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Tuesday, September 10, 2013 An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 110th year, issue 12 News, page 2

Lifestyles, page 3

Opinions, page 5

Sports, page 4

Study Break, page 6

TUESDAY MORNING TAKEAWAYS

Practice facility plan spares woods

RYAN SUTHERLAND / SPPS

Detrick Bonner (8) celebrates with teammates after an interception.

Breaking down the home opener

BY CAMERON AUSTIN | news editor

The location for the indoor football practice facility, winter session classes, and a new Marching Virginians facility were among approved items at the BOV meeting on Monday.

T

he Virginia Tech football team will have a new place to practice — come rain or shine — in their brand new indoor practice facility to be located on their current practice turf. This new facility, and several other changes were decided during the Board of Visitors meeting on Monday. Among these changes was Tech beginning to offer winter session classes and a new Marching Virginian practice facility, which was approved for

JACOB EMERT sports editor

facts on the go

Virginia Tech’s 45-3 win over Western Carolina was more-orless a glorified practice. The result — even prior to the opening kick — was never in question. Rather, it was an opportunity for the Hokies to clean up some problem areas before the schedule begins to pick up. One-on-one coverage Logan Thomas has never lacked confidence in either himself or his receivers. He knows it, his receivers know it, and Saturday that confidence cost him. Twice. Overall, he was much improved from a week ago, connecting with his receivers on 17 of 31 attempts including a touchdown. He also threw a pair of interceptions, which were eerily similar to each other. On a fi rst-and-10 midway through the first quarter from the Western Carolina 43-yard line, Thomas tried to take advantage of one-on-one coverage. Demitri Knowles ran a go route down the right sideline, but was unable to establish much separation from Trey Morgan, the Catamounts defensive back. Thomas slightly underthrew the deep ball, but in order for Knowles to be successful this year he must be able to do more than just use his speed to outrun defenders. He and the rest of the Hokies receivers have to be able to win 50/50 balls, something they haven’t done regularly enough so far this year. Morgan played the ball better than Knowles, and Thomas’ interception total for the year reached two. “One-on-one coverage, we have to make a play,” Thomas said after the game. “I have to put better placement, but we also have to make a play.”

NEWS

Logan Thomas didn’t attempt a rush in Saturday’s game for the first time since becoming Tech’s starting QB. With just over one minute remaining in the fi rst half, Thomas threw his second pick of the game, again trying to let Knowles make a play in single coverage. On the WCU 20-yard line, Thomas threw a ball to the corner of the endzone where cornerback Christian Gill, who was in better position than Knowles the entire play, came away with the ball. This time, more of the blame could fall on Thomas, as the pass didn’t give Knowles much of a chance to come away with the ball. Still, for the Hokies passing game to have success this season, their receivers have to be able to create separation in man coverage, and at least make 50 percent of the plays on 50/50 balls. Saturday, they

One-on-one coverage, we have to make a play. I have to put better placement, but we also have to make a play.”

Logan Thomas Hokies quarterback did not. Thomas is going to trust his receivers to make the plays, and he is going to keep giving them the opportunities to. Now, they just have to go up and get the ball. see TMT / page four

MELISSA DRAUDT news reporter The presidential search committee, along with the board of visitors, showed interest in the opinions of undergraduate students in a forum on Monday. Students representing all aspects of life met in in Squires Commonwealth Ballroom from 4 to 6 p.m. to discuss qualities of an ideal president, the future of Virginia Tech and what makes Tech unique. The forum was divided into several round table discussions facilitated by members and volunteers of the committee. Later there was a large-scale discussion facilitated by the chair of the presidential search committee, George Nolen. Among suggestions for the advance-

see page 3

see FACILITY / page two

ment of the university, students spoke about increasing focus on underrepresented academic programs. “Our humanities and social sciences are left at the wayside,” said a history and political science major publicly. “I think the president needs to celebrate diversity in education and the differences between individuals and what they excel at academically.” Technological prowess was mentioned several times as an important skill for the incoming president, and the expectation of their social media presence was emphasized in the forum. Aerospace engineering major, Emoke Toth, spoke on the effect of a professor’s interest in teaching. “It’s not the technology that’s most important in the classroom, it’s the professor,” said Toth.

THE SEARCH HAS BEGUN vt Presidential Search

see INPUT / page two

Scoreboard fails in third quarter CAMERON AUSTIN news editor

The long awaited debut of the 108-foot new score board in Lane Stadium wasn’t exactly smooth sailing. During the third quarter of the football game against Western Carolina, the score-

board, which is currently the eighth largest in college football, experienced technical difficulties until the end of the quarter. According to Tom Gabbard, associate director of athletics, a breaker from the control room to the video board failed unexpectedly.

“We had been running tests and had power to the board for four to five weeks, so we were very surprised when the board glitched out,” Gabbard said, attributing the mishap to “Murphy’s Law.” Once diagnostic tests were run and the cause of the issue was determined, the board

OPINIONS Career Services shares advice for the perfect interview outfit after the VT Career Outfitters event was a huge hit. Check out the tips!

BOV approves $4.75 million facility for Marching Virginians see page 2

Indoor Football Practice Facility The new indoor football practice facility will be located on the eastern half of the existing practice space. It will be conveniently located close to the locker rooms and medical facilities, while only having minimal impact on the existing Stadium Woods, the 14-acre grove of old growth white oak trees on campus. The location of the new facility

had been a point of contention among community members in the past due to the proximity of the proposed location to the historic Stadium Woods. Previous proposals for the project caused discontent among community members when they discovered almost three acres of the woods would be torn down for the facility. After thousands of calls and emails in favor of saving the woods, the university denied that particular proposal.

Students give input in president search

LIFESTYLES

Hot and humid weather expected this coming week see page 2

initial planning.

student

voices

see page 3

was reset, and was up and running by the fourth quarter. “We’ll wait for the next game and hopefully it won’t be an issue again,” Gabbard said.

ONLINE Find out what your fellow studnets have to say about Gobberfest.

Check out our video of Gobblerfest on www.collegiatetimes.com

CollegiateTimes @collegiatetimes

@CameronOAustin


2

newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 10, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

Facility: Marching band practice space approved from page one

The decided-upon location comes as a compromise for the athletic department as well as community members who were concerned with the woods’ preservation. It was determined by an outside consultation group that the woods provide millions of dollars of value to the university. Rebekah Paulson, director of Friends of Stadium Woods, said that though they’re pleased with the new location, they’re not calling it a victory just yet. “As long as there is minimum impact on the woods and they follow through with what they say they’re going to do, then it will be a victory,” Paulson said. The practice facility has been in the works for years, according to Director of University Relations, Larry Hincker. “Several years ago, the board approved a capital project, which is essentially a line

item on a budget with a dollar amount that says, ‘You can go build a 25 million dollar project.’ “What we never had, though, was a location to put it,” Hincker said. That $25 million dollar budget will also include renovations to Rector Field House and will include the construction of an indoor hitting facility for the softball team. The next step in the process, according to Hincker, is to fi nish raising funds and to start looking at designs for the project. “We don’t have all the money in hand, and we won’t move forward until there’s a certain critical mass.” Groundbreaking dates may be far off in the future depending on how private fundraising goes. Construction on the Signature Engineering building didn’t begin until all funds were raised; however the Center for the Arts began construction before all money was in hand.

Winter Session classes This January, students will have the option to knock out credit hours over winter break. Monday, the Board of Visitors also approved a measure that will allow students the opportunity to take for-credit classes between the fall and spring semesters. The sessions will be open to undergraduate and graduate students who are already enrolled in the university and will be similar to summer session classes. Classes will be available in a variety of formats, including online and residential. “There’s a ton of demand for it,” Hincker said. Proposed Marching Virginians Facility Also proposed at the board meeting was a practice facility for the Marching Virginians. The current practice facility involves an exposed dirt field without

“We would like to see more emphasis on getting professors that are … passionate about teaching — they’re not here to do research. They make or break the class.” The quality of professors was a popular topic among students in the forum. “I’d prefer having a professor who is … passionate about teaching me what I need to know to be successful in life and in my career,” Toth said. Toth also advocated for increased availability of financial aid, both merit and needbased, which was received with applause from the stu-

dents. Tech is not the only university searching for a new president. Ohio State, Texas A&M and Clemson are among the schools competing for the most qualified, passionate and innovative individuals to lead their institutions. The forum for undergraduate students followed an earlier session for retired faculty and staff of the school. The committee will also hold a forum for graduate students in the Graduate Life Center on Sept. 12 at 6:30 p.m.

WANTED

changing rooms, restrooms or storage. The College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences worked with the Recreational Sports and Athletic department to come up with a shared use and funding plan for the project. The joint finance and audit committee, along with the buildings and grounds committee, is requesting $4.75 million to build a new facility that will include restrooms, lockers, instrument storage and a drum line room for percussion instruments. In addition, the project will include a 3,500 square-foot covered pavilion to provide shelter during inclement weather and a lit, soccer field sized area of artificial turf. The board approved an initial $400,000 for planning.

YOU to advertise in our classified section. Its easier than you think. Just go to collegiatetimes.com and you can write, buy and post your own classified ad in the Collegiate Times today!

@CameronOAustin

weather watch

Input: Social media important to students from page one

NEWS

JAMES MORROW weather reporter

After a week of dry conditions, shower and storm chances return this afternoon. The chance of rain increases through mid-week, before coming to an end Friday. Cooler temperatures are also in sight as we begin drying out over the weekend. Heat and humidity return to Blacksburg today with a high of 85 this afternoon. Partly cloudy skies and calm winds from the west will do little to relieve that warmth. A few showers may develop during the evening hours and persist overnight.

Daytime temperatures in the mid80’s will linger through Thursday as a cold front approaches from the west. The front will move through during the day on Thursday. Storm chances increase ahead of the front, which will bring cooler temperatures into Southwest Virginia. Things will dry out just in time for the weekend with much cooler temperatures and fall-like conditions making an early appearance in the last few weeks of summer.

@wxBONE

@MelissaDraudt

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

status

Feb. 6

3:11 AM

Possession of marijuana/Drug paraphernalia X2

Pritchard Hall

Cleared by arrest

Sept. 5

9:57 AM

Vandalism/destruction of property

Dairy Road

Active

Sept. 6

1:45 PM - 1:50 PM

Larceny of a wallet

War Memorial Gym

Active

Sept. 6

11:50 PM

Falsely summoning police

Oak Lane and Duckpond Dr. Inactive: Referred to student conduct

Sept. 7

1:13 AM

Appear intoxicated in public/Underage Possession of Alcohol

University Bookstore Parking Lot

Inactive: Referred to student conduct

Sept. 7

1:48 AM

Appear intoxicated in public

Alumni Mall/Main St.

Cleared by arrest

Sept. 7

2:36 AM

Underage possession of alcohol

Outside of Architecture Annex

Cleared by arrest

Sept. 7

3:54 AM

Appear intoxicated in public

Slusher Wing

Cleared by arrest

Sept. 7

12:43 PM

Simple assault

Sterrett Dr.

Active

Sept. 7

1:41 PM

Appear intoxicated in public/Underage possession of alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared


LIFESTYLES

lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 10, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

3

Career Outfitters dresses students for success CHELSEA GILES lifestyles editor

Cinderella could vouch that the right shoe can change your life. Students who attended the Virginia Tech Career Outfitters event were curious to see how an entire outfit could do the same. With students lined up before the first day of the event even began and eventually over 300 students served by the end of the day, there is an obvious need for business outfit advice. Johanna Smith, assistant director of career services at Tech, said she did not know what to expect in attendance, but the students were overtly appreciative of the event. “While they were here, a lot of students were appreciative and asked if we would do it again,” Smith said. “There are a lot of ideas coming around for how to do it twice a year.” Donna Cassell Ratcliffe, the director of career services at Virginia Tech, said the professional environment is different from what students are used to, and the sooner students prepare for the transition, the easier it will be. This includes knowing how to properly dress depending on the occasion and having those outfits prepared.

While they were here, a lot of students were appreciative and asked if we would do it again.” Johanna Smith Assistant Director of Career Services

“We want to encourage students to consider their dress, their manner and all the ways they’re branding themselves,” Ratcliffe said. “You want to think about how you’re projecting yourself.” Though the Career Outfitters event had specific clothing categories for various business functions from business casual to professional attire, Ratcliffe shared particular outfit advice for the daunting, yet exciting, first step into the business world: the interview. She said the interview outfit can seem daunting to students, but it’s a sure way of putting the best foot forward. “It’s better to err on the side of too professional than too casual, because the visual impression in the first five minutes has a major impact,��� Ratcliffe said. For students planning interviews or marking down career fair dates, one way of reducing stress, Ratcliffe suggests, is to invest in one interview outfit and always have it cleaned, pressed and ready to go. “Plan each part of the interview outfit,” Ratcliffe said. “Plan head to toe, and put the entire outfit together.” Some interviews are a two

day process, for which there is no need to buy two suits. Ratcliffe said to focus on the basics to create a new outfit — only change the blouse or necktie instead. Another aspect of the Career Outfitters event that catered to students was the affordability of the clothes. Ratcliffe assured that interview attire does not have to be high-end or trendy. She even suggested students shop at Goodwill stores or thrift stores to piece together their “interview uniform.”

We want to encourage students to consider their dress, their manner and all the ways they’re branding themselves.” Donna Cassell Ratcliffe Director of Career Services

On the note of trendy, she also added that a tip for women is not to equate a business outfit with one for going out in the evenings. It’s advised to dress conservatively with minimal jewelry and to be aware of the cut of the neckline. Since conservative and professional are the two catch words for planning the interview outfit, Ratcliffe said even though tattoos and piercings are becoming more common and acceptable, there should still be effort to cover them for the interview. Though some work environments are more open to body art, the interview is still a place to present your most polished self. Some potential employers may not be as accepting of a tattoo or piercing, which could hinder access to the next step in the process. “You really need to ask yourself what you are willing to be eliminated on,” Ratcliffe said. She advised men to wear long sleeve shirts if they have arm tattoos, just in case they are asked to take off their jacket in a warm room or more relaxed interview setting. Women with leg tattoos can opt for pantsuits instead of skirts. “Even if you don’t have one but you are considering getting a tattoo, just think ahead for your professional life and maybe get it where it won’t be as evident,” Ratcliffe said. So if it’s time to set aside a special hanger in the closet for the “interview uniform,” Career Services offers these tips and more in the various career launching events they host for students. Though there is no set date for the next Career Outfitters event, Smith said any updates will be posted on the VT Career Outfitters Facebook page.

@gilesreporting

more info Check out the CT this week for more advice and information in our Career Guide pages. Be better prepared for the transition into the professional world with our interviews and tips from Virginia Tech’s Career Services in our new Career Corner series starting Sept. 26. BEN WEIDLICH / SPPS

Jordan White searches through what’s left at Career Outfitters for an Engineering Expo outfit.

head to toe

professional fashion advice for your upcoming interviews

SMALL TOUCHES OF PRINT like plaid or stripes either for a shirt or tie are not as distracting, so those are options to add a little extra flare.

PRACTICE TYING A TIE. It is an essential piece of the suit package, and you don’t want it to be a cause of worry as you prepare for the interview.

WEAR SIMPLE BLOUSES AND AVOID BUSY PRINTS. Solid colored white or pale yellow shirts are the best with a navy blue, black or gray pant or skirt suit. SAVE THE KHAKIS FOR ANY DAY EXCEPT THE INTERVIEW. A dark navy blue, black or gray suit paired with a light colored shirt is ideal. And don’t forget to tuck it in.

MINIMAL IS THE KEY WORD FOR ACCESSORIES. Subtle heels or a small necklace adds a professional touch.

Present yourself as a professional potential employee. Carry your resumes, notes and pens in a padfolio. It will also give you a place to store business cards.

SKIRTS SHOULD BE KNEE OR MID-KNEE LENGTH WHEN STANDING. While sitting in an interview, a short skirt hem can be both distracting and a reason to fidget.

Think head to toe. Check your “interview uniform” shoes for scuffs, tears or an overall worn-out outlook. A little extra care such as polishing can round out the entire look.

If you don’t own at least a mini ironing board and a basic iron, it’s time for an investment. Wrinkled clothes are distracting and exude a lack of attention to detail.

Use a light touch when applying perfume or cologne. Though a unique scent adds to your presence, it should not take away from what you’re saying.

ANDREA LEDESMA/ COLLEGIATE TIMES


4

sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 10, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

SPORTS

TMT: Hokies improve against Catamounts from page one

“When (Thomas) throws the ball up, he’s having confidence in us to go up and make the play, sometimes as receivers we don’t and it turns into interceptions and he gets a lot of flack for it,” said receiver Joshua Stanford. “He’s very confident, but as receivers we have to make the plays when we get the opportunity.” Fresh faces in the passing game Joshua Stanford, Willie Byrn and Kalvin Cline combined for 12 receptions for 150 yards on Saturday. A week ago, the inexperienced trio had one catch between them. Disappointed with the performances of his bunch, wide receivers coach Aaron Moorehead expressed during the week leading up to the game that no player’s role was set in stone, and whoever was performing best would play. Neither Stanford nor Bryn offer their quarterback a deep threat; Stanford is just 6-foot1 and Byrn is under 6-feet. What they do offer, however, are consistent hands that can get separation in the open field and make plays with their feet. As long as they keep doing that, Thomas will get them the ball. “He’s been the best-kept secret,” Stanford said about Byrn, who had just one reception before Saturday despite his junior status. “We see it in practice and everything like that and he’s like a Wes Welker-type: real quick, very explosive, good hands and everything.” Cline, a true freshman who pulled in four catches for 46 yards against WCU, is fi ll-

ing in for Ryan Malleck who suffered a left labral tear during the preseason and will miss the entire 2013 season. Malleck figured to be a big part of the new offense under coordinator Scot Loeffler. Cline hopes to be able to learn from Malleck, and continue to be a legitimate target for Thomas. “Malleck, with his injury he’s kind of putting his knowledge on me with the playbook and everything,” Cline said. “He knows my athleticism and I’m able to fill that role. Lot of routes running, that’s kind of the offense I came from in high school, and transitioning from basketball I have a lot of speed and quickness and it kind of translates over perfectly for this offense.” Saturday, D.J. Coles, the team’s number one receiver heading into the season opener, had just one reception in the very limited amount of playing time he received — it was a 19-yard touchdown catch. Hokies head coach Frank Beamer noted that Coles would receive less playing time moving forward, and that the Hokies “just have to play him less plays and get more out of him per play.” Coles has been bothered by bad knees and has admitted he is playing a couple of pounds overweight. “D.J. can be as good as he wants to be. We’re trying to get him back healthy,” Thomas said about his fellow senior. “His knee has been on and off here for a while. D.J. helps us tremendously in our receiving corps, just experience wise. So as much as we can get him on the field the best we’ll be.” Running game gains

depth One of the bright spots for Tech last week against Alabama was Trey Edmunds’ explosion for 132 yards. Saturday, the Hokies gained 237 yards on the ground, but involved numerous new players in doing so. J.C. Coleman missed the opener with an ankle injury but rushed for 38 yards on seven carries against the Catamounts. He took over for Edmunds on a couple drives and showed good bursts and quick cuts, both signs that his ankle is healing well. Joel Caleb, a freshman, made his first start as a Hokie after being suspended for the season opener. Caleb averaged six yards a carry over six carries including a 13-yard touchdown. Chris Mangus received five carries on Saturday, the same number as against Alabama, but showed off more of his explosive speed. He busted a 76-yard touchdown run on a pitch to the left. Edmunds, the Hokies top back, had a pair of one-yard touchdown runs and finished with 68 yards on 15 carries. “I thought Mangus made an exceptional run and showed his ability,” Beamer said. “The guys probably should have had him, but he made a nice little move and outran them to the endzone. He’s a fast guy — if we can work to get him in space a little bit he can really help this football team. Joel, I thought he ran tough and good and strong. Good to see J.C. back in there, and Trey, I think he’s just going to continue to get better.” The running game Saturday also offered a couple of firsts. For the first time under Frank Beamer no running play resulted in negative yardage,

and Logan Thomas did not attempt a rush for the first time since becoming a starter. Punt Return Not tons of analysis here, but certainly worth noting. Kyshoen Jarrett was the primary punt returner for the Hokies on Saturday, and he never looked comfortable. He returned five punts for 21 yards, but what’s most worrisome was his decision making. Twice he decided against calling fair catches, only to be nailed by opposing gunners immediately upon catching the ball. In the third quarter, after the defense forced a WCU punt, Jarrett opted to call a fair catch, but moved out of the way at the last second. The ball bounced off his leg and was recovered by the Catamounts, leading to their only score of the game. “What happened is, he was going to fair catch it and then a guy flashed in front of him and he naturally tried to avoid him and then all the sudden the ball hits his foot,” Beamer said. “I think the lesson there, if he realizes it’s the other team, just go catch the ball and if he interferes with you then we’ve got a penalty.” More of the same for the defense. Tech’s defense shut down top-ranked Alabama, so it’s no surprise that they suffocated the Football Championship Subdivision (formally Division 1-AA) Catamounts. Jack Tyler, who led the Hokies with 11 tackles, admitted the objective for the defense in a game like that one isn’t only to shut out the lesser opponent, but to not allow them to cross midfield.

RYAN SUTHERLAND / SPPS

The Hokies celebrate after D.J. Coles catches a 19-yard touchdown. The defense allowed just 162 yards and held the Catamounts to only two successful third down conversions on 13 tries. Detrick Bonner had a pair of interceptions, including one in the first quarter resulting in the first defensive touchdown for the Hokies since the 2010 ACC Championship Game. It is Kendall Fuller, however, who deserves the majority of the compliments on the play, as the freshman cornerback recovered well and deflected the ball into Bonner’s hands. The first of three interceptions for the defense came from another true freshman, Brandon Facyson, who came

away with an Eddie Sullivan pass in the first. It was the first of his collegiate career. As opposed to an opponent like Alabama, playing Western Carolina provided an opportunity for the Hokies to improve where they needed it most. They showed lots of progress, but they still have plenty of room for more in the upcoming weeks. If the mistakes continue down the road against greater opposition, they will be game-changers rather than just lessons to learn from.

@JacobEmert

Men’s soccer upsets Syracuse JIM MCNAMARA sports staff writer

Two late game goals powered the men’s soccer team past the 17th-ranked Syracuse Orange on Friday night in front of a raucous home crowd. The match was Syracuse’s fi rst ACC game since the school joined the conference earlier this year. The Hokies welcomed them with a loss. “That’s college soccer,” said head coach Mike Brizendine. “There are crazy results all over the place.” The home crowd was electric and stood behind the Hokies from the start. “It was unreal,” said sophomore forward Kai Marshall. “I’ve never experienced that before and it was amazing.” Out of the 24 combined shots in the game, 15 came in the first half alone and both teams played at a fast pace for the entire half. While the play was speedy, it was also physical. There were three yellow cards in the first half, two on Syracuse and one on Tech. One card was particularly costly for the Hokies when a foul in the 17th minute resulted in an opposing penalty kick. Syracuse forward Nick Perea buried the penalty kick, which proved to be the only goal of the game for the Orange. At the start of the second half it was clear both teams were starting to slow down. The pace of play had decreased from the first half and scoring opportunities for both teams were few and far between. “We settled down a lot,” Marshall said. “We were defi nitely still looking for

RYAN SUTHERLAND / SPPS

The Hokies men’s soccer team beat No. 17 Syracuse 2-1 in overtime. the perfect time to go — we didn’t want to give the ball away and rush.” As the second half was nearing the end, the game seemed as though it would end with Syracuse’s lone goal. That all changed in the 85th minute when Syracuse misplayed a ball deep in their half, which led to a fast break goal for senior midfielder Robert Alberti. “Once I saw it hit off the post I wasn’t sure if it was going to go in. Once it did, everything happened so fast,” said Alberti. “They took me to the ground. Just a great feeling.” With that goal, the crowd got back into the game and Tech seemed to have all the

momentum. And in the 98th minute, Tech capitalized on that momentum. Marshall and midfielder Brandon Eaton were able to get behind the Syracuse defense, and Marshall was able to score his second goal of the season. “Brandon played a great ball into to me and I just put my head down and banged it in, didn’t even think about it,” said Marshall. The Hokies hope to continue the momentum on Friday, Sept. 13 when they play Duke on the road in Durham. The game is slated to begin at 7 p.m.

@CTSportsTalk


OPINIONS

opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 10, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

5

The Collegiate Times is an independent studentrun newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Priscilla Alvarez Managing Editor: Danielle Buynak Art Director: Kevin Dickel Design Editors: Brad Klodowski, Andrea Ledesma Public Editor: Andrew Kulak Web Editor: James O’Hara Multimedia Editor: Nick Smirniotopoulos News Editors: Cameron Austin, Dean Seal News Reporters: Melissa Draudt, Leslie McCrea News Staff Writers: Kelly Cline, Josh Higgins, Matt Minor Features Editor: Chelsea Giles Features Reporters: Madeline Gordon, Jessica Groves Opinions Editors: David Levitt, Shareth Reddy Sports Editors: Jacob Emert, Alex Koma Sports Media Manager: Mike Platania Assistant Photo Editor: Ben Wiedlich Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: James Dean Seal Circulation Manager: Keith Bardsley

MCT CAMPUS

Gobblerfest experience still confusing for first-timers If you go to Virginia Tech, you’ve probably also been to “Gobblerfest” — an afternoon of advertising and campaigning for the various groups, clubs, organizations and businesses around campus and in the community. The Drillfield is packed for the day and freshmen are encouraged to sign up for the listservs of clubs they may want to join. However, last year when I was new to the school, Gobblerfest seemed so overwhelming and stressful that I didn’t even want to go. Walking around with a couple of friends trying to find my way in a world filled with people calling at me, shoving free things in my face, and being allaround too peppy made me want to turn around and walk straight back to my cozy little dorm room and lock the door. It pains me to say that this year, I was one of those campaigners. And as much as I love my organization, I still felt bad approaching freshmen that clearly didn’t want to be approached quite yet. Our booth was right at an entrance to the Drillfield, and I could see on every freshman’s face that they had yet to take it all in. They definitely weren’t ready to be harassed by some tree-hugging sophomore. Talking with my fellow advertisers, I realized that not everyone has the

student

voices

same view of this day as I do. Looking back, I only remember a few clubs I saw because I still have their free Frisbees. So many of the other booths that day got mushed into one blur for me.

However, last year when I was new to the school, Gobblerfest seemed so overwhelming and stressful that I didn’t even want to go.”

The idea of Gobblerfest is a good one, yet from the outside looking in it’s just a mess of booths scattered on the Drillfield. Perhaps this could eventually be remedied with directional signs and clear sectioning for types of organizations, but for now it will probably remain a day of confusion for everyone who has never attended previously. MICHELE NEWBY -regular columnist -sophomore -English

What did you think about Gobblerfest this year?

“It helps freshmen get really involved with a bunch of clubs, and helps get all the clubs out there to see.” Sam Welborn, sophomore

WELBORN

“It could be organized better. I had some trouble getting connected to the types of clubs I was looking for.” Lauren Malhorta, freshman

MALHORTA

“It’s awesome. When I saw it I was definitely overwhelmed though.” Meaghan Davis, freshman

DAVIS

Gameday litter reflects poorly on Tech students It’s football season again, and therein lies something unique about the Virginia Tech experience and its close ties to football games on Saturday afternoons. This weekend’s game went well, and it felt good to be back among fellow students, alumni and fans. I am almost always impressed by how Tech fans conduct themselves in the spirit of athletics. Near the end of the game, many football fans gradually left due to the massive margin of points on the scoreboard, leaving behind an array of empty cups and bottles, aluminum foil, football programs and other trash. Th is is not surprising, however, considering that 75% of Americans have admitted to littering in the past five years, according to StatisticBrain. But the unscrupulousness with which so many loyal Tech fans litter in their home stadium just rubs me the wrong way. Fans’ behavior at sporting events speaks volumes about the school. In fact, I know of former students who in part chose to attend Tech because of the sense of community they felt while jumping to ‘Enter Sandman’ in a sea of orange and maroon. However, had I been a prospective student at this game, I might have changed my perception

of the Tech community. One would think that at such a nice stadium, on such a nice day, with the abundance of so many trash cans, fans simply carrying their trash out and throwing it away wouldn’t be difficult. Seeing all that garbage left behind by Tech fans does not portray a positive image about our fan base, or our university for that matter. In my opinion, littering is a habit of ignorance and shows a degrading lack of self-respect. But Lane Stadium wasn’t even the worst of it. Parking lots from tailgaters were full of trash and people continually walked by and failed to pick up anything as they passed. What seems even worse is the fact that alumni, who hold this place so dear in their hearts, would be so complacent and tolerant of the obscene amounts of trash in the stadium and surrounding areas. At Saturday’s game, I witnessed an alumnus, proudly sporting his class ring, walk away from his empty water bottles and aluminum foil at his alma mater’s own football stadium. According to Business Insider, Blacksburg is the 17th smartest city in the country. One would imagine that in such an intelligent, progressive location littering would be among the least of our problems.

Such a blatant display of unintelligence and ignorance is totally unnecessary, and I propose that littering laws be enforced at football games, no matter if tickets were purchased or not.

Seeing all that garbage left behind by Virginia Tech fans does not portray a positive image about our fan base, or our university for that matter.”

Currently, those who litter in Virginia can face up to a $250-$2,500 fine for littering. Although enforcing the laws won’t totally eliminate littering, knowing that a heft y fine for doing so will cause offenders to think twice about throwing their trash anywhere other than in a trash can. ANDREW WIMBISH -regular columnist -senior -English

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September 10, 2013

Stay in the know.

The Collegiate Times. Pick up your copy today.

Today’s Birthday Horoscope: Social life provides the backdrop for your feature this year, with a full community cast. Expand your circle for new opportunities. Plan for inancial growth with persistent saving. De ine what you want, and invite participation. Venus in Scorpio adds secret, spicy trysts this month. Nurture what you love.

Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham Quote of the Day

A great artist can paint a great picture on a small canvas. -Charles Dudley Warner

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xkcd by Randall Munroe

By Billie Truitt

Week of September 10 through 13

ACROSS 1 Utah’s state gem 6 Stable newborn 10 Emblem 14 “Don’t try to be ___” 15 __ jure 16 Slicer’s warning 17 See 38-Across 20 Passed down, as folk mus. 21 Shop gripper 22 Four Holy Roman emperors 23 ’40s-’50s pitcher Maglie 24 Tangle of hair 25 P.D. alert

Hot Songs Cheerleader - St. Vincent Fast Car - Tracy Chapman Honestly? - American Football Crave You - Flight Facilities, Giselle Sleeping Pill - Yo La Tango

9/10/13 26 See 38-Across 33 Silver and gold 35 Absorb, as a loss 36 Via, à la Burns 37 “__ you clever!” 38 Clue for 17-, 26-, 43- and 57Across 39 Intersect 40 Unlike Wellesley College 41 Board partner 42 Downloadable media player 43 See 38-Across 46 Clunker 47 Cruet fluid 48 Corn serving

51 That and that 54 Proverbial equine escape site 56 Sharp part 57 See 38-Across 60 Plotting 61 Head start? 62 Neutral shade 63 Dry run 64 No sweat 65 Being pulled DOWN 1 Knave of Hearts ’ loot 2 Fictional plantation owner

3 Guitar played with hands and feet 4 Dry 5 San Diego attraction 6 Having limits 7 Makes a choice 8 U.S. Open stadium 9 Rickey broke his stolen base record in 1991 10 “Assuming that’s accurate,” biblically 11 Winter garb 12 Guesstimate words 13 Takes home 18 Rogers’s partner 19 Last year’s frosh 24 Hot sandwich 25 Sequence of scenes 27 It’s not posed 28 Aptly named author 29 Holiday tuber 30 Dismissive bit of rhetoric 31 Highland tongue 32 Legendary seamstress 33 Eponymous physicist Ernst __ 34 Switch add-on 38 “I’m talking to you!” 39 PC key below Shift 41 Wicked 42 Turner memoir

44 Member’s payment 45 Where kroner are spent 49 Disco era term 50 Sign up for more 51 Letter-shaped fastener 52 Optimism

53 Granola grain 54 __ Bing!: “The Sopranos” nightclub 55 Some votes 56 First lady’s garden site? 58 Golfer Michelle 59 Hitter’s stat

Friday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

9/6/13

WORDSEARCH: ACC Schools Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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WORD BANK Virginia Tech North Carolina Wake Forrest Duke North Carolina St Virginia Maryland Clemson Georgia Tech Florida St Miami Pittsburgh Syracuse Boston College Notre Dame ACC

Stay in the know.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Accept good coaching, and heed your partner’s advice. Schedule more time for romance. Choose a fun destination. Make sure others are cared for, and then go play. You’re especially attractive intellectually. Add delicious fragrances and lavors. Taurus (April 20-May 20) It’s a very lucky day. Offers for more creative work start pouring in. Soak it up. Write the conclusion you’d like to see. Imagine what you’d like to accomplish and aim high. Accept a boost. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Set aside stores for the winter. Pay back a social debt. There’s a bene icial addition to your home. Catch up on your reading. Conditions are excellent for a romantic outing. Include beautiful scenery and deliciousness. Cancer (June 21-July 22) You’re getting wiser. Form a new partnership, providing a material advantage. Accept a hefty assignment. Gather as much as you can. Check outside opinions. They love you. Invest in your own business.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) There’s good news from far away. Accept the applause graciously. You’re tempted to spend more than you have. Invest in home, family and real estate, within your means. Relax in the afterglow. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Consider family in your decisions. You’re beloved beyond your wildest dreams. Bring out the good stuff, with the best quality. Consult an expert. Receive an unexpected bonus. A hike or beautiful walk revives. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Try something new. Your good reputation precedes you. Consider your higher values. Keep most of your resources hidden. Your peace of mind increases. You can achieve the abundance of your dreams. Share your appreciation. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Don’t fall for a sob story. Gather facts from friends. It’s getting good. Trust your team. You’re gaining admirers and a cheering section. You have plenty of support. Full speed ahead.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) You produce a treasure, and self-esteem increases exponentially. Celebrate with an intriguing companion. See the sights. Choose your destination with fun in mind. Draw upon hidden resources. Coast on your recent successes. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Start planning an adventure to follow a passion. Keep others on course. You get some lucky shots. Ground transportation may be easiest. Research the history to get the full lavor. Consult an expert. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Follow your inner impulse. Plan for the future. Your personal vision inspires others. Begin, and get farther than expected. Let your partner share the load. Organization and archiving keeps things lowing smoothly. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) You’re building favor with an in luential partner with good ideas. Learn. Dig in. The good news is that there’s plenty of work. Extend a cooperative hand. You’re drawing rave reviews. Encourage each other.

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LIFESTYLES

lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 10, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

7

watch: The World’s End Movie Rating

“The World’s End” is the third piece of a loosely related series of films known as the Three Flavours Cornetto trilogy. The English duo of actor and comedian Simon Pegg with writer and director Edgar Wright continues their long collaboration with this follow up to the first two films in the trilogy, 2004’s “Shaun of the Dead” and 2007’s “Hot Fuzz.” As in the preceding films, Pegg’s main co-star is longtime friend Nick Frost. “The World’s End” follows a group of friends on a pubcrawl turned epic fight for survival. Pegg plays Gary King, the ne’er-do-well leader of the group, who gathers his childhood friends together for a trip back to their hometown to attempt the Golden Mile, a pub-crawl across 12 bars. However, it soon becomes apparent that something is amiss. As it so happens, their old town has been taken over by alien robots. The group decides their safest bet is to continue the pubcrawl as if nothing is wrong in hopes that if the robots don’t realize they know, they will be safe. Naturally, hijinks ensue. The pub-crawl then takes a turn for the dangerous as the robots use violence to keep hold of the town. The fight sequences that result are nothing short of awesome. After the great success of “Shaun of the Dead” and “Hot Fuzz,” it’s hard to imagine the pressure on Pegg and Wright in making “The

World’s End.” This pressure shows — if only a little. The film drags on toward the end and is a bit sloppy in its resolution. The ending is the definition of random, not to mention more than a little depressing.

After the great success of ‘Shaun of the Dead’ and ‘Hot Fuzz,’ it’s hard to imagine the pressure on Pegg and Wright in making ‘The World’s End.’

However, with the excellent cast, everyone plays off each other impeccably, and the script makes up for the lapse in the plotline. The Gary King character is so selfish and awful that audiences should hate him, yet Pegg makes him surprisingly sympathetic. A definite highlight is Pierce Brosnan’s cameo as the laughably sophisticated and vaguely creepy schoolteacher from the friends’ school days. The film even gets unexpectedly deep. On the cusp of the climax, Gary and Andy deal with the nature of alcoholism, addiction and forgiveness. This surprising amount of heart gives another layer to the movie, pushing “The World’s End” from a simple apocalyptic-comedy into a truly well-rounded film.

@katieVTCT

“The World’s End” is the final film in the Three Flavours Cornetto trilogy, which also includes 2004’s “Shaun of the Dead” and 2007’s“Hot Fuzz.” The trilogy is a series of comedy genre films directed by Edgar Wright and written by Wright and Simon Pegg and starring Nick Frost.

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September 10, 2013

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Tuesday, September 10, 2013 Print Edition