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Wednesday April 24, 2013

An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 109th year, issue 1 News, page 2

Food & Drink, page 5

Opinions, page 3

Sports, page 6

Study Break, page 4

Students outsource accounting New Hillel center

unites community LEAH KOMADA news staff writer

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

Students remain unhappy with Accounting courses. The average GPAs for the two introductory classes are 2.37 and 2.33, respectively. KELLY CLINE news staff writer

Business majors are required to take the Principles of Accounting introductory courses, and many agree about the level of difficulty involved. An option that’s become popular for business students is to take an easier, transferable course at community college. Some accounting students prefer to take their financial accounting class at

community colleges to avoid the more difficult classes at Virginia Tech. Michelle Gzybowski, a junior finance major at Tech, said she took the classes at a community college in northern Virginia during the summer of her freshman year. “I’ve heard horror stories about how hard it is (at Tech) and…I didn’t think I would be able to handle it,” Gzybowski said. “If I took it at community college, that allowed me to take it at an easier pace.”

But students who want to try this route had better check with the Accounting Department. In order to maintain the reputation of their rigorous — yet successful — program, the Accounting Department doesn’t always allow the credits to transfer from other institutions. According to Dr. Reza Barkhi, the head of the Accounting Department at Virginia Tech, when a student wants to transfer credits, the syllabi of the courses in

question have to be evaluated by the corresponding departments at Virginia Tech. When there is a Principles of Accounting course considered, Dr. Jennifer Clevenger forwards the syllabus to Dr. Barkhi and Professor Lynn Almond to be reviewed. After looking over the syllabus, if the course covers enough of the material that would be covered in the Tech class, a recommendation is made to accept or deny the credits. see ACCOUNTING / page two

Hillel, the Jewish community at Virginia Tech, opened a new $2.5 million building this month, with the hopes it would be a visible representation of support and opportunities for the Jewish community at Tech. “Our building provides an additional programming space for students to gather for learning, socializing and religious activities,” said Hillel Executive Director Sue Kurtz. “We are not replacing the programming spaces we currently have at the university, we are simply adding another.” The building was created in memory of Malcolm Rosenberg, an entrepreneur and Jewish philanthropist, who endowed the Jewish student program at Virginia Tech. “Malcolm always envisioned a modern center for Jewish life here at the university,” said Kurtz. “After he passed away, his wife Diane sought to bring his vision to life.” The building contains several spaces available for students to hold meetings as small groups or larger organizations. “It is often times difficult to have a meeting space consistent every week,” said Kurtz. “We invite all organizations to use the space available, not just Jewish students.”

Inside the building is a synagogue where students can go for any holidays or traditions they celebrate. “The mother of a student in the Corp of Cadets donated a Torah for the new synagogue,” said Kurtz. “The establishment of this building is truly a community effort.” Weekly community meals will also be held every Friday night and the dinners will be prepared in a kosher kitchen. “Now we can really meet the needs of students who care about having traditional Jewish meals,” said Kurtz. The hope is that this building will create a stronger community on campus, as well as create a greater appeal for those prospective students wishing to have access to a Jewish community. “It is important that freshmen or students looking at (Tech) who are part of a vibrant Jewish life in their current community see the same existence here at Tech,” said Kurtz. It takes the effort of many to create an ideal learning and living environment for students in college. “Our main goal is to provide students with an accessible place for learning and socializing and to bring some of the Jewish traditions onto campus, for everyone to participate in and learn about,” said Kurtz.

Toxic chemical spill shuts down Draper Road for hours CAMERON AUSTIN news reporter

A hazardous material spill on Tuesday caused the block of Draper between Roanoke and Lee streets to be closed. According to the driver of the truck, 20 to 30 gallons of copper amine C9 was spilled and traveled directly into a drain leading to a fresh water source. The chemical is commonly used as a wood preserver, but can also act as a fertilizer, which is toxic to fish. W.E.L Incorporated is a hazardous material cleanup company that offers 24-hours services in Southwest Virginia.

The process of removing the chemical from the street involves vacuuming the areas and then incorporating the Blacksburg Fire Department to flush the drains with large amounts of water. According to the driver, improper loading of the chemicals caused the spill, and he was not at fault. It will cost several thousands of dollars to clean up. The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality was on scene supervising the cleanup.

Follow the writer on Twitter: @CAustinCT BEN WEIDLICH / SPPS

Hazardous material crews work to clean up a chemical spill along Draper Road. The spill caused a closure of the street for several hours.

Town members voice concern over BMS development DEAN SEAL news editor

COURTESY OF BALZER AND ASSOCIATES INC

Skepticism inundated the latest discussion over the fate of the proposed development at the old Blacksburg Middle School site on Monday night. A public input meeting was held to discuss the rezoning and conditional use permits filed last March by Fiddler’s Green Partners, in hopes of progressing their development of an urban, mixeduse neighborhood on the 20-acre site, which has sat vacant since 2003. Following a brief introduction by Planning & Building Director Anne McClung, Jim Cowan, the attorney and representative for possible local developer Fiddler’s Green Partners, presented an overview of the revised rezoning request. With more than 30 citizens of the town present for meeting, members of the community followed the presentation with nearly an hour of questions, com-

ments and concerns for Cowan and Steve Semones, an engineering advisor that accompanies Cowan to provide technical insight into the project. The subject of the crowd’s apprehensions varied, but even Cowan’s well-prepared answers did not appear satisfactory for some members. “It’s unclear to me that anyone has committed to anything except the residential area,” said one member of the crowd, decrying the lack of invested suitors for the commercial and office units. “Nobody will buy or lease commercial building when you don’t have the zoning to actually build the building,” replied Cowan. “So you have a little bit of a chicken and the egg.” Cowan said he has received letters of interest from companies, but the development must move forward before they can begin committing companies. see ZONING / page two


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news

april 24, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: mallory noe-payne, priscilla alvarez, dean seal newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Accounting: Low GPAs are average Zoning: Town looks at proposal from page one

“It’s handled on a case-bycase basis,” said Almond, an accounting and information systems instructor and coordinator of the Principles of Accounting classes at Virginia Tech. “We’ve got to make sure that once (students) take the introductory classes, they’ve been exposed to enough material that they can go on and take the upper level classes and do well. And when people want to transfer courses in, we don’t have any set rules. We assess each course based on the syllabus and the material covered, and we try to be very respectful of other universities and community colleges.” For the fall 2012 semester, the overall average GPAs for ACIS 2115 and ACIS 2116 were 2.367 and 2.331, respectively, validating some students’ opinion that the classes are too tough on new students. “They’re difficult,” said Adam Powers, a junior fi nance major. “Especially

because it’s your first experience with accounting coming in and a lot of people don’t know anything, so it’s kind of this big learning curve. But I think the good in that is, at least personally, I found that that’s not what I want to do. “So, for that reason alone, they’re good classes. But they’re hard. I can definitely see why people want to take them elsewhere.” T he Ac c ou nt i ng Department’s administration professes this is a necessary evil in order to prepare students to advance to their other courses and, in the long-term, their careers. “It is like learning a new language,” Barkhi said. “But, I assure you, there is no business today you can be successful at without understanding the numbers behind operations.” Although the classes are hard, many students who took them at Tech are happy that they did and don’t see the point in taking them at a community college. Mindy

Tang, a sophomore finance major, thinks that taking an easier class elsewhere is like cheating yourself. “It’s a cop out because I think that if you’re taking it at a community college, you don’t get as much out of it as you would here, and it’s fundamental for business,” Tang said. “You have to know how to do accounting, so you can’t just skip over it and take it at a place that doesn’t teach you everything you need to know.” Many students also have complaints about the administration. Barkhi explained this is because the classes are relatively small. Though there are some advantages to this, the downside is that there are a limited number of professors to teach them, which is why TAs serve as the principal instructors for some classes. However, the coursework between classes is almost identical, and the administration holds weekly meetings in which they bounce

ideas off each other and talk about ways to handle and improve the classes. “The number of students we serve is just tremendous,” said Barkhi. “They are welcome to come and talk to me and tell me if they have systematic problems with some people.” Tech will always accept courses from other institutions as long as those courses are compatible with the accounting and information systems requirements, but, as Barkhi said, courses change, and the same classes may not always be comparable with Tech’s. “It’s not that we object to people taking the classes elsewhere,” Almond said. “But we expect them to be comparable to what we’re doing...we want to maintain the quality of our program to maintain the quality of our graduates.”

from page one

There was also concern raised over the proposed use of buildings in the development, with some members of the audience leery of allowing the site to falter in locking in certain uses during the rezoning. The same was done with Blacksburg’s First and Main Shopping Center, which has struggled since it was completed. Cowan responded that the proposed site would be ideal for attracting companies seeking commercial space downtown, but without the attachment of retail locations. “What you want is foot traffic,” he said. “This isn’t going to be a retail location; that’s not realistic for this site.” More trepidation arose surrounding the amount of public park space in the area. In discussion of “The Dell,” a proposed public park that would take up a substantial expanse of the uneven land at the back of the site, one member of the audience criticized the space as “another useless park” in the area. Members of the audience also inquired as to how the residential areas in the development could be catered toward older tenants, rather than students, as was addressed in the town’s master plan. Cowan believed that with mostly one and two bedroom apartments, students may be dissuaded from renting homes in the area, but that living in a college town has advantages and disadvantages, and that there was no way to completely prevent students from living in the area. One of the most adamant detractors of the design of the project was Greg Tew, an associate professor and director of professional and relations in Virginia Tech’s School of Architecture & Design. “I’m struggling to see how this project makes our town better. … “There is an elegance to (Blacksburg’s 16 blocks) that I think is really missing here,” Tew

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Charges dropped for ricin suspect GREG GORDON mcclatchy newspapers

Federal prosecutors abruptly dropped charges Tuesday against a Mississippi man accused last week of sending letters laced with poisonous ricin to President Barack Obama and Mississippi Sen. Roger Wicker, even as authorities promptly searched the home of another apparent suspect. The man charged last week, Paul Kevin Curtis, had been released on bond hours earlier in Oxford, Miss., in a perplexing, fast-moving turn of events. A federal magistrate’s brief court notice stated that charges against the 45-year-old suspect from the northern Mississippi town of Corinth were being withdrawn because “the ongoing investigation has revealed new information.” Curtis’ attorneys have suggested in court that their client, who has behaved erratically and written angry, ram-

bling posts on the Internet, was framed, noting that the sender signed two of them “I am KC and I approve this message,” just as Curtis typically did on his Facebook page. However, U.S. Magistrate S. Allan Alexander in Oxford stated that the charges were being dismissed “without prejudice,” meaning that they could be reinstated if new evidence surfaced. Curtis was arrested last week, two days after authorities intercepted letters containing ricin, a potentially deadly biological agent found in castor beans, addressed to Obama, Wicker, a Republican, and a Mississippi Justice Court judge. The Associated Press reported that investigators for the FBI, U.S. Marshals Service and U.S. Capitol Police, some wearing protective suits to shield themselves from hazardous materials, searched the home of Everett Dutschke, a Tupelo resident,

on Tuesday. Dutschke told the AP that he is innocent and knows nothing about the ingredients for ricin. He said that agents asked him about Curtis, whether he would take a polygraph test and if he had ever bought castor beans. “I’m a patriotic American,” the AP quoted him as saying. “I don’t have any grudges against anybody. I did not send the letters.” Dutschke did not respond to a call from McClatchy Newspapers. Earlier, a third day of hearings over Curtis’ detention was canceled without explanation. Curtis’ attorney has asserted that a search of Curtis’ vehicle and home found no evidence of ricin or devices that could be used to make it, the AP reported. The FBI said last week that tests by an outside laboratory had confi rmed the presence of ricin in the letters to Obama and Wicker. However, a federal law enforcement official familiar with the matter told

McClatchy Newspapers on Tuesday that the tests did not indicate that the granular substance in the letters containing the biological agent was highly potent, or “weaponized,” which would have required a process to chemically extract the toxin from castor beans. The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the investigation is ongoing, said that the incident appears to have gotten disproportionate attention in the news media and that the letters amounted to a sophisticated scare tactic. At a news conference after he was released, Curtis thanked Wicker “for his kind words about me in the press. And for the record, I have always felt that he is a good and an honest man. I respect President Obama. I love my country and would never do anything to pose a threat to him or any other U.S. official.”

said. “What we basically have here is a large apartment complex surrounded by parking lots, not streets, and a couple of highway buildings. It feels like a kind of development you would see if you took any exit off highway 81.” According to Tew, the original master plan was somewhat of a rushed effort, but that the current plan still doesn’t conform to what the Town Council had envisioned. “We want this to be a premier example of new urbanism, but it couldn’t be any further from what new urbanism is about,” Tew said. “I can only assume it’s likely to go downhill from here.” Tew complained that the development doesn’t include walk able spaces because of the orientation of parking spaces and homes. Cowan disagreed, saying, “I think there’s a lot of public space there.” Cowan also faced questions regarding the 25-year local tax rebate he proposed, which has not been well received by members of the town and county. Cowan has defended the call for the rebate, saying that with 40 percent of public space available on the site, the town has to be willing to contribute funds to the development. Cowan will face another round of scrutiny during a second public input meeting, scheduled for May 2. According to Anne McClung, the town staff will be evaluating the proposal and filing a staff report to the Council by, tentatively, May 16. “It’s a big project. People have questions and opinions and there’s a lot of compromises in the master plan we’re required to follow,” Cowan said once the meeting had concluded. “Its part of the process, helping people understand what really is being proposed, what’s not, and what it’s going to look like.”

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

arrestees

status

2/28/2013-3/01/2013

9:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Follow Up To Larceny of Money

Lavery Hall

3/11/2013-3/24/2013

10:14 AM - 5:16 PM

Follow Up To Harassment

O’Shaughnessy Hall

4/20/2013

2:15 PM - 7:00 PM

Follow Up to Burglary / Breaking and Entering / Destruction of Property

Football Locker Room

4/22/2013

12:42 PM

Possession of Marijuana / Possession of Drug Paraphernalia

Drillfield Drive

Dillon Mathew Haynes, 20, Lynchburg Va

2/14/2013-4/12/2013

5:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Larceny of a bicycle and lock

Outside Squires

Active

4/22/2013

9:16 PM

Harassment

Hutcheson Hall

Inactive

Inactive Renato Jesus, Rodriguez Nunez. 20. Blacksburg Va

Cleared by Arrest Inactive

Cleared by Arrest

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opinions

editors: josh higgins, shawn ghuman opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

april 24, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

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The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff

MCT CAMPUS

MCT CAMPUS

what you’re saying Letter to the editor: April 16 comments insensitive Fred: Courtney, your thoughts are very eloquently presented. I wouldn’t characterize today’s students as being insensitive to what happened on April 16. Rather, society has proceeded through the five stages of grief over the murders of April 16. Now six years later, most of us are at acceptance. That doesn’t mean accepting what happened, but rather realizing the loss is permanent and electing to move forward with positive efforts as we can’t change the past. Same thing happened for 9/11 and will eventually happen in the aftermath of last weeks shocking bombing attack in Boston. Anonymous: Courtney, you speak well for us who were here April 16, 2007 and heard the gunshots and watched the ambulances line up and saw the police swarm and the students run. Those of us who are no longer together still touch base with each other on April 16th because we shared something so deep. We have moved on, but we go back a bit to remember and honor, and we always will.

Those offended by Bieber deserve an apology Brian: What does he have to apologize for? I am by no means a Bieber fan and I think he is a spoiled and stuck up celebrity who only cares for himself, most of the time. However, I think his statement had nothing but good intent and he doesn’t owe an apology to anyone. Any person that has ever been on the internet has probably at one point seen an Anne Frank joke, there’s not an outrage every time that happens. People just want to give him a hard time because they don’t like him, and this is a chance to criticize. How did he insult her at all, how did he degrade her and what she stands for in any way at all? He actually seemed pretty inspired by his visit if you read his entire comment. Don’t let jealousy and dislike cause so much hate towards one person. Guest: Look, I am by no means a Bieber fan - seems like most of the time he’s acting like a selfish moron, but I don’t think his comment was that bad - basically what he was saying was, “I hope she would like me” ... what’s so bad about that?

Media inaccuracies add to hysteria W hat is wrong with the New York Post? Thursday morning, the tabloid newspaper’s front page featured a huge photo of two young men with backbacks, with the giant headline: “Bag Men: Feds seek these two pictured at Boston Marathon.” In the online story, the pair’s faces had big red circles around them. Yes, sort of like targets. Turns out, the young men had nothing to do with the blasts. Thursday af ternoon, the Post backpedaled: “Investigators have now cleared the two men whose pictures were circulated last night in an email among law enforcement officials, sources told The Post today. Authorities determined neither had any information or role in Monday’s attacks at the Boston Marathon.” After an appropriate hail of criticism, the Post’s editor, Col Allan, incredibly defended his decision to smear two innocent men. And yes, that was a smear. “We stand by our story,” Allan said in a statement

sent to several news organizations. “The image was emailed to law enforcement agencies yesterday afternoon seeking information about these men, as our story reported. We did not identify them as suspects.” True. The story didn’t identify the pair by name, and did not call them “suspects.” But by making a lame pun about their backpacks, the Post leaped past any kind of journalistic restraint and implied the men were suspects in the case. How could you read the photo and the giant headline any other way? ABC News tracked down one of the young men, actually a teenager, slimed by the Post: “Salah Barhoun, 17, said he went to the police yesterday to clear his name after he found himself tagged in pictures online. He had just gone to watch the race, he said, but soon after the explosions, he was singled out by Internet sleuths as looking suspicious. Federa l aut horit ies passed around images of

Barhoun, attempting to learn more information about him, sources told ABC News.” When the FBI did release photographs of two men it is seeking in connection with the attacks Thursday afternoon, they didn’t look anything like the two young men whose lives the Post tried to ruin.

News organizations have performed spectacularly this week, but it is their unfortunate lapses that will be remembered...”

in the case. Other outlets, including The Times, then reported what those other news outlets were saying. NBC and the New York Times did not report the faux arrest, nor did they report what others were saying. But CNN had a double dose of egg on its face when veteran reporter John King said his sources told him that the arrestee was a “dark-skinned male.” King qualified the statement as much as possible and cautioned not to leap to conclusions, but once he uttered the phrase, the damage was done. Claims feed into stereotypes and affi rm our worst prejudices. A Saudi Arabian kid running from the blast must be the suspect. A couple of swarthy backpack-toting kids watching the race must be the suspects. The New York Post promulgated both those stories. Th is is how hysteria starts.

News organizations have performed spectacularly this week, but it is their unfortunate lapses that will be remembered, and probably taught as cautionary tales. On Wednesday, CNN, Fox News and the Associated ROBIN ABCARIAN Press erroneously reported -McCarthy newspapers that an arrest had been made

FCC censorship confines broadcast networks

In

a surprising turn of events, the Federal Communications Commission announced early this month it would consider hearing arguments for changing current broadcast television decency standards. Currently, broadcast television networks are banned from using explicit profanity and “non-sexual” nudity between the hours of 6 a.m. and 10 p.m. If the networks don’t comply, the FCC is permitted to impose fines of up to $325,000 per incident. This is in contrast to cable networks (FX, Comedy Central, AMC, etc.) who don’t face these same restrictions. And while many may see this change in stance by the FCC as a mere reflection of American society, the FCC’s ultimate goals here are protecting the market for television, which is a cause for concern seeing as it isn’t often, if ever, considered a division within the government that has any economic interest or authority. Since the spring season of television began this year, broadcast television ratings have declined, while cable ratings increased.

According to Nielsen, a company dedicated to gathering statistics on what Americans watch, read, play, browse and buy, the American people are beginning to switch what they watch on television.

...The FCC ban really prohibits the type of shows the broadcast networks can produce, which limits many financial opportunities for broadcast networks.”

The Nielsen data shows that cable television programs like “Sons of Anarchy,” “Duck Dynasty” and “The Walking Dead” are consistently beating broadcast programs like “Dancing With the Stars,” “Castle,” “30 Rock” and “Parenthood” in terms of ratings and overall viewership, and many broadcast ratings are currently experiencing record-low ratings numbers. While some of the ratings drop can be attributed to the rise in streaming ser-

vices like Hulu and Netflix, the decline in overall show quality certainly isn’t helping. Furthermore, the data suggests Americans choose to watch shows that contain more violence and/ or inappropriate humor over shows that have to be “watered down” in order to be on broadcast television. And while it doesn’t take sex and violence to make a good show, the fact that the creative team is limited in its direction reduces a show’s potential. Instead of providing protection to the American public, the FCC ban really prohibits the type of shows the broadcast networks can produce, which limits many financial opportunities for broadcast networks. And that’s what it comes down to: money. Broadcast networks are starting to lose money to cable networks and they don’t want to give cable networks any more market share and have used their power to inf luence Washington. Broadcast networks’ main source of revenue is advertising, while cable networks rely on advertising and the money they get from licens-

ing their content to cable providers. Since cable networks have now begun to push the envelope with violent/ sexual/crude humor series like “American Horror Story,” and “The League,” they have begun to see increased ratings in accordance with the Nielsen data. With an increase in ratings, advertisers would want to advertise on cable networks more than broadcast networks — contractspecifications withstanding — giving less money to broadcast networks. Current television decency standards are behind the times and need to change. The ban should be repealed, but not because broadcast network lobbyists are paving the way with money, but because we deserve the highest quality television possible. With an equal playing field and broadcast network money, television might improve. MARCUS WILLIAMS -regular columnist -junior -economics major

Editor in Chief: Michelle Sutherland Managing Editor: Nick Cafferky Design Editors: Andrea Ledesma, Alicia Tillman Special Section Design Edtitor: Danielle Buynak Public Editor: Erin Chapman Web Editor: Chelsea Gunter Senior News Editor: Mallory NoePayne Associate News Editors: Priscilla Alvarez, Dean Seal News Blog Editor: Cameron Austin News Reporters: Leslie McCrea, Justin Graves, Andrew Kulak, Donal Murphy News Staff Writers: Alex Gomez, Sean Hayden, Max Luong, Cody Owens, Features Editors: Emma Goddard, Nick Smirniotopoulos Features Staff Writers: Ben Kim, Katie White, Kara Van Scoyc, Allie Sivak, Jacob Wilbanks Senior Opinions Editor: Josh Higgins Associate Opinions Editor: Shawn Ghuman Sports Editors: Matt Jones, Zach Mariner Special Sections Editor: Chelsea Giles Copy Chief: Nora McGann Copy Editors: Allison Hedrick, Kristin Gunther, Sam Huff, Mackenzie Fallon, Alexis Livingston, Kayleigh McKenzie Photo Editor: Kevin Dickel Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: James Dean Seal Circulation Manager: Keith Bardsley Student Publications Photo Staff Director of Photography: Brad Klodowski Lab Manager: Trevor White College Media Solutions Assistant Ad Director: Carla Craft Account Executives: Robert Alberti, Taylor Moran Inside Sales Manager: Amanda Gawne Assistant Account Executives: Catie Stockdale Jordan Williams, Elizabeth Dam, Emily Daugherty Creative Director: Diana Bayless Assistant Creative Director: Nik Aliye Creative Staff: Mariah Jones, Samantha Keck Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2012. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate


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april 24, 2013

Regular Edition Today’s Birthday Horoscope: Strengthen infrastructure, review numbers and work your plan; finances shine for the next six months. Save some away. Your team is crucial, so spread appreciation and build bridges. Social buzz sparks with family, friends and community. Participate, contribute and grow your networks and influence.

April 26th Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham Quote of the Day

“Happiness is where we find it, but rarely where we seek it.”

For Rent

- J. Petit Senn

FOR RENT, 2013/2014, Pheasant Run Crossing, more info at 1417christinecourt.com or call 434 713 9332.

Send us your quote and see it here! creative.services@collegemedia.com

XKDC by Randell Monroe

UT CONDO FOR RENT $280 3BR available 8/1/13 4BR/2BA unit, Kitchen/ Baths remodeled, very convenient, privately owned, no smokers. 804.387.5176

61 He lowered the New York Times’ price from 3¢ to 1¢ 62 Doofuses 63 Reds, maybe 64 Clothes alterer of a kind 65 Disappearing sound, and a hint to this puzzle’s theme 66 Tex’s “What if ...”

Week ending April 26, 2013

Hot New Songs Cruise • Florida Georgia Line B****, Don’t Kill My Vibe • Kendrick Lamar Still Into You • Paramore Wild For The Night • A$AP Rocky, Skrillex, Birdy Nam Nam Don’t Hold The Wall • Justin Timberlake

By Mike Peluso

ACROSS 1 Tic, for one 6 Arcade trademark word 10 Its website has a “Rodents 101” section 14 “__ Go Again”: Whitesnake #1 song 15 Brand at Petco 16 Pats on a buffet 17 ’30s-’40s Kildare portrayer 18 Answered on “Name That Fabric”? 20 Just the binding? 22 Pocatello sch.

4/24/13 23 Texter’s “Oh, before I forget ...” 24 Pah lead-in 25 Car radio selection 28 Hedger’s OK 30 Land measurement 32 “Discreet Music” composer 33 Surrealist Jean 34 On the __ vive: alert 35 City south of Fort Worth 36 Scale model of an ancient rival of Rome

40 Oomph 41 DOD arm 42 Aus. currency 43 Seasonal helper 44 Olds 442 rivals 45 Honolulu’s __ Palace 49 Mouth formations 51 H.S. dropout’s exam 52 Author Yutang 53 High dudgeon 54 Burger queen? 57 Non-contraband cheese? 60 Rock’s Burdon et al.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Con irm facts before jumping to conclusions. Keep doing the stuff that works. Cleaning your working space can increase your productivity. Don’t move furniture to avoid getting the work done, though. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Don’t make wild promises you can’t keep. You’re likely to change your mind later. Call for reinforcements, or consider a new partnership that brings a new perspective. Ponder before speaking. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Your mind is moving faster than usual. Take advantage of an extra dose of imagination to increase your earthly comfort. Prepare for a bumpy road, as well. Postpone travel. If you can’t, add cushions. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Review all options. Listen to what others want, and check the facts you’ve been presented. Your investigation leads to a treasure. Long-distance communication clari ies. Celebrate your discovery with your team.

DOWN 1 Ramshackle 2 Native American hallucinogen 3 Pointers 4 Tuner option 5 Where Clark met Lewis in 1804 6 “Attack!” 7 Jazz great Malone 8 Oscar winner Jannings 9 Toledo-to-Akron dir. 10 Not spare the rod? 11 Sellers role 12 Antipoverty agcy. 13 Exiled Cambodian Lon __ 19 Like some consequences 21 Revealing ’60s’70s fad 25 Literally, “pray God” 26 SASE, e.g. 27 Overly 29 Slam 30 Blue hues 31 Heel 35 Medieval fortification 36 Sports Authority Field altitude

37 Like some movies 38 Chicken general? 39 It may be a relief 40 Last of 26, in Chelsea 44 Erse speaker, perhaps 46 White rat, e.g. 47 Reunion attendees 48 Actually existing 50 Contentious talk

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) While you can afford an excellent communication system, don’t get more than necessary. There are hidden factors, and it may not be the best use of funds. You can solve the puzzle. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) New information illuminates. Watch out for hidden agendas. Check for changes, as a creative project gets delayed. You have what others want. Discover another source of revenue; it may require juggling. Improve your effectiveness. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You’re good at generating money now. It pays to recycle, so reduce unused stuff. An auction may bring the best price. You win free space and even cash. Take time for luxuriating and mindless wandering. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Go carefully. You may want to shout at people. If so, take ive. Call in a favor. Delay a meeting to spend more time with family. Include visiting a beloved locale. Share your dreams.

Lifting the Veil off Blacksburg Weddings. Pick up the Collegiate Times on April 26th.

51 “Whither thou __ ...”: Ruth 54 Five-time U.S. Open champ 55 Jazz phrase 56 Coffee choice 57 Herbert who played 11Down’s nemesis Inspector Dreyfus 58 Green prefix 59 Gillespie’s genre

4/23/13

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Conversations provide insight. In luential people are watching. The action is behind the scenes. There’s a promise of riches. Being well organized is crucial; odds are good you’ll forget something. Share your joy. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Shop carefully, and discover a treasure. You can’t be two places at the same time; prioritize meetings. Friends provide support. You’re gaining respect, but don’t get cocky. Go farther than ever before. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Intuition gets you through a sticky spot. Call the moment you see that you’ll be late. Financial success snowballs. Ask for more and get it. Pay back a debt. Don’t push yourself so hard! Aries (March 21-April 19) The more you love, the more you feel loved. Minimize travel, and don’t send your package yet. Shop carefully. It’s a good time to visualize utopia. Friends inspire you. Write down the possibilities.


editors: editors: emma goddard, nick smirniotopoulos featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

food & drink

Recipe: Red beans and rice with crawfish Brian Cromer | features staff writer

april 24, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

Drink of the week: Red berry mojito

Instructions: PAUL KURLAK / SPPS 1. Fill a large stockpot with about 10 cups of water. The crawfish and vegetable scraps will go into this to make a quick stock. 2. Rough chop three of the celery stalks and three of the carrots then add them to the water. Add the bay leaves and one tablespoon of old bay seasoning. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. 3. Break down the crawfish, saving the tail meat and throwing the scraps into the stockpot. Dice the onion, celery, carrots and bell pepper. Add all the end pieces and trimmings to the stockpot. Mince the garlic. Cut the kernels off the cob of corn. 4. Simmer the stock for 15 minutes, then strain and reserve the liquid. Heat a large saucepot over medium heat. Dice the bacon and saute over medium heat until browned, about 10 minutes. Add the onion and saute with a pinch of salt for about 15 minutes. 5. Add the pepper, celery, carrot, and garlic. Cook for 15 minutes, adding a few tablespoons of oil if the pan gets too dry. 6. Add the tomato paste and eight cups of the stock. Add the beans and bring to a simmer. Simmer for two to three hours, until the beans have softened. Add water to the mixture if it dries too much. 7. In a small saucepot, melt the butter over low heat. Add the crawfish to the butter to warm up. Once the crawfish is hot, add it to the bean mixture along with half of the butter. Once the beans are tender, mash about half of them with a large spoon. 8. Chop the cilantro and green onions and mix them with the beans. Add the remaining old bay and tabasco, season with salt and pepper to taste. Fold in the rice until uniformly mixed. Serve.

WANTED

Chelsea Giles | special sections editor YOU to advertise in our classified section.

Most crawfish found in grocery stores are precooked, so all that needs to be done in this recipe is warm it in butter to serve. In addition, use the shells and vegetable scraps to make a quick stock for cooking the beans. The homemade stock is a big improvement over store-bought, making the finished dish richer and packed with crawfish flavor. Prep time: 30 minutes Cook time: 3 hours Ingredients: 2 pounds precooked crawfish 1/2 pound red beans — soaked 1/2 pound smoked bacon or ham 10 cups white rice — precooked 1/2 cup unsalted butter 1/4 cup fresh cilantro 1 large onion 1 bell pepper 6 celery stalks 6 carrots 4 garlic cloves 1 ear sweetcorn 3 green onions 2 bay leaves 4 tablespoons Tabasco 4 tablespoons old bay seasoning 1 tablespoon tomato paste

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

Drinks can be any dieters worst enemy. Cocktails are a sure way to take in extra calories or sugar that you may be trying to carve out of your daily diet. Before you give up going out or give up on your diet entirely, here are a few tips for making skinnier cocktails without sacrificing taste in the race to get that summer body. - Stay away from using fake juices. They are loaded with added sugars, so a good first step is to only use fresh squeezed or 100 percent fruit juice. A few other nutritious add-ins includes ginger, lemon, and coffee. - Cut back on sodium. Instead, mix with seltzer water in replacement of something carbonated. - As far as the actual alcohol goes, remember less is more. Aim to make smaller portions with only one shot per drink. Another healthy cocktail option is a juicetail, which combines fresh vegetable and fruit juice as the mixers. All of these tips can be applied to shake up this week’s drink recipe, the red berry mojito. The sugar may be replaced with a simple syrup made with honey. To make this antioxidant filled substitute, mix ½ tablespoons of honey with ¾ tablespoon of warm water.

Ingredients 10 mint leaves ½ lime cut into wedges 1 tsp white sugar 8 fresh raspberries 2 fresh strawberries 2 tbsp. Bacardi white rum crushed ice ¾ cup pineapple juice

Its easier than you think. Just go to collegiatetimes.com and you can write, buy and post your own classified ad in the Collegiate Times today!

Directions 1. Tear mint leaves into the bottom of a cocktail shaker. Squeeze in the juice from the lime wedges and drop in the juiced wedges. Add sugar and fruits, then muddle. 2. Pour in rum, then, add crushed ice and shake vigorously to mix and chill. 3. Pour into glass and top with pineapple juice and more crushed ice. Enjoy.

C

Donna Wertalik Professor of Social Media Pam mplin College of Business

5


6

sports

april 24, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: zach mariner, matt jones sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Wrigley Field gets needed renovations College playoff nearly ready CHRIS DUFRESNE mcclatchy newspapers

MCT CAMPUS

Wrigley Field may be the second-oldest stadium in baseball, but some renovation is desperately needed.

The planned $500 million-project should help give hope to downtrodden team The friendly confi nes of Wrigley field will be undergoing a major facelift. The framework for a $500 million renovation project was finally accepted by the City of Chicago on April 15. The start date for renovations has not yet been decided. Wrigley is the second oldest ballpark in the major leagues, behind Boston’s Fenway Park, and is due for some modern changes. The park was first opened in 1914, and this 99-year-old stadium has been home to some amazing moments in baseball history. Baseball is the only sport where tradition and history in a stadium take precedence over modernity. Whether it’s renovating or completely tearing down a stadium, baseball fans are very reluctant to get rid of what has been around for so many years. That being said, Wrigley arguably has the worst clubhouse in all the majors; there is very limited room for the players. It has been long overdue for a change. One of the biggest terms agreed on was the installation of a brand new electronic video screen. The current scoreboard in center is 2,000 square feet, while the new video screen will be around 6,000 square feet. A separate sign will also be added in left field. Something that will make most fans happy and excited is that with these new renovations, the Cubs will be able to hold 40 night games a year instead of just 30. The night start time brings more excitement to the game and creates an atmosphere that fans love to be part of. The addition of the new screen and sign allows the Cubs to reach new agreements with advertising deals that can help pay for this overhaul. The character of the historic park will be diminished a little, but, in the long run, these additions will only help the Cubs franchise. The rooftop seating at Wrigley field offers one of the most unique ways to watch a baseball game. The buildings that make up this seating are currently in the ninth year of a 20-year contract with Wrigley Field. The agreement prohibits the Cubs from building anything that obstructs the view of the fans from watching the game. This has been the biggest controversy surrounding the new agreement for renovations, but the screen and sign should only take up marginal viewing space from the rooftops. With the rooftop seating being such a tradition at Wrigley, it is important for owner Tom Ricketts to make adjustments to the renovations in order to keep this tradition alive. The renovations are not only benefitting the Cubs, but also the city of Chicago. Part of the renovation plans includes a new, 175-room hotel, with an office building, retail store, health club and parking garage. Both the Cubs and the community will benefit from these renovations. Many fans will say that taking away history and tradition is not good for the game, but

Wrigley has been in poor condition for many years now and is due for an upgrade. The Cubs have not won a World Series championship since 1908, which was six years before the field was even built. Having these renovations done gives Ricketts a newfound confidence that the Cubs will bring a championship back to Chicago. These renovations will help enormously in the future for the Cubs and their ability to market themselves to All-Star caliber players. “This massive investment will help us generate the resources we need for our baseball operations to develop championship-caliber players, “Ricketts said. It is astonishing sometimes how renovations and other new furnishings can improve a

team from one year to the next. Just look at the New York Yankees, who won the World Series in the same year they opened their new stadium. When you have a well-kept and recognizable stadium like Wrigley field, it makes players want to play for you. The Chicago Cubs fans are one of the most passionate and dedicated fanbases in the country and have waited a long time for a championship. With the help of these renovations, the Cubs look to be taking steps to building a championship team year-in and year-out. ZACK CONWAY -sports staff writer -sophomore -communication major

The last vestiges of the controversial Bowl Championship Series, conceived years ago on a cocktail napkin, will be phased out this week at a swank Pasadena, Calif., hotel. College football power brokers are meeting in Southern California to tie up loose BCS ends as they pin down the particulars for a new four-team playoff beginning in the 2014 season. “We’ve done a lot of the heavy lifting,” BCS Executive Director Bill Hancock said. On this week’s agenda for the BCS commissioners: Picking a name for the new system. The BCS, which was formed in 1998, will cease to exist after Pasadena concludes the current cycle by hosting the Rose Bowl on Jan. 1 and the final BCS title game on Jan. 6. Don’t expect anything exotic. The new name is likely to be something as simple as College Football Series, though fans in one Southeastern Conference state have lobbied for AAI (Annual Alabama Invitational). The Rose, Sugar and Orange bowls have already been issued semifinal spots. The Rose and Sugar will host the first semifinal games on Jan. 1, 2015, with the Orange getting a semifinal in 2016. Each bowl will get four semifinals over the length of the contract. The frontrunners for the other three host bowls are presumed to

MCT CAMPUS

Nick Saban and his Crimson Tide will face a playoff system in 2014. be the Fiesta, Cotton and will be on the panel. It will be similar in concept to the Chick-fil-A. The title game will be up 10-person committee used for annual bidding, much for the NCAA basketball like the Final Four and the tournament. However, the football comSuper Bowl. It will be a shock if the first mittee is likely to be larger college football champion- and could include a repreship game is not awarded sentative from the media. to Cowboys Stadium in In addition to choosing the playoff teams, the commitTexas. The commissioners are tee will also help pair toplikely to settle on the com- ranked schools in the other mittee’s size this week but major bowls. probably will not name who

Wednesday, April 24, 2013 Print Edition  

Wednesday, April 24, 2013 Print Edition of The Collegiate Times

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