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june 6, 2013

what’s inside News .............2 Lifestyles .......3 0pinions ........5 Sports ...........4

109th year blacksburg, va.

Mad Dog boutique Sig Ep house faces will remain open uncertain future BY CARLA CRAFT | lifestyles editor

RYAN SUTHERLAND / SPPS

The letters still remain on the Sigma Phi Epsilon house in oak lane.

Long line of student conduct violations leads up to chapter’s withdrawal and loss of new house. KELLY CLINE news editor BRAD KLODOWSKI / SPPS

Dorothy Egger, owner of Mad Dog women’s clothing boutique, shows off her new merchandise.

After announcing that her store would close in May, owner Dorothy Egger decides to keep Mad Dog open after strong customer reactions. Downtown Blacksburg women’s boutique, Mad Dog, will be staying open — despite announcing that it would be closing its doors in May. Virginia Tech alumna and Mad Dog owner Dorothy Egger has been working in the retail business for 31 years. She announced in the end of April that she would be closing her trendy, colorful store on May 16, 2013, after owning the business for ten years. “Thirty-one years of doing something is quite a while,” Egger said. The store held sales in the beginning of May, and the merchandise was discounted further every other day as it neared the presumed closing date. Despite trying to close in a little over

two weeks, Egger brought in new shipments almost as often as she cut prices. According to Egger, loyal Mad Dog customers came out to the store in droves begging her not to close her doors. Her Facebook followers also took to the Internet to express their wishes. As May 16 came and went, the closing sale continued and the shipments were still coming in. On June 4, Egger announced to Facebook and in the store’s window that Mad Dog would not in fact be closing, but would stay open. “It was my customers — my customers who asked me, begged me, came in here and cried (who changed my mind),” she said. “It’s nice to know

that you’re appreciated and liked that much.” Many of Mad Dog’s loyal customers have expressed their joy at the news through the store’s Facebook page, however, that’s not the only place people were celebrating. “People were cheering outside when they saw the sign in front of the store,” Egger said. “(Mad Dog) is really convenient for me, because I don’t have a car, so I just go there mainly to shop for dresses for formal events,” said Jane Harlow, a sophomore Theater Arts major. ”They are the only store in Downtown Blacksburg with stuff for people my age that isn’t ridiculously expensive.” see BOUTIQUE / page three

With the university’s support, national administrators of the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity recently withdrew their chapter from Virginia Tech due to general misconduct and underperformance from its members, aft er thirty five undergraduate members lived in their new $5,000,000 house for just one semester. The decision to build the house was made several years ago when Tech announced its Phase IV building project for the Oak Lane community. The new project aimed to further the work of the former development phases, creating safer structures and a community that would support learning and brotherhood. Sigma Phi Epsilon had been under alumni and national speculation since being placed under an Alumni Advisory Council in December 2008 for several incidents of poor conduct,— many which involved alcohol abuse and violence. In one instance, according

to the official Sig Ep Chapter History and Summary of Support, an intoxicated brother was involved in an argument at his apartment complex with a non-member and the non-member’s mother. The argument culminated with the brother assaulting the non-member with a broken beer bottle, and infl icting fi ft y-five stitches on the victim’s face. Another member “suckerpunched” a non-member at a Sig Ep party, subsequently hospitalizing the non-member, for which the member received five months of social probation. There were also reports of members illegally possessing and distributing drugs, making inappropriate racial statements during football games and providing alcohol to underage members of the community. Many reports were also made concerning conduct violations involving hazing. In one particular case, a new member was forced to buy gas and food for his brothers to the point that his parents cancelled his credit card.

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see HOUSE / page two


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NEWS

collegiatetimes.com

June 6, 2013

House: Facility left empty after chapter withdrawal from page one

The same member was also made to drink vodka until he vomited just before he went home for Thanksgiving, and was forced to park in a noparking zone by an older member and then pay the ticket. The new member eventually saw a doctor because he was not eating or sleeping to the point that it was affecting his health. Despite a string of behavioral incidents, Sig Ep was the first national fraternity to take Tech up on its new development series. Both fraternity alumni and the university provided funding for the $5,000,000 mansion — which is equipped with a Hokie stone fireplace, a conference room, thirtytwo beds and an elevator. The payment for the house was a one-third/ two-thirds agreement between the two parties. Fraternity alumni pledged to cover one-third of the cost, while the university covered the other twothirds. “Housing construction projects are ultimately paid for over time by your room and board fee,” said Mark Owczarski, a member of University Relations. “We have about 9,000 students who live in university housing. They pay a room fee for the room that they receive. That money obviously goes into an account to help maintain those buildings, furnish the buildings, cool the buildings, provide electricity, as well as for construction and renovation. That’s how the university ultimately pays [for] those projects.” According to the same Sig Ep Chapter History and Summary of Support, dur-

ing the 2012 Fall semester, the semester before the brothers moved into the new house, the fraternity was found guilty of several accounts of hazing and other conduct violations. Tech administrators informed Sig Ep nationals that they planned to enact a conduct process which would likely lead to the chapter’s loss of recognition at the university. In anticipation of the new house, headquarters and alumni-volunteers opted to implement plan of action for the fraternity that would help hold brothers to standards of the organization, create alcohol-free social programming and effectively improve conduct by the end of the 2013 spring semester. At the end of their probationary semester, though, fraternity performance had not improved enough to merit the chapter’s continuation at the university. S e ver a l i nc ident s occurred during the semester, including sixteen members’ citations for student violations such as underage consumption, public intoxication, theft, and vandalism. In that time, two of the members received two citations each, resulting in an overall total of eighteen citations. Further, only twenty members showed up for the ribbon-cutting and house dedication ceremonies, disappointing alumni expectations. The chapter also continued to fail to meet alcohol regulations and issued disciplinary actions of little to no consequence for members’ student and chapter conduct violations. After several investigations of chapter conduct, suspend operations notic-

es and plans for members’ reform, the chapter’s charter was effectively withdrawn from Tech at the end of the 2013 spring semester, but not before the brothers could do damage to the house. “There were multiple incidents of damage to the new chapter house, including defacing columns, damaged/broken doors, damaged donor plaques, urination on a door by an intoxicated member and members attempting to break into a janitor’s closet,” stated the official Chapter History and Summary of Support. “For the last two years, fraternity staff members and local volunteers have been working to effect change, with little response from the undergraduate members,” said Brian C. Warren Jr., Executive Director of the fraternity, in an official statement concerning the withdrawal of the chapter. “When the cultural issues within a chapter conflict with our values and are too deeply rooted to change, charter withdrawal is the only option.” In the future, the university plans to utilize the house as another on-campus living, learning site, and there are already some ideas about how exactly the structure will meet this objective in the 2013 fall semester. “Housing at the university is always at capacity or slightly above capacity, so those 32 beds will be utilized by somebody,” Owczarski said. “They’re going to talk to students during orientation to see whether or not there is interest in a community they may propose, and by fall there will be 32 Virginia Tech students living in that house.”


watch:

Now You See Me

3

Boutique: Store stays open collegiatetimes.com

New magician film fails to mystify audiences

June 6, 2013

BRAD KLODOWSKI / SPPS

Mad Dog owner Dorothy Egger poses with her dog, Molly. Egger is proud to run a pet-friendly store. from page one

ness.” In any case, Mad Dog’s doors will remain open. There may even be some changes coming to the store. “I think we’re going to try to bring in a bit more missy (clothing),” said Egger. “I don’t know if I’m going to go in the direction of men’s clothes yet, but I’m hoping that’s something a new owner might do.” One thing that won’t be changing is the boutique’s dogfriendly policy. Shoppers will always be welcome to bring their dogs into the store and be met by Molly, the friendly, curly-haired Schnauzer and in-store greeter. Now that Mad Dog will be remaining open for at least another year, Egger is urging her loyal customers and new customers to come visit the store and have a look at her new shipments of dresses and summer-wear. “We have more and more coming all the time.”

BRAD KLODOWSKI / SPPS

LIFESTYLES

“Look closely, because the closer you think you are, the less you’ll actually see.” Four magicians, who make up The Four Horsemen in the latest fi lm “Now You See Me,” bring this statement to life in this fast-paced crime movie. Directed by Louis Leterrier, the fi lm follows four — played by Isla Fisher, Dave Franco, Woody Harrelson and Jesse Eisenberg — who are put together to pull off the greatest heist of all time: robbing a bank and giving the money back to all who have lost something. The magicians lead an FBI agent (Mark Ruffalo), on a wild goose chase as he tries to figure out how they are doing their magic tricks and what their next target will be. The beginning of the movie introduces all of the magicians by placing a card with a meeting location before each of them. And from this early point on, the chemistry

is very minimal between the characters, and the dialogue seems almost awkward. This film, as is true with any movie dealing with magic, everyone in the audience has no idea how illusions are actually being done, and no one is really sure what is going on. The script does a good job of making the audience not worry so much about that by throwing in some good jokes mainly from Woody Harrelson’s character, Merritt McKinney, who is a mentalist. As the tricks become grander and The Four Horsemen continue their deceptive ways, the film flows perfectly from trick to trick and works to incorporate all the characters into each scene. The end, however, will shock and disappoint at the same time. It fails to leave the audience craving more with just a few words and a blackout screen.

Egger still wants to retire, but will be staying at Mad Dog for a while longer. “My goal was really to try and sell the store, not close it,” Egger said. “Maybe if I (hang) on for another year or two, someone would buy it.” In the meantime, Egger will be traveling extensively and taking much-deserved breaks. “I have good employees, so I know I can leave.” Lia De Oliveira owns Lia’s Hairstyling, a salon next to Mad Dog. She was overjoyed to learn that Egger would be keeping her store open. “We’ve been neighbors for so long. We’ve known each other since our kids were little. I’m glad she decided to stay a bit longer,” De Oliveira said. Despite the joy expressed by many customers, not everyone is pleased to hear that Mad Dog will be staying open after all. Some of Mad Dog’s

customers expressed frustration though, because they feel cheated by the circumstances surrounding the store. Danielle Sturgill, a rising first year Master of Public Health student, is one of those disgruntled customers. Sturgill had been shopping at Mad Dog since she was a freshman in 2009. She was disappointed the boutique would be closing, and made many purchases for several days as the prices dropped during the closing sale. “When I heard they were staying open, I was happy initially, but then I thought closer on the matter. It seems they wanted to clear out the store with a new sale and bring in new merchandise all along to give themselves a boost. If they were really closing, they should’ve closed. I will not continue to shop there, as sad as that seems or sounds. I feel tricked and part of a ploy to regain new shoppers and busi-


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Baseball fails to advance out of regional

June 6, 2013

SPORTS

collegiatetimes.com

RACHEL FRANKS sports editor

The baseball team came back from the losers bracket only to lose to Oklahoma in the final of their first home NCAA regional, ending their 40 win season. Friday, the first day of the Blacksburg regional, Tech took on Connecticut in the second game of the day. It was a rough start to the regional for the Hokies. The Hokies were down 4-0 in the bottom of the fift h when a sacrifice fly from first baseman Sean Keselica drove Kyle Wernicki home to cut the lead to three. On that same play Coach Hughes signaled Alex Perez to go for third base, but he was unable to make it and was tagged out. That decision cost the Hokies, who were unable to score again despite leaving three men on base. The game ended with the Hokies down 5-3. Senior Joe Mantiply took the loss for the Hokies on the mound. It was his first loss of the season and a disappointing way for him to end his career at Tech. He pitched 4.2 innings and gave up four runs on 10 hits, though only one run was earned. After the loss the team was disappointed, but not ready to give up. “We have a great team and we’ve been hitting the ball well, so it is a shocker. Any team can win at any time so we just have to come back,” Tyler Horan, the left field redshirt junior, said. “We can’t let this one get to us even though we lost to one of the lower seeds, because we have to come back and play Coastal Carolina tomorrow.” Saturday the Hokies had a must-win game against Coastal Carolina. The first five innings turned into a pitcher’s battle with neither team scoring. Then in the sixth inning Tech got on the board with a single from Mark Zagunis that scored Alex Perez. The seventh inning started out with senior Andrew Rash hitting a solo home run. Later in the seventh catcher Chad Morgan was able to score an unearned run to make it 3-0. A solo home run from shortstop Chad Pinder made it 4-0 in the eighth inning. Then in the top of the ninth inning the Hokies bats got hot and Tech scored five more runs to make it 9-0. Coastal Carolina was able to avoid the shut out when Jacob May hit a solo home run in the bottom of the ninth. They were unable to get anything else going though, and Tech ended the Chanticleers’ season with

RACHEL FRANKS / THE COLLEGIATE TIMES

Catcher Chad Morgan (33) tags Connecticut player Max McDowell (2) out at home plate. The Hokies went on to win the game 3-1. the 9-1 win. Devin Burke pitched the whole game for Tech. He allowed only five hits and one run. Burke moved to 11-3 and has not lost a game since April 14. Coach Hughes was very pleased with the game and with how his players preformed. “I thought it was a really good way to bounce back after a disappointing night, but that is life in the losing bracket,” he said. “Selfishly, I am just happy I get to coach this team another day.” The first game against Connecticut on Sunday was delayed due to the rain. Once it got started though the Hokies were ready to go. They got the first run of the game in the second inning off an unearned run by Horan. Horan scored again in the fourth off a Rash double. In the bottom of the fift h UConn scored its only run of the game off a Tech error. Then the Huskies had the bases loaded with only one out. They were unable to score because Tech completed the double play and catcher Morgan was able to tag a UConn player out at the plate to end the inning. Tech added an insurance run in the top of the ninth when the pinch run-

ner Logan Bible scored to bring the final score to 3-1. Brad Markey got the win on the mound and Clark Labitan got the save. Markey threw for 5.1 innings and allowed one run on five hits. Labitan went for 3.2 innings, allowing two hits and striking out four. “It was a really good college baseball game,” Hughes said. “The stakes were high on the line and we got a good quality start. Everything is predicted on a quality start and we were fortunate enough to have one from Brad.” Then the Hokies had to take on Oklahoma just an hour after the Connecticut game ended. Tech got on the board first when Morgan scored off a Ryan Burns single in the bottom of the second. In the fourth the Hokies scored again off a Rash solo home run, his 11th homer of the season. Oklahoma seemed to wake up in the sixth though, when they scored four runs off two Tech errors. In the bottom of the sixth Horan made it over the plate, but Rash, who was right behind him, got ruled out after the Sooner’s catcher tackled him as he slid home. The game got away from the Hokies in the top of the ninth inning when

Oklahoma scored six runs. Tech was able to score one more run, but could not come back from the six-point deficit. Tech’s season ended in a 10-4 lost. The team was very emotional in the press conference after the game. “It’s been unbelievable,” Rash, a senior, said with tears in his eyes. “I am going to miss these guys. This could be the last time I put on a uniform, but I have the best 34 teammates you could ever have. I couldn’t ask for a better college career. I am happy for this opportunity and I appreciate Coach Hughes giving me the opportunity to play here for five years.” Coach Hughes was sad to end this season with the team, but excited about what holding the fi rst ever regional in Blacksburg will do for the program. “I thought our guys did a great job for the entire tournament,” he said. “The next goal is to sustain this success and keep hosting regionals and advance to the supers. There are a ton of victories that happened this weekend that you don’t see on the baseball field. We got a chance to expose our venue and community nationally, and that is priceless.”


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The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

June 6, 2013

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Sig Ep house wasted Tech funding T

he Collegiate Times released a news report on May 29 regarding university fraternity Sigma Phi Epsilon’s suspension “due to misconduct and failure to meet national expectations.” Just a few months prior to the announcement, the university spent an enormous $5,000,000 on a new house for the fraternity. According to the Times, “Sixteen members were cited for student violations including underage consumption, public intoxication, theft and vandalism. There was also considerable damage inflicted on the new chapter house.” The last sentence is the one that angers me the most, and one that should perturb most Virginia Tech students. After receiving a $5,000,000 house, Sigma Phi Epsilon did not take care of it and wasted university money. This money could, and should have been spent on something useful for the whole student body. To be clear, this is not a rant against

Greek life. I personally have nothing against fraternities and sororities or their day-to-day activities. Since Oak Lane is technically classified as on-campus housing, these students who trashed their house should pay for repairs their inflicted damage. However, it will not be the end of the world if that does not happen, because another fraternity will probably take their place in the expensive “bachelor pad.” Many will argue that $5,000,000 is a small expense for a university — especially one which receives sizable donations, tuition from over 20,000 students and other has many other sources of income. But it is not the amount of money that annoys me most, but rather the moral standard. The school entrusted the Sig Ep fraternity with a house worth $5,000,000, and the fraternity proved how unworthy they were to receive such a gift. It could have been better used to renovate

S E C I O V t studen

Stereotypically, I’m in a black fraternity and I feel like we are kind of ostracized ... They think we are going to ruin stuff and then to see something like this happen, it’s like ‘Well just give us another chance.’ That’s the first thing that came to my mind as a part of Greek life, as a part of APAC, which is historically black fraternity.” Duston Scarborough, senior, marketing management

many on-campus dorms that need carpeting, air conditioning and repairs for students who respect the space they signed a contract to uphold. I know what Greeks do for the community at Virginia Tech, with contributions including their philanthropy and fundraising activities. Most students and charities are thankful for the work they do around campus. But that does not excuse behavior such as this. Greeks, like all students, are held to the rules and restrictions as discussed in the Virginia Tech Code of Conduct. It is time to improve the on-campus housing that the general student body populates. The university should not waste any more money on that area if destruction of property is the end result. RYAN TURK - regular columnist - sophomore - BIT major

I think it’s sad that they lost their charter and that they spent so much money their house that they can’t even live in.” Angela Sainato, junior, ACIS major

OPINIONS

The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times receives no funding from the university.

MCT CAMPUS


Track heads to nationals

6 June 6, 2013

RACHEL FRANKS

collegiatetimes.com

sports editor

Virginia Tech is sending ten athletes to the NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships in Eugene, Oregon from June 5-8. The Hokies are looking to three-peat in hammer throw. The last two were won by now alumni Alexander Ziegler. Tech also had the hammer throw national champion in 2009 with Marcel Lomnicky. This year, both Tomas Kruziak and Denis Mahmic qualified to go to Oregon for Virginia Tech in the hammer throw. The freshman Kruziak looks to give the Hokies a shot at the national championship. Kruziak is from the same club in Germany as Lomnicky, and said that Lomnicky has given him a lot of advice about competitions and the U.S. in general. “I’m pretty confident. What matters is what you throw at the meet,” Wesh said. “So, I’m pretty confident.” Mahmic also has a shot at winning. He qualified with the throw of 205-8 (62.68m). Tech also has a female hammer thrower on her way to the championships. Annjulie Vester had an exciting qualifying round when she fouled her first two throws, but qualified on her third and almost beat her personal best on her

forth with 229-0(69.80m). Javelin thrower Matthias Treff also made things interesting in his equalizing round. Going into the qualifiers Treff was expected to be the best of the field, however, he struggled and it wasn’t until his final throw of the day that he moved into ninth place and secured his spot at his third straight NCAAs. Tech’s 1500-meter runner Grant Pollock qualified for his first trip to nationals after recording a personal best of 3:40.77 and placing third. Darrell Wesh qualified in the 100 meter dash for the Hokies. Running in the toughest heat of the qualifiers, Wesh finished fourth and did not automatically qualify. But his time of 10.29 seconds was good enough to qualify for nationals. This is not Wesh’s first trip to the NCAA Championships. Last year he finished fourth in the 100 meter. One thing Wesh learned from last year is to focus on the completion and not the time. “Everyone is not going to run as fast as they ran before. This is the championships,” Wesh declared. “They are not going to run their PR there. They are going to run the time to win — you are competing you don’t worry about time.” Martina Schultze earned her second straight trip to the championships after breezing

SPORTS

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through the qualifying round with vault of 13-51/4. High jumper Ronnie Black is also heading to Eugene after clearing 7-1/4(2.14 m). Black is coming off his ACC Championship and is headed to the NCAA Championships. Jeff Artis-Gray qualified to compete in the high jump with the longest jump of the meet, but missed qualifying for the 110 meter hurtles. He was hoping to be the Hokies only double qualifier, but was unable to run in the qualifying race because of a mishap in the men’s 4x100 relay. Pole Vaulter Chris Uhle had an outstanding performance in the qualifiers to stamp his ticket to Oregon. He recorded a personal best of 17-23/4 (5.25 m) and did not have any misses that day. Chris will not the only member of his family competing in the championships, his twin brother Joey will be vaulting against him for Air Force. Head coach Dave Cianelli is no new comer to NCAA championpships. Th is is his 12th year coachingat Tech. He has had 13 NCAA individual champions, 125 AllAmericans, 106 ACC individual champions and has been named USTFCCCA Southeast Region Coach of the Year 11 times. Cianelli has seen many different teams, but he says this year the leadership really stands out. “We have a pretty large core of seniors that have really provided a lot of leadership for this team,” Cianelli said. “I think the main thing that I recognize with this group is that we had some outstanding seniors that are finishing up careers here. Ronnie Black, Jeff Earnist Gray and Matius Treff are individuals that have really contributed a lot for a number of years to our success.” This year the men’s team is heading to Oregon ranked 10th in the nation. With eight men competing they have a chance of placing in the top ten at nationals. Cianelli says this is one of their main goals, and he thinks they can accomplish it if each of the individual men can have a good meet.

The Top Ten

Jeff Artis-Gray long jump senior

Ronnie Black high jump senior

Tomas Kruzliak hammer throw freshman

Denis Mahmic hammer throw senior

Grant Pollock 1500m junior

Martina Schultze pole vault sophomore

Matthias Treff javelin senior

Chris Uhle pole vault sophomore

Annjulie Vester hammer throw sophomore

Darrell Wesh 100m junior


Rutgers plagued by continued athletic director woes 7

BOB FORD mct campus

no power. She can’t lead decisively, because she won’t be able to force those under her to follow. Every coach, assistant coach, trainer, and administrator in the athletic department knows that if there is a problem with Hermann _ job security, salary, funding for a sport, whatever _ all it will take is the threat of a trip to the human resources department and a phone call to the newspaper to get that problem solved. Rutgers peeks through the drawn blinds and waits now. The school says it has no intention of firing Hermann before she ever starts, but ultimately it won’t have to. Someone else will.

SPORTS

PHILADELPHIA — Having taken an already terrible situation and somehow made it worse, Rutgers University is intent on drawing the blinds now and waiting until the furor over the hiring of new athletic director Julie Hermann goes away. Unfortunately for Rutgers, the fresh problems it has created for itself, and for Hermann, aren’t going anywhere. It may take a while for the effects of the flawed hiring process to become apparent, but those are inevitable. Last week was another bad one for the Scarlet-Faced Knights. Hermann, named to succeed Tim Pernetti, who was swept out as the scapegoat for the university’s inaction regarding abusive basketball coach Mike Rice, was found to have a few problems with her resume, too. Despite having undertaken what school president Robert Barchi called a search that was “deliberative at every stage of this process,” the search committee either hadn’t uncovered or wasn’t concerned about the two lawsuits in

which Hermann was named as a defendant as an administrator or the accusation that, when she coached volleyball at Tennessee, Hermann was labeled by the 1996 team as being abusive herself. Members of the 26-person search committee describe a process in which the leading candidate was identified quickly by co-chair Kate Sweeney and the hiring recommendation was rushed to Barchi’s desk, without much deliberation or input from the full committee. Part of the hurry was to finish work before co-chair Richard Edwards left for a trip to China. And part of it, apparently, according to committee sources who couldn’t wait to give their side to the Newark Star-Ledger, Bergen Record, and ESPN, was because Sweeney had made up her mind Hermann would be the next athletic director. Now, that’s a hiring process. The bare bones of the problems Hermann had in the past aren’t pretty. That 1996 Tennessee volleyball team said Hermann called them “whores, alcoholics and learning-disabled,” and 15 members of the team signed a publicly released letter attesting to their version

Sweeney apparently thought so. Hermann’s name wasn’t on the list of 47 individuals identified by a head-hunter firm hired to cull a list of prospective candidates, according to the Star-Ledger. (How many of those 47 are women is not known.) Sweeney contacted the National Association of Collegiate Women Athletic Administrators to get some more names, and Hermann’s was on that list. She quickly rose to the top of all the lists. That is fine as far as it goes, but now Hermann has to deal with what the university’s handling of the hiring has left her. In a position that requires a powerful base, particularly for a woman, she has

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CHRIS SZAGOLA / SPPS

Rutgers Scarlet Knights head coach Mike Rice reacts on the sidelines during an NCAA basketball game against Seton Hall Pirates.

of the facts. A jury awarded the group a $150,000 settlement. Hermann eventually resigned as coach and went into the athletic department administration. Also at Tennessee, Hermann was named in a lawsuit filed by an assistant coach who claimed she was fired for becoming pregnant. At Louisville, where Hermann was hired as a senior athletic administrator, another lawsuit was filed, this one by a female assistant track and field coach who took complaints of abusive behavior by the head coach to Hermann and then to the school’s human resources department. She was fired three weeks later, and said that Hermann told her going to HR was a mistake. Again, not pretty. None of us, however, knows the exact flesh of facts that surrounded those bare bones of a story. Hermann, who admits to being hard-driving and demanding, certainly rubbed some people the wrong way. Some of them lost games, some of them lost jobs. More than a few of them tried to get back at her. Whether she was a good administrator trying to deal with crazy situations or a bad one who was the cause of those situations is unknowable from the outside. Everyone involved has a different version of the facts. One thing is certainly, undeniably true: The full Rutgers search committee should have known everything. In fact, it knew almost nothing. “Everything in that letter is true,” Erin Zammett Ruddy, one of the former volleyball players, said in a blog post. “But I agree with what many are saying. This reflects worse on Rutgers than it does on Julie.” There is a gender issue at play here, too, and it is a tricky one to parse. Being a female administrator in what is essentially a male world is incredibly difficult. If she keeps the job she is scheduled to begin June 17, Hermann will be one of only three female athletic directors at a major college or university. In trying to move away from the Rice-Pernetti fiasco, it might have seemed emblematic of a fresh start for the school to hire a female athletic director.

June 6, 2013


8 Capital Cities finds radio success

June 6, 2013

KELLI SKYE FADROSKI

collegiatetimes.com

mct campus

It’s been hard to get away from Capital Cities’ hit song “Safe and Sound.” Even if the title doesn’t ring a bell, chances are you’ve heard it. The track has enjoyed heavy play on mainstream radio, which landed the catchy, danceinfused tune on the Top 10 modern rock charts. Snippets of it also turned up in television commercials, radio campaigns and during sporting events. Such visibility is something most artists dream of, yet the overexposure makes Capital Cities’ Sebu Simonian almost as nervous as he is grateful. “It’s kind of overwhelming,” he shared during a recent phone interview after the duo’s set at radio station KROQFM’s annual Weenie Roast at Verizon Wireless Amphitheater in Irvine, Calif., last month. “I worry that people are going to get sick of it pretty soon. A lot of big songs experience that, but I hope people don’t get

annoyed by it.” Three years ago Simonian, then working as a producer in Los Angeles, placed an ad on Craigslist, soliciting for new talent to foster. He received only one response, from fellow producer/musician Ryan Merchant. The two hit it off instantly, Simonian says, and immediately collaborated on a variety of projects until the pair decided to start their own band. Capital Cities self-released an EP in 2011 and hit the club scene fast and hard, quickly gaining attention with high-energy sets and bouncy, feel-good tunes. Eventually securing representation, the guys signed on with Capitol Records, in a partnership with Lazy Hooks, to officially issue its full-length debut “In a Tidal Wave of Mystery” (out this week), culling together all the material Capital Cities has created since forming. For the new disc, Capital Cities got the chance to work with OutKast’s Andre 3000 on the track “Farrah Fawcett

Hair,” though they’re already eyeing other endeavors. As they’ve crossed paths on tour and at festivals with artists like fellow L.A. outfit Fitz and the Tantrums, Atlas Genius, the Neighbourhood and Awolnation, the guys have been thinking about a variety of collaborative possibilities. Given how the duo’s music samples numerous genres, Simonian says future experimentation could be limitless. “We like to keep things open,” he says, noting that in the past “we’ve worked as commercial music composers … and we’ve had to write music in hiphop, disco, punk, metal and pop — and there were a lot of fast turn-around times to it. It excites us to be flexible, diverse and eclectic. That’s key for us fundamentally. We write dance music that’s interesting.” With the new album about to be available to the masses, an optimistic Simonian hopes people will soon hear more than just “Safe and Sound” before fatigue sets in.

Now Playing! Iron Man 3 When Tony Stark's world is torn apart by a formidable terrorist called the Mandarin, he starts an odyssey of rebuilding and retribution.

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Acclaimed TV series make their final run NEAL JUSTIN For those without cable or a satellite dish, it’s going to be a cruel summer. This is the season when networks go on vacation, filling the airwaves with reruns and mindless reality shows, while Kabletown shifts into high gear with innovative programming that might tempt you into skipping a few barbecues and making a date with your small screen instead.The next few months are particularly bittersweet for several fan favorites that will air their finales. Here’s what to keep an eye out for: “The Fosters”: Lesbian moms (Teri Polo and Sherri Saum) raise a blended family of biological and foster kids. Jennifer Lopez is one of the executive producers, which means there’s a good chance the school principal will be played by Pitbull. (9 p.m. Mondays, ABC Family) “Mistresses”: Alyssa Milano and “Lost’s” Yunjin Kim are among the sexy sirens attempting to live up to the sultry title of this soap, based on a popular British series. Lifetime tried to adapt it in 2008 but decided to work on classier fare — like “The Client List.” (10 p.m. Mondays, ABC) “Burn Notice”: After seven seasons, the sun is finally setting on this sizzling summer treat, but not before Michael (Jeffrey Donovan) and Fiona (Gabrielle Anwar) try to repair their shattered relationship. Best viewed with a pitcher of daiquiris. (9 p.m. Thursdays, USA) “Graceland”: What happens

when a group of undercover agents, picked to live in a house together, stop being polite and start getting real ... suspicious? “Rescue Me” veteran Daniel Sunjata is among the strange bedfellows. (10 p.m. Thursdays, USA) “King & Maxwell”: Jon Tenney and Rebecca Romijn play former Secret Service agents who, when they’re not admiring their impossibly good looks in the mirror, solve crimes. Michael O’Keefe is the FBI agent who vows to someday bring down those crazy kids. (Premieres June 10, TNT) “True Blood”: Vampires stick around forever; the same can’t be said for showrunners. Season 6 marks the first without the steady hand of Alan Ball, who has moved on to shed blood on Cinemax. Will Bon Temps ever be the same? (June 16, HBO) “Futurama”: Matt Groening’s animated series came back from the dead once before, but this time a return is much more unlikely, which explains why Larry Bird, Sarah Silverman and George Takei are lending their voices for what’s expected to be the final 13 episodes. (June 19, Comedy Central) “Crossing Lines”: Donald Sutherland must have noticed what chasing international baddies across the small screen did for the career of his son, Kiefer. The old man headlines this promising procedural along with William Fichtner. (June 23, NBC) “Devious Maids”: ABC passed on this soap from “Desperate Housewives”

creator Marc Cherry about Beverly Hills domestics who manage to find time to scheme between dusting sessions. Eva Longoria is an executive producer. (June 23, Lifetime) “Under the Dome”: Stephen King’s 1,088-page novel of the same name came out in 2009, which means you’re probably just finishing it. This miniseries, about a small town in Maine enclosed in an invisible bubble, should be less of a strain on your eyes. (June 24, CBS) “Dexter”: Our favorite serial killer was beginning to overstay his welcome — until last season’s jaw-dropping ending, which guarantees a whole new slew of problems and a tour de force performance by Jennifer Carpenter. And, yes, this eighth season is the last. (June 30, Showtime.) “Ray Donovan”: Liev Schreiber, Elliott Gould and Jon Voight headline a promising new series about a Hollywood fi xer with a Tony Soprano-like temper. They had me at “Liev.” (June 30, Showtime) “The Newsroom”: TV’s most polarizing drama returns for a second season. Let’s hope the Aaron Sorkin series gets a little smarter and gives more screen time to Jane Fonda. (July 14, HBO) “Breaking Bad”: This. Is. It. The final eight episodes are the event of the summer with Bryan Cranston putting a cap on one of the greatest portrayals in TV history. Surely, Walter White can’t survive. Or can he? Gulp. (Aug. 11, AMC)

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9

June 6, 2013


10 June 6, 2013 collegiatetimes.com

Funk Punch rocks Blacksburg Robert ‘Slim’ Prescott plays the drums and sings during a concert in Sycamore Deli last Saturday. Prescott is a member of the band Funk Punch from Roanoke, VA.

FEATURE PHOTO

photo by brad klodowski

Gemini (May 21-June 20) The next phase seems pensive, especially nice for private contemplation. Make plans, after considering your partner's wishes. Review strategy and priorities, and take time for health (mental, physical and/or spiritual). Recharge. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Friends want you to come out and play, and you have old projects to finish this month. Extra paperwork leads to extra profits. Schedule meetings for today. Get social, and ask your circle to assist. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Expect lots of new directives in the next few days. At first, that may seem like a challenge or test. Career opportunities develop. Compete for new responsibilities, and stay attentive. You'll be held accountable. Use your team.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Th ings fall into place. Plan your agenda and itinerary, and get ready to move. Study the options, and make reservations. Imagine fun and exploration. It doesn't need to be expensive. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Seek new territory. Expand your inf luence while exploring passions. Your fame travels. Review resources and tackle details. Compromise for a winwin. Partnerships hold the gold, so grow them stronger. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Consult with experts. There are some negotiations ahead, and educated opinions can be useful. Consider strategy, methodology and impact on others. Organize finances and papers. Rely on trusted friends and allies.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) There's more work coming in right now. It could get hectic and intense with creative buzz. Let your partner do the talking. Delegate tasks. It's easier to ride the horse in the direction that it's going. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Make more time for love. Your heart is in your work, and there is plenty of it, but a sweet moment is possible if you give yourself permission. Give in to beauty. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) There is a lot going on at home. Make changes, organize, clean and decorate. Creature comforts delight. Is there a party in your future? Get creative, and focus on family matters. Fun calls.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Practicing something you love to do goes well now. All of a sudden, everything starts making sense. Learn what you need to know. Communication channels flow. Boost your electronic capability. Discover another treasure. Explore. Aries (March 21-April 19) Let things cook for a while. It’ll be easier to make household changes soon. Compare prices and quality, and plot with your budget. Build a foundation for prosperity. Serve it with ice tea or lemonade. Taurus (April 20-May 20) You’re more confident. Make preparations for practical action that launches your endeavor forward. Inspire others to move, rather than by cajoling or demanding. Use your debonair charm.


11

June 6, 2013

XKCD by Randall Munroe

Today’s Birthday (6/6/13). Rewards this year come through responsible action and attention to detail. Solving seemingly impossible puzzles entertains you. Grab opportunities for exploration and creativity at work. Share resources, and expand your network. Especially after June 25, there’s profit potential into 2014. Cleverly avoid spending it all. Play outside. Attract partners, and share the resources. Organized bookkeeping shows you how to grow. What do you want over the long-term? Don’t worry about recognition; keep practicing and balancing for health. Take on leadership. Rekindle a spark.

65 Situation in which this puzzle’s symptoms may appear 67 Crystalline stone 68 Emulate the 18Down 69 High: Pref. 70 Made a blooper 71 Had chits to pay 72 Bad-tempered

By Bruce Venzke

6/6/13

ACROSS 1 Times to call, in ads 5 Graduate school degs. 9 Zippo 14 The first Mrs. Copperfield 15 Kathryn of “Law & Order: C.I.” 16 Diplôme issuer 17 Scratchy symptom of nerves 19 Place to get eats 20 Woman in a “Paint Your Wagon” song 21 22-Downs, e.g. 23 Shoot the breeze

44 Treated, as a bump on the head 45 Bank statement abbr. 49 Hardly skilled in 51 Mailer or Miller 53 Moist symptom of nerves 57 60 minutes, in Florence 58 “’Tain’t” rebuttal 59 Prego competitor 60 Like cornstalks 62 Comparable, distance-wise

24 “We are __ amused” 25 Agitated symptom of nerves 29 Hive denizens 31 Shoe part 32 Meara of comedy 33 First name in Japanese golf 37 Parkinson’s treatment 38 Unstable symptom of nerves 41 Fictional neatnik

DOWN 1 Riders, e.g. 2 Woebegone 3 “I wonder if this will fit” response 4 H.S. seniors’ concerns 5 La Méditerranée, e.g. 6 Hard-to-ride horse 7 Ancient calculators 8 New Jersey’s __ Hall University 9 British series ender 10 Henri’s here 11 Way back when 12 Become cloudless 13 Chamomile soother, e.g. 18 Overconfident critter of fable 22 Mil. rank 26 Gobi Desert locale 27 Boring result? 28 Concludes by 30 Period to usher in 34 Enjoy Telluride, say 35 “Best in Show” org. 36 Small bill 39 Part of Q.E.D.

40 Red-coated wheel 41 Steal the spotlight from 42 Still clueless 43 Likes a lot 46 Bach work 47 Civil rights leader __ Scott King 48 Common car sale component 50 Norse god of heroic glory

52 Employed 54 Cellist Casals 55 Softly lit 56 Rainer who was the first to win consecutive Oscars 61 Grandfather of Enos 63 Soft drink suffix 64 Roulette bet 66 Outlaw Kelly

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Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

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5/30/13

WORDSEARCH: SUMMER MOVIES Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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Heat, Spurs set for NBA finals

12

SPORTS

collegiatetimes.com

June 6, 2013

JOSEPH GOODMAN mct campus

A collective state of euphoria and power danced through the building like an electric current jumping across the night sky. They call that heat lightning in Miami. On Monday, it was everywhere and all-consuming. The Heat electrified the crowd at AmericanAirlines Arena and the city at large with a 99-76 blowout of the Indiana Pacers in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals. It took 13 days for the Heat to dispatch the Pacers, and for six games Indiana was a worthy adversary, but in the end, the youngsters didn’t belong on the same court as the Heat, which has now defeated Indiana in the postseason in back-to-back years. Unlike the series, the final game was never close. The Heat led by 21 points entering the fourth quarter and dominated the game from start to finish. LeBron James led the Heat with 32 points, and Miami outrebounded Indiana for the first time in the series. “We had to play our best game of the series to get this one done,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. The Heat now shifts its focus immediately to the venerable

San Antonio Spurs, which swept the Memphis Grizzlies in four games to win the Western Conference fi nals. The Spurs have had nine days to rest between series. The Finals begin Thursday at AmericanAirlines Arena. Game 2 is Sunday in Miami before the series shift s to Texas for three games. The Heat has now defeated the Bulls, Celtics and Pacers in back-to-back-to-back Eastern Conference fi nals. It was Miami’s fourth conference championship in its 25-year history. All have come since 2006. From the beginning, the Heat overwhelmed the Pacers with a frenetic energy it lacked for most of the series. Miami forced 15 turnovers in the first half and had nine offensive rebounds, which was one shy of tying the franchise record for rebounds in the first half of a playoff game. The Heat fi nished with 15 offensive rebounds and won the overall battle of the boards 43-36. “Too much to overcome,” said Pacers forward David West, who had 14 points, six rebounds and six turnovers. For Heat shooting guard Dwyane Wade, Game 7 was a reminder that he can still dominate a game from the perimeter. He finished with 21 points after averaging less

AL DIAZ / MCT CAMPUS

The Miami Heat celebrate defeating the Indiana Pacers in Game 7 of the NBA Eastern Conference. than 15 points per game in the series. Wade was 7 of 16 from the field to go along with nine rebounds, including six on the offensive glass. “I got a lot of opportunities (Monday) and physically I did everything I could,” Wade said. “I thought we came out with the right mentality and put everything behind us and focused on this game.” After Game 6, Wade voiced concerns that he was being given enough opportunities in the series to affect games. In the first quarter of Game 7, James found his teammate early. “I called a play for Dwyane on the first play of the game,” James said. “He got in his rhythm and it was big time.” Wade ripped down his fift h offensive rebound of the game with 5:24 to play in the third quarter and went up strong to create a three-point play opportunity. Wade made his and-one free-throw attempt to give the Heat a 64-49 lead. The Heat cruised from there with the arena’s 20,000-plus fans serenading its players with chants and cheers. James checked out of the game with 5:08 to play after going 8 of 17 from the field, 1 of 2 from three-point range 15 of 16 from the free-throw line. He had more makes from the

free-throw line than the Pacers had as a team (14). James also had eight rebounds, four assists, two steals and block to go along with his aggressive offensive game. “Getting to the free-throw line, that’s how you control tempo,” James said. Said Pacers coach Frank Vogel: “They were just aggressive. They had that killer instinct in their eyes like they weren’t going to be denied.” James’ head nearly touched the rim on an alley-oop dunk f rom reserve point guard Norris Cole with 8:25 left in the second quarter. The dramatic field goal put the Heat ahead 33-27. Miami increased its lead to 52-40 at halftime. From the beginning of the second quarter to the end of the third, the Heat outscored the Pacers 57-34. It was the first Game 7 scenario for Pacers players Paul George and Roy Hibbert and it showed. George, the budding star, fouled out with 7:43 let in the game. He finished with seven points. Wade was the Heat’s primary defender for George for most of the series, but James switched off on the Pacers’ best player for Game 7. It was a key tactic, which limited George while allowing Wade to focus on his offense.

“Any little pressure I could take off D-Wade, I wanted to do that,” James said. Hibbert, the 7-2 center, spent most of the game in foul trouble as well, which limited his effectiveness on the defensive end. Hibbert led the Pacers with 18 points and Indiana shot 40.6 percent from the field. The Heat shot 39.5 percent from the field but outworked the Pacers on defense. Hibbert picked up his fift h foul of the game when he clumsily crashed into Chris Bosh under the basket with 2:09 to play. But the game was long over by then. Bosh finished with nine points and eight rebounds. “They’ve been through it before,” Hibbert said. “They were making the right plays and making game-winning plays because they’ve been through it before.” Ray Allen led the Heat’s bench with 10 points, going 3 of 5 from three-point range. Allen was averaging less than seven points per game in the series before Game 7, but his timely shots demoralized the Pacers in the second quarter. Chris Andersen returned after being suspended for Game 6 and delivered a spark in the second period. He fi nished with seven points and five rebounds in 16 minutes.


Thursday, June 6, 2013 Print Edition