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An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 109th year, issue 85

Art & Entertainment, page 2

Opinions, page 3

Sports, page 7

Study Break, page 6

Tinder simplifies dating Student dies in

car crash in DC MALLORY NOE-PAYNE news editor

KEVIN DICKEL / COLLEGIATE TIMES

BY RACHEL CLINE | features staff writer

Tinder, an iPhone app created in 2010, allows users to link their Facebook profiles to meet potential dates in a nearby geographic area by finding mutual profile “likes.” Imagine this: you are walking down the street and pass someone you would really like to talk to, but you are too shy to initiate. What if you could let them know you are interested without the fear of rejection? That is the idea behind Tinder, a dating app that launched last fall in the iTunes store. Users can find local matches and choose who they’re interested in speaking with, all without the typical nervousness associated with meeting strangers. “(Tinder) connects you with people who are nearby and you get to choose if you like them or not,” said Justin Mateen, co-founder of Tinder. “If a mutual liking takes place, then it connects you with them and you can chat with them through the app.” Mateen explains that he and co-founder Sean Rad developed the app after noticing how difficult it can sometimes be to meet new people, especially online.

“(Rad) and I just realized that dating was broken,” Mateen said. “Online dating was broken. We wanted to create an app that emulates the way the real world works in terms of social discovery and meeting new people.” Word of Mouth After a few months of waiting for word of mouth to spread, the app has increased in popularity since January. According to Mateen, the number of users has spread nationally across every demographic, but a majority of that growth has been among people ages 18 to 25. While Tinder is not quite a household name at Virginia Tech like some of the traditional dating websites, there is a wide see TINDER / page two

Sami Ullah, a 22-year-old senior majoring in business information technology at Virginia Tech, died in a car accident over spring break that left two others seriously injured. Ullah was home in Northern Virginia over break when he crashed his car early Sunday morning, March 10 while leaving Washington D.C. Police say Ullah was driving his vehicle over the Key Bridge and had accelerated to around 90 mph. The front driver’s side wheel hit the island curb, causing Ullah to lose control of the car. Because of the momentum, the vehicle flipped three times before landing upside down, the roof entirely shorn off. Arlington Police spokesman Dustin Sternbeck said two Virginia Department of Transportation workers witnessed the accident and dialed 911 at 4:58 a.m., assisting in emergency medical care and rescuing one passenger from the vehicle. Another passenger was thrown from the car. Both were taken to the hospital and have survived. Ullah was trapped behind the wheel; he suffered a fatal blow to his head and died at the scene. Ullah, a Pakastani who moved to the United States with his family before his 10th birthday, was deeply rooted in his faith and was active in the Muslim community in Northern Virginia. Neeraj Nandanan, a senior finance major, said Ullah was like a brother to him, and he was a person who always put friends and family first. “It was almost like it was his mission to make sure his friends were happy and smiling,” Nandanan said. Nandanan also said Ullah was intelligent, a mature and responsible hard-worker, who would refuse to skip class

more info A candle light vigil is being held for all three students who died over break tonight at 8 in front of the Pylons. or blow off an assignment. He loved the outdoors, and always wanted to be out and about. “He hated sitting around,” Nandanan said. Even though Ullah drove a BMW and a motorcycle sometimes when home, Nandanan was surprised to hear that excessive speed was a factor in the accident, describing Ullah as a cautious and responsible driver, who had never gotten a speeding ticket. Ullah wouldn’t even bring his motorcycle down to Blacksburg to drive with Nandanan, who also has one and always urged him to go for rides around the area. “He’s with me all the time where I go now,” Nandanan said, “He’ll still be my riding partner.” Sternbeck said that a toxicology report, which would show whether Ullah had been drinking or using drugs the morning of the accident, could take up to 16 weeks to be completed. Ullah is one of three Tech students that died over break. Sarah Dugas, a freshman, died March 16 at her home in Virginia Beach and Bryan Baugh, a sophomore International Studies major, died on campus in his dorm room March 7. For information about the other two Tech students, Bryan Baugh and Sarah Dugas, who died over break see online. Follow the writer on Twitter: @MalloryNoePayne

Backstreets closes its doors after 20 years in Blacksburg JUSTIN GRAVES news reporter

Backstreets, a popular Blacksburg restaurant established almost 30 years ago, will be closing its doors for the final time this weekend. Despite Tech’s spring break, the restaurant remained busy this past week as news of the closing drove locals to feast there one last time. Backstreets sits at the corner of Washington and Main Street downtown — not a “back street” by any means — and the name is actually an ode to its original location when it opened in 1984, behind the building that now houses the popular bar and restaurant Sharkey’s. Backstreets moved to its present location in 1987 and will be closing its doors this Saturday, March 23. Eric Sturm, the general manager, has been with Backstreets since then, when it was called

“Backstreets on Main.” It was one of three locations for the restaurant at the time. “Back then, we used to send eight or 10 runs to Lee Hall at one time,” Sturm recalled. “The dining hall food was just not good back then, and we did a lot of deliveries like that on campus. There was no Jimmy John’s, there was no Subway. Everybody went for pizza back then. It was a much different time in Blacksburg.” Backstreets announced before break that they would be closing their doors on Saturday, creating a run on business over the break that may cause them to close early. “Over break we were still expecting to be a little slow but it’s been busier than even during the school year. It’s nice, but we haven’t really hired anyone in the past month or so, so we’re feeling a little short,” Sturm said. The original owner, Steve

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

Backstreets will close for good on March 23, after being a Blacksburg staple since it opened in 1984. Andrews, and Strum have con- price of the special flour the until now. templated closing Backstreets restaurant uses in their dough “Those kinds of things wear over the years at various times more than tripled in price, from you out after a while. We’ve when things have gotten dif- $12 to $40. Despite that, the been through a lot and we ficult. For instance, in 2008 the business pulled through — just felt like right now was the

best time to move on to other things,” Strum said. “I think we’ve taken Backstreets as far as we can take it.” For Strum, the next move will be more about fit than money. “I’m mostly looking to get some place that I really want to be; it’s not all about money,” Strum said. “I just want to be somewhere that has a little bit of a nice culture that makes a difference in the community.” Overall, Strum hopes that the legacy of Backstreets was more than just a place to go get pizza. “With the people I’ve talked to today and the past few days, it’s been a lot of first dates, a lot of ‘we got married after we ate there,’ and that’s what we’d like to be remembered for,” Strum said. “Good people and good memories. It’s definitely been a ride.” Follow the writer on Twitter: @hesonwheels


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march 19, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

arts & entertainment

editors: emma goddard, nick smirniotopoulos featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Tinder: Dating app gets mixed reviews from students from page one

base of students who are using the app. Jennifer Cohen, a sophomore HNFE major, downloaded the app about a month ago after hearing good things about it from her roommate. Like many users, she enjoyed the idea of meeting new people nearby without the fear of fake profiles that often pop up on traditional dating websites. “It links to your Facebook, but your (Tinder) page doesn’t show people your profile,” Cohen said. “All you would see would be my picture, my first name, my year and then whatever sentence I write about myself. Then the part about Facebook tells how many mutual friends and mutual likes you have.” Within the app, users can set a radius to decide how far away their matches can be. From there, they can scroll through profiles to see if anyone looks interesting. If they like what they see, they “like” the person. If not, they move on to the next. Rejecting Rejection However, “liking” people on Tinder is different from real life in that they don’t automatically receive a notification that someone wants to get to know them better. Instead, the app depends on a mutual “like” before setting up a match. “You don’t know that they liked you unless you like each other,” Cohen said. “If I like someone and they don’t like me back, it doesn’t even tell them. So, it’s not embarrassing for me if someone doesn’t like me back because they don’t even know.” For many people, knowing that they cannot be outright rejected is one of the biggest

see their [description] sentence. I feel like most people probably just go through based on looks.” Th is aspect of Tinder is familiar to many students who were avid users of the VT Hot or Not website. The Hot or Not pages allowed people to rate strangers on a scale based solely on their picture. For Cohen, this is one of the app’s biggest flaws. “I don’t want someone who only wants me because they like my picture,” Cohen said. However, Tinder’s creators feel that the app emulates reality as closely as possible. This includes seeing people across a crowded room and feeling an instant attraction, which is similar to Tinder in that the feelings are at least initially based on their physical looks. “Catfishing” Despite its attempts to recreate social life through a cell phone app, many critics are still skeptical of the app because of Internet schemes and the recent phenomenon of “catfishing.” The documentary, and now MTV show, “Catfish,” focuses on online relationships, investigating whether the people behind their Facebook profi les are really who they say they are. Horror stories about fake profi le pages have many TINDER / SCREENSHOT people hesitant to use Tinder Tinder brings pieces from traditional online dating sites to the iPhone. for fear of being “catfished,” especially by people that they appeals of the app. cal of making matches with know live nearby. Mateen “We are doing our best to a majority of the decision feels that this is not an issue take feelings of fear and rejec- placed on their profi le pic- that Tinder users should be tion out of the equation as it ture. too worried about. pertains to not only dating, “It’s not just random people, “Facebook does a fantastic but to social discovery in gen- but it’s a lot about just how job of filtering user informaeral,” Mateen said. they look,” Cohen said. “It tion in order to prevent fake Do You Like What You See? pops up and you see a pic- users, so for the most part, we A lot of users and critics, ture, and then you have to rely on their ability to detect though, are a little skepti- click the next thing to even inauthentic data,” Mateen

said. “Unlike many other dating apps, we do not let users create a Tinder account unless they’re on Facebook and have 50 or more friends.” Even with the extra security surrounding the app, Cohen decided to delete the app after running into issues with a match. After deciding to only like people that shared mutual friends with her, Cohen felt much safer with her set of matches and chatted with about 10 of them. Many seemed interested only in hooking up, but one stuck out as someone she may be interested in meeting in real life. “We planned a time, but he

really cool because you get to meet people. I just thought it would be cool because there are a lot of people at Tech that I don’t know, and I thought it would be a good way to meet people.” Mateen echoes this sentiment, saying that the Tinder team wants the app to evolve into being about more than just dating. Looking Towards the Future “Right now, it’s just about dating, but actually, it’s whatever you make of it,” Mateen said. “We’re going to venture into new avenues eventually. It’s going to be about all social discovery, not just dating.” Cohen feels that the path that the app is on right now could lead it towards becoma phase that will ultiWe’re going to venture ing mately die out, just like “VT into new avenues Hot or Not.” However, she thinks that if Tinder is able to eventually. It’s going transform and move beyond to be about all social being just a dating app, it could stick around. discovery, not just “I’m hoping that it’ll shift,” dating.” Cohen said. “If more people get on, there will be less Justin Mateen creepy people and more norTinder co-founder mal people, and then it’ll be kind of like Facebook and meeting people that way. I seemed against meeting in think the idea is cool, but not public,” Cohen said. “I don’t the way it’s being used now.” Whether Tinder will withunderstand why.” After her match continued stand the test of time that to reject meeting in dining all social applications and halls and insisted on meeting websites must go through in his dorm instead, Cohen remains unclear, but Mateen stopped talking to him and feels that people who are still unsure should give it a deleted the app. Although her experience chance and wait for upcomwith the app was less than ing changes, including the ideal, Cohen says she does launch of the app on Android understand why the app has markets. “We’re overwhelmed with spread so quickly. “It’s fun to see who likes Tinder’s initial success and your page,” Cohen said. “If it growth,” Mateen said. “But were actually used for what we are just getting started.” I told it was for, it would be

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editors: josh higgins, shawn ghuman opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

opinions

march 19, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

what you’re saying

The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

On “Curbing student drinking requires mentality change”

Collegiate Times Editorial Staff

Doug Dooling: Penn State student here. State Patty’s Day is not on St. Patrick’s Day. In 2007, spring break fell over the latter, so some students founded State Patty’s Day in February. Strangely enough, the creator behind the faux holiday has since condemned State Patty’s because of its destructiveness. Anonymous: Want to fix college binge drinking? Lower the drinking age to 18. They need to redo that study to show how many Seniors binge drink versus underclassmen. In my experience Seniors (Generally over 21) binge drink and had a lot less crazy wild parties then Freshmen/ Sophomores. Or if they had crazy parties it was the underclassmen who got more drunk. College students drink more because they aren’t allowed to, so the stigma of, “be cool and drink because we are in college now without parental guidance,” stems from the desire to do what they couldn’t in High School.

MCT CAMPUS

Transportation bill finally takes on VDOT G

ov. McDonnell’s transportation bill has been attacked from all flanks. Progressive Virginians are upset about new hybrid vehicle fees, and conservative Virginians are upset about “new taxes” levied to finance a cut in the gas tax and much needed infrastructure development. But Gov. McDonnell deserves credit for taking on the problem of gas taxes no longer working: his actions will redefine infrastructure policies for our generation. Stephen Dubner, co-author of the book “Freakonomics,” recently published a podcast outlining the problem. According to the Congressional Budget Office, vehicles manufactured from 2017 to 2025 will be required to achieve between 34.1 and 49.6 miles per gal-

lon due to increased fuel efficiency standards. Higher mileage standards are necessary to achieve energy independence and to curb the impact of cars on the environment, but also reduce the costs of driving and require us to buy less gas, driving down gas tax revenue. The gas tax was used to fund road maintenance until drivers began to shift towards greater fuel economy. The gas tax was designed as a “user pays” system. Trucking companies that use Highway 81 should have to pay to maintain it just like I do when I drive to and from Virginia Tech. But since the tax is not indexed to inflation, and we have more fuel efficient cars, revenues have dropped. Recently, several proposals have popped up nationwide to solve transportation

revenue problems. One idea is to focus more on sales tax to fund roads. A sales tax to fund roads violates the “user pays” principle because poorer Virginians who use the roads less pay more of their income in sales taxes than truckers who pass through our commonwealth for six hours at a time hauling goods to other markets. Grover Norquist said the “user pays” idea should scrap any new taxes and fees and “direct more general-fund revenue toward infrastructure.” But that would mean cutting other vital services like Medicaid and school funding. We do have to pay for our roads and other services if we want to keep them. Even a staunch federalist would agree that roads and infrastructure should be the purview of

Gov. McDonnell deserves credit for taking on the problem of gas taxes no longer working: his actions will redefine infrastructure policies for our generation.”

state government. Dubner mentions tracking how much people drive and charging them for road use at the end of the year. A simple check of the odometer on state inspections could give a reading of how far a driver has gone and then the commonwealth could levy state taxes based on

that driver’s actual use of our roads. We could also use GPS technology to achieve the same goal. Any proposal to fix our transportation funding system is going to be controversial and imperfect. We must do a better job of ensuring that people who use our roads pay for our roads. Gov. McDonnell’s plan punishes hybrid vehicle owners and imposes taxes on the poor for roads they do not use as much as the previous tax base. But despite poor policy decisions, I compliment the governor for tackling a big problem with no easy solution. JOSH YAZMAN -regular columnist -junior -political science

People still don’t Costco shows good business options wash their hands C

T

here are things that spark my interest on campus quite often. Some days it’s something funny or enlightening, and sometimes it’s something I wish I didn’t see. However, some things are just plain gross — particularly in the dining halls, where ravenous students are literally drooling over our delicious campus food. To the person at the salad bar in D2 last week licking his fingers then reaching for the salad tongs — I saw you, and it was disgusting. I would like to think that when students go off to college, they make an honest attempt to at least pretend to be somewhat grown up. But after seeing students like the finger-licker of D2, I’ve begun to doubt that sentiment. It isn’t just the dining halls — it’s everywhere. I’ll visit a restroom in almost any academic building, and I see someone sneeze into their hand and indiscriminately grope for the door handle. To those who do this, do you know what kind of germs you are propagating? I hate to preach about this, but with nasty viruses going around in the dead of winter, poor hygiene gives ample opportunities for bacteria to do their worst. Among the typical flu and cold viruses, a particularly nasty one has developed over the winter months. Known as Norovirus, it’s a terrible stomach bug that doesn’t last too long, but will wreak havoc on the gastrointestinal tract for about 24 hours. According to the Centers for Disease Control, Norovirus peaks around the colder months of the year, when our immune systems are compro-

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mised because of short, cold days. In the United Kingdom, this virus has swept the nation, infecting over 1.1 million people. Not only does the virus thrive in wintertime, it can survive for months on end in the cold weather and is resistant to alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Along with the shorter days and low temperatures, the fact that most college students stay awake well into the night studying has also been proven to compromise the immune response. One thing that baffles me is that while this information is everywhere, people still do not take precautions. Whenever someone commits a reprehensible act like the D2 finger-licker, it reverberates “I’m inconsiderate.” However, some people take hygiene to the extreme. I’ll admit, I sometimes get too carried away with religious hand washing and holding my breath when someone visibly sick walks by, in hopes whatever they have won’t come my way. Perhaps the solution to poor campus hygiene would be best promoted through more propaganda. Remind people of the nasty things out there that can and will sicken you, and in due time, they will come to learn — hopefully not the hard way. It isn’t that difficult, people. One of the best ways to prevent unwanted sickness is simple: wash your hands. Oh, and don’t lick your fingers. ANDREW WIMBISH -regular columnist -junior -English

onsider two companies — the first offers quality products at a low cost to its customers, while paying its employees above average wages and providing them with excellent health insurance if they choose to take it. The second company offers a wider array of low cost products with a higher variance in quality, but on average pays wages that are at or just above minimum wage. Which would you rather work for? The real world parallels to these two companies are Costco and Wal-Mart. Some self-reported statistics from the two companies: Costco’s average wage is $17.00 compared to Wal-Mart’s $9.68. Costco covers 82 percent of its employees with company health insurance while WalMart covers 48 percent. A couple of inferences can be made as to the long term goals and priorities of each company based on these two data points. Clearly, Costco prioritizes the welfare of its employees over adding an extra tenth of a point to its profit margin. The same cannot be said of Wal-Mart, with its history of incredibly low wages and reluctance to provide decent health coverage for its employees. Although both business models are successful, there is

a clear winner when it comes to the distribution of that success. Wal-Mart’s “success” just translates to exorbitant wages for its executives and ever increasing dividends for its shareholders. Costco’s success, on the other hand, is proof that a business can be successful with everyone coming out

CEOs make many multiples of what the average employee pulls in, but is there really any reason for this?”

a winner. Th is idea challenges the prevailing notion that a business’s success is only possible if someone is getting screwed. Many people fail to acknowledge this hard truth, but look no further than the leading companies in each industry to see who is reaping the maximum benefit. CEOs make many multiples of what the average employee pulls in, but is there really any reason for this? Could their ingenuity and value to the company really outweigh the value of an average employee’s labor by so much? Jim Sinegal, co-founder of Costco, does not

believe so. In 2005, he said “Having an individual who is making 100 or 200 or 300 times more than the average person working on the floor is wrong.” Sinegal’s position is definitely a unique one in a corporate culture of institutionalized greed. For major corporations, the bottom line is what matters, and if employees are benefitted along the way, it’s a bonus. Sinegal’s approach is a more sustainable model, reducing turnover and promoting loyalty from employees. The Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2013 has been introduced in Congress, seeking to gradually increase the federal minimum wage to $10.10 from the current $7.25. Unsurprisingly, Costco is championing the bill, with President and CEO Craig Jelinek vocally putting his support behind it. Raising the minimum wage seems to be a no brainer for Costco, whose starting wage is $11.50. If only other companies would take the hint; exploitation is a thing of the past, better business means better treatment.

SHARATH REREDDY -regular columnist -sophomore -economics

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march 19, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

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Airedale Malamute Akita Foxhound Mastiff Pinscher Beagle Bloodhound Boxer Bulldog Chihuahua Chow Collie Daschund Dalmatian

44 ID checker’s concern 45 An original Mouseketeer 48 Séance sound 50 Make a choice 53 *Street urchin 55 “To Kill a Mockingbird” author Harper __ 56 AOL chats 57 California wine valley 58 Church chorus 60 Playwright Simon 62 *Chain for plussize women’s fashion

DOWN 1 Moistens in the pan 2 Many John Wayne movies 3 President Harding 4 Lion’s den 5 Taoist Lao-__ 6 “Well, lookee here!” 7 Road repair worker 8 Future doc’s undergrad concentration 9 Smarten (up) 10 “Well, __-di-dah!” 11 Desert feature 12 Fashion world VIP 13 Los Angeles bay named for an apostle 18 Smooch 22 Turtle’s protection 26 Salon service often paired with a mani 27 Memo-routing abbr. 28 GI’s address 33 Entrepreneuraiding org. 35 Makes believe 36 Memorial structure 37 Peewee

38 Eucharistic plate 39 Farming prefix 40 “Look before you __” 43 On a pension: Abbr. 46 Sung syllables 47 Francia neighbor 49 Bartlett or Bosc 50 Chicago Fire Mrs. 51 In a sty, say 52 Exam taker

54 Family matriarchs 59 Fable 61 Sad 63 911 response initials 64 Ottoman governor

Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

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3/7/13 1

health. employment. crime. music. sports. art. education. housing. government. world politics. travel. traffic. construction. business. sales. relationships. entertainment. virginia tech. ut prosim. construction. organizations. downtown. dorms. dining centers. tuition. We share your concerns. Check us out in the paper or online at collegiatetimes.com

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sports

editors: matt jones, zach mariner sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

march 19, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

7

Miami takes home first ACC title; Hokies sent home early JACOB EMERT sports reporter

The 60th ACC men’s basketball tournament tipped off Thursday in Greensboro, N.C. It took four days and 11 games to narrow the field to one, but for the first time ever, the Miami Hurricanes are ACC tournament champions. North Carolina State — who, unsurprisingly, was welcomed by a massive home-court advantage — and Virginia Tech faced off in the tournament’s second match, which tipped off March 14. The Hokies were able to keep up with NC State for much of the first half, trailing by just six at the break. However, the size and strength of the Wolfpack became too much for the Tech to handle, and N.C. State came out on top, 80-63. Erick Green, whose shelf is quickly filling up with various personal performance plaques, has lacked oncourt support from his teammates all season long. Despite the team’s last place finish in the ACC, Green has been able to mask some of the Hokies shortcomings by making games competitive on his own. In his final game in a Tech uniform, however, he had no such luck.

NC State point guard Lorenzo Brown finished the night with 12 points and seven assists, but was most impressive on the defensive side of the ball. He limited Green, who leads the nation with 25.4 points-per-game, to just 15 points on 19 shots. The finish was disappointing for the Hokies, but not surprising; they won just four conference games under first-year head coach James Johnson. “It hurt, because, like Coach (Johnson) said, I’m a winner, and I’ve always been a winner,” Green said. “I was looking forward to holding the trophy up and ending my college career as ACC champions. I got the hugs from my teammates and walked off with Coach. It sucked, man, because I didn’t want my college career to end like this. Green was less than 20 minutes removed from the final buzzer of his final collegiate game, but still, he was able to find the words to describe what the past four years as a student-athlete at Tech has meant to him. “I know it was a losing season, but I’ve learned a lot,” Green — who averaged just 2.6 points as a freshman — said. “It sucks that it has to

end and I’m going to miss college basketball; I’m going to miss being in college hanging out with these guys and Coach Johnson, laughing and joking. “I’m definitely going to miss playing in Cassell Coliseum in front of the Hokie fans; that’s something that’s always been great and I’m going to miss that a lot.” The Hurricanes received the tournament’s No. 1 seed — the first in school history — after finishing the regular season as the outright champions, but had a fair share of trouble getting past Boston College in the quarterfinals. After scraping by against the Eagles, the ‘Canes breezed past NC State in the semis on the back of Durand Scott’s 32 points. Facing the Tar Heels on Championship Sunday, the Hurricanes sought to be the first team from outside the state of North Carolina to win both the ACC regular season championship and the ACC tournament. Miami led 44-41 after a half that saw 15 made three-pointers shot at a 51 percent clip. Shane Larkin, Miami’s first-team All-ACC point guard, recorded 15 first-half points and five assists. He was on his way to 28 points and

seven assists, as well as a tournament MVP trophy. “You don’t realize how quick he is well, some of (the media) think (they) realize how quick he is, but until you’re out there defending him it’s just a different level of quickness,” said UNC guard Marcus Paige, who had the task of sticking with Larkin. “He’s really a complete guard, he’s not selfish, he attacks, he finds the open man, he’s had as good a year as any guard in the country. He’s a great player.” The second half was as well played as the first — the teams combined for only 17 turnovers in the entire game — but Miami capitalized on UNC errors down the stretch and pulled away. “I thought the first half was about as high a level of basketball as I’ve seen all year long,” said Miami head coach Jim Larranaga. “We were shooting the three about as well as they were, so just a tremendous college basketball game, and we’re thrilled to be the ACC Tournament Champions for 2013.” Despite their extremely impressive resume, Miami became the first ACC team to win both the regular season and conference titles and not

TREVOR WHITE / SPPS

Cadarian Raines shoots over NC State’s Richard Howell in the Hokies 80-63 loss. receive a No. 1 seed in the NCAA tournament; It will be a No. 2 seed in the East region. Duke also received a No. 2 seed, while UNC and NC State are both No. 8 seeds.

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Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Continue to resolve issues creatively. Ask a female friend for advice. You have better luck for the next two days, every little bit counts. A inancial shortfall is temporary. Your understanding continues to increase all week.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) Strive for harmony and joy at work. It’s possible and pro itable. Continue to increase intimate connections. This is not something you can fake, so don’t try. Focus on pleasant interactions. Travel later.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Better stay close to home now and avoid arguments. Travel can be challenging, too ... a walk’s nice for a change of scenery. There’s no need to worry, though, especially about money. Keep your promises.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) You’re moving fast and things seem easy, but don’t fall asleep at the wheel. Intimate relationships could use some attention. Listen like your life depends on it, or like love does.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Continue to be respectful and increase your career stature. Now’s the time to study and focus on the future. There’s no need to buy toys just yet; you could compare costs.

Submit to Couple of the Week!

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Feeling the love may require some concentration, but it’s there. Notice the magnetism. Spend some time with a favorite person and replenish you spirit. Acknowledge them for who they are for you.

LESSON: Lube your lug nuts

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Listen to words of advice from your friends. They have a lot to contribute, if you let them. Then return the favor. Continue to decrease clutter this week, to create new space. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) It’s not a good time to travel yet. Cut the luff, but don’t worry about money now. There’s a challenge coming, and you can forge ahead. Meditate for harmony. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Consider options and investigate possibilities carefully. Odd circumstances increase your vigilance. You’ll ind what you seek. A female asks the burning question. Continue to check things off your list.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) There could be a setback. Don’t let this dissuade you from manifesting a dream. Discuss shared inances, and continue to limit spending. Be gracious in a heated moment. It will work out. Get some rest. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Heed your mate’s concerns. Don’t splurge on treats. But pursue romance! What you start can continue to increase later. Family matters vie with work for your attention. Postpone a inancial discussion for later. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You’re luckier than usual today and tomorrow, and your self-con idence increases all week. Hold on to your money, though. There could be hidden dif iculties. The more thorough you’ve been with a job, the better.

WHY: Lug nuts, if not lubricated occasionally, can seize or “freeze” to the studs due to corrosion. Repairing them can be expensive. Having to call a tow truck for a flat you can’t remove is even more expensive.The next time you change or rotate your tires, pick up some anti-seize lubricant at your local auto supply store. Clean the stud threads with a wire brush and wipe them with the lubricant. It’s formulated to prevent the lug nuts (spark plugs, too) from seizing and won’t allow them to loosen as you drive, the way other lubricants might. If a lug nut does freeze to a stud, try spraying the nut and stud with WD-40 or Liquid Wrench. Allow it to penetrate for 10 or 20 minutes. Use a heat gun to apply heat.Then use a ratchet wrench to remove the lug.

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march 19, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: emma goddard, nick smirniotopoulos featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

New ‘Sim City’ promotes Carell’s humor grows stale more online interaction Movie Rating

Game Rating

The ability to serve as the city’s mayor is not what sets the new installment of “Sim City” apart from its predecessors — it’s the ease with which you can build up that city. If you manage to look past the DRM debacle that led to endless problems for early adopters of the game, you’ll find that “SimCity” is one of the most approachable city building simulations ever. The largest obstacle you’ll likely face is the 15,000 simoleon starting budget. Proper road placement and building zoning are the keys to any successful city, but the challenge comes in the form of managing finances and appeasing the needs of your citizens. Maintaining a clear focus for your city is essential as the actual space allotted to each virtual city is incredibly limited. Fortunately, “SimCity” makes it both fun and easy to place roads, zone areas for specific growth, and build parks and attractions. With a wealth of data maps and information available about almost every aspect of your city, you’ll never waste time wondering what you should be doing to accomplish your goals. Advisors pop-up with friendly messages, giving you recommendations that usually guide you down the right path. Instead of creating massive cities, Maxis has opted to create a region system that links cities together. Instead of creating and running cities independently, all players are required to claim a plot of land within a larger region. All of the cities within that region share certain technolo-

gies and can trade resources, products and services. A city dedicated to taking out garbage will use its vast garbage truck fleet to collect trash from neighboring cities, as well as from its own. The beauty of this new approach to city building is it really makes for a meaningful cooperative experience. Although this works at its best when all of the mayors communicate with each other to avoid overlapping industries and research, it still plays a significant part, even if you’re jumping into a random public region. This all breaks apart when you treat the game like any other “SimCity” game. The size of each city is restricted to the point that you really can’t hope to dominate or even start to enter every single industry. Focusing on a single purpose for each city is definitely necessary. A large tourist destination can’t afford to export power to regional cities. These overarching changes to the way the game is played aren’t necessarily good or bad. Rather, they’re a huge change from what most players are used to. Amid the immense coverage of the “SimCity” launch’s failure, Maxis has created a game that manages to modernize the “SimCity” franchise, while maintaining the very things that make the series what it is. You may no longer be able to build gigantic cities that stretch across the screen, but you’ll be able to build cities connected to a larger region. BEN KIM -regular game columnist -sophomore -communication major

“The Incredible Wonderstone” is the latest film from comedian Steve Carell. Carell plays the titular character, an aging magician who, along with his best friend Anton Marvelton (Steve Buscemi), performs a Siegfried & Roytype magic show, complete with rhinestones and a badly choreographed dance to the song “Abracadabra.” Burt and Anton’s friendship is threatened by Burt’s massive ego, while their popularity is threatened by an over-the-top street artist named Steve Gray (Jim Carrey). The cast is completed with aspiring magician Olivia Wilde serving as Burt’s assistant, the retired magician Alan Arkin who inspired Burt as a child, and casino owner James Gandolfini. “Burt Wonderstone” follows Burt’s character arc as he struggles to deal with a rival stealing his audience, repairing a lifelong friendship and re-discovering why he fell in love with magic in the first place. The movie’s story of show business rivalries and the redeeming power of friendship is nothing original, but it’s entertaining and sympathetic enough to get audiences invested in the characters. Carell returns to a character he knows all too well — the unbelievably oblivious buffoon — and a more physical comedy after a recent foray into genuine leading-man status with “Crazy, Stupid, Love.” While Carell plays this role well, after “The Office,” “The 40-Year-Old Virgin,” “Dinner For Schmucks,” and most of his other filmography, the character is getting a little stale. Is the character amusing? Yes. Would it have been a lot funnier

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New Releases Movies Friday, March 22 “Admission” A straight-laced admissions officer for Princeton University encounters some surprises, when it turns out that a gifted, but unconventional, student applying may be the son she gave up many years ago. Starring: Tina Fey, Paul Rudd

if we hadn’t seen it a million times already? Absolutely. Jim Carrey is surprisingly fun as the wild street performer Gray, a sort of Criss Angel and David Blaine mash-up. Carrey revels in the outrageous, and its always fun to laugh at a caricature as eccentric as his character. Indeed, it’s Carrey and the rest of the supporting cast who actually provide most of the best parts of the movie. Arkin, fresh off an Oscar nomination for his supporting role in “Argo,” delights in his deadpan humor as the magician who prompted Burt’s interest in magic as a boy. And in a smaller role, Jay Mohr plays a charmingly unsuave wannabe magician who steals a brief scene. The writing team of John Francis Daley — famous for playing Sam Weir on the cult classic television show “Freaks and Geeks”— and Jonathan Goldstein created the script.

They’ve recently received noteworthy praise for “Horrible Bosses,” which is a lot better than this film. “The Incredible Burt Wonderstone” is directed by Don Scardino, who is best known for directing and producing episodes of the recently ended television show “30 Rock.” With so many big names attached to this film, there was a lot of potential here. But while Burt Wonderstone’s ridiculous antics are funny and the movie is entertaining, it feels like we’ve seen this story a few times already. My recommendation is that if you’re craving to see Steve Carell portray an awfully costumed buffoon, just stay in and watch the infinitely superior “Anchorman.” KATIE WHITE -regular movie columnist -junior -history major

“Olympus Has Fallen” When terrorists attack the White House and take the president hostage, an exSpecial Forces operative is the only one who can fight back. Starring: Gerard Butler, Morgan Freeman, Aaron Eckhart

Games Tuesday, March 19 “Gears of War: Judgment” This game precludes the Gears of War trilogy after the aftermath of Emergence Day, following Kilo Squad as they fight to save the city of Halvo Bay. “The Walking Dead: Survival Instinct” Based on the popular AMC TV series, this first-person action game follows survivors Darryl and Merle Dixon as they journey across the Georgia countryside.


Tuesday, March 19, 2013 Print Edition