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Wednesday, September 25, 2013

An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 110th year, issue 21 News, page 2

Lifestyles, page 6

Opinions, page 3

Sports, page 5

Study Break, page 4

Decades of information hacked Cycle class

mimics dance club atmosphere

BY MELISSA DRAUDT | news reporter

144,963 individuals affected

MADELEINE GORDON lifestyles editor

16,642 Randy Marchany, monitors and responds to cyber attacks against VT computers and IT services. “The Administrator account password did not follow VT’s password strength rules,” said Marchany, regarding how the attack was possible. “(It) was trivial and easy to guess.” Going forward, Hincker says it’s just a matter of doing the right thing. “We’re going to do what’s appropriate and what’s right as well as what’s required by law,” Hincker said. The only action the university was obligated to take by law was to inform the individuals of the potential threat to their security.

The beat drops and a chorus of excited cheers reverberate through the dark room. Sweaty bodies pulsate to the deafening music, while neon clothes glow under the blacklight. But this isn’t a scene from a dance club downtown — it’s CLUB CYCLE, a unique group fitness class held in McComas Hall’s Spin City. CLUB CYCLE is a twice-weekly cycling class that mimics a dance club atmosphere by playing Electronic Dance Music (EDM) and incorporating dance moves with the traditional spin workout. The idea behind the innovative class came to Ph.D candidate and fitness instructor Jordan Hill when he stepped inside the Spin City workout room in 2011. He knew he could use the space to combine his two loves: fitness and EDM. “I was blown away by the high quality sound system and the awesome lighting configuration,” Hill said. “It’s just like a club.” Hill, who is originally from Colorado, was also inspired to create the class because he saw the lack of an EDM community in Blacksburg — a sentiment echoed by CLUB CYCLE regular and junior finance major, Sarah Kowarski. “As someone who was already passionate about EDM, I came to Blacksburg and I couldn’t find any outlet for it,” Kowarski said. “But when I came across this class, I was like ‘This guy knows what he is doing.’” According to Kowarski, Hill is always upto-date on the latest EDM music. Much like a DJ, Hill said that he uses new music in every workout. Since the class started in January 2013, Hill has created over 42 fresh set lists for his classes.

see HACKED / page two

see SPIN / page six

drivers license numbers potentiallly accessed

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY KEVIN DICKEL / COLLEGIATE TIMES

partly through a Tech A server linked from Italy successfully hacked into a Human accessed server in Italy. Resources files, accessing application records dating to 2003. “The issue here is that someVirginia Tech announced Tuesday morning that a human resource server had been illegally accessed, potentially compromising over 16,000 job applicants drivers license numbers. The server contained sensitive information on 144,963 people who applied for positions at Tech between 2003 and 2013. Last week, Associate Vice President for Human Resources Hal Irvin, sent a letter to 16,642 people whose personal information, including name and drivers’ license numbers, may have been accessed on Aug. 28, 2013. University officials were noti-

fied in August by an email stating the server was involved in questionable activity. The other 128,321 applicants were not personally notified because their information on the server consisted of standard employment applicant information, by which no credit card, date of birth or social security information was compromised. According to Larry Hincker, associate vice president for University Relations, the attack was the result of human error in policy and protocol when dealing with sensitive information. A forensics investigation determined that the information was

one on our staff goofed,” said Hincker. “There really are no changes to be made to the pro-

The issue here is that someone on our staff goofed... There really are no changes to be made to the protocol” Larry Hincker University Spokesman

tocol. We have well-understood policies and procedures with respect to securing data.” University IT Security Officer,

Students enact Tech named Military Friendly school political change in different ways TREVOR PENKWITZ news staff writer

JOSH HIGGINS news reporter

Root canals, cockroaches and traffic jams have one thing in common: they have a higher approval rating than Congress, according to Public Policy Polling. With congressional approval hovering at 15 percent this year, it shouldn’t be a surprise that Americans by more than 2-1 say the best way to make change in society is outside of politics through volunteer organizations and charities, according to a USA TODAY/ Bipartisan Policy Center poll conducted in June. This trend is particularly strong among people younger than 30. Buddy Howell, a Virginia Tech communication professor who has conducted research in political communication and persuasion, said it’s no surprise young people feel this way. “We don’t give young people the view of politics as exciting, as promoting change, as influencing

NEWS

people’s lives and having an everyday impact,” Howell said. “When you’re young and haven’t had a job yet — a full-time, 40-hour-workweek job, trying to have a monthly budget, paying student loans, having taxes withheld, Social Security — many (political) issues are still a few years down the road.” Kelsey Jo Starr, a junior political science major, is one of such young people avoiding politics. Initially, she had interest in working in political consulting but switched career paths due to the political climate. “I was raised on a rather idealistic version of politics, in which there were at least some people that seem to be out for the greater good,” she said. “The more I see, the more cutthroat and partisan it’s getting. I don’t mind working in a bipartisan government — I just want people to get along or have basic decorum.” Starr now intends to pursue see CHANGE / page two

For the third consecutive year, Virginia Tech has been recognized for being in the top 20 percent of military friendly schools by Victory Media, the premier media entity for military personnel transitioning to civilian life. “Inclusion on the 2014 list of Military Friendly Schools shows Virginia Tech’s commitment to providing a supportive environment for military students,” said Sean Collins, vice president of Victory Media and a nine-year Navy veteran. The 2014 Military Friendly Schools list highlights 1,868 of the nearly 12,000 higher education institutions that are doing the most to embrace America’s FILE APRIL 2013 / SPPS military service members, veterans and their families as stu- Cadets discuss their roles in an upcoming training mission at the Army Field Traning Exercise in April. dents to ensure their success with the University. to serve as the first-stop for nection to the Veterans@VT tion accredited by the Virginia Dr. Patty Perillo, vice presi- veterans and their families. student organization — a Values Veterans Association, dent for Student Affairs, said The office handles all com- chapter of Student Veterans of dedicating at least five percent “Virginia Tech offers many pliance paperwork with the America. of all open job positions to programs on campus to help Veterans Administration and According to Colonel Chris veterans. veterans feel comfortable and coordinates with the Student St. Jean, a 26 year Army “When we feel valued and welat home, such as welcoming Success Center and University Veteran and Assistant Director comed, we are more inclined to receptions to meet other veter- Registrar to ensure student for Undergraduate Admissions, want to go somewhere,” Dr. ans as well as faculty and staff veterans are connected with “Virginia Tech offers guaran- Perillo mentioned, referring to that serve as advisors for aca- resources to help their transi- teed admission to any Marine Tech’s commitment to tradidemic support. (Tech also has) tion to academic and campus Corps soldier who earned at tion, history and the Pylons, student organizations, like the civilian life. least a 3.0 GPA in high school, which many military personStudent Veterans of America Those served have access to and scored a 600 or higher on nel live by every day. group on campus.” tutoring, mentoring, assis- the Math portion of the SAT.” In May 2012, the Office of tance navigating the Veterans Virginia Tech is currently @TPenkwitz Veterans Service opened Association system and con- the only education institu-

LIFESTYLES

SPORTS Check out the Indian Run Stringband, the local band that is reviving old-time music throughout Blacksburg.

How much will the Human Resource security breach cost Tech? see page 2 The 2nd Annual Hokie Hijinx Scavenger Hunt begins. Find out how to get involved. see page 2

ONLINE Wondering what news hit the Hokies football team this week? Check out the football notebook inside.

Check online for constant updates throughout the day. www.collegiatetimes.com

CollegiateTimes @collegiatetimes

see page 6

see page 5


2

newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 25, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

NEWS

Hacked: Bad password allows break-in Second annual from page one

However, in response to the attack, Tech is providing identity insurance and access to a credit monitoring service for a year to individuals whose driver’s license numbers were accessible during the attack. Depending on an individual’s choice of company, between Equifax, TransUnion and Experian, each insurance policy is about $15-20 per person, which will end up costing the university thousands of dollars.

Though attempts to hack into Tech systems occur daily, Tech’s Standards for Storing and Transmitting Personally Identifying Information, along with the IT department, have prevented a large-scale hack of this nature in the past. Virginia Tech had a breach in 2011 when malware was loaded on a Tech system and attempted to search the computer for social security numbers and other information. Marchany admits that the main effect of this incident is reputational damage to the university.

“Protecting your sensitive data is a critical mission of the University,” Marchany said. “At the same time, individuals must take the same precautions to protect their personal info on their own computers.” “Data breaches (like this one) are widespread and usually caused by something minor such as a weak password or a stolen laptop with unencrypted sensitive data,” Marchany said. Marchany reassured that the IT security department was well equipped to handle the attack. “We were prepared to respond

to such incidents and took steps immediately to disconnect the system from the network,” Marchany said. “Our cybersecurity monitors gave us the information needed to piece together what happened and determine where the attacks originated.” According to Marchany, the investigation is closed and IT officials believe it was a random probe that found a hole in the system due to a weak password.

@MelissaDraudt

Change: Youth shy away from politics from page one

As young people avoid the political process, political scientists are trying to determine why the shift from politics to public service is happening in the younger generation. Howell said a variety of issues are causing this shift, from economics to cultural and academic factors. According to Howell and his research, young people are getting involved, but at the local level, not the state or federal level. Starr said she thinks young people are starting to realize the futility of using politics to affect change. “It all just seems so hopeless,” she said. “People want

to make real change in the world, not spend all their time fundraising and appealing to a core of 500 voters. People are starting to realize that.” Though students might be avoiding politics, university campuses still attract political organizations and events. On Oct. 24, Virginia gubernatorial candidates Ken Cuccinelli (Rep.) and Terry McAuliffe (Dem.) will debate at the Haymarket Theatre at Squires Student Center. Even though these events give students opportunities to get involved, Howell said these events do not necessarily boost engagement among students, but rather attract those who are already interested and involved.

“In many ways, (these political events are) like an athletic event where you go out and support your team, your side,” Howell said. In addition, Howell said the current young generation might not fi nd these political events appealing. “It’s an instant sort of culture — instant texting, instant tweeting, instant chatting — everything is instant,” he said. “People aren’t necessarily going to want to get engaged with long discussions about budgets.” Though these factors have deterred some students from trying to affect change, Starr said she hopes to use her alternative career path to take a positive step forward. “My hope is that I can pro-

duce research one day about the nature of politics that actually affects how politics is done,” Starr said. “I would like to one day publish a book about the perfect personality traits, social behaviors and the like to produce ideal political situations. The change I do may not be as direct, but hopefully it will one day inspire people to do things a better way.” Howell said promoting discourse on contentious issues could pique interest and lead to ownership of issues that could inspire greater interest running for office or joining an organization.

Hokie Hijinx scavenger hunt begins today MAURA MAZUROWSKI news staff writer

In all the craziness leading up to exams, it is nearly impossible to find a quiet place to study a semester’s worth of information free of your hall mate’s chatter and the temptation to watch just one more episode of Breaking Bad on Netflix. Yet if you become this year’s winner of the University Library’s Hokie Hijinx Scavenger Hunt, you will guarantee yourself a 24-hour secret study spot, free from all social and technological distractions that college students face daily. Last year, the library had 24 teams and over 150 people participate. So far this year, 35 teams and over 176 people have registered for the event. “We were really able to engage a lot of students with it and help them get out and explore campus,” said Scott Fralin, outreach support specialist with the library. The rules of the scavenger hunt are simple: teams of varying sizes will be given clues to different locations across campus. A picture with at least one team member must be taken at each site and shared via Google Drive with the library staff, who will then review all photos at the end of several rounds and determine the final score. Along with the study room during exam times, there will also be various smaller prizes including t-shirts and water bottles. Fralin hopes the hunt will be a fun way for students to engage with their campus. “It’s a great way for students to just take a break before the semester gets too crazy so that they have a chance to just enjoy themselves,” he said. The event begins today, Sept. 25 at 5:00 p.m. and will end the evening of Monday, Oct. 1.

@JoshuaLHiggins

Kenya captures 11 of alleged al-Shabab mall terrorists

@MauraMazurowski

Correction An article that ran in yesterday’s “Collegiate Times” incorrectly identified Ron Fisher as Nielsen’s CEO and a Virginia Tech alumnus. David Calhoun is the CEO of Nielsen and graduated from Tech. Fisher is a Product Development Leader with the company. We regret the error and apologize for any confusion.

WANTED MCT CAMPUS

Kenyan police officers relax during a tea break down the block from the Westgate Shopping Centre, Tuesday, Sept. 24 in Nairobi, Kenya. ALAN BOSWELL mcclatchy newspapers

With speculation rampant about the nationalities of the gunmen who seized control of a Nairobi shopping mall Saturday and executed scores of shoppers, Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta declared Tuesday that the bloody siege was finally over, with five terrorists killed and 11 suspects taken prisoner. The Kenyan leader announced that 61 civilians and six soldiers had died during the brazen terrorist attack, the deadliest in the country in 15 years. The death toll was expected to rise, however; Kenyatta said investigators must now pick through the debris of the Westgate shopping complex — three of its floors collapsed — where more bodies are expected

to be found. Dozens of people thought to have been in the mall when the attack began are still unaccounted for. At least 240 people were injured. “The terrorists and civilians are trapped in the debris,” Kenyatta said. “These cowards will meet justice, as will their accomplices and patrons, wherever they are.” The capture of 11 of the suspected attackers should go a long way toward helping authorities learn their identities. Al-Qaida’s affi liate in Somalia, al-Shabab, has claimed responsibility for the attack, calling it retribution for Kenya’s invasion of Somalia in an effort to crush al-Shabab. But rumors have been flying since Sunday that at least some of the Nairobi assailants grew up outside Somalia, including in the United States — something of paramount interest to officials

in countries that have taken in hundreds of thousands of Somali refugees in the past two decades. At least 20 men have left Minnesota alone since 2007 to join al-Shabab, in what the FBI calls one of the largest recruitment drives in U.S. history by a foreign terrorist group. Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., said this week that “at least 40 to 50 Somali-Americans” had gone to Somalia to be trained. Others doubt the authenticity of the reports of Westernized attackers, which originated at a time the Kenyan government couldn’t give the exact number of assailants waging terror in the mall. “Suggestions that British and American nationals were part of the Westgate attackers are to be treated with caution,” Valentina Soria, a security analyst at the

defense consultancy IHS Jane’s, said in an emailed statement. “It is surprising that Kenyan authorities were able to provide rather detailed information on some of the attackers so early in the investigation,” Soria said. The attack drew substantial attention from U.S. and other intelligence agencies, reports indicate. The command center for the Westgate operations was swarmed with a host of American military officials assisting the Kenyan operation, according to two people who visited the center. They agreed to speak only on the condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to talk to a reporter. Israel is thought to have provided advice on the counterterrorism operations; the Westgate complex is Israeli-owned.

YOU to advertise in our classified section. Its easier than you think. Just go to collegiatetimes.com and you can write, buy and post your own classified ad in the Collegiate Times today!

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

status

Sept. 10

Midnight - 10:53 a.m.

Follow-up to Larceny of Motor Slides

Seitz Hall

Inactive

Sept. 10

5:45 - 5:55 p.m.

Follow-up to Larceny of a Wallet

Lavery Hall

Unfounded

Sept. 21-22

11:30 p.m. - 2 a.m.

Larceny of a Wallet

Media Lot

Active

Aug. 25

12:30 a.m.

Underage Possession of Alcohol x 3

Barringer Hall

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct


OPINIONS

opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 25, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

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The Collegiate Times is an independent studentrun newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Priscilla Alvarez Managing Editor: Danielle Buynak Art Director: Kevin Dickel Design Editors: Brad Klodowski, Andrea Ledesma Public Editor: Andrew Kulak Web Editor: James O’Hara Multimedia Editor: Nick Smirniotopoulos News Editors: Cameron Austin, Dean Seal News Reporters: Melissa Draudt, Leslie McCrea News Staff Writers: Kelly Cline, Josh Higgins, Matt Minor Lifestyles Editors: Chelsea Giles, Madeleine Gordon Opinions Editors: David Levitt, Shareth Reddy Sports Editors: Jacob Emert, Alex Koma Sports Media Manager: Mike Platania Assistant Photo Editor: Ben Wiedlich Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: James Dean Seal Circulation Manager: Keith Bardsley

MCT CAMPUS

VT Crushes must prioritize privacy U

nless you’ve been living under a massive chunk of Hokie Stone, you know about Tech’s most popular Facebook page: VT Crushes. The page is not even a year old, and is one of the most well known across campus. The concept is simple: anonymously share your crushes when you’re too afraid to approach them in real life. Simple, cute and innocent — right? For the most part, the answer is yes. In some cases however, VT Crushes doesn’t only post forlorn lover’s laments, but occasionally “stalker” pictures to go along with them. And those are the posts that make my creep radar shoot off the charts. Many, if not all, of these crushes have no idea they are being photographed. They are also unaware that a picture of them is going to end up on a page that may be viewed and commented on, by a majority of the student body of their school. I’m sure many of us are guilty of taking these pictures ourselves, and possibly

even sending them to our friends, but our friends (hopefully) do not then go on to share that picture with the entire school. Should a line be drawn? Should VT Crushes stop allowing posts that have pictures accompanying them? It’s one thing to be mentioned in a post, where, unless someone feels the need to go and look you up, you can maintain a certain level of anonymity. It is another thing to have your face posted on a page with over 6,000 likes without your knowledge. Well, without your knowledge until someone tags you in it. Recently, a picture was posted of a girl sleeping when she apparently spent the night in someone else’s bed after a “weird night.” Does that not set off major red flags for anyone else? Not only was this girl unaware of being photographed, but she was also in a vulnerable position where she couldn’t even have stopped the picture from being taken.

One could argue that posting a picture is no more invasive than when someone is tagged in the comments, but the difference lies in consent. The pictures on your profile are there because you are allowing them to be, whereas the picture on VT Crushes is one you might even not know exists. It’s the same as the difference in being seen in a bathing suit and being barged in on while in your underwear: even though they are similar articles of clothing, you are choosing to let people see you in one while the other you are not. Let it be said, I have no problem with VT Crushes. It’s a cute idea with sometimes even cuter results, and clearly does not intend to do any kind of harm. It is the stalker-like, no-permission-given pictures that I find issue with. AMY RIEGER - regular columnist - sophomore - communication

Education on illicit substances will improve student welfare G

one are the days where we thought Molly was just a girl’s name. The name has now become synonymous with a specific part of drug culture. Molly is the nickname for powderbased MDMA in capsule form, and has now become more prevalent and popular than its pill based counterpart, ecstasy. This is due to the fact that molly, in powder form, tends to be cut with less active ingredients than ecstasy, leading to a cleaner, more pure high. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, illicit drug use among 18 to 25-year-olds rose from 19.4 percent in 2008 to 21.4 percent in 2011 and is projected to continue to rise. With this in mind, the holes in the Virginia Tech Party Positive program are hard to ignore. It’s ignorant to continue to assume that underage and binge drinking are the only things that happen on college campuses. Our generation is one that doesn’t respond well to the “just say no,” abstinence-only pedagogy. And the whole “let’s not talk about it, just pretend it doesn’t exist, don’t go looking into it” teaching method is

extremely ineffective. Drug culture and popular culture are becoming more and more intertwined. Many songs and even their artists speak about the use of Molly. “We Can’t Stop” by Miley Cyrus has a refrain which refers to molly. “Molly” by producer Cedric Gervais, who inspired Hip Hop artists Tyga & Wiz Khalifa to also come out with a song creatively titled, “Molly” are centered on the drug. These songs and many more both promote the use of molly, and suggest that it is important to have a good time. And like a sponge, our generation absorbs and accepts that message. The rise of Electronic Dance Music and its spillover to other genres has certainly revived the rave scene, where many people “enhance” their experience by using MDMA. Tech, and more importantly the Party Positive team, needs to acknowledge this and provide fact based, non-judgmental information about the dangers of drug use, specific information on drugs and how these illicit substances can interact with other drugs and alcohol. Under no circumstance should Tech be supporting or advocating the use of drugs, but why not extend

the Party Positive umbrella to cover information on certain drugs? The Party Positive initiative shows that Tech cares about students and wants us to be safe, why not extend that care? We should be able to have access to legitimate information, have discussions and ask questions without the fear of judgment or prosecution. Our students should not have to rely on Yahoo Answers to find out if molly mixes with alcohol, or how not to overdose. It is illogical to believe that all college students abstain from drinking and drug use. If we know that, why aren’t we giving them as much information as possible? Bad decisions are not a result of information, but a lack of information. Maybe with that information some of our fellow Hokies will give their keys to their friends, keep hydrated and maybe curb their appetite for illicit substances.

MARCUS WILLIAMS - regular columnist - senior - economics

College Media Solutions Ad Director: Michelle Sutherland Account Executives: Taylor Moran, Stephanie Morris, Danielle Pedra Inside Sales Manager: Amanda Gawne Assistant Account Executives: Catie Stockdale Jordan Williams, Emily Daugherty, Emily Reina, Becca Schwartz Creative Director: Diana Bayless Creative Staff: Mariah Jones, Samantha Keck, Kitty Schaffernoth, Seden Craig. Katherine Miller

Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2013. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


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September 25, 2013

Today’s Birthday Horoscope: Broaden your education this year. Whether through formalized study or personal experience, immerse yourself in new cultures and enthusiasms. Re-assess your priorities as you plan adventures. Water and tend your garden (and inances) with regular discipline for thriving. Balance work and play for health and wellness. Share love.

Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham Quote of the Day

“Life is just so painful and messy and hard and worth it and all that stuff.” - Robert Downey Jr.

HOOPTIE RIDE The Hooptie Ride is currently hiring drivers with good driving records. Drivers must be at least 23 years old. Earn $ while having fun! Call Ken @ 540-998-5093 hooptieride@verizon.net

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64 Potatoes’ partner 65 Post-Christmas retail event 66 Bog fuel 67 Hwy. accident respondents 68 Managed care gps.

downloads

By Carl Esposito

ACROSS 1 PC screens 5 Bumbling types 9 Washer or dryer: Abbr. 13 Banister 14 “Deck the Halls” syllables 15 Cuba, to Castro 16 *Start of a Jackie Gleason “Honeymooners” catchphrase 19 Capone associate Frank 20 Political satirist Mort 21 Pale

You Oughta Know- Alanis Morissette Smile - Lily Allen Don’t Think You Wanna- Sleater-Kinney Run the World (Girls) - Beyonce Cherry Bomb - Bratmobile

9/25/13 23 “Be right with you!” 25 Moe, Curly or Larry 28 Space-saving abbr. 29 *Vivaldi classic, with “The” 33 Pot-scrubbing brand 34 Fencing sword 35 King with a golden touch 36 *Cat’s blessing, so it’s said 39 Brainstorms 42 Company with a “swoosh” logo

43 “The Racer’s Edge” 46 *Tennessee Ernie Ford hit about coal mining 49 Musician’s asset 50 Big name in tea 51 New Orleans university 53 Orch. section 54 Coarse file 58 Pantyhose that came in a shell 59 What the starred answers start with 63 Upscale hotel chain

DOWN 1 Chums 2 Met by chance 3 Men’s wear accessories 4 Bandits in Vegas? 5 More than occasionally, to a bard 6 Oohs’ partners 7 Circus insect 8 Scout uniform component 9 Help 10 Free TV ad 11 Layered building material 12 Layered ristorante offering 17 Feudal estate 18 “Do it, or __!” 22 Loch of legend 24 Filmmaker Ethan or Joel 26 Domesticated 27 Suffix with psych 30 Ivy League sch. in Philly 31 Got going again, as a fire 32 Fancy watch 36 NHL part: Abbr. 37 “Understood” 38 Dryer outlet 39 Followers: Suf.

40 Low-cal soda 41 Radical 43 Company associated with the alcoholic “7” in a “7 and 7” 44 Citrus hybrid 45 Gets the creases out of 47 Brontë’s “Jane __” 48 “Star Trek” helmsman

52 Dog restraint 55 Zenith 56 Goblet feature 57 Jr.’s exam 60 Cell “messenger,” briefly 61 Tailor’s concern 62 Fourths of gals.

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

9/24/13

WORDSEARCH: Cocktails Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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WORD BANK 1 Pina Colada 2 Mimosa 3 Gin and Tonic 4 Martini 5 Salty Dog 6 Margarita 7 Cosmopolitan 8 Hurricane 9 Mojito 10 Long Island Iced Tea 11 Mint Julep 12 Bloody Mary 13 Mai Tai 14 Mudslide 15 Appletini 16 Screwdriver

Aries (March 21-April 19) Others help you advance. A private connection proves valuable. Money burns holes in your pockets. First things irst. Do what you promised, or renegotiate. Set long-range goals. Then spend a little. Keep to your budget.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Financial opportunity knocks. Accept a gift. Count your labor as money saved. Work harder to protect your investments. The cash may arrive at the last minute. Flex your mind. Put in the extra effort and succeed.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Buy a household item you’ve been needing. Find just the right place for it, but irst, make sure it’ll work. You’ve earned it. Do what needs to be done. Logistics are a signi icant factor. Family shares joy.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) A friend solves your problem by encouraging you to try alternatives you hadn’t previously considered. They inspire you with the missing piece that makes the connection. Upgrade workplace technology. Relax with something delicious and refreshing.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Apply what you’ve recently learned to your work. Act quickly. Accept assistance. Come up with a new idea. Costs are higher than anticipated. Incite excitement. Check out a distant bargain, but not by going there.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Luck luctuates wildly. Hit pay dirt. Keep a lid on spending though. You’ll see how to use what you’ve recently learned. Provide motivation. A journey begins. A loved one provides valuable information. Get lost in the reading.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You get a bright idea about work, and it meets an urgent need. Your excitement is contagious. Prepare to use what you’ve learned to pay the bills. Apply creative energy. Provide facts. And get a bonus.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Discover hidden treasure, or call in a debt that’s owed to you. You can ind a use for the extra money. Inject an enthusiastic spark to your work. Your fame travels. Send someone else ahead.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Relax before a new endeavor. Scrub-adub-dub! Sudden inspiration excites Cancer (June 21-July 22) Delegate to your creative efforts. Re-arrange the perfectionists for a job well done. New furniture. Feed the work machinery. contacts lead to opportunities. Ease Get farther than expected. Keep into new responsibilities. Let intuition digging and ind the clue. Add a be your guide. Take appropriate surprise conclusion. action. Surprise your partner with tickets. Simply enjoy the moment.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Try something new. You gain an insight. Others ask your advice. Your friends now believe you can do just about anything. Choose your battles carefully. This will be fun. Find solid facts to support your theory.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) Success! Don’t hide or diminish it. Accept offered bene its. You put in the necessary effort. Keep your promises to an elder. Consider possible costs of upcoming actions. Gain security. Be decisive. Put your heart into your work.


SPORTS

sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 25, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

5

Football notebook: Journell, Coleman ready to return ALEX KOMA sports edtor

The Virginia Tech football team may have a short week of practice leading up to Thursday’s clash with Georgia Tech, but that doesn’t mean it has lacked compelling storylines. Instead, some big news has come out about the team’s maligned kicker, the development of some key injuries and a new helmet design. Some issues may be more important than others to the Hokies’ chances at beating the Yellow Jackets, but it’s been a fascinating news week all the same. Journell Returns After Cody Journell suffered through the worst game of his career against East Carolina, many speculated that his performance or some lingering injury would keep the kicker out against Marshall. Journell did indeed fi nd himself on the bench on Saturday, but for entirely different reasons. Head coach Frank Beamer announced that he’d suspended Journell for a violation of team rules on Saturday morning, forcing the inexperienced Ethan Keyserling into the starting lineup. Despite his transgression and his long history of personal troubles, Journell will start on Thursday as he tries to atone for his error. “I made a mistake last week and I’m sorry for it,” Journell said. “I apologized to the coaches and players and my family and everybody who supports me. But I’m going to come back and play this week.” Journell had previously run afoul of the law when

he was arrested for breaking and entering in 2011, but the coaching staff ’s confidence in him hasn’t wavered. “He’s made some mistakes, but he’s certainly a good kicker and a good kid,” Beamer said. “As far as his ability kicking, he’s solid. Got the same flight every time. Made some big kicks. I think that’s a good kicker for us.” But refocusing on football brings its own problems for the redshirt senior. He missed two field goals and an extra point against ECU, but insists he feels confident now. “I’m as confident as I can be without being 100 percent,” Journell said. Good Injury News The Hokies have been brutalized by injuries this season, but things are starting to get better in the shadow of the Georgia Tech game. Running back J.C. Coleman missed his second straight game with an ankle injury when he sat out against Marshall, but seems to be ready to return at full speed on Thursday. “He said he felt great,” said running backs coach Shane Beamer. “So hopefully tomorrow when he wakes up he’ll feel good and that will carry over to Thursday, because we need to get that speed on the field.” Coleman missed the Marshall contest largely so he could be ready for ACC play, and it seems that he’ll meet that goal this week. With starting running back Trey Edmunds still smarting a little from an injury he sustained late in the fourth quarter against the Thundering Herd, Coleman’s presence will be especially important. “I know I add a whole other dimension to the offense

LEFT: FILE DEC 2012 / SPPS

RIGHT: PHOTO VIA HOKIESPORTS.COM

Left: Antone Exum (1) celebrates with teammates after making a crucial late-game interception in last year’s Russell Athletic Bowl. Right: New helmets, featuring a Hokie Stone design, will be worn by the Hokies in tomorrow night’s game at Georgia Tech. with the passing game, and what I bring to the table as a running back too, both of those aspects of the game I can help out on offense,” Coleman said. But while he may be a little hobbled, coaches suspect Edmunds will be ready to go on Thursday. “I think he’ll be OK,” Shane said. “I think it was just a little tight and sore… If we had a game today, he would have played.” The good news extends to the defense as well. Cornerback Antone Exum will have a checkup with his surgeon, Dr. James Andrews, in Pensacola, Fla. on Saturday to evaluate his injured right knee.

He hopes that Andrews will clear him for next Monday’s practice so that he can play in the team’s home matchup against North Carolina on Oct. 5. “I feel good out there,” Exum said. “I’ve been working extremely hard to get the knee where it needs to be to make those certain cuts and movements.” The cornerback is just eight months removed from his ACL injury, but he thinks he’s ready to come back stronger than ever. “It’s coming together,” Exum said. “I feel like I can be better than I was before I hurt the knee.” Hokie Stone Helmets “Hokie Stone” has been a

staple on Tech’s campus for years now, but now a small piece of it is coming to the football team. The program announced that the Hokies will wear unique helmets designed with a Hokie Stone pattern on Thursday night as a nod to the university’s tradition. “We’re going to have that Hokie Stone helmet on and that’s the foundation of our football team, that’s the foundation of Virginia Tech,” Frank Beamer said on the Tech Talk Live radio show. “When everything comes together that Hokie Stone is really, really strong and so hopefully we’ll be strong there Thursday night.” The design is certainly an

unconventional one, but players are more concerned with the significance they communicate than how they look. “I like the message behind it more than really the look of it,” said linebacker Jack Tyler. “It’s just the community and the pillars that we’re trying to represent, I think that’s the part that I like.” The team will have to hope that this added confidence, in addition to the return of Journell and some good injury news, will help carry them past the Yellow Jackets on Thursday.

@AlexKomaVT

Navy scores early in both halves, shut out Hokies, 2-0 DANNY NOKES sports staff writer

The Virginia Tech men’s soccer team was looking to create some momentum heading towards the midway point of their season against a solid Navy squad last night. A 2-0 loss, however, prevented that from happening. “We knew they were a good team,” said Hokies head coach Mike Brizendine. “We just didn’t get up for it tonight… I thought our legs weren’t good. I didn’t think we were good in any spot. We weren’t sharp tonight.” The Hokies were coming off a 1-1 tie with conference rival and No. 1 North Carolina, while the Midshipmen were coming off a 3-0 win over UMBC. Tech looked energized coming out of the gates, but Navy BEN WEIDLICH / SPPS grabbed an early lead when Drew Ranahan (3) expresses frustraton during Virginia Tech’s 2-0 defeat to Navy last night. Jamie Dubyoski beat senior goalie Kyle Renfro in the 10th minute for his fift h goal of

Express Yourself. Write Design Paint Draw

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the season. Kai Marshall got a good look at the net for Tech in the 19th minute, but goalkeeper Aaron Dupere was able to handle it. Dupere amassed 5 saves on the night for the Midshipmen. The Hokies kept the ball on Navy’s side of the field for most of the first half, outshooting the Midshipmen six to three. In the 51st minute after a great save by Renfro, the Hokies countered and had another great look at the Navy net. Dupre, however, got in the way of forward David Clemens’ shot. The Midshipmen pulled away in the 53rd minute when junior midfielder Grant Valenstein scored his fi rst goal of the season off an assist from Dubyoski. The energy that the Hokies had started the game with seemed to fade as the game went further into the second half.

“Coach always says we need to come out really intense and we didn’t,” said senior midfielder Austin Stewart. “That was our downfall.” Navy outshot Tech nine to six in the second half. Both the Hokies and the Midshipmen both fi nished with 12 shots on the night. The loss brings Tech’s overall record to 3-2-2. “We have a good team,” Brizendine said. “We have a good opportunity to pick ourselves up on Friday night.” The Hokies will have a chance to rebound this Friday night at Thompson field when they take on another ACC opponent in No. 16 Clemson. “Against Clemson we need to come out fi red up and try and get the first goal so we can keep the momentum instead of coming from behind,” Stewart said.

@CTSportsTalk


6

lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 25, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

LIFESTYLES

Local band revives old-time music in Blacksburg KATRINA SPINNER-WILSON town of Blacksburg applied for the Crooked Road recoglifestyles staff writer nition, which was then voted When she borrowed a on by its Board of Directors. banjo from a shop owner in “I appreciate the simplicity Blacksburg in the 70s, Ginger of old time music and the Wagner was just trying stories it conveys,” Browning something new. Over time, said. “I love to see the young Wagner learned how to play learning from the old and the instrument and is now a the tradition that continues vital member and developer to be passed down through of the local band Indian Run generations.” Stringband. Browning said that she “I wanted to learn to play by believes the Indian Run ear and I wanted to play with Stringband is an incredibly other people,” Wagner said. talented group of musicians The Indian Run Stringband, with a contagious passion for which is made up of four old time music. members including Wagner, “Hopefully people can taste has been together since 2010. authentic old-time music,” They have played at a variety Wagner said. “We will be of places such as Oddfellow’s, playing tunes that people in the Floyd Country Store, and this area play and tunes we most recently Blacksburg know people would know.” Brewdo. Wagner and the band will On Wednesday, Sept. 25, be singing and exemplifying the band will be hosting their unique sound, which Blacksburg’s Market Square she describes as cohesive and Jam from 8 to 11 p.m. at rhythmic. the local farmer’s market. “People who don’t play can The jam is now a stop on also hear and be exposed to the Crooked Road, which is (old-time music),” Wagner Virginia’s Heritage Music said. “We often have some Trail that winds through the dancing such as free form southwestern region of the dancing where they stand state. around and flatfoot.” Two years ago, Heather At any gig or event, Wagner Browning, the commu- said that the band loves seenity relations manager for ing dancers. It not only gives the town of Blacksburg, them a rush, but it reassures helped organize the weekly them they are doing someold time jams through the thing right. Community Relations Office Kristie Dorfler, the bass of the Montgomery County player in the band, met Tourism department. Wagner in 2010 at a week“Our goal was to introduce ly jam session, where she the community to old time expressed interest in old time music, provide quality fam- music and asked Wagner and ily entertainment in the new fiddler player, Paul Herling, park and give the musicians to teach her. a dedicated venue to meet up Dorfler began playing the weekly and do what they do bass at ten years old, but did best. Play,” Browning said. not continue playing through According to Browning, the college. When she came to

PHOTOS BY BEN WEIDLICH/ SPPS

Since forming in 2010, Indian Run Stringband has played throughout Blacksburg, hoping to reintroduce the community to old-time music. graduate school at Virginia Tech she saved up to buy herself a bass. “With bass, you have to keep the rhythm,” Dorfler said. “I love being able to keep the rhythm and be the background.” Ecstatic that the Market Square Jam is now part of Crooked Road, Dorf ler hopes the weekly event will attract younger people to get more involved with old-time music. “I think this music is fantastic,” Dorfler said. “I would love to have more students and younger people. This is real music, it makes you feel good.”

Spin: Participants bond over electronic dance cycle class from page one

Hill also plans the workouts much like one would choreograph a dance. “The other vision behind (CLUB CYCLE) is that when I listen to electronic dance music, I want to dance,” Hill said. “So the whole goal was to develop a way that we could move a lot more than you could ever move on a real bike or in a traditional spin class.” With this in mind, Hill choreographs dynamic routines that involve various upper body motions and leg isolations, which requires slower movement of the legs. According to Kowarski, this makes the class a total body workout. “We are going left to right, working on core strength and balance, and then going into a full sprint,” Kowarski said. “It is crazy intense and definitely one of the best cardio workouts I’ve ever done in my life.” Due to the intense nature of the class, Hill describes it as an intermediate to advancedlevel cycling class, however anyone, including beginners, is welcome. That is, if they can get in. Much like a real dance club,

there is often a line outside Spin City and unfortunately not everyone makes it in the 35-person class — especially since the vast majority is comprised of returning cyclists and the popularity of the class continues to spread. “I alter my schedule so that I can make it to CLUB CYCLE, because I always walk out feeling like it was so worth it,” Kowarski said. Most CLUB CYCLE attendees have similar attitudes to Kowarski’s, and Hill said that he believes that is why the class is so successful. “The reason that it’s so popular is because of all the people who come and make it so awesome every week,” Hill said. “The regulars have an energy level and a love for fitness and electronic dance music that just makes it into an amazing experience every time.” Hill and the class regulars work hard at achieving the club atmosphere time after time. Hill said that he puts the effort in outside the class by creating the routines, but it is the participants who put in the effort in during class. Their energy is what keeps Hill inspired, he said. They also deck themselves

out in neon outfits for every class and use certain phrases, like saying they are “in the club” when they’re in class. Hill said that what sets CLUB CYCLE apart from other classes isn’t just the club atmosphere but the tight-knit group that the participants have formed. The participants give 100 percent every time, often cheering each other on throughout the intense workout. “It’s not the format, it’s not the music, it’s the community,” Hill said. “My regulars know each other. It’s not just a workout.” With over a 150 members on the CLUB CYCLE Facebook page, EDM might have finally found its home in Blacksburg, even if it’s amongst those who like to workout. According to Hill and Kowarski, CLUB CYCLE is not only a fun experience, but one of the best and most intense 60-minute cardio workouts on campus. “We are a community of people who love to play hard,” Hill said.

@maddi757

RYAN SUTHERLAND/ SPPS

CLUB CYCLE regulars share a love of electronic dance music, neon clothing and intense workouts.

According to Wagner, most of the music that Indian Run Stringband plays originates from Uncle Dave Macon, a banjo player known for singing funny and colorful oldtime songs. Indian Run Stringband differentiates itself from other bands by developing different tunes, singing and harmonizing. In particular, Indian Run Stringband learns several ballads, or stories as songs, whereas other old time bands might only do one or two ballads. “I don’t know if our guitarist or bass player does it, but they have this kind of rocking beat and they really

punch it,” Wagner said. “I don’t know where it came from, how it started or how we do it, but it has a real punch to it. It’s exciting for me when we play it.” In April the band released its first CD with several songs from the public domain, which gives anyone access to play the music. Tim Pak, a musician and soundman, mastered the CD for the band. Pak has also hosted the band three times to perform at the Side Door Coffeehouse in Radford. “(Indian Run Stringband) is definitely an old-time band, but what I like most about their music is their song

selection,” Pak said. “They don’t just stick to the same songs that everybody plays. They play different songs.” The band is named after a creek that runs behind Wagner’s home, which shows her appreciation for Blacksburg, she said. “(Blacksburg) really is home to me since I have lived here 38 years and for 33 in the same old farmhouse outside of town,” Wagner said. “Also, my own career and the community of musicians and friends I have here make it a great place to live.”

@kspinz

watch:

Prisoners

Directorial decisions, character flaws disappoint There’s a moment midway through “Prisoners” where you can’t help but realize that for all of its high-profile cast and dreary, artistic cinematography, the film is too often a battle of realism and nonsensical behavior. Hugh Jackman plays everyman Keller Dover, a deeply religious man with a failing carpentry business, living in a rainy suburb with his wife (Maria Bello), teenage son and six year old daughter. Amidst an adorably amiable Thanksgiving dinner with the neighbors, Dover’s daughter, along with the neighbors’ sixyear-old girl, go missing with little evidence of where they could be, except for an eerie RV parked in the neighborhood. Enter Detective Loki (Gyllenhaal) to nail down the only suspect — an oddly exceptional Paul Dano, as the driver of the RV with the mental capacity of a 10-yearold. Despite an overly intimate interrogation by Loki, he is unable to keep the driver in custody, causing Dover much anguish. It’s easy to worry that this may develop into a blue collar “Taken,” minus the international secret agent sheen, but it chooses to flow like a David Fincher-style psycho-thriller, exploring red herrings and exploiting visceral torture scenes. The Oscar-nominee studded cast includes not only Jackman and Gyllenhaal

in the leads, but a woefully under-used Terrance Howard and Viola Davis as the somber set of neighbors, as well as 2010 Supporting Actress winner Melissa Leo. Leo plays up to her high standard, but Howard spends most of his screen-time looking weepy while Davis is enchanting as a stewardess of maternal fervor. But the emphasis here is on Jackman. He channels what initially comes off as Wolverine-style over-aggression into a powerful performance, shaped with just enough “angry smashing” and a few good tastes of palpably sad “angry crying”. While Bello’s turn as Mrs. Dover is both forgettable and inconsistent, the duo of Paul Dano and David Dastmalchian as the investigation’s only suspects show meek but engrossing talent. Their performances, coupled with Roger Deakins’ expert cinematography, create an ominous thriller that employs enough suspense to engage the audience effectively. But as engaging as it is, something never sits quite right with “Prisoners.” Canadian director Denis Villeneuve seems to be striving too hard to get Oscar nods, rather than craft ing a tight, complex character study. With a high-profi le cast and a two and a half hour running time, Villeneuve attempts to balance his craft as both an epic and arthouse flick. It’s not hard, however, to think he could trim out roughly 45-minutes of superfluous shots for a leaner, more

concise product. And despite its twist-laden plot line, character motivations are too-frequently contradictory and irrational. Around the third time Gyllenhaal decides against calling in backup in a life-ordeath situation, you’ll have a hard time brushing it off. “Prisoners” will pull you in and you will invest in its mystery, even after a twist that instantaneously dissolves one (maybe two) of its key characters’ credibility as a real person. But its occasional yet significant absurdity and misguided directorial decisions might leave you disappointed that a decidedly Fincherinspired fi lm couldn’t have just been given to Fincher to make it a classic. DEAN SEAL - news editor - senior - finance major

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Wednesday, September 25, 2013 Print Edition