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Now that you’ve dried out from the Marshall game, see how the Hokies snagged a close win

see page three Tuesday, September 24, 2013 An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 110th year, issue 20

News, page 2

Lifestyles, page 4

Opinions, page 5

The two-wheel takeover

Sports, page 3

Study Break, page 6

Fraternities extend bids to new pledges

BY ABBEY WILLIAMS | lifestyles staff writer tem consists of over 4,000 students, 55 organizations and four councils. “We are grateful that we have such a large community where there are so many different opportunities for joining and for having different types of dynamic experiences,” Hughes said. We’ve broken down the process into five detailed steps to show exactly what goes into their procedures.

LEAH KOMADA AND LESLIE McCREA news reporters

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

Fraternity bids were handed out last night, marking the end of the two-week long Interfraternity Council recruitment process. This process is meant to give everyone participating a chance to learn what each fraternity represents, as well as give the current members a glance into what potential new members have to offer. “Chapters normally base their recruitment process off of their rituals, beliefs, values and what they expect out of their members,” said Byron Hughes, the interim director for fraternity and sorority life, as well as the Interfraternity Council Director. “They all have a desire to gain men that will contribute to their organization.” Virginia Tech hosts the fourth largest Greek system in the nation, with approximately 18 percent of the undergraduate student body involved in these organizations. The sys-

Step One: Students interested in going through IFC recruitment register for the process, which verifies eligibility and allows access to more information. This fall there were 600 men registered, which is an increase from the 475 who expressed interest last year. Step Two: Each fraternity holds both informal and formal events. The events may range from dinner with the chapter to golfing to information sessions and are open to any interested student. see BIDS / page eight

Travis Head, assistant professor of studio art, takes to the streets as part of the ever-growing bicycle culture.

Tech has taken measures to make campus safer and more accessible for bicycle riders.

G

etting around on two wheels is not only an efficient way to travel from class to class, but the statistics prove that traveling by bike is also becoming more popular among Virginia Tech students and staff. While just 676 bicycles were registered through Tech in the

2011 academic year, that number more than doubled in 2012, when 1,387 cyclists could be found riding through campus. 2013 already boasts 976 bikers, a number that will only rise as the academic year continues. In an effort to match the growing number of cyclists, 23 new bicycle racks have been installed

around campus, providing over 230 new places for bikers to leave their wheels. It is efforts like these that recently caused The League of American Bicyclists to designate Tech as a bronze level “Bicycle Friendly University.” see WHEELS / page four

BEN WEIDLICH / SPPS

Reid Obeck, a freshman bio chem major, accepts his Sigma Chi Bid.

Tech will host October debate SGA partners with TurboVote CAMERON AUSTIN news editor

It was announced on Thursday that Virginia Tech will host the third and final gubernatorial debate on Oct. 24 between candidates Ken Cuccinelli (Rep.) and Terry McAuliffe (Dem.). The two will face off in Squires’ Haymarket Theatre in a panel style debate sponsored by Virginia Tech and WDBJ-7. Just 12 days before the Nov. 5 election, it will be the last opportunity the candidates have to face off. Though the details are still being worked on, WDBJ-7 announced it will produce and broadcast the event along with WUSA-TV in Washington,

NEWS

D.C. The latest poll data from the Washington Post/Abt-SRBI poll released Monday showed McAuliffe leading Cuccinelli 47 to 39 percent. Libertarian candidate Robert Sarvis is holding 10 percent of the poll, and may be key to deciding the election. On campus, student organizations are gearing up to campaign for their respective candidates. Joseph Degreenia, president of the College Republicans at Tech, hopes students will come out to get to know the candidates for more than just their campaign tactics.

MATT MINOR

info on the go Last year, Virginia Tech hosted the Senate debate between candidates Tim Kaine and George Allen. This year’s debate will be panel style, with details yet be decided.

see DEBATE / page eight

LIFESTYLES

news staff writer

The Student Government Association of Virginia Tech recently partnered with TurboVote, a New York-based nonprofit company dealing with online voting registry that aims to take the burden off students when it comes to remembering and registering for upcoming elections. The website, which can be accessed via https:// v t .t u rbovote.org /reg ister, allows students to quickly and easily confirm their current voting status and receive emails or text messages regarding all things related to elections, including absentee mail-

in ballots and notifications about upcoming elections. “We do not want voting to be a challenging process for our students, and believe a resource like TurboVote helps eliminate some of the obstacles that may discourage voting,” said

SPORTS The CT sat down with two actors from Comedy Central’s “Brickleberry” to talk about the show’s new season.

Read what the weather holds for the first week of Blacksburg fall. see page 2

We do not want voting to be a challenging process for our students...” Anjelica Smith vice president of the Student Government Association

Anjelica Smith, vice president of the Student Government Association. “Voting is important, and our college education should prepare us to be active and healthy citizens.” According to TurboVote’s Twitter page, its main goal is to make “voting by mail as easy as renting a DVD from Netflix.” They achieve this by doing all of the legwork and allowing the student to simply worry about where the closest mailbox is. Although the company formed in 2010, it has partnered with over 58 colleges and 29 non-profit groups before the 2012 presidential election. see VOTE / page two

ONLINE Curious about how the men’s soccer team stuck it out against No. 1 North Carolina this weekend?

Check out our website for continuous daily updates:

www.collegiatetimes.com CollegiateTimes @collegiatetimes

see page 7

see page 3


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newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 24, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

Nielson TOPTEN app makes bus stop on campus AMBER LEE news staff writer

AMBER LEE/ THE COLLEGIATE TIMES

Students lined up to test the new Nielsen TOPTEN app on Friday.

Despite the rainy weather, students still came out to participate in Nielsen’s TOPTEN app bus tour held Friday in front of Squires Student Center. Ron Fisher, Nielsen’s CEO and Tech alumnus, made Virginia Tech one the top stops on this bus tour to promote Nielsen’s newest innovation — an app that provides top ten trend lists for television, movies, books, music, mobile apps and consumer products, such as candy, beer and cosmetics. “Th is app is all about unbiased data for what Americans are really buying and watching,” Fisher said. Nielsen’s 10-day bus tour stopped at 10 universities, including Howard University, New York University and the University of Wisconsin, to introduce Nielsen’s first

consumer app “TOPTEN” to college students. “We spend a lot of time here recruiting the fine students of Virginia Tech,” said Sarah Habib, company rep and bus team leader. Habib said that what makes this app different from other similar apps on the market is that this particular app is based on actual data. “This app is the only app that provides you real access to database lists across TV, music, movies, books, websites, videogames and products,” Habib said. “It’s all based on real data, no consumer opinions — facts only.” The TOPTEN app also has the ability to customize and personalize the top ten lists for the consumer based on the customer’s demographic. “Say a 21-year-old woman wanted to know what women similar to her were watching and listening to,” Fisher said. “She could enter

her information into the app and get a personalized list.” Habib said Nielsen decided to heavily promote on college campuses because research showed that 18 to 24-year-olds would be the perfect target audience for this app. “We wanted to build an experience that would bring the app to life,” Habib said. The Tech stop of the tour included free Bull and Bones to anyone who downloaded the app, iPads set up around the tent to let students test the app and a silent disco with giveaways. Nielsen also created a customized playlist of Tech’s students’ choices of top 10 songs of the summer to play during the event. The app is available for download from the Apple store or Play store.

@CollegiateTimes

Vote: TurboVote offers online voter registration for students from page one

According to TurboVote’s website, over 180,000 people used the service, and they sent out over 87,000 voter forms. Smith mentioned that Tech

is one of a handful of Virginia institutions that have partnered with TurboVote this year, including the University of Virginia, James Madison University, Virginia Commonwealth University and Longwood.

“We have been collaborating with a number of student groups and university offices to spread the word about this resource,” Smith said. “Thankfully, TurboVote does more than just register folks to vote. With the

option to receive text and email reminders about elections, it is a great tool to not only encourage registration, but participation too.” With the Virginia gubernatorial election fast approach-

ing on Nov. 5, SGA hopes TurboVote can help students balance their workloads along with having their voice heard.

NEWS weather watch

JAMES MORROW weather reporter

Fall has officially arrived in Blacksburg. Partly sunny skies with cool temperatures and a light breeze will be the story of the week with rain chances remaining at a minimum. After a brief, but heavy soak this past weekend, things have dried up and cooled off in the New River Valley. Rain chances remain low throughout the week with highs consistently in the low to mid-70s. Lows will drop to a chilly 49 degrees tonight, and fog will be an issue around campus most mornings. There is a slight chance of sprinkles on Wednesday, but most areas will remain dry. Cloud cover throughout the afternoon will keep high temperatures around 70. Clouds will hang around overnight keeping lows in the mid50s. Temperatures will slowly increase to the mid-70s by the end of the weekend with clear skies and littleto-no rain chances until early next week.

@wxBONE

@MBMinor

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

status

Sept. 21

12:27 AM

Appear Intoxicated in Public

Otey Street

Cleared by Arrest

Sept. 21

12:52 AM

Appear Intoxicated in Public

Alumni Mall

Cleared by Arrest

Sept. 21

3:08 AM

Driving Under the Influence

Perry Street

Cleared by Arrest

Sept. 21

3:08 AM

Narcotics Investigation

Perry Street

Active

Sept. 21

11:50 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Sept. 21

11:50 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Sept. 21

11:58 AM

Appear Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Sept. 21

12:00 PM

Obstruction of Justice

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Sept. 21

12:06 PM

Appear Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Sept. 21

1:15 PM

Appear Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Sept. 21

1:24 PM

Underage Possession of Alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Sept. 21

1:30 PM

Appear Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Sept. 21

1:10 PM

Appear Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Sept. 21

2:45 PM

Appear Intoxicated in Public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by Arrest

Sept. 21

11:03 PM

Underage Possession of Alcohol

Barringer Hall

Cleared by Arrest

Sept. 22

1:00 AM

Appear Intoxicated in Public

Kent Street/Washington Street

Cleared by Arrest

Sept. 22

1:47 AM

Appear Intoxicated in Public

Kent Street/Washington Street

Cleared by Arrest

Sept. 22

1:50 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol/Appear Intoxicated Public

East Ambler Johnston Hall

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Sept. 22

2:07 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol X2/Purchase of O’Shaughnessy Hall Alcohol for a Minor

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Sept. 22

2:11 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol X3

Montieth Hall

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Aug. 30

10:00 PM

Underage Possession of Alcohol X5

Pritchard Hall

Inactive: Reported to Student Conduct

Sept. 14

12:17 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol

Johnson Hall

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct


SPORTS

sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 24, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

3

TUESDAY MORNING TAKEAWAYS Tech squeaks by Marshall

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

JACOB EMERT sports editor

A

football team’s biggest goal is leaving the stadium with a better record than when they entered it. Virginia Tech achieved that goal on Saturday, 29-21 in triple overtime. While many complained about the Hokies poor performance against Marshall, consider this: Marshall performed at a much higher level than the Hokies did for much of the contest, yet they’d do just about anything to switch spots right about now. It’s better to be lucky than to be good Logan Thomas, Jack Tyler and Willie Byrn all had identical reactions Saturday when asked about the multiple lucky breaks that went in their favor against Marshall: “Finally.” The Hokies were outplayed for much of Saturday’s game and could have easily been 2-2 on Saturday night. The Football Gods would have none of that, though. The biggest break of all came on a fourth and goal from Marshall’s two-yard line with just over three minutes left in the game. Trailing by seven, with the final outcome relying heavily on one play, Thomas took the shotgun snap and sprinted right out of the pocket. Watching receiver Willie Byrn the whole way, Thomas released right into awaiting hands. The hands weren’t those of Byrn, but rather those of Marshall defensive back Darryl Roberts. Roberts, unable to secure the ball, deflected it over his head to Bryn, who was waiting in the corner of the endzone and secured his first collegiate touchdown grab. “The play was open. The guy made a really good play. Fortunately for us, he’s not 6’4”,” Byrn said. “He undercut it and he just made a really good play and I was lucky enough to see the tip all the way through and it came into my hands.” Thomas prefaced his postgame comments by thanking “God for everything he’s given (him).” Thomas was clearly aware of just how fortunate his team was on numerous occasions. One such occasion was when punter A.J. Hughes fumbled a long snap in the second quarter, only to pick it up and scramble for 12 yards for the first down, and shift field position in the process. Another was on third down in triple overtime when Thomas forced a pass to a covered

Byrn, but a pass interference prolonged the drive and led to the eventual game-winning touchdown. On the very next drive when Marshall faced a do-or-die fourth down to keep the game alive, receiver Davonte Allen let the ball slip through his hands in the endzone. “I feel like my entire time here those breaks have gone every other team’s way,” Tyler said. “It just felt like today they were finally coming our way. It’s nice to finally get a game like that. That last play that Willie caught, a little fortunate, but I mean that’s football. I’ve seen it happen against us. It’s tough, but it’s nice to finally get that on our side.” BeamerBall(?) After the Alabama game, the last of the BeamerBall diehards got off the train. The ideology that had surrounded head coach Frank Beamer was kaput. Three weeks later, however, the Hokies managed a defensive touchdown, a blocked field goal and a blocked punt for a touchdown. Announcing the return of BeamerBall is still premature, yet it’s entirely unavoidable. “We need things like that. BeamerBall, that whole thing, I’m happy that’s finally coming back and we’re starting to do that again,” Tyler said. “To win games at this level you need great special teams play. Special teams is the reason we won (Saturday’s) game.” After Tech’s defense forced Marshall to punt on the opening drive, Kyle Fuller broke through the line practically untouched, blocking the punt with relative ease. Derek DiNardo, who noted after the game that he hasn’t touched a ball in a game since his senior year of high school, picked up the loose ball without breaking stride and the Hokies found themselves in front 7-0 before their offense ever took the field. The importance of this year’s team getting points from places other than their offense cannot really be understated. “It felt real good. We knew we had a good chance at blocking it. There were some at ECU that I was close (to blocking). They just gave me a short edge, and I really focused this week on blocking a punt since it’s not as easy as it looks,” Fuller said after recording Tech’s first blocked punt against an FBS opponent since the 2010 opener. “But I got a good block and we were able to score, so we came in wanting to change the game and I feel like we did that.” It wouldn’t be until the Hokies needed it the very most that the special teams would once

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

Derek DiNardo (41) recovered Kyle Fuller’s blocked punt to score Tech’s first touchdown. again step up. In the second portion of the second overtime, Marshall kicker Justin Haig lined up for a 39-yard field goal to give the Herd a thrilling victory in the torrential rainstorm. Derrick Hopkins was able to move his 311pound frame off the ground high enough to block the kick and keep the Hokies chances alive. It was the first time Tech has blocked a field goal and a punt in the same game since 2006. Adjusting on the fly Kyshoen Jarrett said it was “drive and pride.” Jack Tyler called it “getting comfortable with what they were trying to do.” But no matter what the defenders attribute it to, something changed with the Tech defense at halftime. In the first 30 minutes of play the Marshall offense tallied 205 total yards of offense — one fewer than the most the Hokies have surrendered in a game this year — and 21 points. After the half, however, the Herd gained 156 yards and, much more importantly, zero points. Last week, against a weaker ECU opponent, that kind of adjustment took just one drive. The Hokies allowed only three points and 129 yards after getting scorched on an opening 75-yard touchdown drive. “That’s what Coach Foster is good at,” Tyler said. “He’s the best defensive coordinator in America for that reason. He can watch one

half of football and change up what we’re doing and it’s going to be successful. We all had confidence in him. All we have to do is run the defense and we know we’re going to be successful.” Junior rover Kyshoen Jarrett, still giving Foster credit, said it wasn’t adjustments at the half that were necessary, but rather a gut check. They had the right game plan coming in, Jarrett believed, and it just became about executing. “We knew that’s not how Virginia Tech defense should be portrayed. That’s not how we played in the first half,” he said. “During halftime we rallied up as a defense like, ‘Man, we really got to step it up individually.’ We had to have the will to win.” Once again, Tech’s offense struggled, and the seven-point deficit entering the half made it clear that the defense had to buckle down. And buckle down is just what they did. For two halves and three overtimes, Tech’s defense was perfect in the only form that matters: points. Once again, Foster’s bunch came through when it mattered most. With a short week looming before the Hokies head to Atlanta to face Georgia Tech, the defense will have to remain stout for the team to have a chance against the undefeated Yellow Jackets.

@JacobEmert

Men’s soccer battles top ranked UNC to scoreless draw JIM MCNAMARA sports staff writer

TREVOR WHITE / SPPS

Forward Kai Marshall (7) helped the Hokies stay competitive with top ranked UNC.

The Virginia Tech men’s soccer team played to a hard fought 0-0 draw against the top ranked University of North Carolina on Friday night. Throughout the game, the Hokies had a large crowd cheering them on. With more than 2,000 fans coming out to the game, it was something new for some of the younger Hokies players. “Honestly, it’s amazing,” said forward Andre Thomas, a recent transfer student to the program. “With the crowd and the fans, I never had something like that before.” Friday night showed that when the Hokies play well, they will be able to stay with any team in the country this year. “I thought we played with them, if not outplayed them in the first half,” said midfielder and team captain David Clemens. The team was able to push the ball

and attack UNC, as it had five shots and two corner kicks in the first half. As the game went on, and especially in overtime, UNC started to show why they are the number one team in the country. The Tar Heels outshot Tech 5-2 in overtime as both teams were visibly tired. Some of fatigue can be attributed to the schedule for Tech. Last week was the first week the Hokies had two games in one week this season. With the draw on Friday night, Tech moved into a tie for fourth place in the ACC, one point ahead of the Heels themselves. “It shows just how difficult it is and how much of a grind it will be,” said head coach Mike Brizendine. “Our league is unbelievably difficult. There’s a reason we’re the best league in the country. It’s still going to be a dog fight to get into the ACC tournament.” The Hokies first objective of the season is to make the conference tourna-

ment. Unlike previous years, that has become more difficult. The ACC recently welcomed three new teams to the conference, including nationally ranked Syracuse and Notre Dame, as well as Pittsburgh. Accordingly, the conference tournament will now include on the top eight teams in the league. If the Hokies can maintain this level of play, making the conference tournament is a very realistic goal for the team, even playing against some of the top competition in the country. “We really have come a long way in the last three years,” Clemens said. “It was really good to play with a number one team tonight.” The Hokies take on Navy on Tuesday and on Friday they play No. 13 Clemson. Both games start at 7 p.m. at Thompson Field.

@CTSportsTalk


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lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 24, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

LIFESTYLES

Wheels: Bicycle friendly measures earn recognition from page one

Since 1880, The League has represented America’s 57 million cyclists through advocacy and promotion of safer roads. According to The League’s website, the “Bicycle Friendly University” designation is unique for several reasons. In addition to the fact that young adults are wanting to drive less and ride more, university campuses are ideal settings for a bicycling lifestyle because of their defined borders and high density environments, the site said. The Bicycle Friendly University program evaluates applicants’ efforts to promote bicycling in five primary areas: engineering, encouragement, education, enforcement and evaluation/planning, known as the “Five E’s.” Virginia Tech is one of six schools in the state to be recognized for its efforts. Students and professors have mixed opinions about the accuracy of Tech’s new distinction, however. Travis Head, assistant professor of studio art, agrees with the League of American Bicyclists. “I probably bike to work about once every week or two,” Head said. “I haven’t been hit or hit anyone else. It doesn’t seem dangerous to ride your bike around town or the university. Plus, it’s actually faster to ride my bike than it is to drive.” Jeff Peckins, a junior human nutrition, foods and exercise major, disagrees. “I dislike people on bikes a lot,” Peckins said. “As a pedestrian, they go way too fast and you never know when they’re coming. I’ve been run into more than once.” Peckins added that it’s scary when driving, because bikers don’t abide by the rules of the roads, which makes them more likely to be hit or cause traffic problems. “Since they’re in between a pedestrian and a vehicle, they just do whatever is most convenient for them at the time,” Peckins said. Not all students have a negative opinion about biking, though. Priscilla Herzberg, a senior human development major, commutes to class regularly by bike, despite her recent accident with a Blacksburg Transit bus. “I was in a bike lane about to enter the crosswalk and expected the bus to stop but the driver wasn’t looking at me,” Herzberg said. “By the time I realized he wasn’t looking at me and he didn’t see me, I was already in front of the bus.”

KEVIN DICKEL / THE COLLEGIATE TIMES

Herzberg didn’t sustain any serious injuries and didn’t allow the accident to change her opinion on biking. “It didn’t scare me away from biking,” Herzberg said. “I do see drivers make the mistake of not looking for bikers all the time.”

It doesn’t seem dangerous to ride your bike around town or the university. Plus, it’s actually faster to ride my bike than drive.” Travis Head Assitant Professor of Studio Art

Although Herzberg’s case is frightening, it is not uncommon. According to Virginia Tech Police records, there were 13 biking-related accidents in 2012 alone and many more are believed to be unreported.

However, with over a thousand people choosing to transport by bike, the percentage involved in accidents is relatively small. Tech has taken several steps to make this environmentally friendly form of transportation safer and more pleasant for everyone involved. Debby Freed, the alternative transportation manager at Tech, is just one person taking charge of improving biking conditions on campus. “About three years ago the League started looking at giving universities the ‘Bicycle Friendly’ designation,” Freed said. “That was exciting, because it gave us a roadmap to what we needed to do to improve cycling conditions on campus.” Although Tech has several biking initiatives in place, such as a Bicycling Ambassador Program and “Wheels in Motion” blog, it was other specific criteria that garnered the new award.

“It was the combination of our sidewalk policy, our bike lanes in the roadways, the increase in the number of bike racks, our partnership with Blacksburg Transit and our future plans that gave us that bronze designation,” Freed said. Another improvement is a new office for the Alternative Transportation, which opened with the beginning of classes this semester and is located on the first floor of the Perry Street Garage. Starting on Sept. 20, a bike mechanic will be at the facility from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. as a resource for students to learn about basic bike repair. Emergency bike kits and fix-it stations are another resource for cyclists at Tech. Bike kits can be checked out at Newman Library, Squires Student Center, War Memorial Gym and the Perry Street Garage. The three fi x-it stations, which are repair stands with attached tools, are located near the entrances of the

I do see drivers make the mistake of not looking for bikers all the time.” Priscilla Herzberg Senior human development major

Graduate Life Center, Dietrick Hall and Randolph Hall. Although Freed is excited about the strides made for biking at Tech, she acknowledges the hostility that sometimes exists between bikers and motorists or pedestrians. “Not only do motorists need to be aware of cyclists and be looking for them, but cyclists have a responsibility to communicate to motorists as well,” Freed said. “It’s all about cycling in a way that’s predictable so that people know what to expect.” One heavily debated point of contention is bikers on the

NEW CRC Saturday Bus Service For more information Call: 540-961-1185 Visit: www.btransit.org

sidewalk, especially during busy times like class changes. “We allow cycling on the interior campus sidewalks as long as they’re not overly crowded,” Freed said. “If the sidewalks are crowded, cyclists are supposed to dismount and walk their bikes.” Cyclist use of the crosswalks has also caused concern for others. “Cyclists shouldn’t cycle at bicycle speeds through crosswalks. Cars just aren’t looking for them,” Freed said. “They’re looking for pedestrians, so bicyclists should slow to pedestrian speed to cross a crosswalk.” The A lternat ive Transportation site offers many resources on bike safety as well as information on bike registration and parking. The office can be reached at 540-231-2116.

@AbbeyWilliamsVT


OPINIONS

opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 24, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

5

The Collegiate Times is an independent studentrun newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Priscilla Alvarez Managing Editor: Danielle Buynak Art Director: Kevin Dickel Design Editors: Brad Klodowski, Andrea Ledesma Public Editor: Andrew Kulak Web Editor: James O’Hara Multimedia Editor: Nick Smirniotopoulos News Editors: Cameron Austin, Dean Seal News Reporters: Melissa Draudt, Leslie McCrea News Staff Writers: Kelly Cline, Josh Higgins, Matt Minor Features Editor: Chelsea Giles Features Reporters: Madeline Gordon, Jessica Groves Opinions Editors: David Levitt, Sharath Reddy Sports Editors: Jacob Emert, Alex Koma Sports Media Manager: Mike Platania Assistant Photo Editor: Ben Wiedlich Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: James Dean Seal Circulation Manager: Keith Bardsley MCT CAMPUS

Dining services should offer halal meat option O “ ver the years, Virginia Tech has earned a reputation for excellence in facilitation, promotion and celebration of diversity on its campus. Even though we have come a long way in celebrating our differences, there are still many initiatives that could be taken to further facilitate this practice. Last week while having lunch in Owens Dining Hall, I was reminded of a potential initiative that is of great importance to the Muslim community of Blacksburg: the introduction of a ‘halal meat’ dining option. Virginia Tech has a substantial Muslim population, many of whom cannot eat meat that is not prepared in a prescribed religious manner. This ‘halal meat’ follows the same principal as Kosher meat and, not surprisingly, Kosher and halal meat share similar slaughtering techniques. For Muslim students living

on campus, not having a halal meat option spells tremendous inconvenience and frustration. They are required to sign up for an on-campus meal plan, but they have very limited dining options across different dining halls. Many Muslim student groups have been trying to campaign to get some sort of limited halal meat option on the meal plan, but their efforts have fallen on deaf ears. Initially, the demand of a halal meat option may seem a touch unfair, but it is important to keep in mind that the dining services provides a Kosher option to its students. Since dining services has already taken up the idea of reaching out to different students by offering them specific dining options, it only makes sense for them to offer some sort of Halal meat option. According to a survey conducted by the Islamic Food

Your Views [letters to the editor]

Marshall fans appreciate Blacksburg hospitality As I walked across the parking lot in front of Lane Stadium, all decked out in my Marshall green, a Virginia Tech fan walked up to me and said, “Where are you from?” I replied, “Huntington.” He replied, “I want to welcome you to Blacksburg. I went to the Marshall-Virginia Tech game in Huntington a couple years ago and could not have been treated better. We were made to feel so welcome. I hope you have a great time today.” Th is is the kind of mutual respect Herd and Hokie fans have developed over the five games they have played since 2002. There are no future games scheduled between the two schools. But, after the triple overtime thriller on Saturday, I hope this is not the case for long. This is the kind of rivalry Herd fans would love to have on their schedule every year. I hope to get the chance to watch my Herd play in Lane Stadium again, and we would welcome Hokie fans to Huntington. Unfortunately, I left with my heart broken on Saturday, but this is a rivalry that should continue. Thanks for the warm welcome and Go Herd! Joshua Spitz

Many Muslim student groups have been trying to campaign to get some sort of limited halal meat option on the meal plan, but their efforts have fallen on deaf ears.

and Nutrition Council of America, around 12 percent of colleges now offer some sort of a limited halal meat option on their meal plan. As a pioneer in the university dining services industry, it is rather embarrassing that we still have no such option for our students. The cost of implementing a partial or limited halal meat option would be minimal, as there are innumerable

wholesale suppliers that supply the meat at competitive prices. In fact, the economics of such a venture make it a profitable prospect because there is such a huge demand all over Blacksburg for halal meat with only two restaurants in town carrying this option. Above everything, it is important to continue the tradition of promoting diversity and being inclusive. Having a halal meat option on the meal plan would not only be fitting for one of the top dining programs in the nation, but will fall perfectly in line with our university’s beliefs regarding diversity. NABEEL CHOHAN -regular columnist -senior -accounting @nabeel_chohan

Movie sequels cash in at cost of quality I n today’s cinema, every amazing movie seems to carry a less-thansatisfying sequel or two. In the case of the “Fast and the Furious” franchise, there are six movies in the series with a seventh on the way. It was announced in Time magazine this week that actor Lucas Black, who played Sean Boswell in the third installment of the series, is returning for “Fast and Furious 7.” They predict that there will be a “Fast and Furious 8” and “Fast and Furious 9” as well, which I feel is absolutely ridiculous. How many “Fast and Furious” fi lms should we be subjected to before it is considered overkill? I have not given another look to “Fast and Furious” since the second film, appropriately titled “2 Fast 2 Furious.” However, I thought it would be interesting to watch “Fast & Furious 6” when it hit theaters last spring, so I bought a ticket. There were two disturbing thoughts that ran through my head when watching the film. The first was that the movie was all action and little plot, with a miniscule amount of character development. The second thought was that I was not lost watching the movie whatsoever. I did not watch the third, fourth or fift h installments, but I was able to pick up the sixth installment as though nothing took place in between. This shows how far behind the series left its roots. I hate to pick on the “Fast and Furious” franchise because their success is quite impressive and a bit unbelievable. They are just one of the most recognizable examples of a quickly progressing trend of “milk-

ing the cash cow for all it is worth.” And the same tragic event is taking place with “Pirates of the Caribbean.” According to several sources over the past month, the fift h installment of the series is slated for a 2016 release. If it is as inadequate as the last sequel, “On Stranger Tides,” I will not be pleased. The series should have ended after the third film, but it seems as though anyone will watch a film with Johnny Depp as the lead character. It seems as though very few feature films can stand alone anymore. I am not sure if Hollywood ran out of original ideas along the way, or if directors forgot what a “risk” is. And if you do not see this trend taking place, please look to the sequels that are in theaters currently or coming out soon: “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2,” “Insidious – Chapter 2,” “Planes” and “Paranormal Activity 5” (as if the fi rst four weren’t painful enough). Movies have more of an impact when they do not have many other films connected with it. It is time for producers and directors to start being more original. I would much rather see a new fi lm with an interesting concept than the third installment of a movie with the same concept as the first two. I’m looking at you “The Hangover.” RYAN TURK -regular columnist -sophomore -BIT

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Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2013. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


6

September 24, 2013

JUST THNK THIS IS WHERE YOUR AD COULD BE GETTING EVERYONE’S ATTENTION AND MAKING YOU LOTS AND LOTS OF MONEY Today’s Birthday Horoscope: It’s easier to work as a team this year. Home, romance and career remain the focus, and travel especially tempts. Study and explore a new passion. Take a class or two. Go there, maybe. Manage your wealth with persistence and discipline, to grow. Keep love as the overarching context.

solid right? get a hold of us as collegemedia.com

Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham Quote of the Day

The truth will set you free, but first it will make you miserable. - James A. Garfield

records. Drivers must be at least 23 years old. Earn $ while having fun! Call Ken @ 540-998-5093 hooptieride@verizon.net

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THE TOWN OF Blacksburg is currently accepting applications for the following part-time wage position: Bus Operator I. For more information, please visit our website: www.blacksburg.gov. An EEO Employer M/F/D/V

Send us your quote and see it here! creative.services@collegemedia.com

xkcd by Randall Munroe

HOOPTIE RIDE The Hooptie Ride is currently hiring drivers with good driving

60 Grammer with Emmys 61 Intern, often

downloads

By James Sajdak

ACROSS 1 Monster 9 “Doesn’t anyone else see this?” 15 Ivory tower milieu 16 Ottoman officials 17 Blue chip, e.g. 19 It’s south of Vesuvius 20 Vermont ski resort 21 Bar choice 22 URL part 23 Lamb kin 24 Flushed 25 Small change, maybe 27 Réunion attendee

You Oughta Know- Alanis Morissette Smile - Lily Allen Don’t Think You Wanna- Sleater-Kinney Run the World (Girls) - Beyonce Cherry Bomb - Bratmobile

9/24/13 29 Job transfer consequence, for short 30 Winner of the 1976 Pulitzer Prize for Music 32 Incan herd members 34 Artisan 36 Horn of Africa native 39 Disney character voiced by Robby Benson 43 Spacewalks, for short 44 Bargaining side

46 Uruguay’s Punta del __ 47 Pump choice: Abbr. 48 Augsburger’s article 49 Neapolitan crowd? 50 Spring bloomer 52 Soft bunches 54 Foot massage expert? 55 Fitness ideal 58 17th/18th-century division of New France 59 Motel posting

DOWN 1 Adaptation words 2 Transition zone between plant communities 3 Obsessed 4 Poet __ St. Vincent Millay 5 NSAID, e.g. 6 “__ babbino caro”: “Oh my beloved father” (Puccini) 7 Monkeyed (with) 8 “You look familiar ...” 9 __ fatso: bit of Archie Bunker languagemangling 10 Didn’t play 11 Creeds 12 Euclidean proposal 13 Honoree of a sixmeter-high Johannesburg statue 14 Oaxaca y Veracruz 18 Part of FEMA: Abbr. 26 Guayaquil girls: Abbr. 27 Delicate 28 Iconic bull 29 Indian princess 31 Team that plays in Fla.’s Amway Center 33 Chocolate companion? 35 An abbreviation of

36 LPGA star who is the youngest living World Golf Hall of Fame inductee 37 Not neat 38 Mysteriously enchanting 40 Elaine’s home, in Arthurian legend 41 Close overlap of fugue voices

42 Ring around a crib? 45 Score words for a pair 51 Criteria: Abbr. 52 Caterer’s delivery 53 Like many horses 54 Seurat’s Seine scene 56 Road reversal, familiarly 57 Punk rock offshoot

Friday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

9/20/13

WORDSEARCH: At Your Desk Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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3. Printer 4. Stapler 5. Calendar 6. Laptop 7. Speakers 8. Computer 9. Coffee Mug 10. Ruler 11. Calculator 12. Tape 13. Paper Clips 14. Scissors 15. Markers 16. Textbook 17. Binder 18. Music 19. Sleepy

Aries (March 21-April 19) Don’t stick your neck out for the moment... it’s not necessary. It’ll be easier to learn for the next two days, and you’re extra brilliant. Associates become entranced. Don’t overextend. Keep a low pro ile. Taurus (April 20-May 20) It’s getting easier to make household changes. Add candles, new textiles, or a pretty detail. Make more money than you spend today and tomorrow. Extra income is possible. Practicality vies with idealism, and wins. Gemini (May 21-June 20) You’re hot today and tomorrow. Don’t take anything for granted. Conditions are changing in your favor, though. Don’t start anything new yet. Handle your priorities and adjust as needed. A distant relative appears on the scene. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Finish your work in private today and tomorrow, and postpone a inancial discussion, expense or trip. Finish up old projects instead. Make plans, a budget, and copy the itinerary. Keep it quiet for now.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Fantasies may need to be delayed. Don’t fall for a sob story. Talk it out with friends today and tomorrow and handle a misunderstanding. Discuss your next move with your partner. Resting at home may be best.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Negotiations resume. It’s all in the game. Compromise is required for the next two days. A misconception gets uncovered. Recall a friend’s wise advice. Watch what you say. Re ine the plan. Keep the faith.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Don’t encourage the peanut gallery, when you all should be quiet and respectful. Keep them focused and occupied. There may be a test. Career matters demand your attention today and tomorrow. Give thanks, and double-check the data.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Power on for the next two days. There’s plenty of work coming. Something you want is prohibitively expensive. Don’t waste your money or worry about it. Find a viable substitute, or share it with a group.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Create a plan for the long-range future with shortterm actions, and schedule them. The next two days are good for travel. Don’t try to impress anyone. Aim for colorful freedom and fun, preferably with someone delightful.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Take more time for play today and tomorrow. Maintain a modicum of decorum. You’re lucky in love. Devote yourself to your own passions and pursuits. Re-draw and revise your pictures. Indulge your creativity. Include a fun partner.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Do inancial planning today and tomorrow. Discuss shared inances. Discover you’re worth more than you thought. Re-consider a change at home, and reward yourself after with romance and compassion. Treat yourself nicely.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Associates provide answers today and tomorrow. Revise vague statements. Reconsider beliefs, dogma or an outdated view. Don’t gossip about work. Household matters need attention, and travel conditions aren’t great. Find a pool and enjoy the water.

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LIFESTYLES

lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 24, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

watch: Movie Rating

T

he new fi lm “Battle of the Year” tells the story of an American breakdancing crew as they train for the biggest breakdance competition in the world. Josh Holloway, best known as Sawyer on “Lost,” plays Jason Blake, a down on his luck former basketball coach who is picked by hip-hop mogul Dante (Laz Alonso) to train a group of breakers. Dante, a former breaker himself, wants the crew to win the Battle of the Year, the premier breakdancing competition in the world, which an American group has not won in 15 years. The crew, however, doesn’t get along and struggles to form a cohesive unit in time for the competition. This is the equation with which they made “Battle of the Year”: take every sports movie cliche imaginable, subtract any heart or

character development and add badly filmed dance scenes. It’s actually impressive how many sports movie tropes they manage to cram in the 109 minute running time. There are shallow rivalries, even more shallow reconciliations and what may just be the worst, most saccharine locker room speech ever filmed. But despite all that, the absolute worst part of the fi lm is actually what should be the most exciting — the dance scenes. It’s not because the dancing isn’t good, but because it’s so poorly filmed. Director Benson Lee previously helmed the documentary “Planet B-Boy,” which follows breakdancing crews as they prepare and compete in the 2005 Battle of the Year and formed the basis for this movie. “Planet B-Boy” was well shot, with a heavy focus on the breakers themselves and their intense passion for the sport, while also giving much screen time to the actual

“Brickleberry” actors discuss second season

Battle of the Year

dancing. “Battle of the Year” does none of that. The editing of the dance scenes is too frantic — the average shot can’t be much over a full second and there are way too many camera angles. The audience doesn’t get a chance to actually watch the breakdancing because the camera is moving so much.

Indeed, the only good part of “Battle of the Year” is getting to see Chris Brown get punched in the face. But even that, while truly satisfying, isn’t worth the price of admission.

Even this could be overlooked if the script was better. In terms of the dialogue, all of the typical emotional exchanges are unintentionally funny.

A D T H C T

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The characters are more trope stand-ins than developed people, and several characters simply disappear without a trace at points in the fi lm. Ill-conceived jokes on ethnicity and sexuality are the icing on this mess of a cake. Indeed, the only good part of “Battle of the Year” is getting to see Chris Brown get punched in the face. But even that, while truly satisfying, isn’t worth the price of admission. If you want to watch some legitimate breakdancing, with much more interesting characters and a lot more heart, watch “Planet B-Boy.” Unless you have a very high tolerance for screenwriting ineptitude and messy dance scenes, don’t bother with “Battle of the Year.” KATIE WHITE -regular columnist - junior -history major

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INTERACTIVE ADVERTISING, find out more by contacting College Media Solutions. Space is limited to a first come basis, so call in TODAY!

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Give the gift of memories!

Attention Major Bus Detour The second season of the hit comedy, “Brickleberry”, premiered on Sept. 3 and new episodes debut every Tuesday on Comedy Central. ABBEY WILLIAMS lifestyles staff writer

While Comedy Central is known for releasing edgy and provocative television, the Sept. 3 debut of the second season of the hit animated sitcom, “Brickleberry”, shows a continued effort to push the envelope. Created by comedians Waco O’Guin and Roger Black, “Brickleberry” follows the exploits of an unusual group of national park forest rangers whose misadventures include everything from swimming in toxic lakes to getting caught in forest fires. Some of the show’s success is due to executive producer Daniel Tosh, who also voices foul-mouthed bear cub Malloy, and frequently mentions the show in his own popular Comedy Central series Tosh.0. The Collegiate Times had the chance to talk to two legendary actors who voice characters in the show. Tom Kenny, known for voicing everything from SpongeBob SquarePants to Spyro the Dragon, gives life to “Brickleberry’s” gruff head ranger, Woody Johnson, while Jerry Minor, who has been featured on Saturday Night Live and Delocated, voices Denzel Jackson, the park’s laziest ranger. CT: What made you choose to work on a show like “Brickleberry”? TOM KENNY: I’ve always worked in disparate arenas

and I love it all. It’s all really fun. Doing all that Nick Jr. stuff is really fun in its own way and doing something like “Brickleberry,” where sometimes it’s the most foul and disgusting things I’ve ever said, that’s great.

This one for me is a little bit of a departure from the stuff I’ve done before which is why I really like doing it. Jerry Minor “Brickleberry” Actor

CT: How has your past acting careers affected your presentation on “Brickleberry”? JERRY MINOR: It’s completely different kinds of characters. This one for me is a little bit of a departure from the stuff I’ve done before, which is why I really like doing it. It’s a lot easier for me to get into a characterization I probably couldn’t do physically. KENNY: I welcome the opportunity to play someone like Woody because I really haven’t done anybody like that before. He’s older than me. He’s crusty. He’s closeminded and ignorant, racist and homophobic. It’s fun to play someone who is so markedly different from you. Ironically, “Brickleberry” is a workplace comedy and could happen in the real world, but SpongeBob is much more like

me than Woody is. It’s kind of fun to play someone who is a disgusting jerk. CT: You see a lot of comparisons to shows like Family Guy or South Park. What would you say makes “Brickleberry” stand out from those shows? MINOR: I think those shows take a lot of pride in the thought about the subjects that they’re handling and I think this show is the opposite. It takes pride in its reckless handling of sensitive subjects. KENNY: Family Guy and South Park are not a bad yardstick to reach for. One thing I’ll say is similar is that they have the fingerprints of their creators on them. I think Roger Black and Waco O’Guin definitely have a comedic sensibility that is uniquely theirs. They do comedy that pushes the boundaries. CT: Do the things Comedy Central allows or bans from making it to air ever surprise you? KENNY: A lot of it is kind of a case-by-case basis. It’s funny, I’m always amazed by what gets on because sometimes it’s pretty edgy. But by the same token, I’m always surprised by the stuff that doesn’t seem like such a big deal but raises a red flag and ends up having to go. With “Brickleberry,” if they think a line is going to be trouble, they’ll have you lay a whole a bunch of different iterations of the line. They also write

variations that are even more disgusting to see if they can get an even more hardcore joke through. The outrageous crew of park rangers will continue in their shenanigans for the duration of the season. The newest episode, “Trailer Park,” promises to exemplify “Brickleberry’s” comedic flair when it debuts this Tuesday, Sept. 24.

Blacksburg Transit Riders: Whipple Drive and Givens Lane Areas Due to road construction BT will temporarily suspend service to Whipple Drive. This is expected to last 4 – 6 weeks. During this time, stops on Givens Lane will remain open and a temporary stop will be placed near the intersection of North Main Street and Whipple Drive. This detour is anticipated to begin the week of September 23rd but iss subjec subject too cchange. bu a ge

For more information or updates please check our website www.btransit.org or call 540-961-1185.


8

newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 24, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

Bids: Men on campus find brotherhood

BEN WEIDLICH / SPPS

Andrew O’Grady, a freshman Engineering major, pushes open Pritchard’s side door to accept his Theta Xi bid.

from page one

Fraternities also hold personal interviews. Step Three: Typically held the weekend before bid handouts, each fraternity has closed rush events that are invite-only. “Men that have built more successful relationships will be invited to a specialized event with the chapter. Those men invited are those that will be considered for bids,” Hughes said.

Step Four: If a student is given a bid, current fraternity members will greet them on and off campus to offer a place in their organization. Men may be offered more than one bid to various fraternities. Following bid handouts, potential new members consider which organization they would like to join in a two-day silent period. Step Five: Two days after bids are given, potential new members go to Squires

Student Center to accept the bid to the fraternity they wish to join. On average, around 300 men accept bids. “This is an occasion to build lifetime relationships and memberships, be a leader, be involved and serve the community at the same time,” Hughes said.

@LCKomada and @LeslieMccrea

Debate: Polls show close race from page one

“The debate gives students a unique opportunity to get to know the candidates beyond the sound bites and mail pieces,” he said. “This is a critical election for many students. They are choosing the type of job market they want to enter,” Degreenia said.

Andrew Whitley, president of the Young Democrats at Tech, said that the debate being held in Blacksburg shows the importance of the New River Valley region in the upcoming election. “It highlights the importance of Tech’s campus and Blacksburg in the election,” Whitley said. “They didn’t do it at UVA or a Northern

Virginia college. They came to Blacksburg.” Last year, a similar event was held when Democrat Tim Kaine and Republican George Allen faced off in a debate for the Senate seat.

@CameronOAustin

Tech takes Makers Faire in NYC ERICA CORDER news staff writer

Out of the millions of people in New York City on any given day, this past weekend, at least 11 of them were Hokies. Building construction professor Dr. David Goldsmith organized the trip via the Myers-Lawson School of Construction after securing a time slot on Sunday to present at the biannual Maker Faire, an event hosted by Make Magazine dedicated to showcasing innovators and artisans. “I’ve been familiar with Make magazine and the movement since it started. I knew this was a big cultural event — you see a lot of people from all kinds of places doing all kinds of things,” Goldsmith said. “I thought it was a good fit for what we’re doing in the lab over at Bishop-Favro Hall. It was an inspiration for me in coming up with the lab, so I wanted to be able to come and share what we’re doing, get the word out a little bit, have feedback and just participate in this broader ‘Maker’ movement.” The exposition was located in Queens in the Hall of Science on Saturday and Sunday. As reported by the New York Daily News, Maker Faire was expected to draw a crowd of over 70,000, includ-

ing 650 presenters. With such a supportive environment from the Maker community, Goldsmith found plenty to draw from for his own presentation. “We’re trying to take all of this excitement, all this innovation and the revolutions that have occurred in information technology and making technology in the last few decades and apply it to building problems,” Goldsmith said. The weekend trip to NYC was made possible through the support of the arts department, which covered the large majority of the expenses. The ten students, ranging from undergraduate to graduate students in various fields, contributed $100 to help fi nance the costs of travel, lodging and tickets to the Maker Faire. Because the sponsorship of the arts department made the trip affordable, some students had their first ever opportunity to experience Maker Faire and New York City, like in the case of sophomore electrical engineering major Saiara Adrita. “This was my first time,” Adrita said of the Maker Faire. “I really liked the booth for Microsoft. They had robots and programming and I’m really into electronics. For a change, I also

liked the craft site. They had pretty interesting stuff, too.” Junior electrical engineering major Johnathan Mayo also found booths of interest while exploring the fairgrounds on Sunday. “The highlight of the Maker Faire was seeing the live Mousetrap game. These guys had taken the board game, Mousetrap, and built it to a larger-than-life scale. A two-ton safe dropped at the end onto a taxicab,” Mayo said. The trip was not all business, however. A 5 a.m. start on Friday for the 502-mile drive allowed the group time on Friday evening to explore the city. Members of the group also had the option of venturing out on Saturday to do additional sightseeing. “Outside of Maker Faire, I met my friends and yesterday we went to the Empire State building. Then we went around Manhattan and walked around the city. It was a really good weekend all-in-all,” Adrita said. Mayo, who visited the Museum of Natural History, agreed. “It was a fantastic opportunity. I’m glad I had the chance.”

@EricaCorder

NEWS


Tuesday, September 24, 2013 Print Edition