simple Assault

College Avenue

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 20

2:33 AM

Appearing Intoxicated in Public

Outside Wallace Hall

Cleared by Arrest

Oct. 20

2:48 AM

Driving After Illegally Consuming Alcohol

Clay Street

Cleared by Arrest


OPINIONS

opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 22, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

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The Collegiate Times is an independent studentrun newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Priscilla Alvarez Managing Editor: Danielle Buynak Art Director: Kevin Dickel Design Editors: Brad Klodowski, Andrea Ledesma Public Editor: Andrew Kulak Web Editor: James O’Hara Multimedia Editor: Nick Smirniotopoulos News Editors: Cameron Austin, Dean Seal News Reporters: Melissa Draudt, Leslie McCrea News Staff Writers: Kelly Cline, Josh Higgins, Matt Minor Lifestyles Editors: Chelsea Giles, Madeline Gordon Opinions Editors: David Levitt, Sharath Reddy Sports Editors: Jacob Emert, Alex Koma Sports Media Manager: Mike Platania Assistant Photo Editor: Ben Wiedlich

MCT CAMPUS

Low voter turnout Host countries should not will sully Virginia’s prioritize games over citizens governor’s election S K en Cuccinelli: Not for us. Terry McAuliffe: Stealing jobs from Americans. This year’s gubernatorial race has been filled with these type of storylines in various negative advertisements, if you regularly watch TV, I’m sure you’ve seen some of them. This isn’t news, as nearly every major political race features negative advertisements to try to put off undecided voters from a candidate. However, it seems that this year these negative ads are having more of an impact than ever before. In the latest polls, McAuliffe currently leads Cuccinelli, garnering an expected 47% of the vote, and if this reflects what will happen Election Day, it will be the first time a Virginia governor would be elected with less than half the vote. I work with one of the gubernatorial campaigns, specifically with grassroots marketing and voter outreach in Montgomery and nearby counties. This job means interacting on a daily basis with potential voters to discuss which candidate they plan on supporting for governor this year. As southwest Virginia is historically a conservative area, it would be expected that support for the ultraconservative candidate Cuccinelli over his liberal opponent would be more widespread. However, my experience has revealed a different reality, as many voters have expressed disappointment in their choice of candidates. The general tone from undecided voters has been one of apathetic disdain. The disconnect between candidates has led to some voters turning to Robert Sarvis, a Libertarian candidate. Others are deciding to not vote at all, stating that they can’t bring themselves to vote for either candidate. These two candidates are

as different as the ideologies behind the Democrats and Republicans, and present two dramatically different views for our state’s future for the next four years. However, the danger lies in the idea that two less-than-ideal candidates make an excuse for not voting. Should a majority of people adopt this mentality, our state’s gubernatorial race would be decided by an uneven representation of people.

However, the danger lies in the idea that two lessthan-ideal candidates make an excuse for not voting.”

It’s obvious that low voter turnout is bad. We learned this as early as civics class in middle school. In offyear elections such as this one, voter turnout rates are generally low — significantly so among young people, such as college students. In an election with these candidates, the potential for it being one of the lowest turnouts in recent history. How can we combat this issue? Easy. Educate yourself about these candidates and their views, and then go vote on Nov. 5. Don’t bemoan the choices that our future governor makes if you do not contribute. Whether your vote is cast for Cuccinelli, McAuliffe or even Sarvis, go out and exercise your right to cast one at all. It’s important that Virginia has the right governor, one who is truly elected by, and representative of, the people. TINNY SONG -regular columnist -junior -political science

we’re YOUR newspaper. send a letter to the editor and express your views.

ports is one of the great equalizers in this life. People of all ages, creeds, nationalities, economic standing and genders play sports around the world. Whether as a profession, using the best equipment in the best facilities, or for the pure joy of it, with make-shift balls in an alley-way — sports are an escape. Indeed, the modern Olympic Games were founded by Pierre de Coubertin to “contribute to building a peaceful and better world by educating youth through sport practiced without discrimination of any kind, in a spirit of friendship, solidarity and fair play.” Yet it’s inequality that is being highlighted around the world with upcoming Olympics and World Cups. After a year off from any major world competition, the Olympics and World Cup return this winter and summer in two of the newly advanced economies of the world: Russia and Brazil.

The 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, faces threats of boycotts after Russian president Vladimir Putin signed a law earlier this year forbidding the promotion of “nontraditional” families. The United Nations and European Union have called the law a violation of human rights. And while it can be argued that Russia has in many ways violated the human rights of its citizens (see: Pussy Riot, Alexei Navalny), this particular law is an affront to LGBT athletes from around the world who have trained their entire lives to compete for Olympic glory. And now they face a choice: give up their dream or compete in a country that would deny their rights. Brazil is hosting the upcoming World Cup as well as the 2016 Summer Olympics. With a stalled economy, the country is now under duress. Bankers, transport workers, teachers and workers from every strata of society have

engaged in strikes to protest the government’s priorities. Instead of social programs to move the nation forward, the government is seen to be funneling resources to large-scale stadium projects for sports-tourists. Much of the country lives in poverty yet the government is sending the message to its people that the facade of a successful economy and country is more important than its actual success. So why have the selection committees rewarded Brazil and Russia when they don’t even respect their own citizens? The selection committees have tarnished their own brands and violated their own missions. Because of this, host countries of the Olympics and the World Cup get to use these major sporting events as a showcase. CAROLINE KELLY - regular columnist - sophomore - English

Hypocrisy taints privacy debate

M

ark Zuckerberg, founder, CEO and “face” of Facebook is a man whose idea of privacy is that there is none, except for that reserved for himself. Facebook recently decided to remove the option for its users to hide from search results, meaning that at any time anyone can search for you and find you on Facebook. Facebook cited the fact that since less than 5 percent of its users utilize this option, they feel that there is no need to continue providing this service. This is interesting considering Zuckerberg made headlines recently when he purchased the four houses that neighbor his own because of privacy concerns. Not only is privacy becoming less and less relevant, but the amount of information we post online that is publicly available is increasing. This is interesting in light of recent public outrage over NSA information collection. The NSA’s public image has declined severely after Eric Snowden revealed the agency’s massive project to gather infor-

mation about not only suspected terrorists, but American citizens. The American public, much like Zuckerberg himself, has been caught in a state of hypocrisy. Why are we so mad that the government is collecting our data when the same information is readily available on our Facebook walls, Twitter feeds, YouTube channels, Tumblrs, Flickrs, Instagrams, Pinterests or other social media outlets? We can’t have our cakes and eat them too. We can’t ask the government to protect us against potential terrorist threats while simultaneously asking them to trust us. The government is going to use any and all available resources to achieve their goals. The people we voted into office don’t care about privacy because we don’t care about privacy, we care about stopping terrorist threats, and now after we found out how the bacon is made we’re angry. According to the Pew Research Center, as of Aug. 5th 83 percent of all adults aged 18-29 use social network-

ing sites. Granted not all of us use these websites in order to spam our friends with 15 minute updates, but as pointed out by Facebook, only 5 percent of it’s 218 million active monthly users chose to use the privacy option, clearly privacy is no longer something we are interested in. We shouldn’t blame the government for our loss of privacy, we should blame ourselves. If we really wanted privacy we wouldn’t be posting bathing suit albums of Facebook, we wouldn’t even be using Facebook, we wouldn’t be tweeting our vacation itineraries, or making YouTube videos which show our homes and families. Fortunately, we live in a country where we can change our government without having to stage a coup. If privacy is something we want, we need to not only demand it from the government — we must demand it from ourselves. MARCUS WILLIAMS - regular columnist - senior - economics

send an e-mail to opinionseditor@collegiatetimes. com with your letter or guest column attached.

Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: James Dean Seal Circulation Manager: Keith Bardsley College Media Solutions Ad Director: Michelle Sutherland Account Executives: Taylor Moran, Stephanie Morris, Danielle Pedra Inside Sales Manager: Amanda Gawne Assistant Account Executives: Catie Stockdale Jordan Williams, Emily Daugherty, Emily Reina, Becca Schwartz Creative Director: Diana Bayless Creative Staff: Mariah Jones, Samantha Keck, Kitty Schaffernoth, Seden Craig. Katherine Miller

Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2013. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


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October 22, 2013

Today’s Birthday Horoscope: It’s a year of artistic exploration.

Romance and creativity blossom this autumn and next spring. Work could involve music, photography, art or writing. Exhibit and launch. There may be travel included, especially next summer. Partnerships personal and professional thrive (the April 29 eclipse sparks a new level). Career flowers next summer and autumn. Express your love.

Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham Quote of the Day

“To be beautiful means to be yourself. You don’t need to be accepted by others. You need to accept yourself.”

life, our world transformed: Remembering the Future, science fiction stories by Alan Kovski. On Amazon.com.

Textbooks for Sale Don’t Fear Research Papers! They’re easy & fast when you use these unique techniques. Do your OWN great work! Learn how at

- Thich Nhat Hanh Send us your quote and see it here! creative.services@collegemedia.com

Notices

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For Sale BOOKS: dangerous dreams, stolen memories, collapsing societies, lost identities, lost souls, engineered

xkcd by Randall Munroe

By Gareth Bain

music downloads

ACROSS 1 '50s-'60s Bronx Bombers nickname, with "The" 5 South Seas tuber 9 Oceans 14 Like the team before @, on schedules 15 Not much 16 Hotel courts 17 Best Original Song Oscar winner from ... Disney's "Pocahontas" 20 Little one

for the week of October 15th through 18th

Gremlins- Danny Brown Alligator- Action Bronson Orion’s Belt- Riff Raff Barbie Girl Dirty- Lil B Tamale- Tyler, The Creator

listen up

10/22/13 21 __-tzu 22 On the calmer side 23 ... Disney's "Aladdin" 28 Headache 29 WSJ headline 30 __ rock: music genre 31 Faux pas 33 Bars with hidden prices? 35 Evensong? 39 ... Disney's "Song of the South" 43 Wed. vis-à-vis Thu.

44 Reed of The Velvet Underground 45 Expel, as lava 47 Western treaty gp. 50 Periods prec. soccer shootouts 52 Before, poetically 53 ... Disney's "Mary Poppins" 58 French city mostly destroyed in 1944 59 Golf's Woosnam 60 Tyler of "Jersey Girl" 61 ... Disney's "Monsters, Inc."

67 Athena's shiel 68 "__ chic!" 69 File's partner d 70 Actor Milo 71 Holiday tuber 72 __-Ball s DOWN 1 Brolly user's garment 2 __ Jima 3 '20s White Hous nickname 4 1997 ecological e protocol city 5 Gustatory sensor 6 Blood typing abbr 7 Sight site . 8 Bilingual Canadian city 9 John who explored the Canadian Arctic 10 Openly hostile 11 Showy extra 12 Like tridents 13 Marquis de __ 18 Three-sixty in canoe 19 Coyote call a 23 Grain beard 24 Suffering from vertigo 25 Legendary skate Sonja r 26 "Ixnay!" 27 Sgt. Snorkel's dog 32 Covert __: sp stuff 34 Disney frame y 36 Some mag spreads 37 Flat hand, in a game 38 __ Khan: "The Jungle Book" tiger 40 Elemental bit

41 Judgment Day 42 Blow away in competition 46 Pint-size 48 Low-pH substance 49 Crudely built home 51 Switchblade 53 Tables-on-thestreet restaurants 54 "__-Ho": Dwarfs' song

55 Non-mainstream film 56 Prefix with mural 57 Civil rights activist Medgar 58 "Farewell, cara mia" 62 Metaphor words 63 Skirt line 64 Asian plow puller 65 Vague pronoun 66 Hawaiian strings

Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

10/17/13

WORDSEARCH: Famous Artists Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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WORD BANK 1 Botticelli V O W 2 Monet S N K 3 Da Vinci V A A 4 Van Gogh E T N 5 Klimt 6 Jackson F E D Pollock 7 Kandinsky L L I Y L N 8 Cezanne 9 Matisse M O S 10 Andy Warhol J E K 11 Donatello 12 Picasso E I Y 13 Salvador Dali P Y D 14 Renoir Z Y K 15 Manet

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Aries (March 21-April 19) Partnerships and alliances are crucial. Handle home upgrades together with exceptional patience. Use what you learn, and soak in new lavors. Make sure everybody knows what they’re doing. Don’t shop, yet. Travel conditions improve. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Clean up your workspace. Start now and discover something hidden that you’d lost. Review your data, and get everything organized. Attention to detail is key and could be pro itable. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Communication comes naturally. There could be breakdowns in the transmission or with transportation. Make sure your message gets received as intended. Track all packages. Have a well-thought-out plan. Creative expression satis ies. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Consider your personal philosophy or that of someone admired. Take on qualities and characteristics that they model. Schedule extra time for the unexpected. Retreat into peacefulness for a bit. Take things slowly and thoroughly. Relax into it.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Go ahead and get cerebral. Embrace your inner brainiac. Plot and scheme and get it all down on paper. Group involvement provides satisfaction and mutual bene it. Budget extra time for traf ic or unforeseen delay. Buy tickets early.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Communication is the key for successful travel together. Stay patient, and wait to clarify misunderstandings. Make no assumptions or snap judgments. Messages get lost in translation. Maintain a sense of humor.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Uncage your creativity for a rise in status. Use it to bene it a social cause dear to you. Allow extra travel and delivery time. Double-check reservations over the next three weeks. Keep it organized, yet free.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Discipline and service allow greater freedoms. There’s satisfaction in impacting a cause. Sidestep or go around any roadblocks. Pad the schedule around deliveries, transportation and electronic equipment. Contribute to correct an injustice.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Allow plenty of travel time, and keep mechanical equipment in repair. You feel strongly about ethics and philosophy. Take leadership with a group cause. Stay lexible and bend with the wind. Keep standing for truth, justice and beauty. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Don’t get frustrated by miscommunications. Just allow extra time and deliver important messages twice. Enjoy frequent conversations with key partners for mutual bene it. Balance busy time at work with restful meals and moonlight.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Stay lexible and easy-going. Fun with interesting people tempts you to play hooky. Handle the basics, and ask your crew for support. Maybe you can work something out for mutual bene it. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)

Express your creativity at home. Balance your color scheme, furniture layout and style. Handle household repairs. Plan extra time for deliveries, for unexpected visitors or delays. Review invoices and statements. Watch for overcharges. Relax into silences.


SPORTS

sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 22, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

5

Hokies beat Wake Forest in OT, blow out Pittsburgh RACHEL FRANKS sports staff writer

Virginia Tech’s sixth ranked women’s soccer team had a big weekend, beating No. 19 Wake Forest 2-1 in a comeback overtime win on Thursday and stomping Pittsburgh 4-0 on Sunday. The two wins bring the Hokies to 13-1-2 on the season and 8-1-1 in the ACC. The wins also extended their winning streak to nine. Wake was the fi rst game the team played as the sixth ranked squad in the nation, the highest ranking achieved in program history. The Hokies are not playing under the radar anymore, and the team knows it. “We try not to pay attention to the rankings, but the higher you go, the more people are going to want to beat you,” said freshman forward Murielle Tiernan. Head coach Chugger Adair just wants the team to focus on winning. “Our girls have to forget about rankings and things like that to step up and play,” Adair said. Adair was pleased with the tough victory over the Demon Deacons, but was not too happy with how the team started the game. “Wake had a good game plan today and they were better than us at the start tonight,” Adair said. “We dug ourselves a little bit of a hole … In the end we got a good result tonight, but it took a lot more effort than we wanted, digging out of that hole.” Wake Forest put the first points on the board, making it 1-0 at the eleven minute mark. It was the first time the Hokies have been behind since they lost to North Carolina on Sept. 12.

upcoming games Thu Oct. 24 - 7 p.m. No. 3 Florida State Sun Oct. 27 - Noon Miami Thu Oct. 31 - 7 p.m. at Virginia Nov. 3 ACC Tourn. quarterfinals

Tech was not behind for long, as Shannon Mayrose tied the game in the 26th minute. Junior midfielder Katie Yensen got the assist, as she passed the ball to Mayrose at the top of the box. Mayrose was able to shoot it left-footed, and the ball bounced off a Wake defender and into the top right of the goal. This was Mayrose’s fourth game back after an injury this summer, but Mayrose now has goals in two of the team’s last three games. Despite her recent goals, she still feels she is not back to where she was last year. “Being out for two months was hard on my fitness, so I don’t think I’m back up to speed in that aspect,” Mayrose said. “I’m just trying to do everything I can to get back up to speed with my touch, my fitness and everything.” Adair is happy to have her back, even though she is not quite 100 percent. “She is not quite back to where she was last year, but she is coming back and she is still making an impact,” Adair said. “She is a smart, experienced player who is very good for us and having

depth upfront is key and that was key tonight. “ Tiernan scored the gamewinning goal in the 99th minute off a close range shot to the upper right corner of the goal. Despite the tight final score, Tech outshot the Deacons 18-7 in the game and 12-3 in the second half. Both Tiernan and Mayrose were frustrated with all the missed opportunities. “Our shots to other teams shots are always double,” Tiernan said. “We have to work on finishing our chances so we don’t have to end up winning in overtime.” The team is averaging 15 shots per game, but is currently only connecting on them 16 percent of the time. But the team had no trouble scoring against Pittsburgh on Sunday. Junior midfielder Katie Yensen scored two goals in the first half to lead the Hokies to a 4-0 victory. Tiernan also scored in the fi rst half off a header and senior Ashley Manning scored the final goal of the game in the beginning of the second half. Tech dominated the whole game, with the Hokies outshooting the Panthers 18-3 and taking 6 corners to Pitt’s one. Starting goalkeeper senior Dayle Colpitts only played until halftime and didn’t have to make any saves. Carline Kelly came in for her and made two saves for the shutout. Now, the team is looking to move up in the standings again with another pair of ACC home matches. The Hokies will play Florida State on Thursday at 7 p.m. and hold their senior day on Sunday at 1 p.m. against Miami. ZACK WAJSGRAS / SPPS

@CTSportsTalk

FSU’s win over Clemson hurts Tech, ACC’s image F

or a brief moment on Saturday night, the college football world respected the ACC. One of football’s most ridiculed conferences finally earned a place on the national stage when the country turned its attention to the touted matchup between Florida State and Clemson in primetime. Most analysts expected it to be a high-scoring battle between the ACC’s two premier programs to see which teams’ national championship dreams would be crushed. Instead, it rapidly developed into an embarrassing home blowout for the Tigers, as the Seminoles dominated them in nearly every aspect of the game. The match did turn out to be high scoring, except Florida State put almost all of the points on the board, winning 51-14. While it may have been cathartic for Hokie fans to watch the Tigers lose so spectacularly in a big game, considering the ill will most Tech fans bear Clemson after the 2011 season, the blowout was actually damaging to the both the Hokies and the conference as a whole. It certainly helps the ACC that the Seminoles ended up ranked so highly in the new BCS standings — Florida State is ranked third in the AP Top 25, but the BCS puts them at second in the nation. But the conference would’ve benefited significantly more if it appeared as if there was SEC-style parity in the league. Few people will be willing to take lower-ranked ACC teams like Virginia Tech seriously if they think the Seminoles are the only team in the conference with talent.

Even if Clemson had lost, but had put up a fight while doing so, observers would have more respect for the Tigers and the whole conference. Instead, they’re quickly being written off as just another ACC pretender that doesn’t deserve top tier consideration. Clemson had the good fortune of only falling to ninth in the BCS and AP standings with the loss, but that was more a factor of the upheaval occurring in the rest of college football than the voters’ opinion of the Tigers. Now, Dabo Swinney’s bunch faces an uphill climb for the rest of the season, and if they lose their season-ending game to South Carolina, there’s no way anyone will give Clemson credit for its early season success. Teams like the Hokies need every team to be taken seriously to land a spot in a quality bowl. The BCS computers were kind to Tech, ranking them eighth to contribute to their 14th overall ranking, and the Hokies will need that goodwill to carry over when it comes time to set the BCS bowls. But those positive feelings might evaporate rapidly. If the Seminoles end up beating the Miami Hurricanes on Nov. 2 and Al Golden’s squad turns around and beats the Hokies the very next week, no one will take Tech seriously. The Hokes could still end up winning the ACC Coastal Division, whether they beat Miami or not, but a big loss to the Seminoles in the ACC Championship Game would be similarly damaging to the ACC’s reputation. This all has serious implications when the playoff begins in 2014. When it comes time for the

selection committee to pick the top four teams in the nation, attitudes toward the ACC will matter. If the conference’s winner is a top team, but the ACC runner-up sits a rung or two below them, will it earn the same consideration that a second place SEC or Big 10 team will? It’s certainly encouraging for the conference that Florida State is currently in the driver’s seat for the title game. If the Seminoles can win the rest of their games, which present few challenges besides a season ending road game against Florida, they’ll represent the ACC on the largest possible stage. But a big loss in that game to a top squad like Alabama would be similarly damaging for the conference’s reputation. That’s what it all really comes down to: appearances. The ACC is experiencing its best overall season in years, with four teams in the top 15 of the BCS standings — just like the SEC. But after years of ineptitude, the conference is facing an uphill battle to get taken seriously by national media. The ACC is a solid league this year, filled with competitive teams, but Clemson’s big loss makes it easy for others to write the conference off once more. Florida State may have benefitted in a big way from the result on Saturday night, but for the rest of the conference, it was a huge missed opportunity. ALEX KOMA - sports editor - communication - senior

Danielle King (8) dribbles around a Wake Forest defender in Tech’s 2-1 win over the Demon Deacons.


6

lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 22, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

HALLOWEEN

Pinterest offers fun House: Local attraction haunts investigators DIY costume ideas from page one

H

alloween falls on the same day each year, but admittedly, the holiday always sneaks up on me. I find myself with nothing to wear, no time to buy a costume and no money to buy one with. If this is you, too, don’t panic. Instead, take it as a fun opportunity to make a unique costume out of what you already have in your closet. Girls, this does not mean you should throw on a black dress and cat ears and draw whiskers on your face with eyeliner. In the age of Pinterest, we have plenty of inspiration and guidance to get more creative than that. One of my favorite do-ityourself costume ideas for this Halloween, which is also gender-neutral, is recreating one of your awkward, elementary school portraits. You know, the ones with the terrible, 90’s-themed backdrops and the bad haircut? There are only a few supplies you would need to recreate this image, such as a foam poster board for the costume’s “backdrop,” which can be purchased at WalMart for under $3. Use your creative abilities to make this as tacky and dated as possible. For example, put neon designs or fluff y, white clouds on it. In addition, use elastic string to feed through small holes in the foam board so that you can fashion it to your back like a backpack and wear it anywhere you go. Go to Goodwill and buy the tackiest top you can find — think windbreakers, turtlenecks or geometric patterns. Girls, break out your old scrunchies and pull your hair up into the lumpiest ponytail or most skewed pigtails possible. And for guys, one word: spikes. Similar costumes can be made with the concept of having a backdrop, like being a walking and talking Rosie the Riveter or Uncle Sam propaganda poster or recreating your favorite album or magazine cover. If you aren’t interested in wearing a bulky costume all night, don’t fret. Another option is couple costumes, which are always a big hit. You could easily dress as your favorite fictional couple, like Pam and Jim in professional, office attire, Dr. Grey and McDreamy in scrubs, or Gatsby and Daisy in fun, 1920s attire. Be creative with group costumes, too. If you ask someone what his or her favorite week of television is, you’ll likely hear Shark Week. So why not combine two amazing times of the year, Halloween and Shark Week, into one great costume? If you have friends planning to go as a group, make

fins out of cardboard or foam poster board and paint them grey. You can wear the fin on your head by attaching it to a headband or wearing it on your back. Tear holes in your clothing and splatter fake blood all over your group to make it look as though a shark attacked you. For bonus points, memorize a few facts about sharks to randomly recite throughout the night. However, creating the perfect costume is only half the battle for Halloween. Decorating is the other fun part of this holiday. If you’re hosting a Halloween party, pumpkins can be functional as well as decorative. Once again, if you’re tight on money, snag a five-dollar pumpkin from the University Bookstore before they run out. Cut yours in half and scoop out the guts so you are left with what looks like a pumpkin shaped bowl. You can fi ll the hallowed out pumpkin with ice and chill drinks in it or line the bowl with plastic wrap and serve chips, dip or candy out of it. This Halloween, I’m opting out of carving my pumpkin. As a poor college student, I’d like to see my investment last until Thanksgiving break so I can stay festive all season. If you’re in the same boat, there are tons of DIY tricks to decorate a pumpkin without cutting into it. One easy craft is covering the pumpkin in tulle and tying it together with festive ribbon near the stem. You can also bling out your pumpkin using glitter and Mod Podge, or use Mod Podge and tissue paper to give it a patterned, textured look. Another trick is painting the entire pumpkin in black chalkboard paint. You can display a countdown until Halloween on it, erasing and changing the number each day. Whatever you do this Halloween, try to do it yourself. For more costume, decoration or food ideas for this Halloween, visit the Collegiate Times’ Pinterest site at www.pinterest.com/ ctlifestyles/. EMILY CARRIGAN - lifestyles staff writer - sophomore - English major

All the seasonal activities St. Albans has to offer are open to the public. The haunted house that runs in October and February draws in young adults and teenagers while the ghost tours, public and private, usually attract professional investigators and curious adults. “I was forced there by my friends, and it was pretty scary,” said Joey Truncale, a senior communication major. “If someone left me in that building at night, I would be terrified.” Truncale visited St. Alabans this weekend and said the building itself was more haunting than the actors. “You would look up and there were holes in the ceiling, and the hallways were shoulder length, which made it really claustrophobic,” Truncale said. “Even the bathrooms looked terrifying.”

Besides the haunted house tours to exhibit its creepy features, St.Albans also offers a historical tour and a photography tour for photographers who want open range to the house. The logo “Th is is one crazy place” has also been called insensitive, but the workers at St.Albans were quick to point out that if one tours the house, they would see that no reference to hospitals or patients are used. According to the St. Albans website, paranormal investigators label the house as the most paranormally active house on the east coast. The reason cannot be pinpointed, but it has much to do with the energy the house has carried in the past and all that has happened around the area. “I saw a shadowy red figure for the first time and had my ‘ah-ha’ moment that this all was real,” Wright said. Wright said she has many stories of her paranormal adventures at St. Albans.

So many that she wants to write a book chronicling her sightings and experiences to share with the public. “It’s so normal now if I see a shadowy figure in the hall, or if something flies across the room,” Wright said. “It’s just a day at work for me now.” Besides the consistent paranormal activity, St. Albans Halloween tours could not be done without the volunteers who work countless hours at the house year round. Though planning for the haunted house started in May, with the effort of the volunteers, it was set up in just two weeks. Volunteers not only set up the haunted house features and work as haunters, but they also help lead ghost tours, clean and do whatever they can to keep things running smoothly. While not all of the volunteers are paranormal experts, after spending the majority of their time at St.Alban’s, it’s safe to say

they all have a strong love for the paranormal world. “I’ve met a variety of people here, and we’ve become one big dysfunctional family,” said Lauren, a high school volunteer for St. Albans. St. Albans provides a different experience for everyone. Some may wish to fulfill a Halloween tradition by visiting the typical themed haunted house. Others may wish to delve into paranormal activity for the first time and have a new experience encountering spirits. But no matter what draws curious visitors, those dedicated to St. Albans want to share the adoration and mission that motivates them to keep the house’s story alive. “Having people fall in love with this building and be awed, not just by the paranormal activity, but with the architecture and history, is the reason we fight every day,” Wright said. “I just love sharing that with people.”

@_LeggomyMeggo11


Tuesday, October 22, 2013 Print Edition