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Friday, September 6, 2013

The Collegiate Times’ comprehensive guide to Virginia Tech Football

www.collegiatetimes.com

THE

PUNCHING CLOCK BY ALEX KOMA | sports editor

Bud Foster stresses that defense needs consistency Bud Foster looks like he would be just as comfortable swinging a pickaxe in a coal mine as he is stalking the sidelines at a football game. Accordingly, the Hokies’ rough-hewn, no-nonsense defensive coordinator has tried to impart this hardworking mentality on to Tech’s defense, and it’s produced some remarkable results over the years. Perhaps no performance was more impressive than the way the Hokies shut down the vaunted Alabama offense in the season opener. Now, the challenge is for the team not to lose focus against Western Carolina and avoid the pitfalls of the 2012 season. “Last year we opened up with Georgia Tech and then we fell off the face of the planet,” Foster said. “I told our kids today that we’re punching the clock and doing

it from start to finish. We just started. Will we play that way every week?” Tech managed to hold the Crimson Tide to just 206 yards for the game, the second fewest yards Alabama has amassed during Nick Saban’s tenure. That’s a sign of a defense that came to play. “The confidence is there,” said linebacker Tariq Edwards. “We just know we have to fi x up some small things, maybe some major things as far as special teams. I think we’ll just go ahead and be a great team.” Edwards was one of the most important components of the rejuvenated unit. After having a breakout season in 2011, he limped through an injury-ridden 2012 season, but recorded six tackles and two pass breakups against the Tide. “He had to knock some rust off early,” Foster said. “But it was good to have him

see FOSTER / page 3

EDMUNDS EXPLODES ONTO OFFENSIVE LINE CROWDED NATIONAL STAGE TAMES BAMA’S TOP NOTCH DEFENSE

MIKE PLATANIA sports media manager

On Saturday, Trey Edmunds ran 77 yards down the sideline and into the end zone, probably finding a way into the Hokies’ starting lineup. Edmunds’ mad dash not only gave the Hokies a sign of life against Alabama, but more importantly, gave an answer as to who the featured back will be this season. After the game, Edmunds earned the praise of head coach Frank Beamer. “Each and every week I think he’ll get better and better,” Beamer said. “First time he ever stepped on a college football field there tonight. (That was a) pretty good crowd he stepped out there against.” Even with J.C. Coleman set to come back from two ankle sprains this week, Edmunds will likely continue to get a majority of the carries. That’s not meant as a knock on Coleman, but in the past, when Beamer finds a back he likes, he feeds him the rock as much as possible. In 2009, Ryan Williams averaged over 22 carries per game and in 2011 David Wilson averaged over 20. Both years, no other running back averaged more than seven touches. It’s a small sample size, but it

FILE / SPPS

Trey Edmunds (14) impressed many with his solid debut numbers last Saturday. also looks like quarterback Logan Thomas will see a reduced role as a runner. Last season, Thomas led the team with 174 carries and never held on to the ball less than seven times in a game. On Saturday against Alabama, Thomas had only five attempts.

Loeffler insisted the option is ultimately dictated by what the defense shows Thomas, but with an improved offensive line and a more talented stable of backs, there’s reason to believe Thomas will let the backs do the running this season.

see TREY / page 3

WIDE RECEIVERS DROP THE BALL JULIA CANON sports staff writer

After posting an abysmal completion percentage of 19.2 percent resulting in just 56 yards against Alabama last Saturday, many fans were quick to point the finger at Virginia Tech quarterback Logan Thomas for the loss. While Thomas certainly did not have a great game against Alabama, he was the victim of many mistakes by inexperienced receivers. Boasting only two returners in the starting lineup, many of the receivers came into the game against Alabama untested. It certainly showed. The Hokies dropped six passes in the game and lazy route running contributed to Thomas’ interception that was returned for a touchdown. Even though many predicted a slow learning curve for the receivers, the subpar performances of D.J. Coles and Demitri Knowles were disappointing.

“Well, I just think (the problem is) concentration,” said head coach Frank Beamer. “I have seen D.J. Coles make a lot of tough catches and Demetri just has to go up and get it at the highest point.” After sitting out much of last season due to reaggravating a knee injury sustained in 2011, Coles is the leader of the group. Coles caught one pass for 34 yards against Alabama. The only other returning starter on the receiving line is the redshirt sophomore Knowles, who is renowned for his speed. Knowles accounted three receiving yards on two catches and dropped four passes. “Demitiri had a rough game,” said wide receivers coach Aaron Moorehead. “There is no doubt about it. We looked at it and he didn’t play his best. You’re disappointed for the kid because at the end of the day he’s a competitor. “He’s not someone that’s going to let something drag on. He was the first guy out to practice on

receiver facts D.J. Coles one reception, 34 yards Demetri Knowles two receptions, three yards Carlis Parker one target, no receptions Charley Meyer did not play, probable for WCU

Sunday. He wanted to get past it.” After Knowles and Coles it’s only freshmen. Redshirt freshman Joshua Stanford was the only other receiver to catch a pass against Alabama and he’s been rewarded with the starting spot over Coles. The coaching staff is also excited to see what redshirt freshman

see RECEIVERS / page 2

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

Offensive line coach Jeff Grimes was pleasantly surprised by the unit’s play.

A young offensive line found cohesion early as it was able to stymie Alabama’s vaunted defense line BRITTANY KEUP sports staff writer

Leading up to last Saturday’s season opener against the Alabama Crimson Tide, there were huge concerns with the number of young players that would be entering the game for the Hokies. The Hokies didn’t get off to the start they would have liked, but some positives came out of the 35-10 defeat. One of those was that the offensive line surprisingly played well together as a whole. New — or just about new in the case of Laurence Gibson — were the Hokies tackles. Jonathan McLaughlin and Gibson each made their first career start against the Tide. “Those guys up front did a great job the entire night. They gave me time to throw. They blocked it up in the run game,“ quarterback Logan Thomas said. Despite the praise from the leader of his team, Gibson was unimpressed with his own execution throughout the game. “Honestly, I was a little disappointed in how I played,” Gibson

said. “I got into survival mode and didn’t play with good technique and fundamentals. I’m working on playing how I practice.” Offensive line coach Jeff Grimes didn’t know what to expect from his freshmen, but he agreed that they had their ups and downs. “I don’t think (Laurence) played as well as he could have, because, you know, maybe first game jitters for him,” Grimes said. “He’s a guy that’s been around for a while but hasn’t played a lot of football. Offensive coordinator Scot Loeffler agreed; he sees an optimistic future. “As a coach you’re always looking at the negative, and if you step back and look at the positive that offensive line, the first five, they’re going to gel and be a pretty good unit,” Loeffler said. Besides the two first-time players, the Hokies line featured three veteran players, right guard Caleb Farris, center David Wang and left guard Andrew Miller. As a redshirt senior and one of the team’s four permanent captains for the 2013 season, Miller was enthused with his line’s performance.

see LINE / page 4


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september 6, 2013

HEAD TO HEAD Collegiate Times sports editors face off with their weekly game predictions. Find out why they made their picks.

ALEX KOMA SPORTS EDITOR

JACOB EMERT

W

W

SPORTS EDITOR

After last week’s depressing loss to Alabama, the Western Carolina Catamounts are exactly the type of team the Hokies need to face. The key for the Hokies is less just plain winning this game, but doing so in convincing fashion. Squeaking by the Catamounts on the strength of the defense isn’t really an option for Scot Loeffler’s offense, particularly for Logan Thomas. The Hokies need to go out there and hang dozens of points on this team to establish that such a feat is possible for this unit, since it didn’t exactly seem feasible in Atlanta. In many ways, the Hokies are playing themselves in this game. The Catamounts may be present on Saturday, but the real battle is all in the players’ minds.

Last week the Hokies took on the best team in college football. Saturday they will compete against one of the worst. Western Carolina went 1-10 last year, with their sole win coming against Mars Hill. Yeah. That bad. No need to waste much time with the prediction: Hokies win convincingly, 41-6. Logan Thomas and the receivers will be very productive, yet questions about the passing game will remain until the team fi nds success against a tougher opponent.

@JacobEmert

@AlexKomaVT

RECEIVERS: ROOM TO IMPROVE

TREVOR WHITE / SPPS

D.J. Coles (18) had one reception for 34 yards against Alabama. from page one Charley Meyer can bring to the table. “Were excited to get Charley Meyer back, he is a very dependable player in there.” Beamer said. After not playing against Alabama due to a lingering hamstring injury, Meyer will get his first game action against Western Carolina this Saturday. Meyer began in the Virginia Tech football

program as a preferred walk on, but worked his way up to earn a scholarship this offseason. The Hokies hope their wide receivers, in particular, and their entire passing game in general, can develop and grow from the rough start and experience more success in the following weeks.

@CTSportsTalk


september 6, 2013

FOSTER: DEFENSE ANCHORS HOKIES from page one back out there having some production and making some plays.” His partner in crime at linebacker, Jack Tyler, was similarly dominant in the run game. He frequently burst into Alabama’s backfield to disrupt running back T.J. Yeldon as he notched eight tackles on the day. “(Tyler) is as instinctive as a guy we’ve had here, he’s got great vision,” Foster said. “I don’t know what he runs in the (40-yard dash), he’ll probably tell you about 4.7 (seconds) or 4.8, but he plays at about a 4.6, he just doesn’t waste steps.” But it wasn’t just the veteran linebackers that turned out impressive performances in Atlanta. Josh Trimble also impressed coaches in his first start at outside linebacker. “I think he played really well,” Foster said. “The Fuller kid played outstanding there for his first ball game, as well as at corner, but I was real pleased with how that group played when it was all said and done.” Foster is referring to freshman Kendall Fuller, the game’s biggest surprise. He made an impact all over the field while playing both outside linebacker and cornerback in his first collegiate game. “We prepared and trained and worked hard throughout camp and throughout the preseason, and it kind of showed right there in the game,” said Fuller. Yet, the younger Fuller was hardly the only standout in the secondary. His older brother, senior cornerback

PLAYER

TWEETS-OF-THE-WEEK James Gayle @JGayle99 If I was a highschool offensive lineman I would definitely want to play for coach Grimes. Coach Beamer did a great Job with the new staff.

Kyle Fuller, grabbed an interception and broke up two passes against the Tide. “He had a great cover game,” Foster said. “Was he as good last year? No. But I think you see a guy working with a little bit of a chip on his shoulder and that’s only going to make him better.” Tech’s vaunted defensive line also gave Yeldon and quarterback A.J. McCarron fits all night long. “I just felt like our front four was always working,” Edwards said. “You could tell how those guys were working hard over the summer. I’m very proud of those guys.”

While some coordinators might be loath to subject their stars to the danger of special teams play, Foster embraces this competitiveness. “You look at Alabama, they’ve got T.J. Yeldon, those kinds of guys are on special teams,” Foster said. “I know this: when I played, it goes by fast, so if you’ve got an opportunity to do special things, why not be a part of that and make it happen?” But the kicking game is hardly the biggest concern against a less-talented team like Catamounts. Instead, Foster will be focusing on dealing with the team’s up-tempo spread offense. “Each week’s a little bit difI just felt like our ferent,” Foster said. “Th is front four was always week we’re facing a spread team that’s no huddle, but working.” we’ve prepared for it because we’ve seen things like that Tariq Edwards before.” Linebacker As an FCS team, Western Carolina might not present much of a challenge for the James Gayle is one of the few defense, but their scheme Tech stars that didn’t pile up could serve as good preparabig numbers during the sub- tion for later games against lime defensive performance. other spread teams. Now, his coaches are look“I know the tempo and stuff ing for him to make a big- is going to be the same next ger impact against Western week (against East Carolina) Carolina. and against North Carolina “He didn’t have any solo too,” Foster said. “But the way tackles, but he got pressure on we practice, we don’t huddle the quarterback,” said defen- defensively, we go four plays sive line coach Charley Wiles. at a time, so we’re going pret“I think James can elevate his ty quick.” game and play better, and he More than the team’s tempo, knows he can.” the defense’s biggest challenge But Gayle is looking to will be proving to Foster that make an impact beyond just it can embody the consistency the defensive line. After the he espouses. special teams unit’s dismal “You expect that same effort, performance, veterans like that same intensity, that same Gayle and Kyle Fuller have motor,” Foster said. “If we do volunteered for coverage that, we’ll give ourselves a duties. chance.”

3

Antone Exum Jr. @IAmSwag1 Time to workout. Watch this.

Derek DiNardo @DiNarfro The things I would do for a faculty/staff parking pass... smh #unforgivable Trey Gresh @tgresh12 Ok, yes obviously I want to fish in the morning. It’s just whether I want to get up at 630 on my only day to sleep in!

Darius Walter Redmond @TheCalc_33 How do u sign up to be the hokie bird ? Lol

TREY: NEW RB TAKES REIGNS from page one Coleman will still be a large part of the offense moving forward, but in a more unique role. Loeffler talked about how important throwing check-downs are to the offense. “We should have had four more completions on checkdowns that you kick yourself in the tail about,” he said. “And on the sack we should have checked the ball down, so it wouldn’t have occurred.” Loeffler also mentioned that

Coleman is talented in the passing game and there’s a role for him, but kept decidedly quiet as to what exactly it will be. Also working into the rotation will be redshirt freshman Joel Caleb, who was suspended for the season opener. Despite having little experience as a running back, Loeffler sounded confident that Caleb could contribute. “I think the switch to running back was one of the smartest things we’ve done. I think that’s his position in every sense of the word. So it’ll be interesting to watch

him play for the first time,” Loeffler said. Edmunds became only the eighth back to run for more than 100 yards against Alabama since Nick Saban arrived in 2007, joining the likes of BenJarvus Green-Ellis and Darren McFadden. Not to say that Edmunds is guaranteed to be an NFL starter, but expect the Hokies to keep putting the ball in Edmunds’ hands, with Caleb and Coleman playing more specialized roles.

@MikePlatania


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september 6, 2013

FRESHMEN

FINDING THEIR FIRE

ZACH MARINER sports staff writer

Th irty freshmen traveled with the Virginia Tech football team to Atlanta for its season opener against Alabama last weekend, by far the most in recent memory. Over half of those that dressed saw action, including nine true freshmen – the most Tech’s put on the field in a game since 2002. Redshirt freshman Trey Edmunds stole the show offensively for the Hokies on Saturday, rushing for 132 yards on 20 carries, including a 77-yard run that accounted for Tech’s only touchdown of the night. “I think Trey is going to be a terrific back,” said Frank Beamer, head coach. “He showed speed. He’s a powerful guy. Each and every week I think he’ll get better and better.” Edmunds was the first Tech running back to rush for more than 100 yards in his debut since Shyrone Stith in 1996. “All I did was run behind my offensive line,” Edmunds said. “My offensive line made it easy for me tonight. I feel that we’re going to do some good things in the future.” The Danville, Va. native looked like an experienced back throughout the game, running north-to-south, keeping his pad level low and exploding through the holes his offensive line opened up

LINE: YOUNG UNIT HOLDS THEIR OWN from page one “I was very impressed. Jonathan stepped up, David stayed healthy,” Miller said. “I’m very proud of Caleb Farris and Laurence, there weren’t that many mistakes, but there were quite a few that we’re going to have to check out the film and adjust.” The Hokies protected their quarterback well, as the Crimson Tide rarely broke through the line and only sacked Thomas once during the game. “I thought we hung in there in pass protection,” said head coach Frank Beamer. “(Alabama was) bringing a lot of stuff. When they bring it, it’s good people coming at you. I thought we hung in there.” Alabama head coach Nick Saban, known for his desire for perfection, noted the Hokies gave his defensive line a run for their money. “(The Hokies offensive line) moved on us up front. We whiffed a few times because they have good quickness,” Saban said. “They outplayed us up front, if you want to know the truth.” Despite a promising performance by a new offensive line, there is always more to work on and build on. “I would say that my level of expectation is higher because it’s our second game,” Grimes said. “And we should have a lot of improvement from the fi rst game to the second game.”

@CTSportsTalk

for him. “We’ve been trying to tell everybody that Trey’s going to be a tough back to stop,” said quarterback Logan Thomas. Edmunds’ physicality as a runner and his speed in the open field — as well as the fact that Tech won’t face a defense nearly as stingy as Alabama’s for the rest of the season — gives the Hokies hope of competing in the ACC’s Coastal Division.

We’ve been trying to tell everybody that Trey’s going to be a tough back to stop.” Logan Thomas Quarterback

“You’ve heard me talk about Trey a bunch of times,” Beamer said. “The kid’s got a lot of ability, made out of the right stuff — a great family. I mean, he’s going to have a terrific future at Virginia Tech.” Cornerbacks Kendall Fuller and Brandon Facyson — as well as offensive tackle Jonathan McLaughlin — were among the true freshman that had an immediate impact on the field against the Crimson Tide. “I think (Fuller and Facyson) will get better and better and make us better on the back end. I was really encour-

aged by that,” Beamer said. “Kendall, he’s a bigâ€-time player and he likes the challenge of it all. I think he’s got a bright future, too.” The youngest Fuller brother finished with four tackles in his debut, playing out of both the nickelback and field corner positions. He and Facyson helped the rest of the secondary shut down explosive Alabama wide receivers Amari Cooper and Kenny Bell for most of the night. Crimson Tide quarterback A.J. McCarron — the country’s most efficient passer in 2012 — finished just 10-of23 passing for 110 yards, one touchdown and one interception. “I think we played very well,” Fuller said after the game. “We prepared and trained and worked hard throughout camp and throughout the preseason and it kind of showed right there in the game.” While it’s still entirely possible that Tech fans will see some growing pains out of the team’s young defensive backs throughout the year, it’s safe to say that the duo is more than capable of filling in for injured cornerback Antone Exum for the time being. The fi fth-year senior isn’t expected back until the start of the ACC play later this month, though he’s said he hopes to be back as early as Sept. 21 against Marshall. As of right now, there’s no reason to think Fuller and Facyson won’t con-

TREVOR WHITE / SPPS

Kendall Fuller (11) was one of several freshmen to make an immediate impact in their first game. tinue to receive meaningful reps even when Exum returns. McLaughlin, the first true freshman offensive tackle to ever start a season opener during Beamer’s tenure, more than held his own against Alabama’s front seven. “I thought Jon did a great job in terms of just being competitive and confident,” said offensive line coach Jeff Grimes. “He just has a natural competitive fire in him. He’s the kind of guy that I think is going to

play at his best when the pressure is on.” Like Edmunds, it’s not unreasonable to think that McLaughlin can continue to have success for the Hokies, considering the Crimson Tide are far and away the best defense Tech will face in 2013. Among the other freshmen that had success on Saturday were safety Chuck Clark (four tackles on special teams), defensive tackle

Nigel Williams (three tackles, two tackles for loss and one sack) and fullback Sam Rogers. All three will no doubt continue to see playing time for the Hokies throughout the season. “When you bring as many freshmen as we brought — a lot of them played, you know — there’s a lot of good players there,” Beamer said. “When we get them some experience, we’re going to be a good football team.”

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Friday, September 6, 2013

An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 109th year, issue 11 News, page 2

Features, page

Opinions, page 5

Sports, page 8

Classifieds, page 7

Reddit co-founder returns to Tech on collegiate tour KEVIN LOHR news staff writer

FILE 2013

Ohanian will be speaking and answering questions at Tech on Nov. 15.

After placing fifth in last year’s “Grow a Collegiate SubReddit” competition, Virginia Tech is welcoming Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian on his 100stop college tour. Ohanian will arrive Nov. 15, making his 18th stop of the trip and marking his second trip to Tech this year. The tour is technically a pro-

motion for Ohanian’s new book, titled “Without Their Permission,” but he also wants to raise awareness about the importance of the internet for this generation of college students. “What I want to promote is how our generation has a tremendous opportunity to do amazing things online. We’re all still figuring out just what kind of an impact the internet will have on the world --

Keep calm, gobble on LESLIE MCCREA | news reporter

let’s be the ones doing it,” said Ohanian in a blog statement he released on Sept. 5 outlining the collegiate tour. Reddit’s founder has organized book-signing and networking time after each event. Following that, students will determine where they can find Ohanian downtown. One of the most exciting aspects of the collegiate tour is the fact that Ohanian plans to bring a special guest with him

to each university he visits. “I’m bringing back an alumn of your school so I can interview him or her about all the awesome stuff she or he has done online since graduating,” says Ohanian. Ohanian graduated from the University of Virginia in 2005 with a B.A. in History and a B.S. in Commerce. see REDDIT / page two

Squad welcomes new spirit coach

BEN WEIDLICH / SPPS

Perren Young’s prepares for first football game with new skills. FILE 2012 / SPPS

T

he view from the top of the Ferris wheel on the Drillfield this Friday will include multiple performances and novelties, hundreds of booths lined along walking paths and thousands of students in search of new ways to get involved. The unmistakable mash up of personalities, activities and options at Gobblerfest each year is brought to campus by Virginia Tech Student Centers and Activities. This year, Gobblerfest is predicted to be larger than ever. This is the second year the event will be on the Drillfield, hosting the largest number of clubs at any one event on campus. The gathering will be held from 4-8pm this Friday, Sept. 6. “It’s kind of an exciting thing to be able to put an event like this on and to see the response we get from people that are participating,” said Steve Burrell, assistant director for Student Organizations for Student Centers and

Activities. “It’s a great opportunity for people in general to learn about what we have available on campus.” Over 400 student organizations have already registered to have booths of their own on the Drillfield, and more are expected to join that list. Organizations that did not pre-register may register at a walk-up booth beginning at 3:30 p.m. “This is a huge event that continues to grow and creates a lot of excitement on campus. It takes lot of people collaborating and doing a lot of things to
put on something this size and to ensure participant safety and enjoyment,” Burrell said. Despite the preconception that the event is focused towards new students, it is open and free to all students, faculty and staff. “I encourage everyone to get out and see what’s out there,” Burrell said. “Meet the people behind the booths and celebrate all that we offer in this

community, including the partnerships we have and the businesses that want to get on campus.” All different types of clubs, groups and organizations will be available to give information on membership, how they are active on campus and what they offer. Performances throughout the night include dance teams, acapella groups and others, followed by a spirit rally to get the crowd hyped for the first home game of the season. “Hopefully the clubs put some thought into what makes their organization unique and are able to describe what they bring to the fabric of campus by who they are,” added Burrell. “It’s a great opportunity to celebrate what it is to be a Hokie.”

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lifestyles staff writer Leading thousands of Hokie fans in cheers at the first home game of a traditionally football fueled university may seem daunting to most, but Virginia Tech’s new head spirit coach has accepted the challenge. With the help of her senior team members, Perren Young rushed into Blacksburg this summer and has lead a smooth transition for the cheer team as they

LIFESTYLES

OPINIONS Solely Swing Club intends to dance their way through Gobblerfest. Learn more about their efforts inside.

see CHEER / page eight

more info

While walking through the sea of booths and fliers tonight at Gobblerfest, you might be asked to dance, courtesy of the Solely Swing Club. Solely Swing is one of the largest collegiate swing dance clubs in the country and the group will be showing off its moves at Gobblerfest in hopes of garnering new members. Senior history major and former president of Solely Swing, Hannah Campbell, said the club invested in a large speaker last year specifically for their booth at Gobblerfest. They will be playing all types of music, ranging from classic swing dance music to more modern tunes like that of Michael Jackson. Members at the booth will be swing danc-

to check out our new app, visit our booth at Gobblerfest today from 4 - 8 p.m.

prepare for the fall season. Young has been particularly interested in focusing on the team’s strengths and preserving game day traditions with the kick-off of her new title. “I’m just looking to take everything they have, because they have so many great traditions and try to step them up and see what areas we can engage the crowd more to make the best game-day experience,” Young said.

Solely Swing dances to engage new members lifestyles reporter

a mobile app

Wondering about the weather for your tailgate? see page 2

KATRINA SPINNERWILSON

MADELEINE GORDON

Introducing the Collegiate Times’ newest virtual platform:

NEWS

Head spirit coach embraces new university, traditions while getting ready for fall season.

Day: Sept. 6 Time: 4 p.m. Where: Gobblerfest Who: Solely Swing Club ing throughout the night. “We have a lot of members who are just bold and outgoing, and happy to walk up to people, put fliers in their hands and get them to dance. They will say, ‘Here, let me show you this move,’” Campbell said. In fact, Campbell said she vividly remembers Solely Swing’s Gobblerfest booth from her freshman year because of how interactive it was. see INTERACTION / page seven

ONLINE How one exam can help graduate students appeal to employers.

For all these stories and more, check out our website at: www.collegiatetimes.com

CollegiateTimes

See some of the clubs you can find at Gobblerfest today. see page 2

@collegiatetimes see page 7

see page 3


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newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 6, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

Where to start?

weather watch

Below is a sneak preview of some of the clubs appearing on the Drillfield for Gobblerfest 2013.

Rollerderby Approx. 10 members, NRV Roller Girl practice 3 times a week, Open to all students, faculty, staff, and skill levels “Promoting the sport and introducing people and really trying to get people to be interested in this internationally growing phenomenon. Even if people are hesitant about playing, there are other ways people can get engaged such as watching our events or refereeing... We are a competitive organized, athletic team so we want to be taken seriously.” President: Stephanie Beeman, graduate student, biomedical engineering

NEWS

JAMES MORROW weather reporter

The heat and humidity hung around longer than expected this week. Rain stayed well to the South as highs in the mid-80s kept its hold on the region. All will come to an end this morning as the last of the humidity burns off in the form of patchy fog. A dry frontal boundary will push through Blacksburg this morning, drying us out and clearing the skies. Temperatures will be held in the mid70s. For the first time in quite a while, thunder and lightning will not be a threat at Gobblerfest Friday afternoon.

Temperatures will warm slightly on Saturday, setting the stage nicely for the Hokie’s home opener. Early-morning tailgaters will wake up to clear skies and chilly temperatures in the 60s. By game time, temperatures will raise into the upper 70s to near 80 by kickoff. A light breeze will keep air flowing throughout the stadium without affecting gameplay. A few clouds will linger in the sky, providing little relief from the sun during the game. Be sure to remember sunscreen! Sunshine will continue into early next week. Rain and storm chances return by Tuesday before we dry out again later in the week.

COURTESY OF ROLLER DERBY

@wxBONE

Political Science 20 members, 4 years old, meetings twice a month, At meetings the members debate and discuss current events, laws, etc., and host outside speakers “If you like debating politics and

the law, come on out. The purpose of the club is to engage in debates and further your knowledge on the subject.” former Vice President: Alex Zodikoff, senior political science major.

Parkour Club COURTESY OF PARKOUR CLUB

Approx. 30 members, 4-5 meetings per week, dependent on skill level open to every fitness level, age, etc. “Parkour is all about flips, but it’s also really not. It’s an art of movement where you can move however you like to move. So most of what we do is try to get people interested in learning about the progressing sport and how to do it with good safe habits.” President: Zach Nemec, senior, civil engineering major.

Reddit: Founder seeks more student interaction from page one

Shortly after, he co-founded the website Reddit.com with Steve Huffman, a fellow UVa. graduate. Reddit has quickly become one of the most trafficked websites in the past three to four years. Bearing the slogan “the front page of the internet,” the site is mainly a social news and entertainment website. Users of the site can register to submit content in the form of links or text posts. The content is regulated by users by “upvoting” and “downvoting” posts, the idea behind the system being to keep content fresh. Users can also engage in dialogue with other users on every submitted post to the site, which is also regulated through the upvoting and downvoting system. What makes Reddit unique is that it has the potential to reach a wide audience through the division of the site into

different subReddits, which can range in theme from politics, atheism, pictures, or news. Virginia Tech has its own subReddit where current students and alumni can share content and dialogue specific to the university. Ohanian is looking to involve his student audience at each school as much as possible. In his blog, he states that before he stops at each university, he will create a post on their college’s subReddit asking the students what sorts of questions they would like him to answer. He expects his talks to function in typical AMA (Ask Me Anything) fashion, AMAs being one of the most trafficked subReddit functions on the site where celebrities and other well-known people are featured answering users’ posted questions.

@kmlohr91

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

status

Mar. 29

12:00 PM

Larceny of an i-Pad and cover

Newman Library

Cleared by Arrest

v

5:54 PM - 6:00 PM

Counterfeit currency

University Bookstore

Active


sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 6, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

3

MAZIAR FAHANDEZH / COLLEGIATE TIMES

SPORTS

Spoiled fans lead to end of streak A

quintessential moment in a Hokie’s experience is being in Lane Stadium with Enter Sandman blasting through the sound system while jumping up and down with 66,232 of your closest friends. On Saturday, that experience will be gone, as a 93 game sellout streak spanning 15 years will come to an end. Hokie fans take pride in their reputation for having one of the best home field advantages in the nation. In head coach Frank Beamer’s 25 years at Virginia Tech, the Hokies have won 137 games at home, with just 33 losses and one tie. Since joining the ACC, Virginia Tech has gone 51-8 at home, with just a single loss coming to an out-of-conference opponent. The Hokies

are one of the most successful teams in the country when at home, and a large part of that is because of the fans. The same fans that after one 7-6 season have allowed that sellout streak to end. Hokie fans have become spoiled by the success under Beamer, and now, at the slightest sign of trouble, have abandoned their team. Tech has earned the right to go to 20 straight bowl games, the third longest active streak in the nation. In addition, Tech has won eight conference championships in its history; five of them have come under Beamer and four in the last decade. Before Beamer became head coach, the Hokies had an all-time .586 winning percentage. Under Beamer, the Hokies have raised that win-

ning percentage by 23 points to .609, giving them the 33rd highest winning percentage in the country. The second winningest coach in Tech’s history, behind Beamer — in both total wins and winning percentage — is his predecessor, Bill Dooley. Under Dooley the Hokies never won 10 or more games in a season, which is the standard that Beamer’s teams have made the norm in Blacksburg. By any metric, the last two decades have brought unprecedented success to the Virginia Tech football team. This success has spoiled fans that have begun to turn their nose up at accomplishments that nearly any other fan base would be thrilled with. While alumni and students will point the finger at each

other, both groups are to blame for the lackluster support. For the second year in a row, Virginia Tech was forced to open up season ticket sales to the general public after Hokie Club members did not purchase their full allotment. For the students, season tickets were offered to freshmen for the first time in recent memory. Many have pointed to the disappointment of the 2012 campaign as the reason for the decreased turnout, but this isn’t the first time the Hokies have had a disappointing season during their streak. In 2001, the Hokies suffered a letdown after the magnificent Michael Vicks left, finishing 8-4. Before the 2002 season, Tech added 11,120 seats in the south end zone.

Even with the letdown and 11,000 new seats to fill, the sellout streak continued. In 2004, the Hokies were coming off of three straight seasons of at least four losses and were unranked to start the season, far more adverse conditions than in 2013. Hokie fans still showed up to support their team and were rewarded with an ACC Championship and Sugar Bowl berth. Others point to uninspiring opponents and the lack of a Thursday night home game. However, fans shouldn’t need to be enticed by shiny opponents or primetime games to support their team. Their football team should be enough of an attraction. Fans have pinned their own complacency on the staff, but that just doesn’t sell. In the

last three seasons the Hokies have made wholesale changes to the offensive staff. There is no excuse. The blame for the streak ending lies squarely at the feet of Hokies fans; the same fans that ensured that Virginia Tech was the only school in the ACC to fill their stadium to capacity in 2011 and 2012; the same fans that helped the Hokies earn a Sugar Bowl berth in 2011 because of their reputation of travelling well. These fans have decided that a single disappointing season is enough for them to quit on the Hokies. They should be ashamed of themselves. JAMES O’HARA - contributing sports reporter - computer science - @nextyeardc


4

newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 6, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

NEWS

Parking on Game Day 18

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Lane Stadium 2

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9 17 Contributer Lots: On Friday after 5:00 PM, all students must move their vehicles out of these lots by 10:00 PM. Violators will be towed. Tailgaters must have a valid pass

1. Cassell Coliseum 2. Stadium 3. Maintenance Lot 4. Outdoor Track/Softball 5. Chicken Hill 6. Health & Safety

7. Vet School 8. Litton Reaves 9. Litton Reaves Overflow 10. Engel 11. Price hall 12. Hahn

13. Solitude 14. Derring 15. I Lot/Cage 16. Duck Pond Overflow 17. Smithfield Road 18. Media Building

Public Lots: These lots are open to all tailgaters. Those without a pass may purchase a spot in the public lot for $ 15. Closed: These lots are closed to all traffic.


OPINIONS

opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 6, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

5

The Collegiate Times is an independent studentrun newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Priscilla Alvarez Managing Editor: Danielle Buynak Art Director: Kevin Dickel Design Editors: Brad Klodowski, Andrea Ledesma Public Editor: Andrew Kulak Web Editor: James O’Hara Multimedia Editor: Nick Smirniotopoulos News Editors: Cameron Austin, Dean Seal News Reporters: Melissa Draudt, Leslie McCrea News Staff Writers: Kelly Cline, Josh Higgins, Matt Minor Features Editor: Chelsea Giles Features Reporters: Madeline Gordon, Jessica Groves Opinions Editors: David Levitt, Shareth Reddy Sports Editors: Jacob Emert, Alex Koma Sports Media Manager: Mike Platania Assistant Photo Editor: Ben Wiedlich Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: James Dean Seal Circulation Manager: Keith Bardsley

MCT CAMPUS

New test provides students with better options S tudents taking their education to the next step after they finish their undergraduate program have no shortage of options to choose from. Looking at law school? Take the LSAT. Th inking about medical school? Try the MCAT. Pursuing an MBA? Graduate programs recommend the GMAT. Most other graduate programs accept GRE scores when considering admissions. But what are your options when you’re looking to jump right into the work force upon graduation? Sure, GRE covers a broad range of skills and is considered the de facto collegiate standardized test. But it can cost test takers up to $200. Students may find that the new kid on the block, the Collegiate Learning Assessment Plus (CLA+), is the better option, one that students should be more exposed to. The CLA+ was designed with employers in mind as a standard-

ized examination that assesses a graduating student’s critical thinking skills. A study by Hart Research Associates found that 93 percent of employers agreed that a candidate’s ability to think critically, communicate clearly and solve problems is more important than their undergraduate major. Surprise, the CLA+ tests and assesses those skills. More than 75 percent of employers surveyed wanted colleges to place more emphasis on skills like critical thinking and applied knowledge in real-world settings. It’s not that the CLA+ will significantly alter a curriculum in say, the communications program at Virginia Tech. It can, however, provide a benchmark for how jobready students are after receiving their degree, and provide insight on areas the department can improve. Tech already does a version of this with the Senior Exit Survey,

asking graduating students questions about their experience in their programs and considering the results to make changes. In comparison, offering the CLA+ can achieve similar results while giving students tangible information about their skillsets that can be passed on to employers. Exam scores shared with employers could end up being critical to a company’s selection process. When they are looking at virtually identical candidates the only difference between them may well be the CLA+. At $35, the new exam is a much cheaper alternative to the GRE and other collegiate exams, while still providing useful feedback. Considering that a wide range of career opportunities exist without the need for graduate level study, and that many graduates take positions in fields only scarcely related to their field of study, the CLA+ would be an excellent step toward proving to employers that

DEA should respect states’ laws The Justice Department made headlines last week when it announced a new federal policy on marijuana. It should come as welcome news to the majority of Americans who, according to an April Pew Research Center poll, believe marijuana should be made legal for adults. The policy memo issued to U.S. attorneys across the nation says that the federal government will not interfere with state laws allowing the medical or adult use of marijuana, as long as those states follow certain guidelines in their regulation of the product. This means that people in Colorado and Washington state, where voters passed such laws in November, will be able to start selling marijuana to people ages 21 and older next year. The feds' policy doesn't change marijuana's classification as an illegal drug, but marijuana policy reformers agree with the principles in it. The Justice Department will now concern itself with certain violations of state laws - eight specific priorities for federal prosecution. Among them are sales to minors and the movement of marijuana across state lines. But actions speak louder than words. Given President Obama's flip-flops on marijuana policy, people have reason to be skeptical. For example, Obama informed me at a fundraising reception in 2004 that he thought medical marijuana should be legal; and in 2008, candidate Obama told an Oregon newspaper that if elected president, he would end the Drug Enforcement Administration's raids on medical

marijuana clinics. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. said the same thing on national television in 2009, and the deputy attorney general issued a memo to that effect later that year. But in 2011, the house of cards fell. The new deputy attorney general, James Cole, issued a watereddown memo stating that the federal government would not go after individual marijuana users but that marijuana businesses were legitimate targets for prosecution. The Cole memo was the equivalent of no policy at all, since the federal government goes after very few individual marijuana users. In 2012, it sentenced only 83 marijuana-possession offenders to probation or prison, according to the U.S. Sentencing Commission. Meanwhile, the DEA raided more medical marijuana providers during Obama's first term in office than it did during the eight years under President George W. Bush. So what can we learn from the Obama administration's words and actions? The key lesson is to write statelevel marijuana laws correctly. There have been hundreds of outrageous DEA raids on medical marijuana clinics in California, Montana and Washington state, but these three states' laws don't explicitly authorize the clinics in the first place. (These states simply authorize patients and caregivers to grow their own.) In contrast, there have been zero DEA raids on clinics in Arizona, Colorado, Maine, New Jersey, New Mexico, Rhode Island and Vermont. In these states, plus the District of

Columbia, there has been a clear licensing process for medical marijuana businesses. While drafting the successful 2012 Colorado ballot initiative, we intentionally modeled the system of adult marijuana stores on the state's existing system of medical marijuana stores. Given the Obama administration's tacit acceptance of the latter, it is fair to expect it will be accepting of the former. The Justice Department's announcement comes at a time when states are increasingly rejecting federal law, which classifies marijuana more restrictively than cocaine, morphine and methamphetamine. Since July, New Hampshire and Illinois enacted laws that made them the 19th and the 20th states (plus D.C.) to legalize medical marijuana. And since June, Nevada and Oregon have legalized the sale of medical marijuana through stores, an expansion of previous laws allowing patients and caregivers to grow their own. The Justice Department announcement is also good news for people who don't necessarily support marijuana legalization but support reining in the federal government. According to a Gallup survey released in December, 64 percent of respondents said that the federal government should not interfere in the implementation of state measures that make marijuana legal for adults. It appears they got their wish. - mcclatchy newspapers

a candidate can handle a workload that they aren’t familiar with. Yes, it may be daunting to dive into yet another standardized test that a student hadn’t planned on taking in the first place. The benefits outweigh the doubts by a heft y margin however, simply by giving that student the opportunity to be a more attractive choice to an employer. With some universities already on board (University of Texas and Marshall University among others), Tech and its students would do well to emphasize and embrace the CLA+, especially if graduate school isn’t in a student’s future. The exam can help improve programs, and help a recent graduate get a job. ERIC JONES - regular columnist - senior - psychology

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Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com.

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Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2013. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


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September 6, 2013

☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯

DO YOU PICK UP THE CT EVERYDAY?

☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯☯

Today’s Birthday Horoscope: Today’s Birthday (09/06/13). Do what makes you happy this year. Fun with people you love feeds you to continue leveling up. Networking provides opportunities; share ideas and skills, and tap into group resources. Accept new responsibility in a bigger game to grow it. Balance with delicious downtime. Connect profoundly.

Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham Quote of the Day

The greater the obstacle, the more glory in overcoming it.

Help Wanted

- Moliere

HOOPTIE RIDE The Hooptie Ride is currently hiring drivers with good driving records. Drivers must be at least 23 years old. Earn $ while having fun! Call Ken @ 540-9985093 hooptieride@verizon.net

Send us your quote and see it here! creative.services@collegemedia.com

xkcd by Randal Munroe

59 Rye fungus 60 A very long time 61 Lobe adornment 62 Slasher’s title hangout, in film: Abbr. 63 Schools of whales 64 Pops the question 65 H.S. junior’s exam

Week of September 3 through 6

By Nancy Salomon

ACROSS 1 Kid’s summer spot 5 Ain’t it the truth 9 Melville’s Billy 13 Craft seen at many a 1-Across 14 Banned apple treatment 15 Current about 16 “Family Matters” nerd 17 __ dry eye in the house 18 Hindu music style 19 Outdo other guests seeking a party drink? 22 Hotel annex?

Hot Songs Go Outside - Cults Bombay - El Guincho Doses and Mimosas - Cherub Heartbeats - The Knife Cathode Ray - Blonde Summer

9/6/13 23 Carson’s latenight predecessor 24 Thurmond who was a senator for 47 years 26 Fancy neckwear 29 Bay Area airport letters 31 Lux. locale 32 Pitcher of milk? 34 Size up 36 Order one so-so ice cream drink? 39 Throw in the direction of

40 __ one’s game: performing below par 41 Bribe 42 Slice of history 44 Hardly silk purse material, in an idiom 48 Building brick 50 Bearing 52 Unnamed degree 53 Activate a dispenser for a fruit drink? 57 Civil rights icon Parks 58 “You bet, señora!”

DOWN 1 Job, and then some 2 Asian capital on a peninsula 3 Champagne brand 4 Assail (with), as snowballs 5 Classic film with dancing hippos 6 Hawaiian hi or bye 7 Works a wedding 8 Catch 9 Too well-done 10 Where not to be paddleless? 11 Whence a front yard growl 12 It may be used to ID a perp 13 Like dice, shapewise 20 Chooses 21 G.I. entertainment 25 Robinson of song 27 November honorees 28 Support group for kids of substance abusers 30 Scam that’s “pulled”

33 Hamburger’s article 35 Without 36 All set 37 Championed, as a cause 38 Fruit used as a vitamin C supplement 39 Airport safety org. 43 Prenatal tests, for short 45 Baffling problem

46 Not marked up 47 Classic role for Clark 49 Military bigwigs 51 “Everything’s fine” 54 Worker protection agcy. 55 Cherokee maker 56 www addresses 57 50 Cent’s genre

Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

9/5/13

WORDSEARCH: Fictional Places Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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WORD BANK 1 Camelot 2 Gotham City 3 Narnia 4 Gallifrey 5 Hogwarts 6 Alagaesia 7 Middle Earth 8 Neverland 9 Shangri La 10 Discworld 11 Oz 12 Panem 13 Wonderland 14 Terabithia 15 Atlantis 16 Westeros

Aries (March 21-April 19) Write up what you’ve learned. You’re especially charming, and the words just low. Negotiate your way through some minor adjustments. Make an excellent purchase now. Share results.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Enjoy using your skills. Study new developments, and immerse yourself in research. Extensive discussion could be required. Your attention and focus are heightened marvelously.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Listen carefully. Get the facts for a brilliant insight. Sell your new attitude. This week is good for working. Pro it from meticulous service. You’re building something cool. It could get intense. Do the paperwork.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) This phase could be potentially prosperous. Ask and your questions get answered. Make a brilliant discovery. Apply your Midas touch to grow your accounts. Start your shopping list. Talk is cheap (and rewarding).

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Follow your yellow brick road. Work de initely takes priority. Come up with a plan. Make a shrewd deal. Anticipate changes. Talk it over. Go out to dinner to celebrate.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) Reply to important communications. You’re lucky in love. You’ll have lots of emotional support. Start a new story, including your heart’s desire. Come up with creative and unusual ideas.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) A meaningful conversation opens new possibilities. Listen carefully. As you gain strength, you also gain options. Memories can entice, but don’t get stuck in the past. No more procrastination. Children require attention. Prepare to launch.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You’re free to express yourself at home, but wider pastures tempt. Investigate possibilities, or get out and travel. Catch a spark. You’ll ind what you seek. Make long-range plans. Dream big.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Write down your amazing ideas. It’s a good time for treasure hunting, which could inspire a frenzy of cleaning up old messes. Reduce clutter. Keep good records. You win the prize.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) The coast is clear. That’s helpful, if you’re working out a compromise. Thoroughly check the data. Discuss shared inances. Opportunity knocks. Consider an investment in your own education.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) Attend to family matters. Time to clean up a mess. Quick thinking is required. Have faith. Issue a press release. Stay home if you need. Share your plans, and accept support.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) This phase could get emotional. Arrive at an important meeting a few minutes early. Check with family before making a date. Your team supports your dreams. Your friends are really there for you.

You should. ☺ Available Tuesday through Friday. ☺


LIFESTYLES

he she

lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

SAID

He said: Finish senior year right, start jumping The first home football game is always exciting – there’s just so much anticipation. We’ve been training all summer for this game and the opportunity to play in front of a, hopefully, packed house. We’ve got a great team this year and we’re matched up against #22 Syracuse. Oh wait … was I supposed to be talking about the first American football game? I was talking about the real futbol – the beautiful game that I’ve played since I was three years old. I guess American football can be pretty exciting too, though. This year, the first home game means the last home game for me and the last time to start jumping. This is my senior year and, unless I miraculously pull a Van Wilder and stay for another three or four years, I won’t be returning to Blacksburg next fall. Knowing that I will be leaving the Burg so soon makes this game more important than it usually is. Somewhere amid all the hype and excitement I forgot to sign up for the lottery last weekend (whoops), but luckily for me this is the first time since 1998 that the game wasn’t sold out. So yesterday morning I snagged a free student ticket from Cassell Coliseum, which saved me the embarrassment of being the bum outside the stadium pleading for a ticket. The first game is an opportunity to put all that pre-season hype to the test. Is the recruiting class really all it’s cracked up to be? How will the new coaching staff fair in the intense game time environment? How far will we make it this year? Let’s face it, we always end up at the Chick-fil-A Bowl or the Orange Bowl anyways.

September 6, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

The first game is often less than it’s cracked up to be, but I think it’s always been more about the hype than the actual game. Most of the teams we play we should blow out anyway (except when we played JMU my freshman year, but let’s not talk about that – actually, let’s

The first game is an opportunity to put all that pre-season hype to the test.”

never mention it again). It’s not going to be that gripping match we’ll see later in the season. It’s probably not going to be that interesting at all to be honest. Let’s be real: My 5-8’’, 150 pound friend from Western Carolina almost walked onto the team. Granted, he’s one of the most athletic guys I know, but it’s evident that this game is not about the competition itself. It’s about gathering the Hokie Nation and getting pumped about the season as a whole and all that it entails. It’s about going to the first tailgate, jumping to Enter Sandman for the first time in seven or eight months and getting rowdy in the stands even though we’re winning 20-0. Start getting rowdy, friends; it all starts tomorrow. NICK SMIRNIOTOPOULOS - multimedia editor - communication major - senior - @nick_smirni

What does the first home game mean to you?

She said: Fans, friends embody Tech football In my four years of high school, our football team won two games – and one of them was a forfeit because the other team cheated. Suffice to say, I didn’t exactly catch the football fever. Then I came to Virginia Tech, with little knowledge of football and even less interest. I didn’t go to a game until halfway through the season of my freshman year when I happened to get a ticket from a friend. As far as introductions go, it was pretty awful: I was woefully unprepared for the freezing wind up in the stands. It was raining. And we lost. And yet, I loved it. When I say I have little knowledge of the game of football, I’m not modestly underselling myself. I genuinely know next to nothing about it. In fact, saying that I have a “little” knowledge might actually be a bit too generous.

And there’s no greater thrill than screaming ‘Let’s Go! Hokies!’ with thousands of what feels like your closest friends.”

For instance, do I have any idea why this particular play is apparently so key? Not at all. But that doesn’t stop me from shaking my key ring with all the force I can muster. I couldn’t tell you what a tight end does, I only just learned what the phrase “Beamer Ball” means (still don’t know what a special team is though) and the referees might as

well be speaking gibberish for all that I can understand them. But when Enter Sandman plays and I’m jumping with 60,000 plus of my fellow Hokies, my football knowledge or, impressive lack thereof, is immaterial, because the best part of Hokie football isn’t memorizing stats or playbooks. The rush of a whole stadium jumping, or the wild camaraderie of tailgating, or the silliness of trying to do the Hokie Pokie in those cramped student stands is what makes it the absolute best. Please excuse my use of the most clichéd of buzzwords here, but football at Tech is the unmatchable because of one thing - community. It might sound trite, considering how frequently the word gets tossed around in reference to our amazing school, but this is one instance where it’s a cliché because it’s true. Nothing can compare to huddling in the north end zone with your friends in a valiant, but failing effort to stay warm in the Blacksburg fall. And there’s no greater thrill than screaming “Let’s Go! Hokies!” with thousands of what feels like your closest friends. Maybe I genuinely believe this because I’m a sap or maybe I’ve just gone and drank the Hokie KoolAid, but either way, I’ve been counting down the days to the first home game of the season. And you can bet that come kickoff, I’ll be in the north end zone getting a bit rowdy and making obvious my complete incomprehension of most football rules. Let’s go, Hokies. KATIE WHITE - lifestyles staff writer - history major - senior

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Interaction: Students to dance at Gobblerfest from page one

She still has the original flier from that day pinned on a bulletin board in her room. “I just remember everyone being really friendly from the get-go and that’s what caught my attention,” Campbell said. “Everyone is just so welcoming and that’s what really sealed the deal for me.” Current club president and engineering major, Elizabeth Mack, said the reason they show off their moves rather than just handing out fliers is for the wow factor. Mack said that their goal is not only to recruit new members, but to get anybody and everybody to come to Solely Swing’s first dance of the year this Saturday. Solely Swing has monthly Saturday night dances in Squires Student Center’s Old Dominion Ballroom and holds a lesson followed by a dance every Friday night at the Blacksburg YMCA. They also have live bands at their dances several times throughout the year, Mack said. This year’s current lineup includes bands like the Boilermaker Jazz Band, Mint Julep and Solomon Douglas. “Because we’re the biggest active, collegiate (swing dance) club, we sometimes have bands that ask us if they can come and play for us,” Mack said. In addition to their weekly and monthly dances, the club also hosts five-week lessons twice a semester, educating their members on particular swing dances like the Lindy Hop and the Charleston. Campbell and Mack said that students can get a preview of these dance moves at their Gobblerfest booth. They will be practicing moves like spins, underarm turns and pretzels. Both Campbell and Mack said the club isn’t just about learning how to dance, but that it’s also about having fun. “We generally have about 75-100 people coming to our dances and I’ve never heard of someone who didn’t have a good time (at one of our events),” Mack said. In addition to having a good time, being involved with Solely Swing is also a great way to get exercise. Campbell said that not only did she keep the freshman 15 off but that she also lost almost 30 pounds during her freshman year. If that’s not enough, joining the club is also a great way to meet potential dates. Mack and Campbell said that for the ladies it’s a great way to meet boys, and not just any boys but boys who can dance. No dance experience is necessary and club members don’t need to have a partner. Campbell and Mack said it’s just a way to have a great time with equally great people. “It rivals Disney World as the happiest place on Earth,” Mack said. Campbell agrees and said that she has truly found her family at Solely Swing thanks to stopping by their booth four years ago today. “We’re a very social and light-hearted group,” Campbell said. “We just like to get together, have a good time and dance.”

@maddi757


8 Cheer: Stunts take new heights

lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 6, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

from page one

Although the teams have only practiced less than a month under Young’s leadership, she said their determined attitudes have been helpful in her transition. “I’m not used to having to move quite as fast,” Young said. “I have a lot of upperclassmen and a lot of institutional knowledge by having a lot of returners on the squad.” One of the returning leaders is Zack Fry, a senior sociology major, who said the seniors have already been set to work with this switch. “The seniors were already prepared for this,” Fry said. “After Ricky left in the fall, the seniors stepped up with the assistant coach and worked as a unit. We know when to work and how to get everything done.” This can-do attitude is balanced with light-heartedness amongst the team leaders, an aspect they immediately saw in Young at the end of try-outs when she asked the team to teach her the Hokie Pokie. This also showed her willingness to preserve school traditions and previous ways of running the team even though she is coming in with her own coaching style, Fry said.

This is a very traditional school with an incredible fan base.” Perren Young Spirit squad head coach

“My main goal really coming in as late as I am is to learn as much about Virginia Tech traditions,” Young said. “This is a very traditional school with an incredible fan base.” Young is no newbie to loyal fans, however. Even though the new coach had done gymnastics in her hometown, Memphis, Tenn. since the age of six and tumbled for an all-star squad in high school, it wasn’t until 2006 when she would hold her first pair of pompoms on the sidelines of the University

LIFESTYLES

TECH SEX You had a one-night stand. Now what?

BEN WEIDLICH/ SPPS

The team practices for six days a week, perfecting their routine. of Mississippi, more famously known as Ole Miss. “The competition aspect was nothing new to me, but the actual sideline and on-thefield Southeastern Conference game was definitely exciting,” Young said. In her fift h year of college, with only one semester left on the squad, her coaches asked if she would be interested in joining the staff. “I thought it was a great opportunity to transition out of being on the team while I was still in school,” Young said. “I decided to stick around and increase my skill set and knowledge in hopes that maybe something like Virginia Tech would happen.” Although Ole Miss later offered her a head coach position, Young chose the position at Tech to branch out of the SEC and begin a new experience. Young arrived at Tech on July 10, hosted tryouts July 26 and coached the first practice Aug. 18. The willing collaboration between Young and the team has resulted in no dismantling

of favored routines but instead an addition of more tumbling and stunts, which is Young’s specialty and a dynamic she is expanding the team’s experience with. “We’re not changing our sidelines, because we have strong band dances, but we are learning new stunts and pyramids,” Fry said. “We will be doing two new pyramids at the game that we have just worked on.” Work is a humble word choice for the team’s routines in preparation for the upcoming games, however. Among the responsibilities are the direction of the cheer squad, dance team, mascots and rigorous training six days a week. Fry is confident in the team to make a hit for the opener this weekend and for the games beyond, saying that while they will continue to focus on transitioning smoothly, they also plan to branch out with the help of their new coach.

One-night stand – Hooking up with someone for one night of sex with no strings attached and hoping to never see them again. That awkward moment when you wake up in a stranger’s bed after a night on the town. One-night stands are a part of the college hook-up culture. Most people consider a one-night stand to typically involve two people who don’t know each other having sexual relations. What most people have come to realize in their college experience, however, is that one-night stands also involve years of awkward moments when you run into the other person on campus, or worse, in the real world. For the most part though, one-night stands are experiences that people tend to put in their past and draw some wisdom from. What I want to clarify is that some of these jaunts do not end as well as others. I think it’s important to start off the semester discussing how to go about having safe one-night stands, should the opportunity present itself to you, and knowing the risks and rewards associated with having casual sex. Advice If you know you are going home with someone and you are extremely intoxicated, skip that last rail. Be sober enough to know what you’re doing, and make the right choices. If you see someone in the bar that you want to get naked with, don’t cling to him or her all night. That’s annoying, and your chances of going home with them are slim to none. Don’t leave the second the deed is done but certainly do not overstay your welcome. Feel it out. Ask for numbers if they seem interested. Use a freakin’ condom. But seriously, it is crucial that you protect yourself and your partner. Because many of these escapades begin with a few too many drinks, you should be sure that you are in the habit of using protection to greatly reduce your risk of getting an STD. When you are at the bar, I sincerely doubt that your pre-sexytime discussion

is about any possible sexually transmitted diseases either of you may have. This means that the only way to protect yourself from unwanted pregnancy and/or STDs is a condom. Wrap it up before you tap it up, people. But OK, let’s say you didn’t use protection. What now? You should be aware of the resources that campus has to offer. Virginia Tech has done an incredible job making protecting yourself easy and accessible. For example, Schiffert Health Center offers a variety of tests that can help you detect any sexually transmitted diseases early on. If you’re concerned about pregnancy, you should visit Schiffert or your local pharmacy. Plan B, also known as the morning-after pill is an option that can prevent unwanted pregnancy when your birth control fails. In addition, you can also go to Schiffert and receive 25 spermicidal condoms for only $5. While I completely condone experimentation and fun, I hope that you will use the resources Tech has to offer when necessary. Think about it before you leave with someone, ask a friend if you’re making a smart choice and then be safe when you’re getting down and dirty. With only a few guidelines to follow, you could make your next one-night stand something you and your friends laugh about for years.

meet the writer TECH SEX is a brand new, weekly column about sex on Virginia Tech’s campus, written by Abby Broughton. Broughton, a junior marketing major, will eventually be pursuing a Ph.D. in sex therapy, in the hopes to make a career out of sex therapy. If you have any questions or comments, email her at ambrough@vt.edu

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Friday, September 6, 2013 Print Edition