Issuu on Google+

Tmobile CIntroducing the Collegiate Times’ newest virtual platform: a mobile app

Find it in the app store under Collegiate Times

An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

Thursday, September 12, 2013

COLLEGIATETIMES 110th year, issue 14 News, page 2

Lifestyles, page 6

Opinions, page 3

Sports, page 5

Study Break, page 4

Student frustrations over air conditioning get heated PRISCILLA ALVAREZ editor-in-chief

The heat moved indoors on Wednesday when the university turned off air conditioning across campus in an effort to preserve power. Facilities Services, the group in charge of operations and

maintenance of university facilities, sent an email out at 2 p.m. notifying students, faculty and staff that the university was shutting off all unnecessary electrical equipment due to a load reduction emergency. According to the email, the unseasonably warm temperatures raised concerns

of potential rolling blackouts had power continued running like usual. For students, the shutdown meant hot classrooms. Alex Kemeny, senior industrial and systems engineering major, noticed the heat shortly after settling for his senior design class at 2:30 p.m.

“I was a little more tolerant of the heat but I noticed the guys around me getting more anxious,” Kemeny said. In response to the heat, Kemeny’s professor ended class 30 minutes early. However, others weren’t so lucky. Nada Berrada, a junior management major, had class in

McBryde 100 along with hundreds of other students in the late afternoon for an hour and 15 minutes. “It’s just this room doesn’t have windows which is a little bit uncomfortable,” Berrada said. “I thought it was a great initiative but reducing lights (instead of air conditioning)

would be more useful.” Facilities Services returned electricity toward the end of the day, complying with their statement that reduction of electrical use would not go past 8 p.m.

@priscialva

Former lineman tackles youth issues The secret is out: PostSecret Live comes to Tech

BY MATT MINOR | news staff writer

Dwight Vick, former Virginia Tech offensive lineman, used to measure his success in the amount of impacts he could make on the defense. Now, the impact he strives for is far more enduring. On Wednesday, Dwight Vick made a return appearance to campus to speak about his journey before and after Tech in an effort to promote Remember Serve Learn, a new initiative by VT Engage. Vick was an offensive guard from 1995 to 1999 and was a key component when Tech began its rise to prominence, helping the team to four consecutive bowl games and two consecutive Big East championships. He served as team captain and was nominated All-Big East his final year. After graduating with degrees in Sociology and Family Child Development, Vick tested the NFL and AFL waters before turning his attention to his self-proclaimed true calling: helping young people achieve success. “Back when I was young, all I would tell

people I planned on doing was being an NFL football player. Simply put, I was egocentric,” said Vick. “It wasn’t until I spoke to a high school and got amazing feedback that I started to look beyond instant gratification, looking beyond today.

LEAH KOMADA news staff writer

see YOUTH / page two

RACHEL FRANKS / SPPS

Hokie hackers unite for competition KEVIN LOHR news staff writer

During the weekend of Sept. 20, Virginia Tech will be sending 110 students to the largest annual Hackathon in the country, MHacks. But this level of representation is a shocking reversal from the eight students who were signed up to go as recently as last Wednesday. Due to a confl ict in transportation to the event, Ben Johnston and Jouella Fabe had the challenge of recruiting at least 40 more students so that Tech students could be provided transportation to the event. Last Wednesday night, Johnston and Fabe, a junior and senior computer science major respectively, launched a campaign that skyrocketed their list of registered attendees from eight to 28 students in just four hours. On Sept. 9, they reached the maximum capacity of 110 students and are now wait-listing interested students. These numbers mean that Tech has gone from one of the least represented universities to one of the most represented at MHacks.

NEWS

“The MHacks organizer was very impressed by our ability to get students to come, and I was very impressed by our Hokies and their school spirit,” Fabe said. MHacks is a hackathon hosted at the University of Michigan by their computer science department and sponsored by a plethora of major technology companies such as Facebook, GitHub and Microsoft.

They’re calling Tech the number one underdog story of MHacks, and they want us to come in and take it by storm.” Ben Johnston Computer Science, Junior

“Any major Fortune 500 company that you can think of will probably be there,” Johnston said. Mhacks is also bringing in a bunch of

see HACK / page two

SPORTS A local business owner shares her story of being young and successful. Check out her career advice.

Check out the daily crime blotter inside for your fi x on local deviancy. see page 2 see page 6

@lckomada

new ‘toys’ and developments in the tech world for attending students to examine and play with, such as the Google Glass, the Oculus Rift virtual reality headset and even quadricopters. The event, which spans over 36 hours, offers the opportunity for around 1,200 students to work alone or in small groups to come up with a project idea and proceed to design and develop it. The only restriction on the projects is that they have to be computer related. “Otherwise, as long as it’s legal, it’s allowed,” said Johnston. At the end of the weekend, the projects are presented to a panel of sponsoring companies and venture capitalists. “Enthusiastic developers come to this event and come up with an idea that they really want to do and really just make it happen,” Fabe said. “There is no major or field restriction for participation at MHacks — anyone interested in technology and development is welcome to attend.”

LIFESTYLES

See what students are saying about yesterday’s power issues. see page 2

“PostSecret Live” is coming to Burruss Hall tonight from 7:30 until 10:00 p.m. Frank Warren, the founder of PostSecret.com, will host the event. PostSecret is an ongoing community mail art project started in 2005. People mail their secrets anonymously on a homemade postcard to Warren in Maryland, and select secrets are posted on the website and published in book compilations. “PostSecret was really popular when I was in middle school,” said sophomore Briar Atkisson. “One of my friends sent in a postcard and it was published, and we just never knew which secret was hers.” The postcards are small works of art that make a statement. Some are more intricate than others, with handmade drawings, designs and collages, while others are just scribbled in sloppy handwriting. No matter the design or

illustration of the card itself, each has a secret anonymously written on them from the sender. The messages are usually things the writer has never shared with anyone, but that are now being shared with the world. The content of the postcards ranges wildly. Some are witty or inspiring, while others are tragic. Tonight, unpublished postcards will be revealed, and Warren plans to share the stories behind them. Warren will also be sharing some of his own secrets, and the audience will have opportunities to contribute as well. A book signing will be held afterward and the books will be for sale, including the New York Times bestseller, “PostSecret: Confessions on Life, Death and God.” The event is free, and tickets are limited to two per person, available at the Squires Ticket Office from noon until 5:00 p.m.

ONLINE Wondering how Virginia Tech will fare this weekend against ECU? Check inside to see how the Hokies are preparing.

see page 5

Check www.collegiatetimes.com for updates around the clock.

CollegiateTimes @collegiatetimes


2

newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 12, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

r e w Po age r t u O

What you’re tweeting:

@CollegiateTimes I think it’s unhealthy and unproductive to students to learn in hot classrooms

Youth: Vick uses life experiences to enact change from page one

@CollegiateTimes they did it so more people get Banana Splits at D2

@R3alAli

@Grossberndt @CollegiateTimes made my afternoon class an unpleasant experience. @MoiTweets @CollegiateTimes wish they’d keep it warmer all the time. I have to wear a sweater in my office year round!

In order to save energy Tech shut down the AC in Squires Colonial..... where there are 500 students..... #SlowlyDying @susanh93

@rockdarter

Hack: Students compete for prizes, industry exposure from page one

The students behind the most outstanding projects can be rewarded up to $30,000 in prize money, an on-site interview with one of the sponsoring technology firms or even venture capital to continue to work on and implement their project. According to Johnston and Fabe, Tech has been underrepresented at past Hackathons and in employment in Silicon Valley. As far as they know, the largest group Tech has ever sent to a Hackathon has been under 20 people. This is Tech’s opportunity to spread a positive image and show that there are many students with potential in the Blacksburg area. “It seems like our name isn’t really out there when it comes to the Computer Science field,” Johnston said. “They’re calling Tech the number one underdog story of MHacks, and they just want us to come in and take it by storm because no one will expect it.” Many of the venture capital companies that attend

NEWS

MHacks never visit Tech, meaning that this might be the attending Hokies’ sole opportunity to make a resounding impression. “If a Tech student comes up with an idea that a venture capitalist finds interesting, there is a very good chance they will be funded,” Johnston said. Johnston and Fabe have high hopes for MHacks 2013 and the future. Fabe personally thinks that a good showing could put Tech on the map in the hackathon and technology worlds, and that this event could be the catalyst for future growth in the computer science field in the Blacksburg area. Johnston and Fabe formed a club called Tech Hackers to follow their successful campaign in garnering interest and attendees for MHacks. They plan to host a few small events, such as mini hackathons or projects in the future that will keep students and Tech interested and excited after MHacks is over.

@kmlohr91

The things I’m doing now are going to have a greater impact than any touchdown or bowl game.” Vick’s current workload would make some people shudder. Along with being a husband and father of three, he recently fi nished working to recieved two degrees: a Master of Arts in Marriage and Family and Master of Arts in Human Services. On his professional side, he is Director of Student Development at College Prep World, writes columns for VTSCOOP.com, works as a therapist and still finds time to do speaking engagements at schools and universities up and down the East coast. “I look back at the times when I was living in Foxridge while attending Tech and playing video games and talking about jump shots or shoes and realize that I could have made a lot better usage of my life then,” said Vick. “There’s a sense of urgency you must have when you’re here on earth.” Growing up around other future athletes like Allen Iverson, Aaron Brooks and his cousins Michael and Marcus (for whom he jokingly mentions that he was the lead recruiter and is waiting for his shrine/plaque to go up on campus), Vick noticed that for every successful person, there were two or three that weren’t so fortunate. He had a realization during his teenage years that would instill his internal drive for helping. “When I was a freshman at Hampton High School in 1990, there were about 600 or so kids in my class. When I graduated, there was a little over 200 there receiving their degrees with me. Pregnancies, drugs, trouble with the law, deaths and a variety of other reasons were the cause of this attrition,” said Vick. “I see the struggle still happening, these kids with the same talent I had getting lost. This is my motivation for getting back and changing it.” In 2007, Vick was named Director of Student Development for the Manassas-based College Prep World, an enterprise he

helped create. The company focuses on determining the best colleges for student-athletes who plan on continuing education, helps them achieve scholarships and also gives clients a few lessons on money management, interviewing skills and resumebuilding skills, things Vick considers imperative for youth. As a man who has experienced success, struggle and failure himself, Vick couples that understanding with the time he spent in the classroom and on the field at Virginia Tech when working with younger people. “The sacrifices I made are benefiting me now,” said Vick. “Sometimes when I’m working with kids who’ve ran into trouble, there could be a room with four gang members, six kids on probation and a couple of runners, and they don’t want to hear you. Just like when I had to go up against Miami, I have to go against this now. Except rather than different colored jerseys, the opponent is resistance and burnout. I use the same techniques I learned on the field and apply them to helping break through to these kids that deep down actually want you to help them.” Vick works tirelessly to volunteer and support those around him. He dislikes the labels placed on kids, like that of being ‘at-risk,’ because he fears that this only leads to judgment, and often it doesn’t capture the full story of an individual. “You always hear about how a lot of kids from broken homes are ‘at-risk’ because of the situation they’ve grown up in, but what about the girl that lives with her parents in a gated community that suffers from depression and cuts herself? She’s at as much risk as anyone else, and deserves to be helped as well,” said Vick. “We can positively change the environment without succumbing to the negativity around us. All it takes is internal fortitude and motivation, and you’ll find that the reward you get later in life is truly amazing.”

@MBMinor

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

status

Feb. 12

7:20 PM

Follow-up to Drug Violation/Possession Harper Hall of Drug Paraphernalia

Cleared by Arrest

Mar. 31

5:50 PM

Follow-up to Larceny of clothing items/ New Residence Hall East sporting equipment

Unfounded

Feb. 4 - Sept. 10

12:00 AM - 10:53 AM

Larceny of motor slides

Seitz Hall

Active

Sept. 10

5:45 PM - 5:55 PM

Larceny of a wallet

Lavery Hall

Active

Sept. 10

9:47 PM

Underage Possession of Alcohol

O’Shaughnessy Hall

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

Sept. 11

3:11 AM

Driving Under the Influence

West campus Drive and Prices Fork Road

Cleared by Arrest


OPINIONS

opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 12, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

3

The Collegiate Times is an independent studentrun newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Priscilla Alvarez Managing Editor: Danielle Buynak Art Director: Kevin Dickel Design Editors: Brad Klodowski, Andrea Ledesma Public Editor: Andrew Kulak Web Editor: James O’Hara Multimedia Editor: Nick Smirniotopoulos News Editors: Cameron Austin, Dean Seal News Reporters: Melissa Draudt, Leslie McCrea News Staff Writers: Kelly Cline, Josh Higgins, Matt Minor Features Editor: Chelsea Giles Features Reporters: Madeline Gordon, Jessica Groves Opinions Editors: David Levitt, Shareth Reddy Sports Editors: Jacob Emert, Alex Koma Sports Media Manager: Mike Platania Assistant Photo Editor: Ben Wiedlich

MCT CAMPUS

Instagram must ban pro-anorexia accounts T

he other night one of my roommates came to me distraught after learning that her former neighbor, a 16-year-old girl, was gaining popularity on Instagram for managing an anonymous anorexia account. What this entails is her posting pictures of various parts of her body, either clothed or nude, with captions such as “never felt so fat, unattractive, worthless, unwanted and alone in my life. I’m trapped.” Unfortunately, this type of account is not uncommon on the popular phone app. Countless others post similar photos and have bio lines that state the users starting weight, current weight, and goal weight. One such account has a gun emoji aimed at the current weight number while the goal weight is partnered with a glittery heart. Instagram is aware of this community and has posted a statement on their official blog that reads: “Any account found encouraging or urging users to embrace anorexia, bulimia or other eating disorders; or to cut, harm themselves or commit suicide

we’re YOUR newspaper. send a letter to the editor and express your views.

send an e-mail to opinionseditor@ collegiatetimes.com

with your letter or guest column attached.

will result in a disabled account without warning.” It is normal to want to belong to a community, especially during the teenage and young adult years. However, when a group is promoting self-harm and habits that are detrimental to a person’s health, they need to be taken down. Instagram is managing this in the best possible way. The company is deleting negative accounts that further promote this destructive thinking. I do not see the removal of these anonymous anorexic accounts, or ones containing other methods of self-harm, as an infringement of a person’s freedom of speech. According to the Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University, 90 percent of people affected by anorexia are women between the ages of 12 and 25. Large portions of that range are young girls that are either in middle or high school. So when they are leaving comments such as “OMG amazing how much weight loss difference?” and “U r literally my thinspo!!” on pictures of unhealthily

However, when a group is promoting selfharm and habits that are detrimental to a person’s health, they need to be taken down.”

underweight girls, it is Instagram’s duty to delete them. Comments can go beyond the twisted adoration and envy to cruel manipulation. A user with the account name “Daddysstarvingdolls” has frequented the girl’s Instagram, leaving comments such as “still fat but the gap is better,” then following up with “we are going to turn you into a pretty doll.” These girls need treatment from professionals, not anonymous users endorsing harmful behavior. Not all that post are in favor of anorexia; they understand the seriousness of the disease and are try-

ing to offer support, promote awareness and assistance in recovery. They remind the girls that they do not have to hurt themselves in such a destructive manner to obtain beauty by leaving positive messages on their photos. Apps and other forms of technology similar to Instagram have the ability to be entertaining, progressive means of communication that allow people to connect in ways they may not have been able to before. That is what makes it even more saddening to see young women diminishing themselves to a number on a scale and vile people such as “Daddysstarvingdolls” validating that claim. Instagram needs to continue censoring harmful content and promoting positive awareness so people affected can receive the help they require and deserve. ALEX HILL - regular columnist - sophomore - political science/English major

State needs funding plan without setbacks to schools Most college students have a simple fact drilled into their heads by now: college tuition costs far too much. Some think the universities take advantage of a culture in which a college education is invaluable to employers. Others cite the several building projects that universities continue to pour money into. Although some colleges and universities seem moneyhungry over the years with their exorbitant prices, very few naysayers point the fi nger at what is truly to blame: state government. According to a USA Today article released last week on the subject, a decrease in state funding is to blame for this issue. When state universities do not receive the funding they need from the state government for general operating costs, tuitions rise and professors lose jobs. Why should Virginia Tech students care if the state government funding is not there to offset skyrocketing tuition costs? For one thing, most students will have to pay back most of this money after they graduate. Virginia is one of the states that hurt the most from these spending cuts. Over the

past five years, the amount of state and local funds per full-time student decreased by 34.3 percent. As students, this funding that the school no longer receives becomes slack that we have to pick up through higher tuitions. Only Washington, Arizona, South Carolina, Idaho, Florida and New Hampshire had more trouble providing funding to their universities between the years of 2007 and 2012.

... very few point the finger at the one who is truly to blame: the state governments.”

Based on the funds per student totals provided by the chart in the USA Today article, and assuming there are around 23,796 full-time undergraduates that pay tuition, the university lost approximately $53 million last year in state funding. This number does not include taxes and other various expenses that are far beyond my under-

standing of business. The numbers and math involved can be a little overwhelming, but this is the reality of the situation. State governments need to fi nd somewhere else to make cutbacks. Slowing down funding to universities hurts students, professors and parents who pay for their son or daughter’s schooling. College tuition cost hikes continue to exceed inflation rates by ridiculous amounts. The problem will not ameliorate unless state and federal governments work together on a plan to provide the proper funding to universities. I f ind t his q uite unlikely, however, as the word “compromise” is a difficult concept for current politicians. But stay calm, Tech students. They may decide to come up with an economically sound plan to fi x this in the next twenty years, so your kids may be spared. RYAN TURK - regular columnist - sophomore - BIT major

Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: James Dean Seal Circulation Manager: Keith Bardsley College Media Solutions Ad Director: Michelle Sutherland Account Executives: Taylor Moran, Stephanie Morris, Danielle Pedra Inside Sales Manager: Amanda Gawne Assistant Account Executives: Catie Stockdale Jordan Williams, Emily Daugherty, Emily Reina, Becca Schwartz Creative Director: Diana Bayless Creative Staff: Mariah Jones, Samantha Keck, Kitty Schaffernoth, Seden Craig. Katherine Miller

Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2013. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


4

September12, 2013

☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯

DO YOU PICK UP THE CT EVERYDAY?

☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯

Today’s Birthday Horoscope: Your community of family and friends are your main focus and treasure this year. Collaboration and teamwork have special power; accept leadership. Fun heightens your business results, so play creatively. Squirrel away funds for a rainy day. Your circles have valuable connections and abundant resources, especially love. Share the goodness.

Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham Quote of the Day

Help Wanted

Advertise

HOOPTIE RIDE The Hooptie Ride is currently hiring drivers with good driving records. Drivers must be at least 23 years old. Earn $ while having fun! Call Ken @ 540-998-5093 hooptieride@verizon.net

Classifieds.

The only normal people are the ones you don’t know very well.

in the

-Alfred Adler Send us your quote and see it here! creative.services@collegemedia.com

xkcd by Randall Munroe

www.collegiatetimes.com

66 Publisher Chandler 67 Task assigned at a meeting 68 German pop star since the ’80s 69 Sewer’s accessory

By Barry C. Silk

Week of September 10 through 13

9/12/13

ACROSS 1 Mascot whose first and middle names are Horatio Magellan 11 Employs 15 “No kidding?” 16 Nonspecific filing abbr. 17 Situations with no legal moves 18 Mlle. counterpart 19 Manhattan’s __ Place, named for a wealthy early American 20 Retired fliers 22 Whale group

Hot Songs Cheerleader - St. Vincent Fast Car - Tracy Chapman Honestly? - American Football Crave You - Flight Facilities, Giselle Sleeping Pill - Yo La Tango

23 Albemarle Sound’s st. 26 Improvisatory composition 28 Case worker: Abbr. 31 “... harken __ die”: Tennyson 33 Carpenter’s gadget 34 They shine in theaters 37 Stretch 38 Russian auto 39 Apply gently 41 Traditional Indian beverage

42 Devil 44 Baylor University hoopsters 46 Piece of protective gear 48 Jutland native 49 Haw. doesn’t observe it 50 Judge 52 Harmony 54 2011 lockout org. 55 Citi Field predecessor 57 “Quiet!” 61 Political mascot creator 63 Washoe County seat

DOWN 1 Latin quarters? 2 Newspaper section 3 Garden supply 4 Hose material 5 More than wheedles 6 Punch spirits 7 “Miracle on Ice” team 8 “Phooey!” 9 Surfer’s perch 10 “El Cid” star, 1961 11 Sounds of hesitation 12 Round Table member 13 English station wagons 14 Hustler 21 Improvisational style 24 Parched 25 Majestic 27 She turned Odysseus’ crew to swine 28 “Runaway” singer, 1961 29 Make worse 30 National Cherry Blossom Festival focal point

32 Out of favor 35 Motown singer Terrell 36 Pops 40 NASDAQ setting 43 Some are exotic 45 Coal tar product 47 1974 Asian Games host city 51 Ex-model Gabrielle 53 Honda model

56 Deal prerequisite, maybe 58 “__-Pan”: carol 59 Fateful day 60 Subdue 62 Dept. of Homeland Security org. 64 Suffix with fact 65 Lon of Cambodia

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

9/11/13

WORDSEARCH: Water Animals Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

G

K

C

R

A

B

Q

P

R

E

D

M

U

O

L

F

A

D

WORD BANK

U

O

K

D

G

I

Q

Q

A

K

S

M

O

V

P

Q

C

Q

L

D

B

T

Y

S

B

L

A

T

R

W I

C

R

H

F

O

O

Q

V

B

O

M

E

M

S

G

E

D

O

L

P

H

I

N

Z

H

D

U

L

R

W E

N

G

T

X

N

O

I

U

L

M

S

G

D

S

G

E

Y

K

L

N

S

Y

N

W D

X

H

M

M

O

J

H

Z

Q

A

W H

I

Y

R

V

N

T

J

X

O

T

Y

C

A

T

F

I

S

H

T

O

D

G

F

E

E

G

L

M

H

A

R

B

Z

R

O

S

X

L

Y

L

I

D

L

X

L

K

V

F

K

C

K

W N

E

J

L

E

E

S

B

L

M

U

P

X

J

W N

L

F

Y

W J

A

E

T

H

O

Y

W S

Q

F

W V

O

L

A

I

J

T

R

O

U

T

Z

F

G

K

B

R

R

U

U

R

S

M

K

J

X

S

L

W J

I

X

H

C

G

N

T

G

B

N

V

S

W O

R

D

F

I

S

H

X

O

P

K

N

H

F

N

R

T

H

B

U

E

S

L

H

T

Q

1 Shark 2 Catfish 3 Whale 4 Swordfish 5 Mollusk 6 Dolphin 7 Clownfish 8 Stingray 9 Crab 10 Oyster 11 Trout 12 Flounder 13 Starfish 14 Jellyfish 15 Clam 16 Eel

D

B

I

H

F

V

Q

B

B

A

E

R

V

O

X

H

I

W

E

T

T

E

K

X

R

V

K

L

Y

Q

X

B

P

P

P

G

S

T

A

R

F

I

S

H

F

E

J

D

D

K

S

P

D

L

Aries (March 21-April 19) You have good ideas. Continue to develop partnering skills. Let your intuition guide you. Decrease your personal workload. What do others need? What’s their motivation? Play that ace you’ve been hiding.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You’re entering a two-day romantic phase. Luxuriate somewhere lovely, with delightful company. Enjoy family and friends. Things seem easy. There may be a con lict anyway. Keep your promises, and soak in the love.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Your own place is a good hideout. Take your work seriously. Bring it home and get comfortable. Delegate pieces to a perfectionist. It’s okay if you don’t know how. Embrace a surprise. An innovation works.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Associates cheer for you and handle a situation by themselves. Keep increasing your savings this week. Practice your arts and skills. Consult an expert to level up. Offer advice only if asked. Cut wasted effort.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Follow a creative leader. Compromise may not be possible, yet. Ask a person with technical skills to help. Delegate and free up some time. Go with people who are highly recommended. Keep increasing options.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Be nice, even if tempted to snarl; compromise gets you farther. Gather more data for a fascinating discovery. Your con idence grows. Keep your eyes, ears and mind open. This cloud has a silver lining.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) Intuition guides career decisions. Plan an adventure with a partner. Keep learning this week, increasing skills and understanding. Patiently wait for the data. Don’t make the expensive choice. Ask for more and get it.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You get a surprise at work. This could lead to interesting things. Explore. Practice something you love. Don’t give up. All of a sudden, everything starts making sense. Invest in newer technology.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Gather your tools and supplies. Keep practicing. You see the light at the end of the tunnel. Surround yourself with peace. Get together for inexpensive fun, like a beautiful walk or card game in the park.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) Trust a hunch. Meditate on it, and then choose. Take on a challenge. The pieces come together. Point out a potential con lict. Financial topics can raise tempers ... avoid complaints. Kick back instead.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Great and fast results astonish you. Reduce your inancial risk this week. Don’t even discuss money, if you can avoid it. Consider an unusual suggestion or a brilliant view. Tidy up and have a dinner party.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) There’s some evaluating going on; keep it objective. Lightning fast talk goes over people’s heads. Intuition provides an answer. Explain your ideas carefully. Change the itinerary. Continue to increase your authority this week.

You should. ADS ☺ Available Tuesday through Friday. ☺


SPORTS

sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 12, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

5

Tech prepares for ECU’s relentless offense JACOB EMERT sports editor

Virginia Tech is in a week of practice bookended by two opponents that come from the same state. The similarities between the two North Carolina schools, however, end there. “No disrespect for Western Carolina, but I don’t think anyone is mistaking ECU for Western Carolina, just because they have beaten us in the past,” said senior defensive end James Gayle. “They are defi nitely someone we need to be prepared for, or they will beat us.” Some of the more veteran Hokies — like Gayle — are prepared to head down to Greenville, N.C. this weekend, remembering that 27-22 season opening loss to the Pirates in 2008. The then-No. 17 Hokies held a nine point lead heading into the fi nal period of play before two ECU touchdowns with under four minutes remaining — the second coming off a blocked

punt return with 1:52 left — knocked Tech out of the top 25. “Five of our last seven games at East Carolina have been decided by seven points or less, so East Carolina is a dangerous team,” said head coach Frank Beamer. “I think they’re sixth on the list there of non-BCS schools that have beaten BCS schools. Of course they’re getting ready to join the league that’s BCS too,” Beamer said. “They’ve got our attention and they’ve got our respect. They are a very, very explosive football team.” The Pirates offensive attack, led by quarterback Shane Carden, operates a spreadoffense at a rapid pace. The Pirates have put up 52 and 31 points in their two wins this season, and average 70 plays per game. Alabama ran 62 plays against the Hokies and Western Carolina fi nished with just 54. While Pirates fans are doing all they can to see that their winning streak — and

Carden’s 79.7 completion percentage — continues, the Hokies have received some assistance from a higher power: mother nature. Hokies defensive line coach Charley Wiles was thankful Tuesday that an incoming cold front would drop the temperature to around 75 degrees for game time. “To be honest, I don’t like going down there to play them, just because it’s hot and it’s so high-tempo,” Gayle said. With the temperature taken care of, the responsibility now falls on Gayle and the rest of the so-far-so-good Hokies defense to stop the Pirates. “Quite frankly, this is probably their Super Bowl,” senior linebacker and captain Jack Tyler said. “I’m sure they have Virginia Tech circled. Th is is one of their rivalry games. It’s going to be a good atmosphere.”

@JacobEmert

FILE 2011 / SPPS

Logan Thomas (3) evades ECU defenders in Virginia Tech’s 17-10 victory in 2011 in Greenville, N.C.

Volleyball wins second consecutive tournament ALI BOWKER sports staff writer

BEN WEIDLICH / SPPS

The Hokies volleyball team celebrates around the net after winning one of numerous points this weekend.

Virginia Tech volleyball coach Chris Riley believed that if his team had over a .250 hitting percentage last weekend at the Middle Tennessee State Invitational, they could come home undefeated. In their opening game of the tournament the team hit .484, and when play ceased at the end of the weekend the Hokies hit .316 and came back 4-0. “We were consistent this weekend,” Riley said. “We played low error and didn’t give away too many free points.” After starting the season 3-1 at the Hokie Invitational in late August, the Hokies second consecutive tournament championship has them off to a 7-1 start on the season. “Every player can play at every level and be successful,” Riley said. “We just have to fine-tune some things and continue to get better and better.” One of the most impressive aspects of the team for senior middle blocker Victoria Hamsher is how successfully the team was able to put their loss to Michigan State behind them. “We were able to put stuff behind us and play our game,” Hamsher said. Hamsher believes that the biggest difference between this year’s team and the one from a year ago is the play of the freshmen. Five of the 16 players on the roster are freshmen. “We’re young and tough,”

Riley said. “The University of Alabama at Birmingham (game) helped us to see where we are. It showed us that we are able to calm down. Our leadership didn’t get rattled. You’re going to lose some games — you just have to be able to turn off the bad.” The team did just that this weekend, as they were able to capitalize on one of their biggest goals of the weekend: commit fewer errors. “We improved on error control the most,” senior outside Samantha Gostling said. “We didn’t have as many errors this week as we did in the first tournament.” The team committed 61 errors this weekend compared to 72 a week ago. With two tournaments behind them, Tech heads into the weekend hosting its second tournament of the season. As always, the team will rely on its quick tempo offense, which allowed them to find their niche over their competition. Gostling also said that the offense helped out this weekend. “We had wide open swings which makes it easier for us to score,” Gostling said. Riley credited much of the team’s success this weekend to their balanced attack and quick tempo offense. “Jordan (Fish) has been running a well balanced offense,” Riley said, referring to his junior setter. Though the Hokies have been playing very well lately, they still know that there are

aspects of their game that need to be improved. “We still have to improve on consistency and playing at the same level no matter what,” Fish said. “We have pieces of greatness — we just have to put them together consistently.” Riley said that if the team serve receives well and plays at the same level of consistency that they did this past weekend, they should have a chance to win. “This weekend will be a real challenge to us mentally,” Hamsher said. “We don’t know much about them, but unlike these past two tournaments where we had a physical challenge, we will have to be prepared mentally to come out on top.” The team will open up the tournament with Lipscomb Friday at 7 p.m. before taking on William & Mary and Dusquesne later in the weekend. “If we come in and are focused on ourselves and play the way we know we can, it will be a successful weekend,” Fish said. Hamsher said that if the Hokies serve tough and put pressure on the other team, they will be able to come out on top. “We need to go out there this weekend with high energy and few errors,” Gostling said. “We also need to have fun. When we have fun, we play smarter.”

@AlisonBowker_VT


6

lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 12, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

LIFESTYLES

Proper etiquette helps job seekers in dining interview knowing your place HAYDEN ROBERTS lifestyles staff writer

Dining etiquette is a thing of the past for many college students. College life ensues a constant on-the-go eating style whether it’s in the car or on the way to class. But in the business world, when dining out with a boss or for an interview, proper dining etiquette is a strong and timeless force. For Latha Pillai, a senior communication major, her experiences of dining out with a boss were good, but she did admit to feeling nervous when dining out with her boss for the first time. “I was definitely anxious at first, but my boss made me feel very comfortable and five minutes after we sat down, all nervous feelings went away,” Pillai said. While she said the relationships she had built with her boss made it so they were comfortable around each other and could laugh things off, she still received some advice on how to make sure the dinner was a professional success. “Knowing when to give your input and knowing when to listen, it’s very important to realize who is leading the conversation and to know when to transition from follower to leader,” Pillai said.

She also said it is important to evaluate the relationship with a boss before dining out for it to flow easier. Whether there is an established and more comfortable, professional relationship with a boss or it’s a first-time interview, there are a few ways to present the most polished and well-mannered self. Becca Scott, a career advisor at Career Services, sat down with the Collegiate Times to share a few should-knows about professional dining etiquette. What are the most important tips someone should know before dining out with their boss or for an interview? They should do research on dining etiquette so they understand the rules of professional and business dining. If they have the opportunity to view the menu ahead of time, they can plan out what they want to order, keeping in mind what will be easy to eat. Pick items that are easy to eat and don’t require a lot of special requests. They should understand that the meal is part of the interview, so they should be prepare to answer interview questions and have a conversation that is business related and master the art of small talk. How do you accept an invitation

to dinner with your boss or for an interview? If invited through invitation, electronic or paper, you should always RSVP. Let them know whether you are coming or not, so they know how many people to plan for. It’s always a good idea, after the meal, to send a thank you note for that effort. Is getting alcohol, if of age, recommended or discouraged? On an interview, it is discouraged. Even if you are 21, you don’t want to ever put yourself in a situation where you may let your guard down and not be at your best performance level. If it’s cocktail hour or the person interviewing you offers you a drink, it’s fine to politely say no. What is the worst thing you can do when dining out with your boss? One of the worst things you could do is take advantage of the situation and order the most expensive thing on the menu thinking your boss is going to take care of the meal. It can show that if you are unconcerned about money over a meal, then what might you be buying with the company’s money? Also, not understanding the rules of etiquette for a meal

Dinner with the boss can be intimidating. Here are some tips to get you through the meal. don't order alcohol unless it's explicitly obvious

when finished with your different courses, place your fork and knife across the plate to alert your server they can clear the plate

keep butter on the bread plate

put your napkin in your lap after you order

could be a big mistake along with texting or talking on the phone. How should the bill be handled? For an interview, the person interviewing you should cover the cost of the meal. There is no expectation for you to cover the bill or pay for your portion. If you’re with

with utensils, work from the outside in

your boss then you would offer to pay for your portion of the meal. You could always offer to pay. Offer twice, and if you are refused twice, don’t offer because then people start to feel insulted. What will help make the meal a sure success? Engaging in a conversation,

being respectful of the boss or the person interviewing you, understanding the rules of etiquette and keeping in mind the focus of the meal to direct it in the right way.

@hayden_CT

Young, successful entrepreneur fulfills town’s potential KATRINA SPINNER-WILSON have to make sure you know what you have and brand it. lifestyles staff writer You have to believe what you In the early 2000s, a young sell.” international student from The months leading up to Bangkok visited her sister at the opening were busy includVirginia Tech and immedi- ing finding a landlord, receivately saw the need for a Thai ing licenses and passing health restaurant in the small town. requirements, to name a few. Aivey CharoensombutContemplating the next amorn, an aspiring business step in her new business, entrepreneur, saw the potential Charoensombut-amorn’s was to satisfy this need by opening graciously approached by stuher own business. dents from Tech’s Pamplin “I saw a lot of opportunity in School of Business who assistthis town, and I thought what ed in marketing through the I had could bring differenc- shop’s website and Twitter. es,” Charoensombut-amorn, Next Door Bake Shop is owner of Next Door Bake only entering its third year, Shop, said. “I took a shot and but Charoensombut-amorn the worst scenario for me back already has plans to open a then was just to go home.” third restaurant, Social House. Prior to opening Next Door “I think of [Social House] Bake Shop, Charoensombut- not as a small business,” amorn, along with family, Charoensombut-amorn said. opened Café de Bangkok in “I know what people I need downtown Blacksburg in 2007. to hire, and I’m going to make After owning a business for sure I’m up there so when they a year, Charoensombut-amorn need it, I can be there to help decided to travel five hours and guide them.” north to Washington, D.C. to Interestingly enough, work for Sephora. Charoensombut-amorn was “I wanted to learn the opera- not entirely sure if she could tions and have a mentor,” own and operate Social House Charoensombut-amorn said. since it is a large project with “The best way to be more effi- an even bigger time commitcient, I was thinking, was to ment. go work for someone and gain She was unsure about a third knowledge through that.” business until the day she was Once Charoensombut-amorn standing in front of the potenfelt more experienced in the tial Social House. world of opening and run“I couldn’t let go. I was like ning a business, she returned ‘Fine, I’ll give up my three years to Blacksburg. Four months doing this,’” Charoensombutlater, Next Door Bake Shop amorn said. was open to customers. The idea of Social House As an incredibly cre- began with Blacksburg native ative and innovative person, Daniel Riley, who was introCharoensombut-amorn knew duced to Charoensombuther shop should include per- amorn through a mutual sonality, originality and color friend. to be successful and different Riley did not consider from what she describes as the Charoensombut-amorn at first typical, quiet coffee shop. since she already owned two “I make sure I am brand- businesses. But with encouring myself through me,” agement from their friend, Charoensombut-amorn said. Riley reconsidered. “It’s such a small town so you

Photos by Ben Weidlich / SPPS Top: Aivey Charoensombut-amorn serves a customer at her bake shop. Above right: Charoensombut-amorn uses colorful decor for the storefront and inside. Right: Bill Green is one of many regulars at the Next Door Bake Shop.

“The process has been challenging and never better since the addition of Aivey,” Riley said. “She’s the project.” To many, it may sound exhausting owning or assisting three businesses; however, Charoensombut-amorn admits the end results make it worthwhile. While people could potentially get frustrated or burned out, the best remedy is to ask for help as soon as it’s needed, she said. “Daniel has a lot of credit into it,” Charoensombutamorn said. “Without him, it wouldn’t complete this way. The house has cost so much more to become a restaurant, but I hope that what I do would make it worthwhile.” Charoensombut-amorn is fortunate to have motivation from her family, friends, kids and certainly her customers. Most of the customers have even become her friends and some, her best friends.

“Aivey is a go-getter, funky,” Caitlin Belcher, manager and employee of Next Door Bake Shop for three years, said. “She’s always doing 50,000 things at once, and she never forgets about anything. “She is really outgoing and cares about her customers and employees.” Most of all Charoensombutamorn still fi nds the small town fascinating, particularly praising the people. While she recognizes she could pack her bags at any moment and open a business somewhere else, Blacksburg shapes who she is today. “To own your own business my advice is you have to go with what you believe in,” Charoensombut-amorn said. “Everyone has strength in you and if you think that can make a difference, it will always be successful.”

@kspinz


Thursday, September 12, 2013 Print Edition