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An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 110th year, issue 13 News, page 2

Lifestyles, page 5

Opinions, page 3

CAMERON AUSTIN

BY KYLE BARGER | news staff writer

news editor

There’s a new engineering design team on the block at Virginia Tech. Joining the similar programs that are already in place is SailBot, a North American fully autonomous sailboat competition that a multidisciplinary group of Virginia Tech students are looking to enter. “We need lots of different types of engineers to get involved, so it will play up the strengths of different people and we can see how it all fits together,” said senior ocean engineering major and SailBot president, Allison Oswalt. “Everyone is going to have their own niche.” Even though the competition spans North America, the number of participants is small. Eight to nine schools compete each year, which means Tech’s program is guaranteed a spot in this coming year’s June contest. Each team will put their sailboat through various events throughout the five-day tournament. These include seakeeping tests such as stability and control of the craft, a navigational course with buoys, a presentation of the design process and a straight-line distance race. Scores are given in each category, and the highest cumulative score wins the competition. “It’s nice because you can score high in one section and a little bit lower in another but still come out really well,” said Oswalt. Even though only a few colleges are involved, Tech will be battling veteran schools that have participated in this event since it’s beginning in 2008. “The University of British Colombia and the (U.S.) Naval Academy are two big timers,” said senior ocean engineering major and Sailbot team member, Tom Shea. “They are the KYLE BARGER / THE COLLEGIATE TIMES ones who usually finish first and second, so those are the The Sailbot team will be constructing a completely autonomous sail boat for competition this semester. ones we’re going after.” Placing in the top two is a personal goal for the team, which others were located in Massachusetts and British Colombia. is still trying to figure out everything from funds to designing a The Tech SailBot team has reached out to some larger compaboat for the first time. Approximately $10,000 is needed for the nies for donations, but now is turning more of its attention to project, and fundraising has just begun. local businesses that are more likely to support a BlacksburgThe majority of the money will be allotted for materials, based organization. but some will go to transportation for the team and the boat. Previous competition sites have been in Annapolis, Md., but see BOAT / page two

Women’s soccer stays undefeated BRITTANY KEUP sports staff writer

The Virginia Tech women’s soccer team remained undefeated last Friday by outlasting UNC Charlotte 2-0. Senior goalkeeper Dayle Colpitts continued her march toward history when she recorded her 20th career shutout, tying for the school record. The Hokies’ offense has also been very strong so far this season with Jazmine Reeves, sophomore Ashley Meier and standout freshman Murielle Tiernan. The team has scored 19 BEN WEIDLICH / SPPS goals in its first six games, a Freshman Kallie Peurifoy (23) is part of a young crop of players that very strong early showing for the squad. have helped the women’s soccer team stay undefeated early on.

SPORTS

Have you heard about Tech’s newest national rankings? see page 2

Although the offense has never been in question this season for the Hokies, there has been some concerns for the defense. The unit sports some inexperienced players on the back end, and head coach Chugger Adair stresses that the transition from backup to starter has been a challenging one. “We have three or four (defenders) who were basically reserves last year so they are coming into being starters this year,” Adair said. Despite remaining undefeated and playing exceptionally well, there are always things to work on and room for improvement. see SOCCER / page six

Steven Salaita is in the national spotlight again with a new article on Salon.com. The Virginia Tech English professor said in his followup article, which was published Monday night, that he’s received extensive death threats both to himself and to his family, which he says, only proved the point he was trying to make. His initial article argued that Americans should analyze the meaning of the phrase ‘Support our Troops,’ and consider the ideology behind the military’s actions, as well as consider those in power making decisions for the military. “My article about the trouble with the phrase ‘support the troops’ suddenly had nothing to do with its own rhetorical anatomy,” he says in his latest article. “Instead, it became a referendum on the evils of

Islam and the vileness of Arab culture.” The original Salon.com article, which was published on August 25, currently has over 1,500 comments and has sparked vigorous debate across the nation about patriotism and the best way to show support for the troops. “Obama has inspired a resurgence of ethnonationalism,” he says. “No modern politician’s ethnicity and religion have been so maligned, so mistrusted, as those of Obama, the heretical interloper, the untrue American.” Several debates between Salaita and visiting communication professor Buddy Howell have been proposed in the hopes of continuing this discussion in a public forum for students. At the time of this article, no final plans had been made for a debate.

@CameronOAustin

Anti-war efforts reflected in film

PHOTO COURTESY OF KEVIN CONCANNON

Virginia Tech is bringing work influenced by both John Lennon and Yoko Ono to campus this week with a documentary and art exhibit. ABBEY WILLIAMS lifestyles staff writer

John Lennon and Yoko Ono are making their way to campus — in art form that is. Not only will Virginia Tech be screening “The U.S. vs. John Lennon,” on campus, but “My Mommy is Beautiful,” an exhibit by Ono, will be on display at the Armory Gallery. Lennon, whose anti-war remarks, “Nothing will stop me. I’ll always say what I feel,” served as the basis of the 2006 documentary, which highlights the Vietnam War. Tech’s School of Visual Arts will be hosting the upcoming event, screening “The U.S. vs. John Lennon,” in

LIFESTYLES

the Graduate Life Center at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12. Despite the film being released over six years ago, the concerns about anti-war protestors and government surveillance remain prevalent issues today. Kevin Concannon, director of SOVA and organizer of the event, sees Lennon’s message as especially fitting with the current political climate. “John Lennon and Yoko Ono believed they had the power to rally the youth,” Concannon said. “And with all the talk about Syria and the anti-war effort, it’s a very timely event.” see ART / page two

ONLINE Need some help to ensure your career search is smooth sailing? Check out our career fair calender and resume tips.

Find out why one sports editor thinks the new indoor practice facility decision came much too late.

Miley Cyrus’ newest music video breaks internet records see page 2

Study Break, page 4

English professor writes follow up to ‘Troops’ article

Tech students collaborate to build self-driving boat

NEWS

Sports, page 6

Check online to see if you can spot yourself in our Gobblerfest photo gallery.

CollegiateTimes @collegiatetimes

see page 6

see page 5


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newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 11, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

what you might have

missed

New iPhones on the market Apple unveiled two new phones that will be hitting the market on September 20— iPhone 5S and iPhone 5C. The iPhone 5C is aimed to be a more affordable option for those interested, and will come in 5 different pastel colors. The iPhone 5S will come in three different colors, and will be at a higher price point then the 5C. Also announced at the press conference Tuesday was the unveiling of new fingerprinting soft ware called, Touch ID, which uses fingerprint recognition in the home button to lock and unlock the phone.

Syria agrees to give up weapons Syria accepted a Russian proposal on Tuesday to give up chemical weapons and win a reprieve from U.S. military strikes, despite the fact that tensions arose among the United States and Russia. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Washington thinks the proposal must be endorsed by the U.N. Security Council “in order to have the confidence that this has the force it ought to have.”

Miley Cyrus video breaks records Miley Cyrus’s new music video for her song “Wrecking Ball” broke an internet record with 19.3 million views in 24 hours. It is now the most viewed music video on the video platform VEVO, breaking the previous record held by One Directions video, which had 12.3 million views in 24 hours. The video has garnered attention due to the provocative scenes of the video, and Cyrus’ interaction with construction materials in a sexual nature.

Tech joins higher ranks Virginia Tech moved up in the U.S. News & World Report’s annual rankings of “America’s Best Colleges 2014.” Tech moved from 28th to 25th for top public universities, and tied with Rutgers, Texas A&M and the University of Minnesota. Tech is one of three universities from Virginia, along with University of Virginia and William & Mary, to be included in the top 25 public universities list.

25

Appeals court reverses parts of ruling in free-speech case KATHERINE LONG mcclatchy newspapers

A federal appeals-court ruling has found that a Washington State University professor who circulated a controversial proposal to revamp the school's communications department was protected by the First Amendment. A lawyer for the American Association of University Professors, which supported the former WSU professor in a brief, called it "a significant ruling protecting the academic freedom of professors at public institutions." Aaron Nisenson, senior counsel for AAUP, said the degree of free-speech protection afforded to university professors was thrown in doubt by a 2006 U.S. Supreme Court ruling, Garcetti v. Ceballos, which restricted the free speech of public employees. "The question in the courts has been, 'When is speech considered academic speech, that is protected?'” Nisenson said. "This was a significant case in that it further clarified when that speech is protected." The case involves David Demers, a former WSU communications professor, who distributed a two-page pam-

phlet in 2007 that outlined a plan to improve WSU's Edward R. Murrow School of Communication. At the time, the future of the school was being debated. Later, Demers _ who now teaches at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University _ sued WSU in U.S. District Court, claiming administrators retaliated against him, in part by giving him negative performance reviews. The district court said that Demers' writings were distributed as part of his official duties and therefore were not protected under the First Amendment. That decision drew on the 2006 Supreme Court ruling which held that public employees acting or speaking in their official capacity were not protected by the First Amendment, Nisenson said. Demers appealed to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which on Wednesday reversed some parts of the ruling. In a statement he distributed by email, Demers called it "a great victory for those who cherish academic freedom, free-speech ideals and shared governance." Demers said professors

should have the freedom to criticize administrators and their policies, and said the decision "bolsters the idea that free-speech protection for professors extends beyond their academic research programs and the classroom. It covers our service role, too." WSU spokeswoman Kathy Barnard said by email that the ruling "speaks for itself. It is worth noting that the court did not in any way find that WSU or its officials/employees engaged in any wrongdoing." The judges found that there was insufficient evidence to show retaliation. But they ruled that Deming's pamphlet, along with the draft of a book he was writing, were protected speech because they addressed a matter of public concern. Nisenson said the Supreme Court ruling in Garcetti has had a chilling effect on university professors and other public-sector employees. The AAUP has been campaigning to get public universities to adopt policies and procedures to protect academic speech, and has been successful at dozens of universities. He said the case affects only colleges and universities in the 9th Circuit, which includes Washington.

According to senior ocean engineering major and team member Wes Downs, the ideal material — but more expensive one — is carbon fiber. What the boat is made out of though will depend on the amount of money raised. “You can build it out of wood if you wanted to, but it’s going to be heavier than the carbon fiber ones,” he said. “It’s really going to depend on what material we choose to use and how much

money we get to spend on it.” The team will begin creating a design for the hull soon. Once the shape is established, it will be sent off to the coding and electronics group to program the boat to travel without human-aid. “Since it’s all autonomous, it has to receive signals from the wind and the resistance on the hull and have sensors everywhere,” said senior ocean engineering major and team member Mitchell Long. “Then from those sensors, you have to run it through

computer simulations to tell it how it needs to move and how it’s going to change directions.” Ocean engineering students in particular are fi nding this program beneficial to their academic and postgraduation success, since the hands-on experience isn’t usually offered in the classroom. “Students are going to spend four to five years in a classroom learning this one way, and then they are going to spend the next 40 to 50

Hokie Effect contest displays student work LESLIE McCREA news reporter

Every year, students have the opportunity to create both slogans and designs for the annual Hokie Effect t-shirts sold to thousands of students, parents, faculty and fans throughout the year. The football Maroon and Orange Effects have already been selected for this year and are on sale at the University Bookstores, but basketball season’s design competition has yet to be determined. Students have from now until Sept. 16 at 5 p.m. to submit entries for the basketball Maroon Monsoon and Black Out shirts. Slogans have already been chosen for both games, which the shirts will be designed around. The Maroon Monsoon shirt must include the phrase “Storm the Cassell” and the Black Out shirt will include the slogan “Play Lights Out.” “The Hokie Effect program started in 2002, and has been going on for a while now,” said Bijan Peters, Junior International Studies major and Director of Hokie Effect. “Since the beginning it has been entirely student run and we pride ourselves on that.” The program has grown extensively since then. “Instead of selling a few hundred to a few thousand like we did originally, we’ve sold as many as 96,000 in one year,” Peters said. Winners of each design category will receive a $200

prize along with the honor of having their design printed on the t-shirts. “It’s something that people still wear, even past the day that it’s designated for. I still walk around campus and see people wearing my design and it’s really uplifting,” said Molly Marshall, sophomore marketing and graphic design major who won the black out design contest last year. Marshall entered multiple designs in the Hokie Effect contest last year, and plans on entering again this year. Winning art is sorted chosen by the program’s three directors based on quality and creativity. “It’s an incredible opportunity, and you’ll have thousands of people wearing these Hokie Effect shirts all over campus,” Peters added. “Hokie Effect shirts can be seen all over the country and all over the world. The winners’ designs will be worn forever and always.” “If anyone wants to do it I strongly encourage them, because it’s lasting keepsake for so many students,” Marshall said. The Hokie Effect will also host Maroon and Orange Effects for sports other than football during the fall season. Men’s Soccer – Orange Effect, Oct. 18 7 p.m. Women’s Soccer – Maroon Effect, Oct. 3 7 p.m. Women’s Volleyball – Orange Effect, Oct. 25, 7 p.m.

@LeslieMccrea

Art: Tech reveals Yoko Ono’s work from page one

Boat: Team looking to raise funds from page one

NEWS

years learning another way,” Downs said. “It’s nice to have a different view of how they are going to be learning in that 40 to 50 years.” Participating in SailBot is important to the team, but the ultimate priority is raising awareness and publicity for the small ocean engineering program. But, as Oswalt said, “Winning has its benefits too.”

@KyleB_VT

The film reflects on time during the 1960s and 70s when Lennon and his wife, Ono, traveled across the world rallying support for anti-war activism. “War is over, if you want it,” became the movement’s motto. In 1969, Lennon attracted international attention when he and Ono married. The couple held their muchpublicized “bed-ins” in Amsterdam and Montreal, where they gave interviews about peace from under their nuptial sheets. The U.S. government, under former President Richard Nixon’s administration, quickly began making efforts to silence Lennon and his followers. Phone tapping and attempts at deportation were just a few of the tactics the FBI utilized against Lennon and Ono. The film’s screening occurs in coordination with two other events happening near the Blacksburg area. Ono’s exhibit “My Mommy

is Beautiful” is running in Tech’s Amory Gallery from Sept. 10 to Oct. 1. In addition to this, an “Imagine Peace” installation at the Taubman Museum of Art in Roanoke also begins this week and will run through January. Mary Kate Claytor, a graduate student studying material culture and public humanities has helped with the exhibition installation and design. “Students should definitely come to the openings and come look at the artwork,” Claytor said. This is the event’s seventh showing at Tech and it will make its way to Florida upon leaving Blacksburg. Whether taking the time to see the film or simply stopping by to view the exhibit, there will be a little bit of Lennon and Ono available for everyone to experience this week.

@AbbeyWilliamsVT

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

status

Aug. 28

1:31 - 1:50 p.m.

Follow-up to Harassment

On Campus

Inactive

Sept. 9

7:30 a.m.

Simple Assault

Davidson Hall Construction Site

Active

Dec. 31 2012 Sept. 9 2013

Unknown

Fraud

University Bookstore

Active

Sept. 6 - Sept. 9 6:30 p.m. - 1 p.m.

Burglary / Breaking and Entering

Latham Hall

Active

Sept. 7 - Sept. 9 5:00 p.m. - 4:40 p.m.

Burglary / Breaking and Entering

Latham Hall

Active

May 4

11:00 p.m.

Underage Possession of Alcohol x 6

Slusher Tower

Reported to student conduct

Aug. 24

9:10 p.m.

Underage Possession of Alcohol x 2

Cochrane

Reported to student conduct


OPINIONS

opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 11, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

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The Collegiate Times is an independent studentrun newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Priscilla Alvarez Managing Editor: Danielle Buynak Art Director: Kevin Dickel Design Editors: Brad Klodowski, Andrea Ledesma Public Editor: Andrew Kulak Web Editor: James O’Hara Multimedia Editor: Nick Smirniotopoulos News Editors: Cameron Austin, Dean Seal News Reporters: Melissa Draudt, Leslie McCrea News Staff Writers: Kelly Cline, Josh Higgins, Matt Minor Features Editor: Chelsea Giles Features Reporters: Madeline Gordon, Jessica Groves Opinions Editors: David Levitt, Shareth Reddy Sports Editors: Jacob Emert, Alex Koma Sports Media Manager: Mike Platania Assistant Photo Editor: Ben Wiedlich

MCT CAMPIUS

Drunk driving should never be an option

T

imes are changing. The days of college kids driving drunk around campus and getting into accidents are slowly but surely disappearing. As universities around the country grow in size, the nightlife seems to increase proportionally. On any regular night in Blacksburg, college students can fi nd a party somewhere in town. There is generally some skepticism about whether college students are able to attend these parties safely, but a new level of responsibility has begun to make waves over college campuses nationally, and especially at Virginia Tech. Numerous Tech organizations have systems of des-

ignated drivers (DD’s). Tech also has other options for sober rides including The Hooptie Ride, Safe Ride from the Tech Police and the Blacksburg Transit Bus System. According to a recent article on GovTech.com by Tanya Roscorla, there are three universities in Texas that are trying a new approach to the designated driver initiative. A smartphone application called “Person Appointed to Stay Sober,” known as P.A.S.S., integrates Facebook events with users who decide to remain sober for the event. It lets Facebook users fi nd a DD at the event they are attending. It also allows people to exchange money for their service as they

see fit. So far, the P.A.S.S. app was launched at the University of North Texas, Midwestern State University and the University of Texas at Brownsville. It would be ignorant to think however, that just because of all the options that are available for sober rides, that everyone uses them. According to the Department of Motor Vehicles in Virginia, there were 8,777 alcohol related crashes in 2012, with 28,719 DUI convictions. Th is number is significantly lower than recent years. Just five years ago in 2008 there were 10,294 alcohol related crashes and 31,469 DUI convictions. Looking at the data, there is definitely an encouraging trend popping up.

With more and more ways to ride safely, the numbers should continue to decrease. I can only speak for Tech when I talk about all the ways we look out for each other every night. Hopefully other college campuses have similar options for getting people home safely. It is important for students at Tech to take this seriously. There are ample ways to travel safely at night in Blacksburg. Be smart and have a DD.

ADAM ROTHE -regular columnist -sophomore -marketing

World Trade Center name must not be exploited as tragic brand W

hen the One World Trade Center building opens in the coming months, it will be the preeminent symbol of American resurgence — a towering reminder that American ingenuity will always bounce back bigger and better. It might be shocking to hear, then, that there are roughly 320 companies and organizations worldwide that are using the World Trade Center name for economic benefit. These companies are using one of America’s darkest hours, for all intents and purposes, as a brand. The World Trade Center Association (WTCA), championed for over three decades by Guy Tozzoli, bought the naming rights to the World Trade Center thirty years ago for a mere $10. Since then, the WTCA has licensed the World Trade Center name to 322 organizations from Boston to Dubai that then

turn around and use the license for exposure, networking and merchandising. The purpose of the WTCA, a non-profit organization, is to foster prosperity through trade and investment, using a worldwide network of World Trade Centers as vessels. The fi rst iterations of the WTC were the iconic Twin Towers built in 1973, and the WTCA took it from there. Today, it costs $200,000 to become a member of the WTCA, with an annual $10,000 fee to continue licensing the name, according to the Roanoke Times. Companies and organizations can then put “World Trade Center” on the face of their towers and offices. The obvious draw is the name recognition, as well as membership to a tightly connected network of WTCA organizations. The merchandising aspect, however, is where the process enters a grey area.

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (who sold the naming rights in 1973 and have been major fi nancers of both World Trade Centers as well as the new tower) estimate that they will generate between $23 million and $28 million annually in revenue from merchandising the WTCA brand. It shouldn’t come as a surprise that much of the value behind the brand recognition of the World Trade Center skyrocketed with the tragic events on September 11, 2001, according to various nonprofit organizations familiar with the licensing process. The attacks shook American resolve, exposed the country’s humanity and boldly challenged the United States as the world’s last superpower. It hardly seems just that companies can exploit the “brand,” which reached unprecedented levels of recognition after suffering tragedy, to turn a profit.

But before moral uncertainty consumes the public psyche, we must remember why we’ve rebuilt the World Trade Center in the fi rst place. When One World Trade Center opens, it will be the defi ning symbol of the American phoenix, rising from its ashes. It will represent the very freedom that we all take for granted when pursuing wealth and happiness in a free economy: the very freedom that WTCA members enjoy when networking and merchandising worldwide. The distinction then, should be focused on the use of the label “World Trade Center” with respect to the historic events, and not simply as a marketing ploy. ERIC JONES -regular columnist -senior -psychology

College Media Solutions Ad Director: Michelle Sutherland Account Executives: Taylor Moran, Stephanie Morris, Danielle Pedra Inside Sales Manager: Amanda Gawne Assistant Account Executives: Catie Stockdale Jordan Williams, Emily Daugherty, Emily Reina, Becca Schwartz Creative Director: Diana Bayless Creative Staff: Mariah Jones, Samantha Keck, Kitty Schaffernoth, Seden Craig. Katherine Miller

Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue.

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September 11, 2013

Today’s Birthday Horoscope: Your focus highlights relationships this year, in partnerships, family and community. Group participation ampli ies your reach, with more accomplished for less. Lead and inspire in the areas of your passions. Stay conservative inancially and build savings. Do the numbers before committing. Give yourself to love without reserve.

Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham Quote of the Day

Creativity takes courage. -Henri Matisse

Help Wanted HOOPTIE RIDE The Hooptie Ride is currently hiring drivers with good driving records. Drivers must be at least 23 years old. Earn $ while having fun! Call Ken @ 540-998-5093 hooptieride@verizon.net

Send us your quote and see it here! creative.services@collegemedia.com

xkcd by Randall Munroe

68 Fix, in a way, as a lawn

By Marti DuGuay-Carpenter

Week of September 10 through 13

ACROSS 1 More than irk 7 Ending with neur11 Ring leader? 14 “Take it easy!” 15 Bonus, in adspeak 16 Actress Lupino 17 Wichita-based aircraft company 18 Accordion-playing satirist 20 Soft spreads 21 Pact 22 Idaho crop 24 Santa __: West Coast winds 25 “Sonic the Hedgehog” developer

Hot Songs Cheerleader - St. Vincent Fast Car - Tracy Chapman Honestly? - American Football Crave You - Flight Facilities, Giselle Sleeping Pill - Yo La Tango

9/11/13 28 Western symbol 30 Hiker’s chewy snack 32 Chart used for comparisons 36 “I didn’t need to know that!” 37 Family leader? 38 Early Beatle Sutcliffe 40 Lower land? 41 Steakhouse section 43 Coming-of-age ritual 45 Medium 49 Grub 50 Italian bubbly source

53 The Dike Kokaral divides its two sections 55 Earth’s life zone 57 Float __ 61 Where many shop 62 One making big bucks? 63 Payable 64 Default consequence, for short 65 They’re often distinguished by degrees 66 Slalom curve 67 God of lightning

DOWN 1 Danish shoe brand 2 Seasonal number 3 Obeyed a court order 4 One who didn’t get in 5 Infomercial knife 6 LAX listing 7 Trendy place to get gas? 8 Kicks off 9 One of the Gallos 10 Drink with sushi 11 Torn asunder 12 Minneapolis suburb 13 Things to face 19 “My World of Astrology” author 21 Turkey diner, probably? 23 WWII invasion city 25 Certain NCOs 26 “Forever, __”: 1996 humor collection 27 Author Sheehy 29 Bust __ 31 Ironically, they might be even 33 Inventing middle name 34 Three-__: sports portmanteau 35 Derisive cries 38 Prepare to be shot 39 Some twitches 42 Like copycats 44 Enthusiastic 46 God, in Judaism 47 Sleazeball

48 Maine resort 50 Humble place 51 Skull cavity 52 Popular rubbers 54 Canadian poet Birney 56 Saucy 58 Pub offer 59 Trouble spots for teens 60 Reason for being denied a drink

62 Row of black squares preceding or following six puzzle answers, thereby completing them

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

9/10/13

WORDSEARCH: CANDY Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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Aries (March 21-April 19) Increase your assets for a month, with Venus in Scorpio. Travel is appealing under the Sagittarius Moon. Fantasies aren’t to be relied upon. Study theory, while taking practical actions. Build creative resources. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Compromise comes easier. Rely on a supportive partner, and express your gratitude. Handle inancial matters. Balance your checkbook. Avoid distractions, as you plot strategy. Take it slow and easy.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Focus on beautifying your home. Things ease up. Plan your next move with your partner. Reality wins over fantasy. Celebrate with sensual pleasures like fresh lavors.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) You won’t be wearing your heart on your sleeve quite as much. Communicate fears and expectations to be free of them. Keep a secret. This empowers you both. Get organized.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You’ll love learning for this next phase. Dive into a sweet obsession. Energize your home base. Think outside the box. Send a postcard to the of ice.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You’re popular, and that busy social life could cause a problem at home. You’re out in the public. Get extra ef icient. Spend with care. Move boldly forward.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) It’s easier to make money for awhile. Don’t take it for granted. Gather it up. The upcoming days are excellent for studying. Just about anything is possible. Make plans that include passion.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) There’s more work coming in for a month -- the kind you like. Let somebody else take care of you. Complete the backstage effort. Stash your earnings in a safe place. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You’re especially lucky (and attractive) Cancer (June 21-July 22) Work gets with Venus in your sign. Stick to your intense. Artistic efforts work out. budget. Spend your new income Don’t gamble now, even on a sure on practical domesticity. Meditate. thing. For four weeks with Venus Keep watching for the full picture. in Scorpio, you’re lucky in love. Relinquish expectations and just play.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Career advances are quite possible over the next month, and social activities engage you. This phase is good for travel. Investigate a dream. You’re building something of value. A supposition gets challenged. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) The upcoming days are especially good for setting goals that lead to beauty, love and joy. Study your direction. Plan for two days in the spotlight. Soak up the atmosphere. Keep it practical.


lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

Computer Science Consortium Fall Career Fair When: Monday, Sept. 16, 3-7 p.m. Where: Squires Commonwealth Ballroom Who: Computer science majors, undergraduate and graduate, should check this one out. Most of the employers are looking to fill full-time positions and internships while others are looking for semester coops. Many companies are also global, so you have the opportunity to work abroad. Engineering Expo When: Tuesday, Sept. 17 to Wednesday, Sept. 18, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. (both days) Where: Check the website for locations: https://expo.sec.vt.edu/ Who: All engineers should take advantage of this career fair catered to them. Employers are looking to hire many for full-time positions, internships and coops. Business Horizons When: Thursday, Sept. 19, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Where: Squires Student Center Who: Sponsored by the Pamplin College of Business, many employers come out to this career fair, which is popular at Virginia Tech. Although some employers are only looking for students with specific majors like business, there are many who are looking for all majors as well. So don’t let the title scare you from going. Employers at this event are also seeking to hire for full-time positions, internships and co-ops.

THE RESUME ter HAYDEN ROBERTS, lifestyles staff wri

Preparing to leave college and going out into the world is a daunting thought, and it leaves many graduating seniors waiting until the last possible minute to polish their resume or begin the job search. Formatting your resume is a great start but it’s also up to you to fill in the white space.

STRESSING SENIOR 1234 Help Lane Blacksburg, VA 24060 (540)333-3333 stressedsenior@vt.edu Objective: A graduating senior trying to figure out how to write my resume and fill up the white space. Education: B.S. Communication, Expected May 2013 Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA GPA: 3.5/4.0 Skills: C++ Programming

Matlab Java Programming

Spanish

Are you proficient in a language or know a lot about the latest edition of Microsoft office? Showing that you have experience in popular programs will help you stand out to an employer.

EXPERIENCE

in the loop: career fairs

September 11, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

Internships: It’s important to find an internship that is specific to what you want to do. If you have experience in the field, employers in that area are going to like that you know how that industry works, and it will be easier for them to train you. Work Experience: Getting a job, even if it’s waiting tables, is always a good thing to have on your resume. It shows you are working to make some money, and that you are a hard worker. A job can also provide some great references. Volunteer: Ut Prosim is our school motto, so start taking it to heart. Virginia Tech has so many great volunteer events throughout the year like the Big Event and Relay for Life. Get out there and join a team or start a new one.

Volunteer experience: Volunteer, The Big Event at Virginia Tech, April 2012 Led a team of 8 students in fixing up a local yard shows leadership, and being specific with numbers also * This helps the bullet point stand out. Quantifying anything helps.

CLUBS

LIFESTYLES

These are a great way to get some experience in a field you are interested in. Also, many clubs do volunteer work as part of their mission, so that gives you even more hours and experience to put on your resume. If there is an open leadership position in the club, apply for it and if you get it, great. Having any kind of leadership role makes a huge difference.

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sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 11, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

SPORTS

Indoor practice facility delayed by lack of compromises L earning how to make compromises is something most people master in preschool. Yet, for the Virginia Tech athletic department, this is a virtue that still needs some work. It took Jim Weaver and company the better part of 15 years, but the department finally found a way of constructing a new indoor football practice facility without offending some part of the Blacksburg community. After earlier plans suggested locating the facility in the area known as the “Stadium Woods” behind Lane Stadium or in place of the Washington Street tennis courts and roller hockey rink, athletics finally found a location that causes minimal waves. Now, the facility is due to be placed on part of the football team’s extensive practice fields, providing immediate shelter for players from Blacksburg’s unpredictable weather. It seems to be an agreeable solution, and although the football team would likely have to reduce the size of their outdoor practice fields under the new plan, it hasn’t attracted the firestorm of controversy the previous options provoked. Environmentalists detested the idea of the destruction of trees that were centuries of years old. Recreational athletes protested the razing of their already limited facilities. It was clear that neither solution was practical while

alternatives existed. The real question though, is how it took so long for the department to come to this relatively simple conclusion. Throughout the battle over Stadium Woods, the only alternative ever publicized was the Washington Street option. It took the university presenting new options for the project to the Board of Visitors this June for the new practice field plan to even emerge. Tech’s Office of University Planning gave the location high marks in categories like “walking time,” “pedestrian safety and lightning protection,” “parking loss and replacement” and “respect iconic views and scale.” In many cases, the practice field site graded higher than both the Stadium Woods and Washington Street options. But somehow, most people are only just hearing about the current proposal now. It’s not as if building a practice facility adjacent to outdoor practice fields is some sort of revolutionary idea. In fact, a pair of fellow ACC schools just provided perfect examples of how to do so. Virginia completed a facility next to their fields last fall, while Florida State finished a similar building this August. While no Hokie necessarily wants to imitate the Seminoles or Cavaliers, this probably should’ve been strong evidence that the practice field option was a viable one. Instead, Weaver and associ-

Soccer: Women prepare for top ranked Tar Heels from page one

“I think that we continue to grow,” Adair said. “We probably have four or five kids who are starters and weren’t starters last year. We will continue to develop and see how they can impact the team as we move forward.” In the first half, the Hokies penetrated the 49ers’ defense consistently, but missed many golden opportunities. The first goal finally came in the fifteenth minute, when Reeves sent a low cross in, which appeared to have been touched by Ashley Manning into the goal, but actually hit a group of the 49er defenders to put the Hokies on the board first. Throughout the first half, Tech controlled the field, applying a lot of pressure and possessing the ball for most of the game, limiting the 49ers’ opportunities to score the first half. “I think that we controlled the whole game in that aspect with possession,” Adair said. “We limited their opportunity to get that flow, and we took that and got that rhythm, kept the ball and allowed ourselves to create opportunities.” Tiernan scored the second goal in the second half for the Hokies. “(Midfielder Kelsey) Loupee played a perfect ball in and I

just snuck around the goalie,” Tiernan said. “I heard her on my back so I just dipped past her.” It is the fourth goal of the season for Tiernan, who will play an important role on the team going forward. “I think that the team looks for me to hold onto the ball, to play off the midfielders and having (Reeves) run behind me a lot,” Tiernan said. The Hokies will try to keep up their winning ways when they take on ACC powerhouse North Carolina on Thursday at Thompson Field. The Tar Heels are currently ranked first in the nation and Tech will get a chance to make some noise nationally by taking down the top team. The team defeated UNC in Blacksburg two years ago by a score of 1-0 when the Heels were ranked eighth, and now the Hokies will try to top that victory this week. A win against the Tar Heels would not only vault Tech into the national conversation with a chance to improve on their No. 22 overall ranking, but would also eliminate the toughest opponent the team will face at home all season. The match is set to begin at 7 p.m.

@CTSportsTalk

ate director of athletics for internal affairs Tom Gabbard pressed ahead with a pair of controversial plans and further delayed the construction of the facility. Honestly, it’s puzzling that the department pushed for the Stadium Woods site in the first place. The university’s “Master Plans” for both 2006 and 2009 list the Washington Street site as the proposed location for the new facility. While school officials have frequently made it clear that those plans were fluid, the eventual nomination of the Stadium Woods site came as quite a surprise. The location was clearly very convenient, but that’s just one small part of what the administration should’ve considered. Although it’s unlikely that Weaver and Gabbard could’ve predicted exactly how strong the opposition to the project would be, it’s still confusing that they thought that a university as agriculturally oriented as Tech is would let the destruction of the trees pass unnoticed. After all, the Arbor Day Foundation has awarded the university with “Tree Campus USA” honors for its dedication to forestry management four different times. But even before activists started taking notice of the project, it would’ve made sense that the athletic department took the predominant pro-nature sentiment around Blacksburg more seriously.

FILE 2012/ SPPS

The football team will finally get a new indoor practice facility adjacent to its outdoor practice fields. Now, Gabbard suggested field could disrupt the foot- department taken a different that 2015 would be an opti- ball team by limiting the size approach to the endeavor, mistic estimation for the of the outdoor field or by clut- maybe it wouldn’t have taken completion of the new facility. tering the area with construc- more than a decade to make The department could’ve tion are greatly outweighed it happen. started things much sooner by the damage this indecision had officials just examined did to the coaches’ recruiting ALEX KOMA other options that required efforts. -sports editor Tech has desperately needsome compromise, instead of -senior pushing ahead with a pair of ed a new practice facility to -communication major keep up with other big prodivisive plans. Concerns that the practice grams, and had the athletic -@AlexKomaVT

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Wednesday, September 11, 2013 Print Edition