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MISSED THE INAUGRATION? see page 8 Tuesday, January 22, 2013

An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 109th year, issue 58 News, page 2

Arts & Entertainment, page 4

Opinions, page 7

Sports, page 11

Study Break, page 10

Student dies in crash over break

End of an era

CAMERON AUSTIN news blog editor

People would describe Annalee Marshall as tremendous and gorgeous. Others would say she was modest, humble, and down to earth. She loved animals, and worked on several service projects at Virginia Tech. She felt at home here in Blacksburg, where she instantly fell in love with the campus and community. That community that welcomed her with open arms is now mourning the loss of a fellow Hokie after Marshall was killed from injuries sustained in a two-car accident on Christmas Day in Loudon County, Va.

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

Frank Beamer cleaned house on his offensive staff last week, firing quarterbacks coach Mike O’Cain, offensive line coach Curt Newsome and wide receivers coach Kevin Sherman, while demoting his long time friend Bryan Stinespring to tight ends coach. see COACHES / page twelve

Community When the Adamnstown, Md. native stepped on Tech’s campus in 2009 for the first time, it felt like home to her. “It was one of those innate things she couldn’t even put her finger on,” said her mother, Lauren Marshall. “She just knew it was where she wanted to be.” Marshall was a senior studying Animal and Poultry Sciences with the hopes of going on to attend the VirginiaMaryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine. She had recently been accepted to various study abroad programs that would give her the chance to work with exotic and rare

COURTESY OF LAUREN MARSHALL Marshall was in a crash Christmas Day.

animals overseas. She loved the sense of community Blacksburg offered her, and saw it as more then just a big football school. “The people here believed in each other, they believed in the community, and they believed in Virginia Tech,” said Lauren Marshall. Currently, her family is working with the school to set up a memorial service in February. It is also hoping to establish a scholarship in her honor. “We feel the love coming from Blacksburg during this hard time,” said Lauren Marshall. Helping Others Marshall was involved in several service organizations see MARSHALL / page six

Flu season reaches dangerous high DONAL MURPHY news reporter

The wind on the Drillfield is not the only thing that Tech students will be battling this winter. As the semester begins, Tech prepares to face the 2013 flu season. The season started in October of last year and has yet to reach its peak. The numbers of people affected continues to accelerate, which is unusual compared to past seasons. With students returning, transmission of the virus is becoming more prevalent. Prior to returning to school, Schiffert Health Center advised students to get the flu vaccine, whether they have had the flu already or not, to further reduce the spread of the virus. The Schiffert immunization clinic administered vaccines in October, but will continue to offer vaccinations for students with appointments. While students are still at risk of getting the flu, the elderly have been affected harder than most years, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Of the deaths from this flu season, more than 90 percent were people older than 65, and so far, 29 children have died. The vaccine has been 62

percent effective in preventing someone from getting the flu, but it does not guarantee protection. With the serious effects on the elderly, there have been shortages across the country of vaccines for people 64 and older, including at the Rite Aid in Blacksburg. While current total influenza related deaths are unknown and still growing, the CDC estimates the total number of deaths this season will reach 36,000 total, 1,000 higher than the usual average. Virginia in particular has been seeing increasing influence of the flu recently. “Over the past three weeks, the number of flu outbreaks reported each week increased from two to 28, and norovirus outbreaks went from three to 11,” said Acting State Health Commissioner Maureen E. Dempsey, MD, FAAP in a Washington Times article. “The majority of those were in school settings. With so much illness circulating, it’s important that we all do our part to help prevent the spread of disease and to protect those who are most vulnerable to serious complications,” Dempsey said. With so much interaction in classes, students need to take extra see FLU / page three care

MARK UMANSKY / SPPS

Blacksburg’s first snow of the season hit the area a week before classes resumed, covering campus in a half foot of snow. DEAN SEAL associate news editor

Students returned to a snowy Blacksburg this weekend. Heavy snowfall started at around 2 p.m. on Jan 17. The precipitation subsided in the evening, and by 9 p.m., the Blacksburg area had accumulated approximately 6.5 inches of snow. The university issued an alert at 2:27 p.m. when the snowfall began, saying campus would be closed starting at 2:15 p.m. that day. Campus reopened the following Friday at 10 a.m. While most roads were cleared by Friday, power outages in the region persisted. At its peak, roughly 128,000 customers in Virginia were without power

following the winter weather. Montgomery County residents saw the worst of these outages. By the following Saturday, 5,400 customers were still without power, down from nearly 10,000 customers the day before. Most of the power outages were the result of tree limbs becoming weighed down with snow and collapsing on power lines. While Blacksburg has mostly recovered from the storm, a wintry mix is anticipated for the upcoming week.

Follow the writer on Twitter: @jdeanseal


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news

january 22, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: priscilla alvarez, mallory noe-payne, dean seal newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Students return to melting snow

what you’re saying

On Hokies secure winning season with 13-10 win over Rutgersers

Anonymous: Congrats to Bud Foster and the D for winning yet another game for the Hokies. Imagine what we’d be like with a decent offense... Measurement: 3 yards on 32 rushing attempts. That’s 3.375 inches per attempt. Stinespring gives new meaning to the old saying “football is a game of inches.” Pathetic.

upcoming events Tuesday, Jan. 22

First Week of Fitness: 7:00 a.m. to January 28 at 12:00 p.m. at McComas Hall. Over 100 group exercise classes will be offered all week to students and faculty. Small group training classes include one personal trainer instructing a group of participants in different style work outs such as P90X or TRX. Grab some friends or make new ones this year during the Free Week of Fitness. 1

The Art of Science: 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

at Armory Gallery, 203 Draper Road. Discover the intersection of art and science as researchers in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences showcase microscopic masterpieces in a gallery exhibition. Exhibit will be available all week.

Solungga Fang-Tzu Liu, guest artist piano recital: 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. at Squires

Recital Salon. Pianist Solungga Fang-Tzu Liu, presents a guest artist recital for students in the Department of Music. Ms. Liu is Assistant Professor of Piano at the College of Musical Arts, Bowling Green State University.

Wednesday, Jan 23.

Thinking of Starting a Business Based on Your Research Discoveries?: 10:30 a.m.

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1. The snow storm Thursday afternoon provided difficulties for students returning for the spring semester. (Trevor White/ SPPS) 2. Despite nearly 6.5 inches of snowfall on Thursday, a sunny weekend cleared most of the accumulation. (Kevin Dickel/SPPS) 3. Though most of the snow has melted, students can still expect a chilly walk across the drillfield for their first week of classes. Highs for the week range from 25 to 35 F. (Kevin Dickel/SPPS) 4

4. Signs in the archway of Peddrew-Yates caution students as they return to the dorms. (Kevin Dickel/SPPS)

to 11:30 a.m. at Room 325 Bioinformatics Building. Come to a discussion for graduate students and faculty on assessing a new technologybased business opportunity and how the VT KnowledgeWorks Tech Transfer Challenge can help. Registration is requested but not required.

Thursday, Jan. 24

Diversity Jubilee (Open House): 10:00

a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the Pamplin Atrium. Join us in a jubilee celebration of the many ways diversity enriches our lives in the college and university. Sponsored by the college Multicultural Diversity Committee. Stop by for information, food, and celebration. Learn about student groups, international study, the diversity case competition, the diversity minor, and more.

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

arrestees

1/19/2013

9:55 PM

Trespassing

Volume II Bookstore

Inactive

1/21/2013

12:09 AM

Possession of Marijuana/Possession of Drug Paraphernalia Underage Possession of Alcohol

Payne Hall

Cleared by Arrest

11/10/2011

9:28 AM

Follow-up to Counterfeit currency

Student Services

Inactive

11/11/2011

8:30 AM - 11:59 AM

Follow-up to Counterfeit currency

Dietrick Store

Inactive

05/12-13/2012

9:00 PM - 10:00 AM

Follow-up to Larceny of jewlery

The Inn

Inactive

12/20/2012 1/17/2013

10:00 AM - 1:15 PM

Vandalism

West Ambler Johnston Hall Inactive

status Daniel Andre Blosser, 19


editors: priscilla alvarez, mallory noe-payne, dean seal newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Flu: Schiffert sends notice to students from page one

to avoid transmission. Symptoms of the flu include a fever, coughing, sore throat, muscle aches, headaches and fatigue, though it differs from a regular cold in that these symptoms come on suddenly. It can also lead to complications such as pneumonia, bronchitis and sinus infections, according to the CDC. Students and faculty who fi nd themselves with these symptoms are advised to stay at home for 24 hours after their fever is gone except for medical visits; wash hands more frequently; avoid

FREE classified ads for Virginia Tech students! The Collegiate Times is pleased to offer FREE classifieds to Virginia Tech students! Simply fill out the form below to reserve your free classified, and bring it to the 618 North Main Street office between 9am & 5pm, Monday through Friday. Allow four business days for processing. You can also stop by the 618 North Main Street anytime to fill out a form there. Your Name: PID: Phone: Dates to run: / / to / / *Ads can be placed to run for up to two weeks. You can cancel your ad at any time by calling 540-961-9860. Text to be printed (185 characters):

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Restrictions: Students cannot place any ads on behalf of businesses or organizations. Free student ads are meant to be placed for sub-leases, rides, childcare, tickets for sale, tickets wanted, volunteers, textbooks for sale, textbooks wanted, lost & found, for sale, roommates, personals, and furniture for sale. Any questions can be directed to 540-961-9860.

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touching their eyes, nose and mouth; and regularly clean frequently touched surfaces.

What you need to know... Vaccine effectiveness 2011-2012, 52% 2012-2013, 62%

Vaccines available at Rite Aid CVS Walgreens Kroger

news

january 22, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

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arts & entertainment

january 22, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

Popular musicians release 2013 albums Each person has a different taste in music. Much like representative art or poetry, music’s appeal is in the eye of the beholder. Some go with the mainstream, swept away with catchy lyrics and formidable beats, while others rebel and listen to more underground or indie music.

the Def Jam Recordings label, and seemingly his music career entirely. However, LL Cool J is back again with his new album “Authentic Hip Hop,” under the S-BRO Music Group label. OneRepublic “Native” (March 26 Receiving critical acclaim for singles such as “Apologize” — which made history by receiving the most airplay in history with 10,331 plays in one week — and “Stop and Stare,” OneRepublic has made an impact especially on younger listeners. OneRepublic debuted in 2007 and has since made a second album, “Waking Up,” released in 2009. The band’s third album, “Native,” features singles such as “Feel Again,” which was released promotionally in 2012.

Regardless of your personal music taste, there is a great variety of albums coming out this semester. From big-time rappers to pop sensations to long-standing country phenoms, there should be something for everyone to enjoy. J. Cole “Born Sinner” (Jan 28) Cole was the first artist to sign to Jay-Z’s Roc Nation label, and in 2011 he released his debut album “Cole World: The Sideline Story,” which hit No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard 200. “Born Sinner” will feature several singles that didn’t make his fi rst album and the single “Miss America,” which was released late in 2012. Josh Groban “All That Echoes” (Feb 5) Groban’s fi rst four solo albums received multi-platinum status, making him the No. 1 best-selling artist in the U.S. in 2007, with over 21 million records sold. “All That Echoes” seeks to follow up on the immensely popular album, “Illuminations,” in which Groban sings about his continuing search for love.

Tim McGraw “Two Lanes of Freedom” (Feb 5) McGraw’s singles continually top country music charts, making him the third best-selling country artist in the U.S. He has had 11 consecutive albums debut at No. 1 on the Billboard albums charts and 21 singles hit No. 1 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart. “Two Lanes of Freedom,”

McGraw’s twelfth studio album, contains 11 tracks and four bonus tracks, featuring Keith Urban and Taylor Swift on the album-ending single “Highway Don’t Care.” LL Cool J “Authentic Hip Hop” (Feb 12) LL Cool J has released 13 studio albums and two greatest hit compilations. His last album, “Exit 13,” ended his long-standing career under

Paramore “Paramore” (April 9) Paramore, mainly known for prominent lead singer Hayley Williams, is set to release its fourth album, the self-titled “Paramore.” After releasing its debut album in 2005, Paramore received Platinum status on “Riot!” and “Brand New Eyes,” the band’s highest charting album. Their new album features 17 songs, including the single “Now.” NICK SMIRNIOTOPOULOS -features editor -junior -communication & psychology major

Golden Globes battle Oscars for award spotlight Each year, all the big names in film gather to congratulate themselves and a hundred of their closest friends. The Awards Season is a big deal in Hollywood, with millions of dollars going toward publicity and campaigning over several months. This is all for a little statue and maybe 30 seconds of screen time before the orchestra starts the awkward get-off-the-stage-now music. The big two award ceremonies are, of course, the Golden Globes and the Academy Awards — for anyone other than film snobs, these are the only award shows worth mentioning. The Academy Awards, or Oscars, are bestowed by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and focus solely on films. The Golden Globes, which are seen as the Academy Awards’ drunken, more hip cousin, are given by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association and award achievements in both television and fi lm. Th is year’s 70th Annual Golden Globes was held on January 13. With the impeccable Tina Fey and Amy Poehler hosting,

The Golden Globes Best Actor (Musical or Comedy): Hugh Jackman, “Les Miserables”

Big Winners Best Picture (Drama): “Argo”

Best Actress (Musical or Comedy): Jennifer Lawrence, “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Picture (Musical or Comedy): “Les Miserables” Best Actor (Drama): Daniel Day-Lewis, “Lincoln” Best Actress (Drama): Jessica Chastain, “Zero Dark Thirty”

The Oscars Notable Nominees Best Picture : “Lincoln,” “Zero Dark Thirty,” “Argo,” “Silver Linings Playbook” Best Actor: Daniel Day-Lewis (“Lincoln”), Hugh Jackman (“Les Miserables”), Bradley Cooper (“Silver Linings Playbook”)

the show was the most entertaining it has been in years. The nominations, however, were largely as predictable as ever: the period pieces “Lincoln” and “Argo” were first and second in number of nominations; the Best Picture — Musical or Comedy category was full of duds (was “Salmon Fishing In the Yemen” really one of the top 5 musicals or comedies this year? Really?); Meryl Streep was nominated; and “Homeland” swept the television categories. One of the few interesting points, though, came

with “Django Unchained” tying “Argo” for the second most nominations with five. Quentin Tarantino’s latest has been wildly popular with audiences and most critics, despite his films being divisively controversial, to put it mildly. The only real upset of the night was “Argo” winning Best Picture — Drama and Best Director. “Argo,” starring and directed by Ben Affleck, was certainly an extraordinary fi lm, but most critics had called Kathryn Bigelow’s Osama Bin Laden manhunt story, “Zero

The Second City Friday, February 1, 2013 at 8pm $42 Gold | $37 Silver | $18.50 Student

Suzanne Vega Friday, March 1, 2013 at 8pm $40 Gold | $35 Silver | $17.50 Student

Loudon Wainwright III Friday, March 22, 2013 at 8pm $20 Gold | $15 Silver

Regina Carter's "Southern Comfort" Friday, April 12, 2013 at 8pm $40 Gold | $35 Silver | $17.50 Student

tickets are on sale now!

LYRIC RII presented by the

Best Director: Steven Spielberg (“Lincoln”), Ang Lee (“Life of Pi”), Benh Zeitlin (“Beasts of the Southern Wild”)

featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Now Hiring The Collegiate Times is looking for a new music reviewer. If you are interested, please contact featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com

Adventure game sets stage for 5-act series Game Rating

It’s not every day you find yourself lost on an underground highway in Kentucky — much less one that manages to capture your imagination and interest. Yet, the first installment of “Kentucky Route Zero” manages to do just that. Pulling into a dark gas station and stepping away from the hum of my truck, I walk forward toward the silhouette of a man. Clicking anywhere sends a horseshoe spinning around a stake that marks my destination; as I move forward to talk to him, I can sense that this isn’t a normal adventure game and can’t help but wonder what exactly this point-and-click adventure is about. It’s completely abstract; it makes little sense to me even after playing through it a few times. In fact, the game’s only flaw is probably that it presents a story that’s just beginning. “Kentucky Route Zero” is a five-part adventure game and its first act leaves me full of questions. What is Conway doing in Kentucky? Where is the Zero? What the heck is going on? That’s not to say this is an incomplete episode — because it isn’t. Although the story doesn’t get past its first hints and murmurs, the taste that I was given made me hungry for more. Early in the game, I find myself talking to a black-haired mathematician living in a small house on a hill. Text scrolls by as I move the conversation along with a variety of quirky dialogue options. I assure the mathematician that I do in fact know how to use a television. To prove my point, I turn on the television in the room. The walls pull away, leaving only the frame of the house still

standing as the picture on the television replaces everything else. Almost immediately, I’m leaving the farmhouse and walking back to my truck as I hear music playing off in the distance. Getting closer, I realize the outlines of the musicians are visible in the foreground. Bluegrass music bleeds into the sounds of night in the countryside. I don’t know who the band is, or what they’re doing on a ridge outside of the Marquez Farmhouse. The game doesn’t tell me, and that’s precisely why it’s so intriguing. “Kentucky Route Zero” is filled with dialogue and text, but so much of the game is presented in the environment around you: the transition from the lit interior of a house to the darkness surrounding, the subtle strings of music that filter in as you enter a new location, and the absence of sound when you turn off your light. I’m in love with the art style, both visual and aural, of “Kentucky Route Zero.” I don’t know where the adventure will take me, but I’m looking forward to the ride. This isn’t your run-of-the-mill pointand-click adventure. There aren’t any puzzles or challenges and you have total freedom to explore the world around you as you try to understand what’s happening. BEN KIM -regular game columnist -sophomore -communication major

Best Actress: Jessica

live at the lyric Spring 2013

LIVE AT THE

Chastain (“Zero Dark Thirty”), Jennifer Lawrence (“Silver Linings Playbook”), Quvenzhané Wallis (“Beasts of the Southern Wild”)

editors: emma goddard, nick smirniotopoulos

www.thelyric.com | 540–951–4771

Dark Thirty,” to win. Th is development is especially interesting considering that Bigelow was shockingly snubbed by the Academy Awards and not nominated for Best Director. Indeed, there are far more interesting nominations for the 85th Annual Academy Awards, to be held on February 24. The most exciting category is always Best Picture — and in this case, nearly every fi lm nominated would deserve to win. “Les Miserables” and “Life of

Pi” were both good movies, but hardly on the same tier as the also nominated “Lincoln” or “Zero Dark Thirty.” Two of my personal favorite films this year, “Silver Linings Playbook” and “Django Unchained” are nominated, but I would not expect to see their names called. The real surprises are the nominations for “Amour” and “Beasts of the Southern Wild.” “Amour” is surprising because it’s a foreign fi lm, spoken entirely in French. It’s deservedly nominated for Best Foreign Language Film,

but I would be shocked to see it win Best Picture. The story is breathtaking and wonderfully original, but it lacks the epic quality that Best Picture winners are expected to have. With zero nominations at the Golden Globes, I expected “Beasts of the Southern Wild” to be another fantastic indie movie ignored by the Academy. KATIE WHITE -regular movie columnist -junior -history major


editors: priscilla alvarez, mallory noe-payne, dean seal newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

news

january 22, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

5

New college applications encourage creative thinking LARRY GORDON mcclatchy newspapers

LOS ANGELES — “So where is Waldo, really?” That’s not the kind of question most high school seniors expect to find on their college admission applications. But it is one of the essay options that applicants to the University of Chicago face this year in their quest for a coveted freshman berth. It is the kind of mindstretching, offbeat or downright freaky essay question that is becoming more common these days as colleges and universities seek to pierce the fog of students’ traditional self-aggrandizing essays detailing their accomplishments and hardships. From Caltech in the West to Wake Forest University in the East, more schools are serving up unusual essay prompts to gain better insights into young people’s minds and personalities. Colleges also hope for more authenticity in a process skewed by parental intrusion, paid coaching and plagiarism. “It’s a way to see students who can think differently and go beyond their academic, intellectual and extracurricular comfort zones,” said Garrett Brinker, an admissions official at University of Chicago. Those essays also “break up the monotony of the application process,” for students and colleges. The Common Application, the online site used by 488 colleges, offers such generic prompts as: “Discuss some issue of personal, local, national or international concern and its importance to you.” The site makes it easier for would-be students to apply, even if some are half-

MCT CAMPUS

Santa Monica High School (Calif.) senior Hannah Kohanzadeh is one of many students embracing the new trend of more personal, expressive essay options for college applicants. hearted about enrolling. have fun”; and Brandeis’ “A to say?’ ” recycle material.” hearing good music or readBut an increasing number package arrives at your door. Judy Rothman, author of Hannah Kohanzadeh, a ing a great book, and tied it to of schools prefer to hear only After seeing the contents you “The Neurotic Parent’s Guide Santa Monica High School her love of new ideas. “I start from serious applicants “aware know it’s going to be the best to College Admissions,” said senior, has embraced the trend. flying,” she said. of the values of the institu- day of your life. What’s inside schools like curveball essay “So many schools don’t pay For idiosyncrasies, other tion,” said Katy Murphy, and how do you spend your questions because “they are attention to the little quirks students described being so president-elect of the National day?” sick and tired of reading the students have. Those personal rushed that they brush their Association for College For some students, the ques- same thing over and over things can tell whether a stu- teeth in the shower, wearing Admission Counseling. tions may lighten an other- again” and because the top- dent belongs there or not,” certain underwear as a good So more colleges are add- wise burdensome task. But ics encourage teen authorship she said. With deadlines days luck charm for exams and ing online supplements that others are intimidated, said without adult coaching. away, she is finishing applica- falling in love too fast, accordrequire head-scratching writ- Murphy, who is college counHigh school seniors have tions to Brandeis, Occidental ing to Occidental’s Dean ing assignments. Examples seling director at Bellarmine mixed reactions, she said: and others. of Admission Sally Stone include Tufts’ “Celebrate your College Preparatory, a high “For a kid who is natural writFor Occidental, an essay Richmond. Inviting such revnerdy side”; Wake Forest’s school in San Jose, Calif. “The er, it is relief and a great break asked: “Identify and describe elations helps ease applicants’ “Think of things that fascinat- colleges talk about the creativ- from the tedious process of a personal habit or idiosyn- fears that they must appear ed you when you were 10 years ity of play and the philosophy the applications. For the kids crasy — of any nature — that perfect and is “an opportunity old — what has endured?”; of Plato. What the students who just want to get through helps define you.” She wrote to seek candor in ways that Caltech’s “Please describe an are trying to figure out is: all their applications, it’s a about how she flaps her arms won’t be intimidating to the unusual way in which you ‘What do the colleges want me nightmare because you can’t when she gets excited about student,” she said.


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january 22, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

news

editors: priscilla alvarez, mallory noe-payne, dean seal newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Marshall: Tech mourns loss of passionate student from page one

on campus. She was slated to become the next president of “Help Save the Next Girl.” The organization is meant to “empower young women and encourage community vigilance against violence,” according to President Laura Schneider. The group was created in honor of Morgan Harrington, the 20-year-old Tech student that disappeared from a Metallica concert in 2009 at the University of Virginia’s John Paul Jones Arena. “Annalee was absolutely instrumental in founding the chapter,” Schneider said. “The potential she had was remarkable and she wanted to do so many great things.” The co-president of the group, Ian Hef lin, and Marshall went on a trip to Charlottesville this past October in honor of the third anniversary of Morgan Harrington’s disappearance. The group had hoped several students could make the trip that day, but it ended up only being Marshall and Hefl in. It was during that trip that Marshall said something which has really resonated with the members of Help Save the Next Girl since her death. “If I have the chance to do service, and make a difference for someone who can’t, how can you not do that?” the group recalled Marshall saying. Their unofficial motto is now, “how can you not stop and help to do service,” based on Marshall’s attitude. Marshall was also involved in the fi lming and creation of a Public Service Announcement for Help Save the Next Girl. The Greater Washington-Fredericksburg area cable stations have agreed to start showing the

COURTESY OF LAUREN MARSHALL

Marshall attends a football game with friend (top left), Marshall visits the White House (bottom left), Marshall was a member of Tech’s Equestrian Team and an avid rider (right). PSA on air, starting this Marshall’s interest in the something bigger then her- Danielle Drombrow, a fellow competitions. week, in her honor. portion of her class about self.” Animal and Poultry Sciences From Equestrian Team Remembering Marshall Ancient Tibetan teachings In her free time, Marshall major, recalled her gift with to Help Save the Next Girl, Jane Lillian Vance, on being wise and compas- loved painting and riding her horses. Marshall’s involvement on Marshall’s former professor sionate. horse Splash. When she was “She was great around the campus had a wide impact. is mourning the loss of one “She was attracted to that at home she was active with horses,” Drombrow said. “She wanted to do so many of her closest students. Vance subject because she was that; her dogs, teaching them agil- “She absolutely loved them. great things, and so many spoke at Marshall’s service in that was native to her nature,” ity training. She was such an asset to the great things will be done in her hometown in Maryland Vance said. “Most kids who “Before she went to Tech, team, and always so posi- her honor. Her legacy will as a representative of Tech. are 20 years old have only her home was really the tive.” prevail,” Schneider said. “Our community is rocked discovered what kind of barn,” her mother recalled. Drombrow described her and shaken with sorrow, “ order they like to place at Marshall was also a mem- laughter as contagious, Follow the writer on Twitter: Vance said at her funeral. Starbucks. But not Annalee. ber of the Equestrian Team always helping lift the team @CAustinCT Va nce remembered Annalee was already a part of on campus and her captain, and encourage them during


opinions

editors: josh higgins, shawn ghuman opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

january 22, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

7

The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff

MCT CAMPUS

Our Views [staff editorial]

Obama’s new term should be clean slate With President Obama’s second term officially begun, it is crucial for citizens to put aside partisan bickering in order to move the country forward. Politicians must work toward the improvement of the nation instead of focusing on political

gains, especially with debt issues on the horizon once again. Credit cannot be used as political fire for an ideological cause. Whether or not you support Obama’s policies, the hatred and uncompromising attitude that has plagued the capital for the past four years needs to end.

Hokie Bird goes beyond role of school mascot

A

lthough it’s a somewhat biased opinion, Virginia Tech has the best mascot in the country. The Hokie Bird is a leader, an ambassador and an innovator for the university. His duties go far beyond that of the average mascot; he is a symbol of everything our school stands for. Using Facebook and Twitter to reach out to the Tech community outside of Blacksburg, Va., The Hokie Bird has a growing fan base of more than 3,000 Facebook friends and Twitter followers, as well as more than 34,000 likes on his Facebook fan page. The Hokie Bird has used this attention to promote activities in new ways. One example occurred last month, when just a day after the horrific Sandy Hook Elementary school shooting in Newtown, Conn., the Hokie Bird organized a massive poster-signing event for the victims via Facebook. Thousands of Tech students attended the poster signing, showing how much influence he has. The Hokie Bird wore a shirt at the poster-signing event that read “Help Newtown Prevail,” relating back to our own history after the April 16, 2007 massacre, which resulted in Nikki Giovanni’s now-famous quote, “We are Virginia Tech. We will prevail.” This event hit home, especially for me, because my sister was a student at Tech on that fateful day back in 2007, and I remember the outpouring of support from around the world for the victims affected by that tragedy. The Hokie Bird does more than organize these types of events, though — he stars as an ambassador for the school.

The Hokie Bird personally routinely interacts with his fans via Twitter, and even congratulated new students for being accepted into Virginia Tech Class of 2017 when decision announcements were made. He wishes loyal followers and friends happy birthday and takes time to comment on almost every picture that is tagged of him on Facebook. He promotes sporting events and joins in on activities around campus, and students can spot him roaming the campus throughout the week. But after all the publicity the Hokie Bird receives, the one item that remains a secret is his real identity. I am sure many of the Hokie Bird’s close friends know his real identity, but no one else will know until the Hokie Bird graduates. It has become a tradition for all who put on the Hokie Bird costume to wear the Hokie Bird feet at their graduation, so their classmates finally know who the Hokie Bird was. The process to becoming a Hokie Bird is a secret too; I have yet to meet a person who knows how the application process works, but I am sure there is a way to find out that I have not discovered yet. Let us not forget what has made the Hokie Bird the icon that he is today. His flamboyant personality and hilarious feats will forever be etched in every student that walks the halls of these Hokie Stone buildings. The Hokie Bird is a beacon of positivity and optimism. Just look at him; he is always smiling. ADAM ROTHE -regular columnist -freshman -marketing major

Policy underscores political problems

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ov. Robert F. McDonnell has begun talks with legislatures to improve the condition of the state’s transportation system with a proposal eliminating the gas tax and raising the sales tax. The bill is conceptually balanced at first glance; only after a second’s thought does it become a real head-scratcher. McDonnell’s new law would remove the 17.5 percent gas tax for an increase in the sales tax from 5 percent to 5.8 percent. According to Huffi ngton Post’s Olympia Meola, this would bring an influx of approximately $3.2 billion in additional funds to the state government over the next 5 years. Economically, the plan makes sense. The extra funds would improve Virginia’s infrastructure, with new roads being paved throughout the state. But since the elimination of the gas tax would incentivize auto transportation, more people would fill those new roads, as more people take advantage of cheaper gas. Those in favor of the law, as outlined by the Washington Post’s Mohana Ravindranath, are mostly businesses whose service is auto transportation — moving services, taxi drivers, distribution facilities. All are significantly important to society’s efficiency dependence, but their benefit is not enough to outweigh the increased congestion and pollution that will accompany this legislation. If anything, the gas tax should increase. The state government should be placing incentives on mass transit and carpools. They should

reward those who made the decision to purchase more environmentally friendly vehicles — not create a $100 flat tax for owning such vehicles, as is part of McDonnell’s proposal. This situation has made me wonder how a smart man like McDonnell could bring forth such a senseless proposition, and I believe it has much to do with an issue I’ve touched on in a previous column. The pressure on current conservative politicians is at the hands of other republicans. In order to be re-elected to their respective offices, these officials are more concerned about beating other

There needs to be a mentality change. There needs to be more focus on the many governed rather than the few governing.” republican possibilities in primaries than the democratic opposition in the actual vote. In other words, in order to ascend politically, conservatives must make decisions that are more focused on appeasing their party, to gain favor over other republican runners, and less focused on the well-being of the citizens. This is especially prevalent in highly conservative areas where there is little chance of a liberal victory. It just so happens that McDonnell’s one-term limit as governor is shortly com-

ing to a close. His political career, though, is far from over. McDonnell can’t just raise taxes because, ever since George H.W. Bush, doing so is considered political witchcraft. When President H.W. Bush said, “Read my lips: no new taxes” at the 1988 Republican National Convention and proceeded to raise taxes once elected, his credibility was shot. Now, it has become a widely held concept that raising taxes, for whatever reason, good or bad, is Republican Party treason. Therefore, in order to offset raising the sales tax, McDonnell wants to throw the gas tax out entirely — an irrational plan as a product of diaphanous political endeavors. This is no way to govern. The political system has become so convoluted and twisted in itself that it’s lost sight of its purpose. It’s “for the people” not “for the self-promotion.” After the impasse in Washington over the fiscal cliff nearly caused another recession and this ridiculous legislation, I find myself growing tired of the partisan malarkey. There needs to be a mentality change. There needs to be more focus on the many governed rather than the few governing. And McDonnell’s proposal is just another example of the pothole politics running rampant throughout the system. DAVID LEVITT -regular columnist -junior -finance major

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news

january 22, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: priscilla alvarez, mallory noe-payne, dean seal newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Obama takes oath before bipartisan crowd DAVID LAUTER mcclatchy newpapers

Barack Obama publicly took the oath of office for his second term Monday, strongly defending the ideology of his party as he urged Americans to accept compromise as a path toward solving the nation’s problems. “Progress does not compel us to settle centuries-long debates about the role of government for all time — but it does require us to act in our time,” Obama said, soon after taking the oath from Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. “Decisions are upon us, and we cannot afford delay. We cannot mistake absolutism for principle, or substitute spectacle for politics, or treat name-calling as reasoned debate.” While just over 18 minutes — relatively short by historical standards — the address hit several major policy priorities Obama hopes to pursue. For the first time, an inaugural address mentioned the rights of gay Americans, as Obama declared that America’s “journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law — for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well.” The president also insisted on the need to “respond to the threat of climate change” — a subject he largely avoided after a stinging loss in Congress early in his first term. “Some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires, and crippling drought, and more powerful storms,” he said. “The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition; we must lead it.” “That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God.” Obama wove those specific policy pledges, along with brief reminders of his proposals for gun control and immigration reform, into a text that, overall, amounted to a strong reaffirmation of the core of liberal, Democratic politics and its belief in the positive role that government can play in the nation’s life. In a nod to those who do not share that outlook, he noted that Americans “have never relinquished our skepticism of central authority, nor have we succumbed to the fiction that all society’s ills can be cured through government alone.” But, he said, “preserving our individual freedoms ultimately requires collective action.” “We do not believe that in this country, freedom is reserved for the lucky, or happiness for the few,” he said. “The commitments we make to each other — through Medicare, and Medicaid, and Social Security — these things do not sap our initiative; they strengthen us. They

MCT CAMPUS

Obama was sworn into his second term of presidency at the National Mall on Monday using the Bibles of Reverend Martin Luther King and the 16th president, Abraham Lincoln. do not make us a nation of takers; they free us to take the risks that make this country great.” “We are true to our creed when a little girl born into the bleakest poverty knows that she has the same chance to succeed as anybody else, because she is an American, she is free, and she is equal, not just in the eyes of God but also in our own,” he declared.

the formal paperwork to submit the nominations of his choices for several Cabinet posts, the Secretaries of State, Defense and Treasury and the head of the CIA. The speech culminated a ceremony heavily laced with references to the country’s long struggle toward equality for its African American citizens. From an invocation by the widow of a slain leader of the civil rights movement that opened the formal proceedings, to the two Bibles on which Obama took the We cannot mistake oath, one of which belonged to absolutism for Lincoln and the other principle, or substitute Abraham to the Rev. Martin Luther King spectacle for politics, Jr., the symbols of the nation’s or treat name-calling 57th inaugural ceremony traced the historic arc that led toward as reasoned debate.” the nation’s first black president. Barack Obama Four years ago, Obama took office with the country in the President of the United States midst of two wars and the worst economic crisis in more than At the conclusion, Obama half a century. His second inauwalked back into the Capitol guration arrives with one war building, then turned for over, the other winding down a moment to look out at the and the economy recovering, but national Mall, filled with hun- with Washington dominated by dreds of thousands of flag-wav- a bitter political stalemate that ing Americans. “I want to see reflects a deep partisan divide in this again,” he could be heard the nation. saying. The inaugural ceremonies, Soon afterward, he signed the themselves, highlighted the idea Capitol’s guest book, then, with of bipartisanship and continuthe bipartisan congressional ity of American democracy. leadership looking on, signed Two of Obama’s predecessors,

Democrats Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, were among the dignitaries gathered at the Capitol’s West Front. So, too, were many of the congressional Republicans who have battled Obama through the past four years. The country’s two living former Republican presidents, George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush were not present; the elder Bush recently was recently released from a hospital in Houston after a bout with bronchitis. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., said before the ceremony that he expected most Republicans to attend the inaugural ceremony, a historic moment regardless of party. He noted that he had prime seats for Obama’s first inaugural and regretted not snapping any photos of the proceedings. “I’m going to try to this time,” he said. Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, a fiery conservative, said “my thought for today is, this is a constitutional event and our forefathers would be proud we’re following the directions they gave us.” “Tomorrow we’ll start the political discussion.” Overall, of course, the crowd, as is typical with inaugural celebrations, was heavily dominated by the president’s supporters, who cheered loudly as Obama’s

motorcade arrived at the Capitol from the White House. They cheered again as the Obamas’ daughters, Malia and Sasha, were introduced and then, a

There was a fierce debate about where our country is going, and he won.” Ed Jennings Obama Supporter

few minutes later, for first lady Michelle Obama. In keeping with the intense enthusiasm that Obama’s presidency has generated among African-Americans, the audience was disproportionately black. Several spectators commented on the special significance of the swearing-in taking place on the nation’s Martin Luther King Jr. day observance. “It’s particularly special that today is the MLK holiday,” said David Anderson, 43, who traveled from Tampa, Fla. “It’s kind of predestined. You can’t get better than that.” Ed Jennings, 44, who sported a knitted Obama cap, said he anticipated the president would

urge unity in his inaugural address. “It’ll be a summary of where this country is. There was a fierce debate about where our country is going, and he won,” he said. Hazel Carter, 90, of Springfield, Ohio, attended the last inauguration and wasn’t going to miss this one. “I prayed, God, just let me keep breathing until the inauguration,” she said with a laugh. “The crowd isn’t nearly the crowd of the first time. The anticipation isn’t what it was,” she said. “It’s a little more subdued, but beautiful. Beautiful. I love it.” Seated next to her, Thelma Lawson, 61, a nurse from Chicago, said she had not attended the swearing-in four years ago, “but now I am so excited because I’m in the midst of what is history of being made twice.” Chinwe Aldridge of Fort Washington, Md., said she and her husband had not decided to come to the ceremony until Sunday night, after some prodding from their two children. “I told them we could have a better shot at home on television,” she said. “They said they had to be here. Those are big words from little kids.”

Obama supports gay marriage DAVID SAVAGE mcclatchy newspapers

President Obama must decide next month whether to endorse gay marriage as an equal right under the Constitution; in his inaugural address, he sounded as though he had made up his mind. “Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law, for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well,” Obama said. During the last year, the president has said he personally supports gay marriage but that the issue needs to be decided on a state by state basis. Currently, nine states authorize same-sex marriages, 41 do not. The Supreme Court has agreed to hear two gay marANDREW CHUNG/MCT CAMPUS riage cases in late March, and both pose questions Greg Josken, of New York and Gustavo Cifuentes, of New Jersey, embrace during the inauguration.

about equal rights for samesex couples. In one case from New York, the justices will decide whether legally married gay couples are entitled to equal benefits under federal law. Obama’s lawyers have joined with gay rights advocates in arguing that the court should strike down part of the Defense of Marriage Act that forbids federal authorities from recognizing a same-sex marriage.

Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law...” Barack Obama President of the United States

In the second case concerning California’s Proposition

8, the court will consider the much broader question of whether gays and lesbians have a constitutional right to marry. So far, the administration has not weighed in on the question. And because it is a state case, the Justice Department could stand aside and not take part. The administration has until late February to decide whether to file a brief in the California case and take a stand on whether the Constitution gives gays and lesbians an equal right to marry. Lawyers close to the administration say the final decision will be made at the White House, not the Justice Department. But all nine justices were seated near to President Obama as he spoke Monday, and he endorsed the principle that “our gay brothers and sisters” are entitled to be “treated like anyone else under the law.”


january 22, 2013

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january 22, 2013

THE REAL WORLD Regular Edition Today’s Birthday Horoscope: It’s getting romantic. The first half of 2013 holds creativity, fun and cultural exploration. Your communication skills are on fire, so light up your social life. Career blazes after June. Provide excellent service, and your fortunes rise. Increase skills to keep pace. Waltz with changes.

ARE YOU READY? Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham Quote of the Day

I would rather walk with a friend in the dark, than alone in the light. - Helen Keller Send us your quote and see it here! creative.services@collegemedia.com

XKDC by Randall Monroe

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Complete the grid so that each column, row and 3x3 box contains the numbers 1-9. Copyright 2007 Puzzles by Pappocom Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com

By John Lampkin

Week ending January 25, 2013

ACROSS 1 Traveler’s reference 6 Baldwin of “30 Rock” 10 A month of Sundays 14 Go after 15 “Later, dahling!” 16 Fictional sleuth who first appeared in the Saturday Evening Post 17 Comedian for hire? 19 Expresses delight 20 Finis, in Frankfurt

Top Tracks I Knew You Were • Taylor Swift

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Ho Hey • The Lumineers

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1/22/13 21 A month of Sundays 22 Euripides tragedy 23 What Shakespeare’s parents had to do? 27 Zoo re-creation 30 Hippy dances? 31 More than portly 32 Frost, for one 33 Opening 36 __ chic 37 Low grade, or an appropriate title for this puzzle 39 18-Down’s love 40 Orch. section 41 Quarry

42 Posttonsillectomy treat 43 Gauchos’ gear 45 Tabloid fodder 47 Green that’s hard to swallow? 50 Material for some balloons 51 Couple’s pronoun 52 Continental wine region 56 Punta del __ 57 Memoir title for Sela? 60 Massage therapy pioneer Ida 61 Way

DOWN 1 Part of a plot, often 2 “All righty __!” 3 Developer’s need 4 Star of “61*”? 5 Ross __ 6 Buttonhole 7 Retired NPR host Hansen 8 It may be lent or bent 9 Grand Banks catch 10 Slide specimen 11 Easy to babysit, say 12 Number no longer used? 13 “Such a shame” 18 Princess with great buns? 22 Get weak in the knees 24 Had 25 K or G 26 Shades 27 Big bikes 28 Stand watch, say 29 Colt 45 holder 32 Layer 34 Teatro __ Scala: Milan opera house 35 Parlor game

37 Movie monster, casually 38 Tip of the Yucatán peninsula? 39 Banish 41 Movie house suffix 42 Vase, in a pinch 44 Michael of “Caddyshack” 45 Like many ski slopes in April

46 Italian sweetheart 47 Uriah Heep, by profession 48 Is sporting 49 Numbers game 53 Freelancer’s enc. 54 “South Park” cocreator Parker 55 Empty 57 On-target 58 Wheels 59 Neither masc. nor neut.

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Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

WORDSEARCH: Woodland Critters Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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WORD BANK 1 Skunk 2 Bear 3 Deer 4 Fox 5 Squirrel 6 Porcupine 7 Cricket 8 Birds 9 Wolf 10 Rabbit 11 Mole 12 Frog 13 Hedgehog 14 Owl 15 Raccoon 16 Chipmunk 17 Bat 18 Beaver

presents Career Guide on stands everywhere 2/5/13

GET READY.

12/12/12


editors: matt jones, zach mariner sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

sports

january 22, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

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Basketball cools down from slow start; Green still shining A first-time head coach, new assistant coaches, only eight eligible scholarship players and 10 freshmen or sophomores isn’t exactly a recipe for success. The Virginia Tech men’s basketball team was chosen by ACC coaches to finish tied for second-to-last with Wake Forest, finishing ahead of only Boston College, in the first preseason ACC coaches’ poll. However, the new-look, new-feel Hokies were not interested in the opinions of their critics. The first few games on most teams’ schedules could be considered preparation games, and Tech’s was no exception. It was the favorite in its first five games, and coach James Johnson hoped they would not only result in victories, but in opportunities for his young team to grow. Tech did not disappoint, as it won its first five games over 13 days, four of which were at home. The first real test of the year came against the Iowa Hawkeyes at home on November 26. It was the first game for the Hokies in the 2012-2013 season against a school from a BCS conference and Tech, once again, answered the call. The Hokies shot 52 percent as a team from the field and 90 percent from the free throw line. Coach Johnson passed his first challenge, 95-79. Just four days later Coach Johnson would get the biggest win of his very young coaching career. The Hokies hosted the then-No.15 and undefeated Oklahoma State Cowboys. Cowboy freshman guard Marcus Smart put up 18 points and 11 rebounds, but thanks to Hokies standout Erick Green, Smart would not be the star of the show. Green scored 28 points in

only 26 minutes en route to an 81-71 Tech win. On December 2, the Hokies were 7-0 and had an upset against a nationally ranked team under their belt. Although six of the first seven games were at home in Cassell Coliseum and the Hokies were considered favorites in a majority of them, their perfect start had swept across the campus and had Hokies’ fans jubilated over the early season’s successes. The feeling would not last long. The first hiccup of the season came a week later against West Virginia in the teams’ first meeting since 2003-2004. After Robert Brown banked in a three-pointer with 15 seconds left to give the Hokies a one-point lead, Juwan Staten drove through a non-existent Hokies’ defense and made a layup with just five ticks left to secure a West Virginia victory, 68-67. The loss to West Virginia did more than give the Hokies their first loss of the season; it marked the beginning of a 2-6 span that included losses to Georgia Southern and BYU. In the final four games of the streak, all losses, Tech allowed an average of more than 91 points a game. Perhaps, the lowest point of the season came on December 15. The Hokies dropped what should have been another home victory to a 4-5 Georgia Southern team. To exacerbate the loss, Tech lost 6-foot-8 forward Marshall Wood to a broken foot. Wood, who was averaging 5.8 points and 4.5 rebounds off the bench, will not require surgery, but a timetable for his return is still unknown. The high-powered offense that had propelled Tech to a

BRAD KLODOWSKI / SPPS

Sophomore guard Marquis Rankin dives for a loose ball during Tech’s 66-65 win over Wake Forest in Cassell Coliseum last Saturday. great start had stalled right before they would need it most. ACC play started for the Hokies on December 5 in College Park, Maryland. The Terrapins proved too much to for Tech, who was outscored by 16 points in the first half. The Hokies returned home four days later, only to drop their ACC home opener by 11 points to a struggling Boston College team. Two hard-fought victories — the first coming at Georgia Tech in overtime, and the second at home against Wake Forest — have put the Hokies at .500 in the ACC. Tech won both games by

a total of six points against teams that, prior to competition, had a combined conference record of 2-6. Though perhaps the wins did not come as easily as they should have, the winning streak may be just what the Hokies needed to get back on track. If the Hokies are to continue their recent successes, Brown — who has struggled mightily over the past few weeks — will need to be a viable second option for the Hokies to compliment senior guard Erick Green. Brown has been battling f lu symptoms for a major portion of the season, but he’s still missed

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22 of 24 shots from behind the arc during Tech’s struggles. The season thus far has been a roller coaster ride, but the 11-6 Hokies (2-2) have a constant source of points in Green. Many were pleased to hear the news that Green had decided to return to Blacksburg for his senior year after Seth Greenberg had been fired in the offseason, but few predicted the level of success he had experienced thus far. Green leads the nation in points-per-game at 24.6 and leads the team with more than four assists per game. While Green’s success is not surprising, the extent

of it is truly astonishing. He has been a steady port for a Tech team going through rocky waters, and will look to be such all year long. The Hokies will continue ACC play on Thursday with a matchup against in-state rival Virginia in Blacksburg. The Cavaliers are 12-5 (2-2), and will be coming into Cassell Coliseum hot off of a 56-36 rout of the Florida State Seminoles. You can follow the writer on Twitter at @JacobEmert JACOB EMERT -sports staff writer -sophomore -history & communication

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experience. Must have passion for the cattle business. Will consider training recent college graduate with degree in agriculture. Great career opportunity. Salary commensurate with experience. Send resume and salary history BRR, LLC, c/o Heritage Building Group, Attn: Don Demarest, 865 Easton Road, Suite 250, Warrington, PA 18976 or email to ddemarest@heritagebuildinggroup.com.

tip of the week

THE TOWN OF Blacksburg is currently accepting applications for the following part-time wage positions: Children’s Art Instructor and Assistant Children’s Exercise & Movement Instructor. For more information, please visit our website: www.blacksburg.gov. An EEO Employer M/F/D/V

LESSON: CAR ENGINE QUESTION: How do I maintain my engine? I never know what to look for and when to check.

For Rent

ANSWER:

PHEASANT RUN TOWNHOME For Rent 2013-2014. 4 bdrm. 2.5 baths. Refurbished. www.techtownhomes.com, techtownhomes@gmail.com

Check engine oil at every other fill-up For an accurate reading, follow this procedure:

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• Run or drive your car for about 15 minutes to warm the oil; then park the car in a level place.Turn off the engine and wait 15 minutes to allow the oil in the engine to drain back to the oil pan. • Remove the dipstick and wipe it clean with a paper towel or rag. Reinsert the dipstick, being sure to push it in all the way, then pull it out again to check the oil level. It should be somewhere between the hash marks on the dipstick. • Add the type and amount of oil as specified in your owner’s manual, if necessary.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) - A breakthrough moment is here. Expand your ideas to reach a larger audience. Use what you’ve gained to build structure. Income luctuates, so think twice before making a purchase.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- There’s plenty to go around; relax and enjoy it. Others need you. Provide leadership, and allow others to lead you, too. You’re surrounded by loving friends. Show them your appreciation.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Beauty surrounds you. Pay attention to the surrounding syncopation to discover something new. Intuition inds an opportunity. Allow yourself to get luxurious, but family comes irst.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Investigate previously impossible possibilities, and use your charm and wit to make them possible. Listen for ideas out of the blue, from those around you, and revise your plans.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Toss the ball to a teammate. Relieve the pressure and make room for a fabulous opportunity. Reinvigorate your team and think outside the box. You’ve got a buzz going.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) -- Savor sweet moments and share them with a loved one. Your generosity is commendable. Don’t let your bright future blind you. Find support in your community, and return the favor.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --Take time to praise, admire and thank someone who’s made a difference. A small risk now pays off. Negotiate from the heart. Relax to avoid a temper tantrum.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- What you lack in funds you can compensate with creativity and self-con idence. Look around; you are well blessed. Love drops a happy surprise in your lap.

Aries (March 21-April 19) -- You’re exceptionally intelligent now. Put your mind to good use. Surround yourself with people who you respect and respect you and ind new solutions to old problems.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) -- Optimism is appropriate now. Pick up the pieces and make something new. Call on your intuitive talent, and accept guidance. You’re surrounded by love.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) --You have more than enough and keep earning more. Read and take the time to let thoughts sink in. Stock up. Share the luck and the love. Confer with family.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- You don’t quite know how brilliant you are, but you could ind out. Go for what you believe in. Discover new friendships and projects to get involved in. Dive in.

Avoid overfilling your crankcase with oil Don’t overfill your engine crankcase with oil. If you do, the oil can rise into the crankshaft, where air bubbles will get churned into the oil.Your oil pump can’t do a good job of circulating oil with air bubbles. The result can be overheating and stress on engine components. Overfilling can also foul your sparkplugs. In fact, overfilling is a bad idea with all automotive fluids. -www.rd.com

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12

sports

january 22, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: matt jones, zach mariner sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Staff changes to benefit offense

FIILE 2012 / SPPS

Running back Trey Edmunds could seriously help the Hokies in 2013.

Coaches: Beamer changes things up from page one

After a disappointing 7-6 season, Frank Beamer decided to shake it up on the offensive side of the ball. Former Auburn and Temple offensive coordinator Scot Loeffler takes over for Bryan Stinespring at offensive coordinator. Jeff Grimes replaces Curt Newsome at offensive line coach and former Indianapolis Colts receiver Aaron Moorehead will coach the receivers. The three new coaches will be officially introduced at a news conference on Friday. Stinespring, Virginia Tech’s offensive coordinator since 2002, will continue to coach the tight ends while also handling the duties as the Hokies new recruiting coordinator. Newsome is expected to take a position on the James Madison coaching staff this fall. Mike O’Cain, Tech’s quarterbacks coach/play-caller, told the Richmond TimesDispatch Thursday night that he was fi red last Tuesday. Purdue announced Kevin Sherman as their wide receivers coach after seven years in Blacksburg. The coaching changes are the biggest shake-up since 2006, when quarterbacks coach Kevin Rogers (Minnesota Vikings), offensive line coach Danny Pearman (North Carolina), receivers coach Tony Ball (Georgia) and defensive backs coach Lorenzo Ward (Oakland Raiders) left for different jobs. With the changes, Beamer made his staff considerably younger. The average age of the new coaches (38) could have a rejuvenating effect on a team that lacked much of a spark last season. Loeffler brings 16 years of coaching experience with him

to Blacksburg. His run-first offense succeeded at Temple in 2011 but failed at Auburn in 2012 after transitioning from a spread offense. Loeffler will coach Logan Thomas and the quarterbacks in addition to his role as offensive coordinator. Grimes, 44, coached an Auburn offensive line in 2010 that paved the way for a national championship. The last two seasons the offensive production has been down at Auburn, but Grimes has remained a highly coveted coach. Following Auburn’s dismal 2012 season, head coach Gene Chizik and his staff was relieved of their duties. Three weeks after the Hokies played Rutgers in the Russell Athletic Bowl, Beamer named the three coaches he hopes will jump start some offensive production. Moorehead, 32, has the least coaching experience of the three new faces. A year after his playing career ended, he joined New Mexico’s staff as a graduate assistant, then moved to Stanford as an offensive assistant for the last three years. Beamer interviewed former Stanford offensive coordinator Pep Hamilton several weeks ago. Hamilton passed on Beamer’s offer, and has since been named the offensive coordinator for the Indianapolis Colts, reuniting with former Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck. Loeff ler, Grimes and Moorehead will officially begin work on January 25. With National Signing Day approaching (Feb. 6), Beamer will look to the new coaches to put the finishing touches on a recruiting class currently ranked No. 13 in the country by ESPN.

Th is offseason, the song remains very much the same as it did a year ago for the Virginia Tech Hokies' offense. You bring back your quarterback, one or two somewhat-experienced linemen and not much else. We all know how that ballad ended in 2012: a 7-6 record and the team’s worst offensive output since Frank Beamer went with the ever-unsuccessful two-quarterback system in 2007 and 2008. (That’s right, Tech fans: if you think watching Logan Thomas and co. struggle this year was painful, just imagine what it was like watch two quarterbacks take turns failing — one at throwing the football, the other at pleasing the fans.) But, because of outstanding defense and special teams, those 2007-2008 teams still won 10 games — something the Hokies failed to this past season for the first time since 2003. So what — if anything — can be expected of out of the 2013 version of Bryan Stinespring’s unit? Well, for one thing, they’re no longer Stinespring’s unit. Which, if you ask most fans, is a good start. After 10 seasons as Tech’s offensive coordinator, Stinespring was demoted by Beamer — his longtime friend — in favor of Scot Loeffler, who spent the last two seasons holding the same position at Temple and then Auburn. Loeffler’s track record, although not the best by any means, is sufficient, given what Tech is known for offensively — a balanced attack paced by the running game that can milk the clock and keep its defense off the field and well-rested. Beamer won’t expect much else from Loeffler. Except, maybe to help aid in the continuing development of Thomas, who underperformed in 2012. During his time coaching at his alma mater, Michigan, Loeffler worked with NFL quarterbacks including Tom Brady, Chad Henne and Brian Griese. He also spent two seasons in Florida coaching Tim Tebow. So what does all this mean for Stinesp…Loeffler’s unit, rather? With two new bluecollar guys in offensive line coach Jeff Grimes and wide receivers coach Aaron Moorehead, they should be able to meet, if not exceed, Beamer’s expectations. We’ll start with Grimes’ (feels weird to say that) offensive line. With the departure of tackles Nick Becton and Vinston Painter, as well as utility-man Michael Via, Grimes will welcome a few new faces to the starting lineup. Re d s h i r t-s ophomore s Mark Shuman and Laurence Gibson are the leading candidates to take the two tackle

BRAD KLODOWSKI / SPPS

After a rough 2012, Logan Thomas and co. have nowhere to go but up with a revamped offensive staff. spots. Despite being highly touted recruits and possessing what is seemingly a large amount of potential, neither one of them has more than 40 career offensive snaps. On the interior line, guards David Wang and Brent Benedict return, along with centers Caleb Farris and Andrew Miller. Miller missed the second half of the 2012 season with an ankle injury and will retake his spot in the middle, most likely forcing Farris to guard and either Wang or Benedict to the bench. Judging a new offensive line is tough, because chemistry is such a vital component. We won’t know what to really expect from them until Grimes is able to work with them both individually and as a unit. In the backfield, Shane Beamer welcomes back his top four rushers from a season ago in Thomas, J.C. Coleman, Tony Gregory and Michael Holmes, all of who ran for at least 300 yards apiece. However, with the addition of freshman Trey Edmunds, who redshirted last season, as well incoming Fork Union transfer Drew Harris, it’s likely that Coleman, Gregory and Holmes will all be battling just to see playing time. Although the coaching staff was unable to settle on a single “feature back” last season — or even two primary runners, for that matter — expect Loeffler’s arrival to bring Tech back to a more traditional system. And don’t be surprised if either Edmunds or Harris — or both — fit well into that

system. A season ago, four Tech running backs had at least 52 carries — and none of them had more than 109. In 2011, David Wilson had 290 carries. In 2010, Wilson, Darren Evans and Ryan Williams each had between 110 and 151 carries. In 2009, Williams had 293 carries. Point here being, Tech failed to establish a running game in 2012 because it had no single back it could rely on — coupled with the fact that it had an unreliable interior offensive line to run behind. Bring in a guy like Grimes, as well as a slightly more experienced group of ball carriers, and you’re probably looking at (at least) a little bit more success on the ground in 2013. Out wide, Tech loses its three leading pass-catchers from 2012 in Marcus Davis, Corey Fuller and Dyrell Roberts. Replacing them will be no easy task. Outside of D.J. Coles — who’s now in his sixth year of eligibility — no current Tech receiver has more than 20 career receptions. Actually, if you eliminate Coles and redshirt-freshman Demitri Knowles, no current Tech receiver has more than two career receptions. Coles and Knowles will most likely start at split end and flanker, respectively. Behind them, there’s minimal experience. Kevin Asante had two catches last season in his first year on the field. Willie Byrn, Christian Reeves and Joshua Stanford each have one career reception. After

that, no receiver on the roster has ever stepped on the field. Expect Asante, Stanford and the crown jewel of the 2012 recruiting class — redshirtfreshman Joel Caleb — to compete for meaningful reps. Again, it’s hard to figure exactly what to make of this bunch at this point — it’s still a little too early for that. But, you’d think such a young group of guys would respond well to a new, 32-year old coach in Moorehead. Time will tell. And that leaves us with Thomas. His yardage and touchdown numbers from 2011 and 2012 are strangely similar — 3,482 total yards and 30 total touchdowns in 2011, 3,500 total yards and 27 total touchdowns in 2012 — but where Thomas really struggled was his accuracy. Add in a shaky receiving corps and a not-so-reliable offensive line and you’ve got the disasterous recipe that made a Russell Athletic Bowl victory reason for serious celebration. Now, Thomas returns for his senior season to an offense that’s in a very similar situation that it was a year ago, save for a new coaching staff. That being said, the impact that Loeffler, Grimes and Moorehead have on this offense could very well make — or break — the 2013 Hokies. ZACH MARINER -sports editor -junior -communication -@ZMarinerCT


editors: matt jones, zach mariner sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

sports

Wrestling rolling through ACC ADAM NORMAN sports staff writer

The Virginia Tech wrestling squad has been hard at work during the winter break, competing in two tournaments and three separate dual meets. The Hokies had two first-place finishes at the Midlands Championships, won the Virginia Duals and dominated all three dual matches, allowing only 15 points combined. Both Jarrod Garnett (125) and Nick Brascetta (149) were named champions at the Midlands, both going 5-0 in their respective weight classes. Garnett picked up wins over No. 3 seed Cory Clark at the semifinals and then won the championship match by a score of 5-1 over No. 4 seed Jesse Delgado from Illinois. Brascetta faced a similar challenge in his last two matches of the tournament securing wins over No. 1 seed Montell Marion and then No. 2 seed Donnie Vinson. Other wrestlers who placed at the tournament were Devin Carter (141) who took fourth, Jesse Dong (157) finished fifth, and Pete Yates (165) ended up third. Yates lost in his semifinal match to Bubby Graham from Oklahoma, his first and only loss of the season. After rolling past Duke in a dual meet 41-0, the Hokies participated in the Virginia Duals. The Duals were held at Hampton Coliseum where sixteen Division-I schools met. Of those schools, five

were ranked including the Hokies, who were 11th at the time. Previous to this year, the best place finish for Tech was sixth place in the 2010 season. In the first round, the Hokies went up against Binghamption, winning easily 32-9. Yates and Dong both got pins for the Hokies in 57 seconds and four minutes, respectively. The next match went similar for the Hokies, breezing by Kent State 26-9. In that meet, Dong broke the school record for career dual meet wins with 59. He picked up a 3-0 win over T.J. Keklak, passing Sean Gray and Chris Marting on the career dual meet wins list. In the next match, the Hokies faced No. 16 Edinboro, who they beat earlier in the year in a close match, 21-16. Fate once again favored Tech, who won 23-10, while only losing three of the 10 matches. With that win, the Hokies advanced to their first ever finals appearance at the Duals against No. 19, rival Virginia. Garnett, Brascetta and Yates all got wins over opponents ranked in the top 15 in the nation, en route to a decisive 21-9 victory over the Cavs. With the win, Tech became the first ever Virginia team to win the Virginia Duals in its 33-year history. This past weekend the Hokies had two ACC dual meets, at North Carolina on Saturday and then at home against NC State on Sunday. Things started out rough for the Hokies against

the Tar Heels when No. 4 Jarrod Garnett was upset by No. 13 Nathan Kraisser. However, things quickly turned around and they did not lose another match (besides a forfeit at the 141 lbs.) getting a decisive win 32-9. The next day, the team again dominated another ACC opponent, winning easily 40-6 over NC State. Nick Vetterlein (184) and Derrick Borlie (197) got back-to-back pins for the Hokies, while Dong got a technical fall by a score of 15-0. Tech is now ranked No. 9 in the nation with an overall record of 11-2 and an ACC record of 4-0. The win over NC State gave the Hokies their 23rd ACC win in their past 24 conference matches. The Hokies currently have four wrestlers ranked in the top 25 in their weight class, all of them in the top 10: No. 4 Garnett (125), No. 6 Brascetta (149), No. 7 Dong (157) and No. 5 Yates (165). Currently, Yates sits at 119 career wins only fourteen shy of tying Sean Gray’s record of 133. Dong joined both Yates and Garnett in the career 100-Win Club, making him only the eighth wrestler in Tech history to achieve the milestone. The Hokies travel next to Maryland this Friday for their last ACC dual meet of the year. Then on Sunday, the Oklahoma Sooners will be in Blacksburg for the Hokies senior night at 2 p.m.

Te’o’s draft stock won’t take hit BRIAN HAMILTON mcclatchy newspapers

On Wednesday morning, Manti Te'o was a more or less glistening, relatively welt-free NFL prospect with one significant but not really treacherous question to answer: Why had he played so terribly in the biggest game of his otherwise superior college career? By the end of the day . . .? In various forms, from various voices and in various contexts, Te'o's name wound up elbow to elbow with Cam Newton, Randy Moss and Lawrence Phillips. The Heisman Trophy runner-up was still a presumed first-round NFL draft pick in April, but that was the collateral damage of a hoax involving a fake dead girlfriend and Te'o's part in it, and the character questions that followed whether the player was an unwitting victim or not. "He's going to have to explain this about 32 (darn) times now, in an interview room or whatever," said one NFL scout who requested anonymity because his team prohibits media interaction. "He's going to have to explain the whole thing and (his) agent is going to have to prep him on it. "He's going to have to have some kind of story that is the same with everybody, or there are going to be even more questions. Is this stable? Did he get screwed? You have to give the kid the benefit of the doubt, but you have to research this thing and find every single angle you can." Late Friday night, Te'o came clean at last to ESPN and began the rehabilitation process for injuries no one has seen before. He was the subject of a scam involving the death of a fictitious girlfriend, Lennay Kekua, that provided the backdrop to a season that put him in the top half of the first round of 2013 mock drafts almost everywhere. To virtually no one's knowledge, it swelled in late December and early January and then Te'o had the disas-

trous performance against Alabama in the BCS championship game. Now every NFL team will work to reassemble the pieces and see if the picture of Te'o looks the same. "As long as I've been in the National Football League, I've never seen a situation like this," said Gil Brandt, a former longtime Cowboys personnel executive and current NFL.com analyst. "If you were at the Oklahoma game, you see how well he played against a good team on the road. For the year, the guy had seven interceptions. When you watch the Alabama game, it was like a guy who wasn't there." So NFL teams may go to extraordinary lengths to see what they have, and Te'o will feel the brunt of it. Teams will investigate players with their personnel departments, and teams also will hire private investigators to dig deeper on perhaps a half-dozen more troublesome or complicated prospects. A second NFL scout said the league will dispatch its own investigators on certain prospects. And then when Te'o sits in a room with a team, he will face pointed queries about a barely explicable situation from men who likely won't be able to wrap their skulls around it. Brandt even suggested this: Teams may want to enlist psychologists to help sift through the question-andanswer sessions on a subject "above people who are not trained in that field." "It's obviously a red flag," the second NFL scout said. "There will be an overreaction to this from a negative standpoint. Initially people want to shoot guys down who are rated up there high, and now they have a situation where they can say, 'Hey, we don't want anything to do with this guy.' "There will be a lot of questions of why, and what was to be gained, and what did you learn from this. A lot of guys who are asking the questions haven't been in that kind of situation before and really don't understand it. They're

going to take a hard line and try to be CIA-type guys." In that and in what will be a bit of a startling juxtaposition for Irish fans Te'o may have just one contemporary equal. "He will get absolutely punished more than Cam Newton, with everybody asking about it," the first scout said. "Now, you're going to see what kind of character the kid has because there are teams that talk. Guys will talk and they will say, 'What did he say to you guys?' Is it constant? Is it the same story? Does it change at all?'" What hasn't changed: The 6-foot-2, 255-pound Te'o fi nished his college career with 437 tackles and a deep well of experience in publicly addressing and making a case to a larger group. He landed at No. 8 in ESPN analyst Mel Kiper Jr.'s initial 2013 mock draft published Wednesday morning, and no one expects Te'o to slide out of the first round, though the second scout opined that he may have gone from the "five to 15" range to "10 to 20." "If Te'o is able to reassure teams that he is, indeed, the victim in this case, his draft stock may not be affected at all," said Rob Rang, a senior analyst for NFLDraftScout. com/CBSSports.com. In an ironic sense, the overwhelmingly bizarre Kekua case may help Te'o explain why he had 12 good performances and one particularly unsettling one. "I think it would," Brandt said. "Whatever we do related to success on the football field is concentration. If you had something like this hanging over your head, it would be pretty hard to concentrate on what's going on on the field that day." Said the second scout: "He'll go through the interview process, he'll visit teams, people will still like 12 of the 13 games and he'll be back in reasonable graces." That would be an acceptable place to be for Te'o, considering where many feared he was headed just days ago.

january 22, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

13


14

news

january 22, 2013 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: priscilla alvarez, mallory noe-payne, dean seal featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

What You Missed... Professor James McGill Buchanan dies

Logan Thomas announces new year plans

Economics Professor James McGill Buchanan died on Wed, Jan. 9 at the age of 93. Buchanan taught at Virginia Tech from 1969 to 1983 and then returned after he retired to Blacksburg in 1998. President Reagan awarded Buchanan the Nobel Prize in 1986 for his influential work on economics.

Logan Thomas told ESPNU’s College Football Live that he would be returning to Virginia Tech for the 2013 football season. Although Thomas was considered a potential top-ten pick after his sophomore season, his draft stock dropped after the 2012 season. With his return, Thomas has the potential to break school records including total offense, passing yards and touchdown passes.

Vice President Joe Biden, Mayor Ron Rordam discuss gun violence Blacksburg’s Mayor Rordam was one of twelve mayors who participated in a conference call with the Vice President regarding gun violence. The call surrounded the long-lasting affects of gun violence on communities. Biden was charged with the task of controlling gun violence shortly after the tragedy in Newtown, CT. Although there was no mayor from Newtown, the mayor of nearby Bridgeport, CT was on the call. Rordam approves of Biden releasing the suggestions from the call.

‘Faith in America’s Future’ President Obama was sworn in for his second term in America’s 57th Inauragtion. The theme of the inaugural ceremonies was ‘Faith in America’s Future,’ marking the 150th anniversary of the placement of the Statue of Freedom atop the new Capitol Dome. Obama is the only President to be sworn in on President Lincoln’s Bible. See page 8.

SPRING

Burkhart, Dove receive Outstanding Scientist Awards On Wed Jan. 16, Governor Bob McDonnell named professors Harold Burkhart and Patricia Dove as winners of the 2013 Outstanding Scientist Award. The Outstanding Scientist Award is given to scientists who have extended their field of study through recent contributions to scientific research. Burkhart is a forestry professor who has spent 40 years teaching and researching efficient forest management. Burkhart has spent almost his entire career at Tech helping develop models for the government, companies and private landowners. Dove spent seven years at Georgia Tech before she became a geosciences professor at Virginia Tech. She specializes in biomineralization and leads the Biogeochemistry of Earth Processes research group at Tech. Burkhart and Dove are two of the 11 Virginia Tech professors who have received the Outstanding Scientist Award.

2013

Follow the CT in print and online this week for full updates

Tuesday, January 22, 2013 Print Edition  

Tuesday, January 22, 2013 Print Edition of The Collegiate Times

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