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2013 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE RELEASED SEE PAGE 7

Tuesday, February 26, 2013 An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 109th year, issue 78 News, page 2

Arts & Entertainment, page 3

Opinions, page 5

Sports, page 7

Study Break, page 6

Accidents spike around Parking lot to add spaces near Surge start of semester

The start of the spring semester at Virginia Tech began with four crashes on campus. Even though it was fewer crashes than had happened in January the past three years, there were more injured pedestrians. Every year, the Tech Police Department distributes reports to their officers with an analysis of the traffic incidents of the year. The reports include the total numbers of accidents, the type of accidents and what areas have had the most incidents that year. Accidents Happen At approximately 9:00 a.m. on Jan. 30, the Blacksburg Police Department was called to investigate a traffic incident on Draper Street outside the Kent Street parking garage. The incident involved a female driver crashing into a bicyclist. The driver was charged with failure to yield the right of way, and the bicyclist only suffered minor injuries. Later that same day, at approximately 5:45 in the afternoon, another vehicle hit three students in a pedestrian cross-

walk on West Campus Drive near the Harper Lot. According to the driver, the windows were fogged up, and they couldn’t see the students in the crosswalk. All of the students were released with minor injuries. For 2012, the police department reported a total of 66 accidents on campus. Fourteen of the accidents involved bicyclists — some of which did not involve an additional vehicle — and six involved pedestrians. “Pedestrians and bikes are our two high risk activities in terms of traffic,” said Lieutenant Deborah Morgan with Tech Police. Over the past three years, there has been an average of 65 accidents on campus every year. Ten percent of the accidents involve pedestrians and 24 percent involve bicycles. “I always make sure I follow all of the rules when biking, even the ones that most people aren’t aware of,” said Nadia Doutcheva, a freshman in Industrial Systems Engineering. The number of accidents decrease

Total crashes by month from 2010-2012 January

15

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21 12

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17

April May

8 16

June July

9 17

August

27

September 23

October November December

see TRAFFIC / page four

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In a special report, the Collegiate Times takes a look at trends in traffic accidents on Tech’s campus over the past three years.

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James Miller, a Virginia Tech Student, crosses Price’s Fork Road on the crosswalk where a student was hit by a car in late October.

Students may see a higher price tag on their parking passes next year. Due to the construction of a new parking garage included in the Turner Street project, there will be a slight escalation of parking permit prices beginning next fall. Richard McCoy, associate director of Parking Services, said the process to determine the new parking permit price was still undergoing, but the increase isn’t expected to be drastic. “We’ve worked very hard to keep the cost of parking down at Virginia Tech,” McCoy said. “We’re one of, if not the lowest, price parking institute on the east coast of our size. We’ve worked hard to keep the price down, and we’ll continue to do that.” The ongoing Turner Street project, which includes the new Center for the Arts building, also includes a mixed-use building and parking garage located across Turner Street from Surge. The mixed-use building will have retail space and house some university offices. The parking garage is meant to provide more parking for the Center for the Arts building and the north-east side of campus. The project’s approximate costs approach $60 million for an 800-space parking garage and the mixed-use building that is 141,000 gross square feet. The Center for the Arts will be located where Schultz Dining Hall used to sit, and the parking garage will be located behind the mixed-use facility. Because of Parking Services’ involvement in managing parking across Tech’s campus, it has had an active role in the construction of the new garage. It is their job to ensure that anyone needing to access facilities on the Tech campus by car is able to do so. According to McCoy, the parking situation at Tech is much better than other campuses of comparable size. Parking, especially faculty/

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Proposed Area For Turner Street Parking Garage

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info on the go The new parking garage will be able to park 800 vehicles, across Turner Street from Surge. staff parking, is more than capable of meeting current needs, McCoy said. Faculty/ staff permits are sold at a ratio of 1.1 per 1 space, with similar ratios being true for students. “I think there are sufficient spaces on campus, but they might not all be as convenient as people might like,” McCoy said. The Turner Street parking garage will be the second deck-style parking option to be available on Tech’s campus. The Perry Street parking garage, which opened in 2010, was the first. McCoy alluded to the fact that Parking Services, in future updates to parking choices on campus, might rely on parking decks more frequently. “Because we have spread out, we want to keep the reasonable walking time to classes or offices intact,” McCoy said. “We have probably moved to t he periphery as far as we can, and we’ll need to start consee PARK / page two

SGA hosts forum on how to improve advising system PRISCILLA ALVAREZ news editor

Academic advising can be a common frustration among students searching for direction in college. In an aim to remedy that, students and administrators came together Monday night to discuss their concerns. The director of academic affairs for the SGA, Caroline Gimenez planned the fi rst advising forum earlier this year to initiate a conversation between both parties. “For the past couple of years, advising has been a hot topic both from an administrator’s

perspective and from students,” Gimenez said. According to Gimenez, previous questions by students have been about pre-professional advising, class planning through checksheets and advisor training. In a search for solutions, the forum was intended for students and administrators to address the issues together. “I thought, what better way to get a conversation going than to put them in a room and let them chat it out?” Gimenez said. However, in order to address problems effectively, Gimenez took a different approach. She

asked representatives from each of the seven colleges to explain the rules and limitations of advising within their specific college to the students. “There are a lot of setbacks to advising, so I kind of wanted to give the administrators and the faculty time to explain to students this is why it’s run this way, this is some of the challenges we face in advising, what can we do to make that better?” Gimenez said. And that is what they did. Nine students and nine administrators attended the event. Seven tables were set up to represent each college in the

university. They all joined in a discussion about their advising structures and how to encourage students to meet with their advisors, among other things. Rachel Holloway, associate dean of undergraduate academic affairs, asked students what they could do to encourage students to meet with their advisors. Ideas mentioned included assigning a consistent advisor beginning freshman year, requiring students to visit their advisor to satisfy first year experience classes, and placing holds on student accounts. Other college representa-

tives, such as the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and College of Engineering, talked amongst themselves on how they each worked with students in terms of academic advising. While the forum discussion was a new approach, this is not the first time the university has worked on receiving student feedback on advising. Every three years, an assessment is sent out to gather student opinion on advising, according to Kimberly Smith, director of the university academic advising center. In addition, individual colleges also conduct their own

assessments — for example, University Studies. “We do surveys since our students have to transfer GIMENEZ out by a certain point into majors,” said Elaine Matuszek, associate director for academic advising and orientation. “We usually get quite good evaluations, and our numbers are high in regards to satisfaction.” Pamplin College of Business, see ADVISE / page two


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news

february 26, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: priscilla alvarez, mallory noe-payne, dean seal newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

you & the cut

Shifts could be reduced at airport MALLORY NOE-PAYNE news editor

Overnight air access to and from Roanoke may become more limited if automatic spending cuts, known as sequestration, go into effect March 1. The airport is on a list of facilities, released by Department of Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood at the end of last week, where overnight shifts at the air traffic control tower could be eliminated. According to the release, the DOT is beginning discussions with air traffic control unions to eliminate these midnight shifts across the country. The closures could impact services for commercial, general and military aviation across the country. However, in Roanoke, it is unlikely that changes to midnight shifts would affect commercial travelers, because the airport does not normally run commercial flights late into the day. According to the online

flight schedule, the airport’s last incoming fl ights normally arrive before midnight, and the first departing flights of the morning don’t leave until after 5:00 a.m. However, it is unclear how this could affect incoming flights that are delayed. The Roanoke Regional Airport is the closest airport to Virginia Tech. Traveling students can also fly out of Richmond International Airport, a three-hour drive, or out of one of the Washington, D.C. area airports around four hours away. If Congress does not agree to a budget by the beginning of March or passes another round of stop-gap legislation to hold sequestration off further, the DOT will see almost $1 billion cut from its budget. Those cuts would affect the Federal Aviation Administration, meaning that many of FAA’s employees will be be forced to take unpaid days off. Sequestration refers to a

more info This week, the Collegiate Times will run a small series on how sequestration cuts might affect students and Virginia Tech. Check back each day for more information.

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

The parking deck is attached to another mixed-use facility which will host some university offices. round of automatic budget cuts that will happen across the board, affecting many areas of the federal government, if the sharply divided Congress doesn’t agree on and pass a budget plan. The cuts would happen because Congress provided for them in legislation that was meant be an incentive for compromise on a budget. The changes would not take place until at least April 1. Follow the writer on Twitter: @MalloryNoePayne

Park: Permit costs will increase from page one

structing upward.” McCoy mentioned that parking decks might be considered in the Squires lot or in the Cage as well. While he could not give a definitive date as to when the Turner Street project parking garage would be open, McCoy did say it should be

relatively soon. According to him, Parking Services has no other large projects in the near future, except for some involvement in the Multi-Modal Transit Facility on Perry Street, because it is being built on what was previously a parking lot area. Parking Services might also have some association in the

planning of a possible surface lot behind the Cage. Other than these small contributions, Parking Services will continue to oversee the parking situation on campus and make sure that it continues to exist in the most efficient state possible. Follow the writer on Twitter: @pitialva

Bburg man cought after manhunt Advise: Students and staff create ideas MALLORY NOE-PAYNE news editor

A Blacksburg citizen accused of beating his girlfriend was captured by police Sunday after an attempt to escape on foot. Andrew Sojka, 32, is now in custody of the Montgomery County sheriff ’s department and is being charged with malicious wounding. Police were called to Sojka’s residence Sunday morning after reports of a fight. Sojka’s

girlfriend, whose name the police wouldn’t confirm, was injured with a concussion. Sojka was not at the residence when police arrived and had fled on foot into a wooded portion of the county around an old quarry off Lusters Gate Road. The search for Sojka involved Montgomery County’s sheriff ’s office and Blacksburg, Radford and Virginia Tech police. The police set up a perimeter around Sojka, when he made a phone call indicating that he

would consider surrendering to authorities. He was then discovered by an infrared camera from a state police helicopter. Sojka’s girlfriend was treated for her injuries and has been released from the hospital. Details of the incident have been confirmed by Captain Brian Wright of the Montgomery County Sheriff ’s Office. Follow the writer on Twitter: @MalloryNoePayne

from page one

on the other hand, does not currently hold as many assessments, but has received complaints regarding their structure. “The first two years are done by professional advisors, and the second two years are done by faculty advisors in the major,” said Jennifer Clevenger, director of academic advising. “That’s been our major source of complaints — that the shift is a tough

thing for students to do.” Both colleges attended the forum, eager to work with students to find solutions. “I think whenever you can get the students’ direct feedback, it’s only a good thing,” Matuszek said. Gimenez will be forwarding the ideas gathered at the forum to deans of colleges and department heads. “I’m going to try to follow up with them one-on-one

SHARE YOUR OPINION Email your thoughts to Caroline Gimenez before the end of the semester to see where we can go from here,” Gimenez said. Gimenez hopes to see problems surfaced at the forum resolved within a year. Follow the writer on Twitter: @pitialva

REAL WORLD Paid Marketing Intern Wanted Blacksburg Transit $12.00 per Hour Job Description at www.blacksburg.gov A Town of Blacksburg application is required for this position by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, March 1st, 2013. Applications are available at the Human Resources Office located in the Municipal Building at 300 South Main Street, Blacksburg, VA 24060 or May be downloaded at www.blacksburg.gov. Individuals with disabilities requiring accommodation in the application process may call 540-961-1188 (voice) or VA Relay Center at 711(TDD). An EEO Employer M/F/D/V


editors: emma goddard, nick smirniotopoulos featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

arts & entertainment Book follows battle with cancer Book Rating

RYAN SUTHERLAND / SPPS

Chef Chang Yun teaches students to cook as a part of SmartLIFE.

Program targets health education MADELEINE GORDON features reporter

In hopes of giving students an education that goes beyond the classroom, Dining Services, Rec Sports and Schiffert Health Center’s health education department have teamed up to create a program that teaches students how to live a healthy lifestyle. The program, called SmartLIFE, advertises an opportunity to “make a change” and “get fit and fresh,” on the Rec Sports website. SmartLIFE offers valuable lessons in fitness and healthy eating, according to the administrative dietician for Dining Services and co-founder of SmartLIFE, Jenny Lindsey. “The goal of the program is to give students healthy eating skills and healthy exercise skills for a lifetime, not just while they’re at college,” Lindsey said, “We’re building those skills while they’re here on campus to take with them for life.” According to Lindsey, who has a B.S. in dietetics from the University of Arizona and a Masters in education from Virginia Tech, the program will consist of five sessions with a personal trainer, nutrition workshops, meal planning workshops and cooking classes with the dining hall chefs. After enrolling in SmartLIFE, all of the workshops are free, except the personal training sessions, which are $75. Lindsey, who also oversees the You’re Eating Smarter program, says SmartLIFE is a more extensive program because it expands on the basic nutrition knowledge Y.E.S. provides. SmartLIFE teaches students how to apply the knowledge learned in Y.E.S., as well as other valuable lessons, Lindsey said. “Y.E.S. focuses on what you should choose when you’re going to the dining hall, but SmartLIFE recognizes that students aren’t going to live on campus forever,” Lindsey said. “SmartLIFE will give them lifelong skills that they can take out into the world after they graduate.” All of the departments, Dining Services, Rec Sports and Schiffert’s health education, came together to work out the specifics of the program to make sure it offered a well-rounded education, according to Lindsey. “It’s a collaboration between departments,” Lindsey said. “You’re getting exercise (tips) from Rec Sports. Through (Schiffert’s) health education, there is the Nutrition 101 workshop, which gives a good background into nutrition. Dining Services’ part in SmartLIFE will provide a healthy meal planning workshop and two cooking classes per session,” Lindsey said. Lindsey, who works for the Dining Services department, collaborated with a health education awareness team and her student assistants to create the new Healthy Meal Planning workshop. The workshop will teach

students how to plan meals, grocery shop and eat healthy off-campus. Lindsey also coordinated with Dining Services’ chefs to provide two cooking classes per SmartLIFE session. According to Lindsey, the classes will teach quick andy easy healthy skills, showing students how to cook on their own. The classes will also teach skills like how to effectively use leftovers. “It will address questions like, ‘If you want to buy some fresh broccoli for a soup, what do you do with the rest of the broccoli? Put it in a salad?’” Lindsey said. “They’ll teach tips for problems that college students typically deal with when they move off campus.” Among the campus chefs that will be teaching the cooking classes is West End Market Executive Chef Mark Bratton. According to Bratton, executive chefs from every dining hall will teach two recipes each. Bratton’s goal is to help students move away from college food like Ramen noodles and Chef Boyardee and develop a confidence in cooking. According to Bratton, healthy eating, and knowledge of nutrition, should be instilled at a young age. “Having children myself, you learn right off the bat,” Bratton said. “Do you just give the child a box of cereal and let them have at it? Or do you show them the side panel with the serving size?” Learning and teaching healthy habits is a movement across campus, according to Bratton. Thanks to motivated faculty members, the whole community is crossing over to an education that is more than just straight academics, Bratton said. “Learning to cook and learning healthy (habits) can improve your life outside of college,” Bratton said. “It’s a skill set that you can take away from this university for life, and it’s a goal we all share.” For Lindsey, it was easy to stay motivated in planning SmartLIFE because her passion for dietetics hasn’t fizzled since being exposed to it in middle school. Since starting at Tech in 1986, Lindsey says she has seen an increase in healthy behaviors and a larger student desire to adopt healthy habits. “In Dining Services, we serve the food that nourishes the body day after day, but we also want to make sure that we are educating students,” Lindsey said. “We’re always looking for ways to provide knowledge.” The program, which is in its pilot stage, started this week. Although the first session has reached its capacity of 60 students, Lindsey said there are already plans to continue SmartLIFE in semesters to come. “As students, you learn a lot in the classroom,” Lindsey said. “But there is a whole lot more that you learn outside of the classroom in the whole college environment, and this is one of those components.”

The idea of a cancer support group makes Hazel Grace Lancaster roll her eyes. The protagonist of “The Fault in our Stars” has better things to do, and cancer just gets in the way. Lancaster is a 16-year-old living with thyroid cancer. According to author John Green, her name is Hazel because “it is an inbetween color, and she has an in-between life.” True to her name, Lancaster struggles to live a life beyond her illness — “an infinity within the numbered days.” Lancaster does find some benefits to attending support group meetings; Augustus Waters is one of them. The two meet in support group and suddenly, Lancaster isn’t sure that she wants to hide behind books anymore. The charming 17-year-old Waters, sometimes labeled “Gus,” lost a leg from osteosarcoma when he was young. As the healthier of the two, Waters gives Lancaster his leftover wish from the Genies, an organization resembling the Make-A-Wish Foundation. The two travel to meet Peter van Houten, author of Lancaster’s favorite book, “An Imperial Affliction.” Somewhere between trips to the hospital and games played on a blind friend’s computer, Waters and Lancaster fall in love. At first, Lancaster is reluctant to open her heart — she calls herself a grenade waiting to explode. Waters confronts her from a different perspective; he tells her it would be “a privi-

lege” to have her break his heart. The consequences of that statement are more severe than either of them could have guessed. “The Fault In Our Stars” beckons to readers much in the same way that “Romeo and Juliet” does — no one can write a book about cancer without exploring the theme of death. Green makes a great choice by attacking the genre and telling you the story of the girl, not the sickness. Although she cannot help it, Lancaster is a grenade who, upon exploding, will change the lives of everyone around her. The reader doesn’t sympathize with Lancaster because she’s dying or sick, though; they sympathize because she is a normal teenager. In fact, Green’s novel is more a coming-of-age tale than anything else. This is a book about friendships, adventure and struggle. Lancaster’s “numbered days” just seem to make relatable plotlines more poignant. By the end of the book, even the word “OK” has been made more beautiful to the reader. However, Lancaster’s advanced vocabular y sometimes distracts from the action. Green’s use of language makes his heroine sound a bit precocious for her age, but perhaps that’s because she reads. Maybe it’s another side effect of dying. At least Lancaster’s inner monologue, if not her words, feel true to form. Green’s portrayal of a family dealing with illness is accurate. The wide range of emotions Lancaster

february 26, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

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New Releases Movies March 1 “Jack the Giant Slayer” Summary: Jack, a young tribe member, rises to the occasion to defend against the onslaught of giants. Starring Nicholas Hoult, Eleanor Tomlinson, Ewan McGregor

experiences with her family and friends allow the reader to firmly plant his or her feet in Lancaster’s shoes. There are times when it feels as though the water in Lancaster’s lungs has entered your own — somehow it doesn’t discourage the reader. Rather, the emotional and physical openness Lancaster shares with the reader strikes a connection as strong as the one between herself and Waters. When Lancaster laughs, the reader laughs. When Lancaster mourns, the reader mourns. It’s the closest thing to friendship a book can offer. The comedies and immense sorrows of “The Fault In Our Stars” are impossibly intertwined; such is life. There are many ways to tell the story of someone’s death, but telling the story of someone’s life is the best way of all. JESSICA GROVES -featured book columnist -junior -communication major

“The Last Exorcism Part II” Summary: This sequel follows Nell Sweetzer as she re-encounters the evil forces that possessed her and caused her family’s murders. Starring Andrew Sensenig, Ashley Bell

Books Feb. 26 “The Storyteller,” by Jodi Picoult Summary: Sage Singer, who runs a bakery, joins a support group to mourn the loss of her mother and strikes an unlikely friendship with a man. But her life drastically changes when he asks her an unusual favor. “Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us,” by Michael Moss. This book by the New York Times investigative reporter explores the growing trend of processed foods and its link to consumer food addictions and the obesity epidemic.

Despite MacFarlane, Oscars prove to be predictable With controversial comedian Seth MacFarlane as host, the 85th Academy Awards had the potential to be a bit of a wildcard. But as fellow comedian Ricky Gervais proved during his popular three-year run hosting the Golden Globes, sometimes wildcards pay off. MacFarlane, known for his thoroughly juvenile animated television series “Family Guy,” was unexpectedly delightful. Even his off-color jokes (like a musical interlude about seeing actresses’ breasts in movies or a crack about John Wilkes Booth “getting in the head” of Abraham Lincoln) got big laughs simply because of his charm and charisma. MacFarlane also got to show off his not inconsiderable singing talents with stars such as Daniel Radcliffe and Joseph Gordon-Levitt, thanks to the ceremony’s theme: the music of movies. The idea of having a theme for the ceremony is an interesting way to try to mix up a potentially stodgy telecast, but in this case, the numerous performances and song breaks took away from ceremony. It almost felt like you were watching the Grammys — or worse, the Tonys. The producers of the show should have trusted in MacFarlane’s charisma and let him carry the show, instead of needlessly muddling the ceremony. The style of the ceremony is always going to get judged and talked about, but it certainly shouldn’t be at the expense of attention for those whom the ceremony is supposed to be honoring. Among the winners, there were actually a few surprises, which is certainly unusual for the Oscars. “Life of Pi,” the fi lm about a shipwrecked young man who survives in a lifeboat with a Bengal tiger, received several nominations, but was not favored in many of those categories.

MCT CAMPUS

However, the film ended up winning four Oscars, including Best Director (for Ang Lee) and Best Cinematography, where it was not expected to win. Indeed, Best Director proved to be one of the most interesting categories this awards season; when the Academy snubbed Kathryn Bigelow (“Zero Dark Th irty”) and Ben Affleck (“Argo”), it was widely expected that Steven Spielberg (“Lincoln”) would walk away with the Oscar. Quentin Tarantino’s “Django Unchained” unexpectedly won for Best Original Screenplay, despite many favoring the more Academyfriendly “Zero Dark Thirty” to win. Another interesting surprise was the tie for the award for Best Sound Editing. Ties have occurred before in Academy Award history — probably the most memorable being between Katharine Hepburn and Barbara

Streisand for Best Actress in 1969 — but it’s highly unusual. Both “Zero Dark Th irty” and “Skyfall” ended up taking home Oscars for Best Sound Editing. Other than that though, the winners were generally a foregone conclusion — did anyone really think that Daniel Day-Lewis wouldn’t win Best Actor, or that Anne Hathaway wouldn’t win Best Supporting Actress? Christoph Waltz won his second Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for his role as Dr. King Shultz in Tarantino’s “Django Unchained.” Even Jennifer Lawrence’s Best Actress win for “Silver Linings Playbook” wasn’t that much of a surprise. The media hyped up the rivalry between Lawrence and Jessica Chastain (in “Zero Dark Thirty”), but when Lawrence won the Screen Actor’s Guild award last month, it was likely she would go on to take the

Oscar. Indeed, as usual, virtually all winners have already won multiple awards this season. Such is the case with “Argo,” which won Best Picture at most major award ceremonies this season, including the Golden Globes and BAFTAs, and at the Oscars. But aside from the egregious snubs to Bigelow and Affleck, the inexplicable praise for the thoroughly mediocre “Life of Pi,” and the distracting musical numbers, the Academy Awards got it mostly right this year — it even managed to keep the broadcast interesting and appropriate (most of the time). And that’s really all you can hope for at the most prestigious award show in Hollywood. KATIE WHITE -featured movie columnist -junior -history major


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february 26, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: priscilla alvarez, mallory noe-payne, dean seal newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Traffic: 66 accidents happen on campus each year from page one

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during the summer months and spike during the fall and spring semester months, especially at the beginning of fall semester. “We work traffic enforcement a lot — it hasn’t changed because we do it often,” Morgan said. “We do target (certain areas), and that information goes out monthly to the officers, and that does modify our enforcement.” Despite the increase during the fall and spring semesters, there has been an average of five accidents per month for the past three years. “The speed limit on the Drillfield is 15 for a reason,” Morgan said. “We have so much that goes on in such a tight area of campus, and it all contributes to traffic crashes in one way or another.” Last October, there were a record number of incidents in one month with a total of 11 accidents, two of which were pedestrians and five of which were bicyclists. “There’s a direct relationship between the number of cars on the road and the number of accidents that occur, so it’s no surprise that there’s an increase during the semester,” said John Sangster, a graduate student in Civil Engineering who did a TedX talk on traffic. “However, there’s usually more going on than one simple factor.” In 2012, the most accidents occurred on West Campus Drive

t a t Wetwselve caikre accideanccidents b an three pedestri two

MICHAELA REARDON/ COLLEGIATE TIMES

with 12 accidents out of the total 66 accidents on campus. West Campus Drive was also listed as the top crash location for both bicyclists and pedestrians with three and two accidents respectfully. Other hot spots from 2011 and 2012 include Washington Street, Southgate Drive and Drillfield Drive. “I always stop at crosswalks and for people crossing the road,” said Angelica Melara, a junior Animal Science major. “I have to make sure that people aren’t crossing because some walk out into the middle of the road and some wait.”

Virginia as a whole According to the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles, there were a total of 120,513 crashes in Virginia in 2011. Overall, there were 1,787 accidents in Virginia that involved pedestrians and 75 were fatal. Of the 1,787 pedestrians, 190 were between the ages of 17 and 20. Accidents with young drivers made up about 20 percent of the accidents in 2011. Statistics from the DMV show that the three most common causes of accidents for young drivers is following too close, failure to yield and speeding.

According to Sangster’s Tedx Talk called “Why Do We Live With Traffic?” motor vehicle fatalities are the leading cause of death in people ages 15-44. On a college campus, where students casually — and sometimes dangerously — cross the street, the question becomes, whose fault is it? “Every incident is a little different,” Morgan said. “You can’t make a generalization one way or the other. What we always tell people is that the vehicle has to look. The driver of the vehicle is responsible for looking while they’re driving their car — not

on the cell phone, not texting — looking at where they’re driving.” According to Virginia law, vehicles must yield the right-ofway to pedestrian crossings — however, law also says that no pedestrians shall enter or cross an intersection in disregard of approaching traffic. “I usually feel safe when I’m walking around campus,” said Vicki Tran, sophomore Business Information Technology major. “Generally, I watch out for myself and watch out for the people around me. Most of the time I try and cross the street in a group of people because you’re less likely to get hit when you’re in a group of people.” Pedestrians and Bikers In regards to the law, pedestrians also have responsibility. Pedestrians shall not carelessly or maliciously interfere with the orderly passage of vehicles — in other words, no jaywalking. “The same responsibility goes to a pedestrian — they have to look before they step out in the road,” Morgan said. “Whether they think the vehicle should stop or not, if a vehicle is traveling at 25 miles per hour and you step out in front of the vehicle, the vehicle may not be able to stop.” Virginia is one of five states that observe the “Pure Contributory Negligence” rule, meaning that if a pedestrian is found to be responsible in any way for the accident, then they cannot claim damages. “It is the responsibility of both

the driver and the pedestrian to make sure their actions are safe. Oftentimes it’s a mix. I don’t think it would be fair to blame one or the other,” Morgan said. Junior mechanical engineering major Garrett Dawson has been driving on campus regularly for the past two years and has come close to having accidents on campus. One night, while driving on Washington Street, he saw a bright light by the driver side front panel. A person dressed in all black had stepped in front of the car without looking and had jumped out of the way. “Luckily, when he jumped, he raised his phone and that was the only thing I had seen,” Dawson explained. “I have had other instances, usually involving phones or people just walking out, but this one sticks out, not only because of how close it was, but because of how I was clearly paying attention to see a phone.” For many students, driving around campus is a big adjustment after driving at home. “(Coming from) a city, cars go first,” said Sarah Gonzales, a sophomore Industrial Systems Engineering major. “When you come to campus, you have to make sure pedestrians go first. I’m really cautious about that. Even though it’s frustrating, I remind myself I’m a pedestrian too.” Follow the writer on Twitter: @MReardonCT

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

arrestees

status

2/15/2013

4:00 - 6:00 pm

Burglary / Breaking and Entering

Cochrane Hall

N/A

Active

2/22/2013

10:24 pm

Underage Possession of Alchohol X 4

Lee Hall

N/A

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct

2/22/2013

11:19 pm

Fake ID/ Undersage Possession of Alcohol/ Appear Intoxicated in Public

Kent Street

Kiley E Quinn, 19

Cleared By Arrest

2/23/2013

1:13 am

Appear Intoxicated in Public/ Undersage Possession of Alcohol Pritchard Hall

Jason Hon-Yeen Lam, 19

Cleared By Arrest

2/23/2013

2:26 am

Appear Intoxicated in Public/ Undersage Possession of Alcohol Lee Hall

Mar Anthony Peralta Evangelista, 19

Cleared By Arrest

2/23/2013

4:43 am

Appear Intoxicated in Public/ Undersage Possession of Alcohol Outside Vawter Hall

Cody Ryan Cummings, 18

Cleared By Arrest

2/23/2013

1:42 pm

Larceny of a Backpack and contents

The Duckpond

N/A

Inactive

2/23/2013

11:39 pm

Appear Intoxicated in Public/ Undersage Possession of Alcohol/ Falsely Summons Police/ Fire

SPH Q

Shannon Colleen Chaney, 18

Cleared By Arrest

2/24/2013

1:09 am

Appear Intoxicated in Public

Draper Road

William Martin Ellena, 21

Cleared By Arrest

2/24/2013

3:16 am

Underage Possession of Alcohol X 4

College Ave

N/A

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

2/24/2013

3:22 am

Possession of Marijuana/ Underage Possesion of Alchohol/ Possesion of Drug Paraphernalia

Slusher Parking Lot

Ian Robert Gregg, 19

Cleared By Arrest

2/24/2013

2:19am

Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol

Otey Street

Thomas Anthony, 21

Cleared By Arrest

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opinions

editors: josh higgins, shawn ghuman opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

february 26, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

5

The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

what you’re saying

Collegiate Times Editorial Staff

West AJ door policy raises questions about community Grace Mulholland: When I was involved in the college council of the Honors Residential College (in East AJ), complaints such as these would be directed to the council, and we would then discuss these concerns with the appropriate faculty, staff, or administrators. I don’t know about the specific operations Residential College at West AJ, but knowing their governance structure, I would expect their council would employ a similar approach for addressing feedback. In response to the issue at hand, I think it is important to consider that good ideas are not always immediately obvious as such and it can take some time before the (full) benefits are realized. Good policies aren’t always convenient, either. If this policy does not seem justified, respond productively: start a conversation with the house/college council, the college’s faculty fellows, or Housing and Residence Life staff. Before dismissing a change, try to figure out the motivation behind it. If you are inclined to criticize, just remember that a great number of faculty members, staff members, and administrators are invested in the success of the community. As such, I doubt that a change such as this would have been enacted capriciously. I do wonder how the policy was introduced to the Residential College at West AJ, as from this article I get the impression that it was implemented suddenly and without much dialogue. Maybe someone can speak to how the circumstances affected the policy’s inception.

MCT CAMPUS

Filibusters lose luster due to laziness W

hen bees decide where to build a hive, they send roughly 100 “scouts” into a potential location so they can search for, and evaluate, just the right tree, overhang or crevasse to build around. According to Cornell entomologist Tom Seeley, when a scout finds a good build site, they dance to communicate their enthusiasm for the location. Several bees compete and the rest of the scouts take sides. The better the spot, the harder they dance. When the scouts make a decision, the losing side turns toward the job of building. The U.S. Senate has a less functional process for resolving differences. The Atlantic reported last year that in 2009, more filibusters were filed than from 1950 to 1969. That includes the Civil Rights act in 1964 and the Voting Rights Act in 1965, which, at the time, were two of the most controversial laws of in the country and were filibustered by

Our Views [staff editorial]

Culture of ‘right of way’ is to blame for large number of accidents on campus On average, 66 traffic accidents occur in a year here at Virginia Tech. That means we have over one accident a week — a number so high that it sounds a bit absurd. However, this problem reflects a serious attitude problem people on campus have when it comes to crossing the street. Although Tech has done a good job making this campus pedestrian-friendly, it has been engrained in our student culture that pedestrians have complete priority when it comes to crosswalks, even to the point where people think the lessons of old, like looking both ways, are no longer applicable. This goes double when people are looking at their phones. This “right of way” mentality is a characteristic of our culture that has blinded road safety and disre-

garded the caution necessary when interacting with much larger, heavier vehicles. Students need to be more self-aware when nearing these crosswalks, while also realizing drivers often have this same careless mentality as well. Accidents will continue until both drivers and walkers begin to treat crosswalks with the same understanding of cooperation rather than selfishness and ignorance. There are possible solutions that the school administration could do that would be effective, such as taking out parking spots before the crosswalks on Washington Street or Alumni Mall, thereby increasing visibility for both pedestrians and drivers. Yet, this would only be a Bandaid on the issue and doesn’t tackle the issue of our culture’s lack of awareness.

we’re YOUR newspaper. send a letter to the editor and express your views.

Senator Strom Thurmond (R-S.C.) until he collapsed on the Senate floor.

The filibuster was never meant to foment the overthrow of the majority. Filibuster is meant to ensure vigorous debate.”

Numbers may be staggering enough, but the biggest problem with the current filibuster is that you don’t have to speak until you collapse anymore. Senators don’t stand up and argue their position for hours and hours until the majority gives up or reconsiders a bill. The modern filibuster is more like a trip to a teacher’s office hours. The minority leader simply steps into the majority leader’s office and declares his party’s inten-

tion to filibuster and you’re filibustered, buster! No debate, no vote. No wonder the Senate hasn’t passed a budget in years. Senior Democrats who remember the Bush years agree with current Republicans that the filibuster is an important tool for the minority to protect itself against domination by the majority. But the filibuster was never meant to foment the overthrow of the majority. Filibuster is meant to ensure vigorous debate. “I feel like talking filibuster is what enables your colleagues and the American public to know whether you’re interposing some reason for delay or you’re just interested in delay for delay’s sake,” said Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) said in an interview with The Hill. More troubling than an unprecedented amount of filibustering is the precedent that replaces the old standards for stopping debate. Since Obama took office, and the filibustering

madness started, 35 freshman Senators have taken office and they’ll start their careers knowing nothing but partisan obstruction. We don’t need to ban the filibuster or prevent filibustering on certain procedural votes as some have proposed in the past. But Senators should be required to carry out filibusters they conduct. If a member of the upper chamber has a problem with a bill, they should stand up in front of the country and state their case — as long as it takes. If enough people agree with a filibustering senator, they can vote to sustain a filibuster. They can even participate. But we should take a lesson from bees and make them dance. JOSHUA YAZMAN -regular columnist -junior -political science

Hollywood spreads affection I

n America, we watch movies where the main characters f lirt and bante, where the protagonist asks the girl out and then the next thing we expect them to do is kiss. Even in our lives, when you go on a date, and the guy is standing on your porch saying goodnight, you expect a goodnight kiss. These are simple gestures that are common in the states because they are what we grow up watching. However, if you were to head over to other side of the world, a kiss would be a far-fetched phenomenon. Seeing people even hold hands would be the rarest of sights. Last week, an article in the New York Times titled “In India, Kisses Are on Rise, Even in Public” was published. At first, I laughed a little, since it seemed like it was just a two-page article on PDA — public displays of affection. It wasn’t until I continued to read that I realized the significance of the piece. The writer in the Times expresses the fact that in India, people not only

refrain from kissing or hugging; they don’t even say “I love you” to their significant other. By living in America, we don’t realize how much of an influence the West has on foreign countries’ culture; it goes beyond politics and economics. Hollywood is an industry, worth billions of dollars, which people all over the world have access to. American media and Western interactions are more powerful than one might consider. Media does not only display America and its culture, it provides a brand of insight on relationships that people from more conservative countries just do not encounter. Some may say this new trend of open affection is due to the media in India selling sex to make more money, or another way that America corrupts other cultures and changes their values for the worse, but I disagree. The West is inf luencing countries like India to be more open and comfortable with their relationships so people can understand the

By living in America, we don’t realize how much influence the West has on foreign countries’ culture; it goes beyond politics an economics.”

strength of their bonds. How can expressing your emotions openly be such a bad thing? Love and affection are not meant just to be seen behind closed doors, this is often the reason some people never reveal their true feelings. This new trend is a move in the right direction for those who are ready to embrace it throughout the world. As we say in America, “freedom of expression” is a one of our greatest rights. JP SINGH -regular columnist -junior -biology

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ACROSS 1 Soccer great Mia 5 Spider’s creations 9 “Beat it!” 14 Steinbeck’s Tom Joad, e.g. 15 Afghanistan’s western neighbor 16 Fabric with a repeated scenic pattern 17 National consensus 20 Metal playing marble 21 Sincere 22 Propelled with sculls

Top Tracks Harlem Shake • Baaur

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2/26/13 23 Camembert cousin 24 Malice 27 Cooks on a spit 32 Biol. or chem. 35 Burn soothers 37 Turn on a pivot 38 Deerstalker’s excitement 42 Grows darker 43 Clark Kent’s birth name 44 Sound of fan support 45 Garlicky shrimp dish

48 Ran at an easy pace 50 Not taken in by 52 Hairdresser Sassoon 56 “The Four Seasons” composer 60 Rock fissure 62 Dark, quiet period 64 Davis who was married to Ruby Dee 65 Word with pyramid or chain 66 Cut down on 65Across

DOWN 1 “In what way?” 2 Japanese canine 3 Long-distance runner 4 Brawls 5 Hi-tech airport connection 6 One-named Deco artist 7 Scroogean exclamation 8 Derisive look 9 More than mono 10 Masked critter 11 Ready for picking 12 “__ well that ends well” 13 Track competition 18 Longtime chum 19 Part of a poker full house 23 Bovine hybrid 25 Unwell 26 Stole 28 Volcanic output 29 Defamatory remark 30 Yellowfin or albacore 31 Fourth man 32 Norms: Abbr. 33 Fashionable 34 Culinary author Rombauer 36 WWII Normandy battle site

39 Doctrinal suffix 40 Cool, like a cat 41 Craps natural 46 Hay fever sufferer’s nemesis 47 __-European languages 49 Split 51 Petty quarrels 53 “Bon appétit,” from mom

54 Was sore after a workout 55 Riga natives 56 Cognac bottle letters 57 “__ Small World” 58 Carpenter’s clamp 59 Et __: and others 60 Vittles 61 Cinncinati team 63 Also

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WORDSEARCH: Girl Names Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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sports

editors: matt jones, zach mariner sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

february 26, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

7

ACC releases football schedule; no Thursday night game in Lane ZACH MARINER sports editor

The ACC released its 2013 football schedule on Monday afternoon, revealing Virginia Tech would not have a Thursday night home football game for the first time since 2001. After a 7-6 finish in 2012 — Tech’s worst season since 1992 — the Hokies were denied a Thursday night game for the first time since being in the ACC. Tech will open the season on Aug. 31 against two-time defending national champion Alabama in the Chick-fi l-A kickoff in the Georgia Dome. The Hokies will follow that with the rest of their nonconference schedule against Western Carolina in Lane Stadium on Sept. 7, at East Carolina on Sept. 14, and back

2013 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE Aug. 31 - Alabama Sept. 7 - Western Carolina Sept. 4 - at East Carolina Sept. 21 - Marshall Sept. 26 - at Georgia Tech Oct. 5 - North Carolina home against Marshall on Sept. 21. Tech opens its ACC schedule on Thursday, Sept. 26 in Atlanta against Georgia Tech and their spread-option attack. Every year since 2010, the Hokies have had at least 10 days to prepare for the Yellow Jackets — this year they’ll have less than five. After that, the Hokies will have three straight home games in October, starting

The Best Is Here!

Oct. 12 - Pittsburgh Oct. 26 - Duke Nov. 2 - at Boston College Nov. 9 - at Miami Nov. 16 - Maryland Nov. 30 - at Virginia with North Carolina on Oct. 5, followed by Pittsburgh on Oct. 12, and then Duke on Oct. 26. Th ree of Tech’s fi nal four games are on the road, starting with back-to-back road trips to Boston College on Nov. 2, then Miami on Nov. 9. The Hokies will get Maryland at home on Nov. 16 before finishing the season in Scott Stadium against UVa on Nov. KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS 30. Logan Thomas will be back for a senior season which includes what many consider a lackluster schedule.

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Childcare SUMMER CHILD CARE NEEDED NOVA Family (Fairfax Station) seeking summer babysitter for 4 year old & baby. Mon/Tue 9am-3pm, Wed 9am-1pm. Email gretchenwendorf@yahoo.com.

Travel Getting cold time to Plan your Spring Break 2010 Get Away! Learn how to travel to beautiful locations like Jamaica, Acapulco and the Bahamas on a party cruise. Find out what other Virginia Tech Hokies are headed to your destination. -Adrian Email: Awhite@Studentcity.com for more information

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Aries (March 21-April 19) Allow yourself more quiet time this month. You may as well tell the truth; it saves hassle. Stick to old rules and your schedule to avoid misunderstandings. Think before speaking.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) You overcome new challenges and set ambitious goals to further you career. A glitch in the communication could rain on your parade. Don’t take it personally.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Dress for power and practice success. Watch for short tempers if you’re going to be late for a family affair (or just be on time). Group activities go well.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) It’s becoming easier to save, not just now, but for the next month. It’s also easier to make money. Offer a calming voice to a loved one. Rediscover a gift or talent that you have.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) For the next month, it’s easier to advance your agenda, especially by listening to other people’s considerations and taking actions to support them. Work smarter and make more money.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You have superpowers to clean up messes now. Move quickly through your stack of stuff and request promised bene its. Reassure one who’s easily upset. Add time for the unforeseen.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) The days ahead are good for achieving romantic or creative goals. Take action. Keep checking the quality and integrity of the project without obsession. Play it cool and easy. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Full speed ahead, you’re in high gear and extra lucky. Watch for opportunities at the top; you can be well-paid. But beware, costs could be higher than expected. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Household chores are more enjoyable. Keep home ires burning by updating inances. Gossip could arise ... it would be wise to avoid falling into that trap.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Get off to a quick start. You’re even smarter than usual. Discover hidden resources. Keep on schedule for best results. Visit a local establishment for supplies. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Be patient with a passionate partner and get rewarded. Re-evaluate your work habits for greater ful illment. Start a light-hearted ire under procrastinators. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) You’ll feel especially appreciated for the next four weeks. Offer corrections to erroneous assumptions; you may ind some resistance. Defend your position with love. It’s important that they know.

TIP: Consider buying winter tires. WHY: So-called "all-season" tires have been on the market for decades. Coupled with front-wheel-drive and anti-skid systems, they have allowed many folks to avoid mounting a true snow tire for the winter months. But there are two trends in tires you should be aware of: 1) Styling priorities have led to manufacturers fitting wider, low-profile tires on a variety of cars. Wide and low profile, on balance, makes a tire worse in the snow. Pressures to improve tire fuel economy have also worked against the snow utility of all-seasons. 2) Winter tires have improved their behavior from the era of knobby, loud "snows" that looked like they belonged on an army truck. New tread patterns and rubber compounds make them quieter on dry roads, yet even more effective on frozen stuff. -www.kiplinger.com

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sports

february 26, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: matt jones, zach mariner sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Hokies improve to 7-1 behind Burke’s strong start JACOB EMERT sports reporter

The Virginia Tech baseball team completed its weekend series on Monday with a 5-3 victory over the Delaware Blue Hens. The win was the third of the weekend for the Hokies (7-1) after starting off the weekend with a 3-7 loss to Temple. After two innings of scoreless baseball the Hokies, put two runs on the board in the bottom of the third frame. Kyle Wernicki, who made his first start of the season, drew a walk to lead off the inning. After a Chad Morgan sacrifice bunt advanced Wernicki to second, Andrew Rash laced a single up the middle to score Wernicki. The next batter, Tyler Horan, beat the pitcher to the bag on a routine groundball to first base for another single; on that same play, Rash, who advanced to second on his single, never stopped running and rounded third to score the second run of the inning. The Hokies were able to maintain the two-run lead for four innings, as starter Devin Burke extended his scoreless innings streak to 10 innings. However, after 48 pitches through four innings, a 31-pitch fifth frame saw three Blue Hens cross home plate. Only one of three runs was earned, however, as a Burke wild pitch and an Andrew Rash misplay in the outfield accounted for two of the three Hokies errors on the

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Upcoming Games Feb. 27 Radford, 3 p.m. TBA Irish Baseball Classic, Cary, N.C. Mar. 1 Rhode Island, noon; Ohio, 3:30 p.m. Mar. 2 Notre Dame, 6 p.m. Mar. 3: Tennessee, 11 a.m. day. Burke didn’t allow the hiccup to shake him. “In the first four innings they hit the ball right at people; in the fifth, they hit the ball as they had been but they found holes,” Burke said. “That’s baseball, that’s going to happen. I wasn’t worried about it.” The Hokies, as they have all year, responded immediately, putting up three runs of their own in the bottom of the fifth. “That was huge because we answered on a very tough day offensively,” said coach Pete Hughes. “For us to answer with three was huge, and it answered a lot of questions I had about our team being resilient and playing from behind.” The Hokies first run of the inning came on a Chad Morgan double that scored

Sean Keselica. “It was a big swing of momentum,” Morgan said. “For us to bounce back with three runs of our own was a big turning point in the game.” Hughes thought it was important to respond quickly. With the lead back in the hands of the Hokies, Burke settled down and pitched another 2.2 innings of scoreless ball. He finished his second start of the season allowing just the one earned run. Hughes then made the decision to put the ball in the hands of reliever Clark Labitan, who came in and retired four straight for his team-leading third save. Burke was the final starter named to the rotation before the start of the season by Hughes, and he will have to earn his spot every start out there. “I just want to give my team a chance to win as best I can,” Burke said. “That’s my mindset. As soon as I come out here it’s make effective pitches. Ground ball, strikeouts, whatever, just outs. Collect outs.” So far, he’s done just that. His record is now 2-0 with a 0.68 ERA. Tech, ranked No. 25 in the most recent Baseball America poll and also received six votes in the USA Today Coaches’ Poll. The Hokies will take the field next on Wednesday as they host the Radford Highlanders at 3 p.m.

BRAD KLODOWSKI / SPPS

Devin Burke (2-0) lasted 7.2 innings and allowed just one earned run, lowering his season ERA to 0.68.


Tuesday, February 26, 2013 Print Edition