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Wednesday, November 28 2012 An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 109th year, issue 49 News, page 2

Food & Drink, page 5

Opinions, page 3

Sports, page 6

Study Break, page 4

PRECINCT PROBLEMS KEVIN DICKEL/ COLLEGIATE TIMES

Miscommunication among officials leaves Tech student voters without an on-campus polling location on election day.

Pritchard Hall Hall (Closest (Closest On-Campus On-Campus Location) Location) Pritchard

Cassell Cassell Coliseum Coliseum (.2 (.2 mi mi from from Campus) Campus)

BY MALLORY NOE-PAYNE | news editor

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tudent-specific problems on election day aren’t unknown to Montgomery County. In 2008, a year with record-setting youth turnout, on-campus voters had to go to St. Michael’s Lutheran Church to vote. A large influx of students near the end of the day clogged the polling lines. In direct response, the county worked to create a new voting precinct primarily for students. “We tried to work something out so we had a precinct that was solely, or almost solely, students. That’s how we came up with E3,” said Randy Wertz, Montgomery County registrar. Despite the effort, long lines persisted this past election period, when the effort to find an on-campus polling location for the new precinct failed.

Election Day Virginia Tech Montgomery Executive Airport (1.5 mi from Campus)

COLLEGIATE TIMES

Cassell Coliseum, the initial choice for this year’s voting location, is just .2 miles from the nearest on-campus residence at Pritchard Hall.

On Nov. 6, voting at the new precinct, E3, took place at the Virginia Tech Montgomery Executive Airport. Students waited in the dark two and a half hours after the polls closed. The last voters didn’t submit their ballots until approximately 9:30 p.m. Alyssa Meighan, a freshman and first-time voter, was one of those students. She arrived at the polls with a group of friends at 3:30 p.m. They left almost two hours later. “We figured it would be like a half hour, maybe,”

Meighan recalled. “We were kind of shocked.” Despite the lines and dropping temperature, the entire group ended up submitting a ballot. Others around them had similar reactions. “I noticed (others) like us were getting frustrated with the whole thing,” Meighan said. One person behind her called into work to tell them he would be an hour late. Just like four years prior, students arrived near the end of the day. According to Ken Farrar, who was in charge of the polling place, between 150 and 200 voters came to the airport each hour throughout the day. At the end of the day, those figures nearly doubled. “My guess is … they were waiting... until after classes were over,” Farrar said. In order for on-campus students without a vehicle to vote in the middle of the day, they would have needed time to get to the airport, located 1.5 miles from the nearest dorm, vote, and then get back between classes. “Location wise, (the) airport’s not great,” Farrar said. “Access to get there is very hard. ... Ideally, we’re right on campus.” But students voters didn’t have an on-campus polling place election day. see POLL / page two

Gallery wraps up Squires 75th anniversary celebration MICHAELA REARDON news staff writer

The Squires Student Center will be capping off the commemoration of its 75th anniversary through pictures in the Perspective Gallery’s new exhibit “Coming TogetherMoving Forward: Squires 75th Anniversary in Images” from Nov. 15 through Dec. 15. “I offered the space for the exhibit after the director of student services had said something about the fact that they were having this year-long celebration,” said Robin Boucher, arts program coordinator for Student Centers and Activities. “I said, ‘why don’t we have some sort of exhibit to cap off the year and give everybody a visual connection to this place,’” The exhibit displays archived photos, yearbook publications, and VTU scrapbooks to show the importance of the Squires

Student Center and its impact over the years. All of the yearbooks and scrapbooks are bookmarked to pages that involve Squires but are also available for visitors to peruse through. “One of the things I wanted to do by having the books in was the fact that we’re so Google oriented with research; I liked the idea of being able to touch and turn pages and actually look at history in this totally absorbed matter,” Boucher said. “There is something different with holding a book and looking at it — it’s a different experience.” Pictures in the gallery date back to the groundbreaking ceremony in the 1930s and continue on through the transformation of the building in the 1960s and 1970s. “It’s interesting to me, when they actually started demolishing the building,” Boucher said. “Looking at it in retrospective, of course, they were trying to

create something more contemporary with the ‘60s building. They made this very modern looking building which encapsulated this original space and everybody comes in here and says ‘they did that to that building?’” In addition to the photo gallery, there will be a reception, “Recording Today’s Memories,” held on Nov. 30 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. During the day, the reception will be informal with cake and punch served from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.; later, a more formal reception will begin at 4 p.m. and serve local foods. “We’re going to take double pictures of everyone,” Boucher said. “Everyone who does it will put one in our scrapbook and write some memory in the scrap book, so we can create little time capsule of today.” Follow the writer on Twitter: @MReardonCT

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

The gallery exhibit honoring Squires 75th anniversary will be open for viewing until it closes on Dec. 15.


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news

november 28, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: mallory noe-payne, victoria zigadlo newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Poll: Cassell passed up for parking

upcoming events Wednesday, Nov. 28

from page one

Squires 75th Anniversary in Images: 12:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at the Squires Perspective Gallery. This exhibit provides you with a trip down memory lane between the years 1937 and the late 90’s using images of Squires from the library archives, Bugle yearbooks, and VTU scrapbooks. Gallery is closed for Thanksgiving break from Friday November 16 at 7 p.m. until Monday November 30th.

From Cassell Coliseum to the Airport Ultimately, the search for a polling location for the newly created precinct led the registrar’s office off-campus to the regional airport, which is 1.5 miles away from Pritchard Hall, the nearest dorm. However, that was not where the search started. “We tried to fi nd a place, frankly, on campus that we could use,” Wertz said. The Montgomery County registrar’s office, led by Wertz, started the search by reaching out to Tech to see if a space on campus could accommodate the polling location. The space would ideally have a large open area for voting booths and covered spaces for lines. The space would would also need to provide parking for those citizens who did not live on campus. E3, while composed primarily of students, also includes town residents that aren’t students — although in much smaller numbers. While it’s impossible to tell exactly how many registered voters in the precinct are students, because the registration process doesn’t require any identification of that sort, the area of the precinct that includes off-campus housing is limited to the apartment complexes near the airport. In the primary elections held in June, when most students are no longer in Blacksburg, the precinct saw a turnout of eight voters. The search also had a limited time span. Establishing a new polling center involves a public hearing, a vote, and also approval from the state’s Department of Justice. That process can take up to 90 days. Wertz was directed to Tom Gabbard, associate director of athletics, internal affairs, to look at spaces the athletics department could provide. He was directed there by Sherwood Wilson, Vice President for Administrative Services. Gabbard admitted to initial surprise at being contacted. “Because there isn’t anywhere else on this 2,000 acre campus to find a place to poll and I’m thinking ‘that’s illogical,’,” Gabbard said. Regardless, Gabbard began to show Wertz, and some on the county electoral board who would eventually have to approve the space, potential locations for the polling center. Cassell Coliseum was initially an area of interest, agreed on by many as an ideal choice with a huge open space and easy access to on-campus students. According to Gabbard, Cassell had no space issues. “Cassell would have been, to

The Jo Carson Project: 7:30 p.m. to 9:00

p.m. at Theatre 101. A new work created from the writings of Tennessee based playwright and author Jo Carson. Developed by Vince DeGeorge.

Company Day Teach for America: 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at Pamplin Atrium.

Thursday, Nov. 29

CATIE CARRERAS / SPPS

Students were waiting in line to vote at the E3 precinct until 9:30 p.m., two hours after Va. polls closed us, ideal,” Wertz agreed. The basketball coliseum, located directly across from

tioned in discussions, however, when brought up with Wertz, he speculated that the necessary spots would not hit 100, or even 50. “For the number of people Because there isn’t that are off campus in that precinct, you would anywhere else on this particular probably need about 20 spots 2,000 acre campus to available,” Wertz said. “We find a place to poll and need a very small number because there’s a very small I’m thinking ‘that’s number off campus.” Gabbard, who had personally illogical.” estimated that hundreds would Tom Gabbard, be necessary, was surprised to hear such a low figure. associate director of athletics “If he’s talking about 15 cars, that’s not a problem,” Gabbard said, adding that the relatively the main dormitories on cam- low number was an inconvepus and next to the McComas nience, but not a mammoth parking lot, was dismissed as one. an option on the basis that “It was never brought up that parking couldn’t be provided we could have had any spacfor voters who had to drive to es there,” Wertz said. “If we the polls. knew we would have had some “If you came on this campus negotiation points on it, we at 10 o’clock this morning and would have taken advantage tried to park in that lot, you of that.” wouldn’t find a place to work, Another potential locaballot day or no ballot day,” tion, the visiting team locker Gabbard said. room in Lane Stadium, was The McComas lot, between looked into but dismissed as a McComas Gym and Cassell possibility because it failed to Coliseum, is used on a daily meet strict legal requirements basis for staff who work at the that those with disabilities can athletic facilities, career servic- access the area without any es, student services, McComas outside assistance. gym and Schiffert Health At this point, according to Center. Wertz, Wilson suggested the “The only way you’re going to regional airport as a potential be able to make that work is to location, and Wertz and his reserve spaces before the day team jumped on it. starts, and you can’t shut this “The only election that would campus down for several hun- give us a problem out there dred parkings spaces, which is would be the presidential elecwhat I believe (Wertz) was talk- tion,” Wertz said, referring to ing about,” Gabbard explained. elections on years that don’t Both Wertz and Gabbard turn out huge crowds. “When agree that specific number of the students aren’t interested, parking spots was never men- it’s obviously not an issue.”

When asked whether any mistakes were made in the process, Wertz denied something could have been done differently to produce a different outcome. “Well, no, you can’t say it was a mistake because everybody assumed, I guess,” Wertz said. “We assumed that the parking area... was not accessible to us. And (Gabbard) assumed that the number of spots needed was considerably more than what we did need. So I mean, nobody did anything wrong, it’s just that in the discussions it never really came out that there was negotiating room. But I don’t think anybody did anything wrong.” Wertz did admit that a quick and easy study from a county engineer could have given the search team specific data on how many parking spots would be necessary. “It wouldn’t have taken long at all to do that,” Wertz said, adding that,“Decisions had to be made quickly. We didn’t have a lot of time to go into a lot of detail on this.”

2016? Erica Wood, SGA Director of Governmental Affairs, ran a campaign to help get students registered to vote this past semester. In September, she received an email from the Campus Voter Challenge, an organization helping student groups make their campus voter-friendly. A list of specific goals for a university included having a polling location on campus for students. Wood admits that, until this time, she didn’t think about the possibility or impor-

Special showing of the film Argo followed by a speaker from the CIA:

11:00 a.m. at the Lyric, $5. As part of the ICCAE Speaker Series, on 29 November, there will be a special showing of the film Argo at 11:00am at the Lyric. Following the movie, the CIA historian that consulted on the film will discuss the film and the operation.

Therapy Dogs at Newman Library: 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Newman Library, second floor entrance. Our friends from VT Helping PAWS (Pet Assisted Wellness Service) will visit for stress relief and companionship. Screening of ‘Miss Representation’: 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at McBryde Hall Room 113. oin us for a special screening of the critically acclaimed film “Miss Representation” that challenges the media portrayals of women and girls, and to learn how this portrayal impacts human trafficking. having a polling location on campus for the next presidential election is In the discussions dependent upon contacting the Montgomery County it never really came Electoral Board, the body out that there was responsible for reviewing pollnegotiating room. But ing places. “A citizen could do it; I could I don’t think anybody do it; anybody could contact did anything wrong.” the board members,” Wertz explained, saying the regisRandy Wertz, trar’s office would be willing to Montgomery County registrar re-approach the search for an on-campus location, but only tance of an on-campus loca- if done through the correct tion. venue. “When elections are that close “If the university has changed to the start of your term (of as far as the parking, and that your SGA position), you don’t type of thing, then I’m sure have time,” Wood said. my board would reconsider, With the limited time because they, like I, want to before election day, Wood make sure that we serve the recognized it would be voters regardless of whether unlikely they would make any they’re students or anyone else headway on the issue. Instead, the very best we can,” Wertz her group opted to continue said. focusing on voter registration Follow the writer on Twitter: drives. @MalloryNoePayne Now, the likelihood of

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

status

10/17-22/2012

12pm - 12pm

Follow up to vandalism/ Destruction of property

Behind Fralin Hall

Inactive

11/10/2012

1:53am

Follow up to aggravated assault

Outside Slusher Wing

Inactive

11/18-19/2012

4pm - 7:30am

Follow up to larceny of welding equipment

I Lot Construction Site

Inactive

11/21-26/2012

12pm - 9:15am

Larceny of headphones

AISB

Active

11/26/2012

5am - 1:27pm

Vandalism/ Destruction of property

Litton Reeves Parking

Inactive

10/18 11/26/2012

2pm - 1:50pm

Threatening phone calls

Main Eggleston Hall

Active

11/26/2012

4pm - 9:30pm

Grand larceny (iPhone and cash)

West End Market

Active

arrestees

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opinions

editors: josh higgins, bethany melson opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

november 28, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

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The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Michelle Sutherland Managing Editor: Nick Cafferky Design Editors: Andrea Ledesma, Alicia Tillman Special Section Design Edtitor: Danielle Buynak Public Editor: Erin Chapman Web Editor: Chelsea Gunter News Editors: Mallory Noe-Payne, Victoria Zigadlo News Reporters: Priscilla Alvarez, Cody Owens Features Editors: Emma Goddard, Nick Smirniotopoulos Features Staff Writers: Ben Kim, Katie White, Kara Van Scoyc, Allie Sivak, Jacob Wilbanks Opinions Editors: Josh Higgins, Bethany Melson Sports Editors: Matt Jones, Zach Mariner Special Sections Editor: Cody Elliot Copy Chief: Nora McGann Copy Editors: Allison Hedrick, Kristin Gunther, Mackenzie Fallon, Alexis Livingston, Kayleigh McKenzie Photo Editor: Kevin Dickel Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: Ryan Francis Circulation Manager: Travis Neale

MCT CAMPUS

Our Views [staff editorial]

Everyone to blame in precient failure

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n a country where every vote counts, easy access to a polling location is necessary. All logical signs of a polling location for Virginia Tech students to vote point to a location on campus. However, the parties involved in organizing a polling location for students neglected to take on any part of ownership or responsibility in the search for a new location. Each party involved assumed the other party had already started the process or was actively involved. However, this was not the case and it resulted in keeping the polling location at the airport, 1.5 miles away from campus, where the only ways to get there are to drive or take a rerouted bus. When asked whether any mistakes were made in the process, Randy Wertz, the Montgomery

County registrar said it was no one’s fault, just because everyone based opinions on assumptions. However, that is where the mistake is found. No party that was sought after to try and change the polling location did anything. The mistakes and faults lie within every party involved because no action other than assumption was taken. Looking forward to 2016, each party involved in changing the polling location must step up and take action to move forward. Students must also advocate for themselves throughout the process. Hopefully, this past election has informed the registrar’s office, the university and any other group involved that assuming achieves nothing and action and communication — no matter how small — is necessary to give students a place to exercise their right to vote.

Ignorance hinders gay rights I

was raised with the idea that God loves us as his children, and he will perpetually care for us with an indescribable and unwavering warmth and compassion. I was told time and time again that our Father was an accepting God, and even when he was pained by our sins, he maintained an equal and superlative rush of care. Because of this, I thought my support of gay rights and the freedom of personal sexual orientation was a sin. Just as I was taught in Sunday school as a child, I thought God was saddened by my beliefs, and I was ashamed to express my support in any public fashion. It wasn’t until about a month ago that an inspirational speech given by Phil Snider, a preacher in Springfield, Mo. extinguished my fears. On August 13th, the reverend stood before Springfield’s City Council and delivered a moving argument in support of a sexual orientation ordinance. Throughout the speech, Dr. Snider spent the majority of his floor time preaching as if he was opposed to the legislature. “…Gay rights goes against the plain truth of the word of God,” he said. Giving homosexuals their rights is like “asking God to bring his judgment upon us.” Every sentence he uttered confused the audience more and more, and it became close to

impossible to remember he was actually in support of the ordinance. As he approached the end of his speech, the reverend twisted his argument in the most clever and innovative way I have ever seen. As he stumbled into his final point, he began to mix up his words. Rather than continuing on saying gay rights, he began using the word segregation. “The right of segregation is clearly established by the holy scriptures both by precept and example.” Upon doing so, he revealed that everything he had said during the speech had been direct quotations of white preachers in support of racial segregation in the ‘50s and ‘60s. Just as Bible Belt Christians of today reject homosexuals and cast them off as sinners against God’s word, white preachers during the civil rights movement cast off African Americans as lesser people. I couldn’t agree more with this comparison and I truly believe we are standing on the edge of the next momentous benchmark in our country’s history. It’s been made clear to me that the only way to avoid repeating our mistakes is to learn from the past. Make note that I am in no way taking away credibility from God’s word. I attempt to hold

true to scripture in my life as much as possible, but I cannot stand for the way it has been interpreted by both Christians of yesterday and today. Pastor Brian McLaren, a fellow gay rights activist, captures this idea superbly. “Just as the Western church had been wrong on slavery, wrong on colonialism, wrong on environmental plunder, wrong on subordinating women, wrong on segregation and apartheid, we have been wrong on this issue,” he said. Both Pastor McLaren and the Rev. Snider believe in our ability to make the world a better, fairer and more beautiful place for everyone. Snider brings this to light via the teachings of St. Augusta, “If love is the only measure, then the only measure of love is love without measure.” We are all loved unconditionally by a remarkable God, and the least we can do is reflect that love without measure. The Rev. Snider closed his statement with a call to action, and I’ll do the same. “I hope you will not make the same mistake. I hope you will stand on the right side of history.” STEVEN BRUNESON -regular columnist -communication -freshman

Norquist’s grip weakens on anti-tax legislation G rover Norquist is losing his grip. It once seemed as if Washington's most powerful anti-tax crusader had the Republican Party firmly in hand. Signing Norquist's public pledge not to raise taxes was almost mandatory in GOP politics. Nine of the 10 candidates initially vying for the Republican presidential nomination, including Mitt Romney, signed on, as did candidates for local, state and national office. Some of them even signed Norquist's vow in public ceremonies, then gave him the originals to store in the vault of his group, Americans for Tax Freedom. The best signatures went on the office wall like trophies. Norquist's power came from a threat that he didn't hesitate to brandish: Any member of Congress who broke the pledge would be called to account before voters, preferably in a GOP primary against someone more reliable. But an increasing number of Republicans are sidling away from Norquist's pledge and reassessing their resistance to any kind of tax increase. Before this month's election, Norquist counted 238 members

of the House of Representatives as signers of his pledge, a majority of the total of 435. But no more than 212 members of next year's House consider themselves bound by the pledge fewer than a majority. Some of Norquist's signers lost their seats. Some newly elected Republicans say they see no reason to sign a formal pledge on taxes. And at least six House members who once signed say they no longer consider themselves bound by it. Even more striking, an increasing number of prominent Republicans are dismissing Norquist as a pest. House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) has referred to him as "some random person." Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., says Norquist's power has been "broken." And in the unkindest cut for any Washington idea-monger, Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., dismissed Norquist as inconsequential. "It doesn't matter what he says," Coburn told MSNBC in July. Not surprisingly, Norquist is fighting back. He says he's confident that the Republican leadership in Congress is still committed to rejecting any net increase

in taxes. And when I asked him this week about his critics in the Senate, he was dismissive in return. None of them "are considered thought leaders on economic issues," he said. That's not a good sign. Describing senators from your own party as dim bulbs isn't normally how lobbyists win friends and influence people. Moreover, when he was asked about the signs that Republicans are wavering - like Boehner's signals that he is ready to accept increased revenue as part of a fiscal compromise — Norquist simply denied any threat. "The Rs are holding," he insisted at a meeting sponsored by a predominantly conservative think tank, the Center for the National Interest. "The fantasy is that the Republicans would cave on marginal tax rates," he said. "They're nonnegotiable." It's true that Republicans have held firm so far against President Obama's demand to raise marginal tax rates on the top two percent of taxpayers. But those same Republicans are talking freely about other measures to increase revenue, including proposals to limit tax deductions and exclusions. And those are

violations of Norquist's pledge too. The pledge explicitly rules out "any net reduction or elimination of deductions and credits, unless matched dollar for dollar by further reducing tax rates." In other words, any change in the tax law that increases federal revenue is out. Lately, however, more Republicans are concluding that increasing revenue is the price of a deal with Obama to avoid the brutal combination of tax increases and spending cuts scheduled to take effect next year if Congress doesn't act. Even Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., usually a hard-liner, said last week that he was "open to new revenue" as long as it was accompanied by cuts in Medicare and other entitlement programs. Norquist isn't buying that strategy. The GOP has succeeded for a generation by fighting constantly for lower taxes, he argues. "Republicans who raise taxes do their own brand a great deal of damage," he said. As for the exit polls that appeared to show a majority of voters on Nov. 6 supported Obama's position on taxes, Norquist has a oneword answer: "Wrong." Plenty

of other polls, he says, show that people still don't like the idea of taxes going up, he said. Norquist insists that if Republicans will only hold firm in the coming negotiations, the president will fold, as he did in 2010. Obama "will eventually have to extend the tax cuts as is," he said. It's no surprise that Norquist isn't embracing a compromise that would raise taxes. His mission in life is to reduce taxes and shrink the federal government. But even he can't ignore the signs that his hold is slipping. Norquist's power has derived mostly from the threat that he would expose tax-raisers to their constituents, who would then express their anger at the polls. But that threat seems emptier now because of a handful of Republicans like Scott Rigell. Last spring, Rigell, a freshman House member from Virginia Beach, Va., decided the pledge didn't make sense any more. He publicly renounced it. He held a series of town halls and interviews in his district explaining his decision. And on election day, he won reelection easily. DOYLE McMANUS -McClatchy Tribune

Student Publications Photo Staff Director of Photography: Brad Klodowski Lab Manager: Trevor White College Media Solutions Assistant Ad Director: Carla Craft Account Executives: Elizabeth Dam, Emily Daugherty, Taylor Moran Inside Sales Manager: Amanda Gawne Assistant Account Executives: Andrew Newton, Jordan Williams Creative Director: Danielle Bushrow Assistant Creative Services Director: Alyssa Morrison Creative Staff: Mary Dassira, Chloe Young, Cameron Vaile, Diana Bayless Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes. com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes. com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints. collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2012. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


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november 28, 2012

Regular Edition Today’s Birthday Horoscope: Today’s lunar eclipse in Gemini emphasizes relationships for the next six months. It gets especially romantic around the holidays. Family, health and wellness are recurring themes. Revise exercise and diet practices as you care for others. Your active social life keeps you hopping.

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46 Kazakhstan border sea 47 Hobbyist’s buy 48 Big-time brat 50 Alter unfairly 52 Baseball’s Sandberg 54 See 43-Across 57 It’s spoken in Karachi 59 Equi- equivalent 60 Attempt to win over 61 With 64- and 66Across, film that premiered in New York City 10/18/1961 64 See 61-Across

37 Like the taste of aspirin 39 “Excellence is __ won by training and habituation”: Aristotle 40 Just ducky 41 Conservationist on California’s state quarter 42 Lacking a solid foundation 45 Opposite of post49 Get situated

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51 Day, in Roma 53 Off one’s trolley 55 “What a pity” 56 British poet Alfred 58 RAF decorations 61 Spider’s lair 62 Prefix with morph 63 HBO’s “__ Feet Under” 65 Vegas roller 67 Chinese menu general

2

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

11/27/12

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editors: emma goddard, nick smirniotopoulos featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

food & drink

Drink of the week: Hot Buttered Rum

november 28, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

5

Recipe: Roasted Chicken and Parmesan-Broccoli

BY EMMA GODDARD | features editor

BY BRIAN CROMER | features staff writer

PAUL KURLAK/ SPPS

This recipe is all about simplicity. Five ingredients and a short amount of prep time translate into a full meal. Take care to keep the chicken skin dry before roasting, so that the result will be crispy and savory. The cooking time for the chicken will need to be altered if the weight of the chicken is different. Prep time: 10 minutes Cook time: 1 hour 30 minutes CONTRIBUTED BY VANESSA BAHMANI

Ingredients: 1 (5 pound) chicken 1 head of garlic 4 heads of broccoli 1/2 cup of parmesan cheese 1/4 cup vegetable oil

As the temperature continues to drop, nothing sounds better than sitting next to a fire with a warm drink in hand. If you are looking to spend a night in with friends avoiding the cold weather, this sweet concoction will do the trick. Adding the optional ingredients will only take this hot buttered rum up a notch. Prep Time: 3 minutes Total Time: 3 minutes

Directions: 1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Rinse the chicken under cold water then pat it dry with paper towels. Removing excess water ensures the skin will brown properly and become crispy. 2. Rub the chicken with vegetable oil and season liberally with salt and pepper. Split the head of garlic in half and place one half in the cavity of the chicken. Roast for one hour and 15 minutes or until the thickest part of the breast reads 165 degrees. 3. Break down the heads of broccoli into 2-inch florets. Toss the broccoli with vegetable oil, parmesan cheese and the salt and pepper. Spread evenly on a baking pan with the other half of the head of garlic. Roast for 25 minutes until the edges of the pieces begin to caramelize. This can be done while the chicken is in the oven. 4. Before cutting into the chicken, allow it to rest under foil for 10 minutes.

Ingredients: 1 small slice of soft butter 1 teaspoon of brown sugar Ground cinnamon, ground nutmeg and allspice to taste (optional) Vanilla extract 2 ounces dark rum Hot water Directions: 1. Place the butter, sugar and spices at the bottom of an Irish coffee glass or mug. 2. Mix well. Pour in the rum and hot water over the previous ingredients. 4. Stir together and serve.

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nam // Beau name info // Shih Tzu & Wes Westie mix inte interests // Running, che chewing sticks, eati eating treats, playing with his Uncle Riley. Love Loves to go for long walk walks and play fetch, then after enjoys a nap accompanied by a nice nic belly rub.

TUESDAY THROUGH FRIDAY

Puppy Advice Ad i off the Week: Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -Delegate more to others, and get the work done. Make time for learning something new. Intuition proves to be right on. Avoid distractions. Keep the faith.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Slow down and listen for the next day or two. Hope broadens your mind. Now is when you’re glad you put in the extra effort to create exemplary work. Wow yourself!

Gemini (May 21-June 20) -- It may be harder and more time consuming, but it will be much more rewarding. A spark of passion lightens up the day. Deeds speak louder than words, and you can move mountains!

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- A change in your work routine coming your way. You’ll get to take on more responsibility. Or maybe not. Appreciate your mate’s uniqueness. Don’t ask for favors now.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- There’s more work coming ... it’s no time for getting sidetracked. Just get things done with the help of experts, or alone.

Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Be present to your luck and intelligence. Start with what you know, and learn what you need. Associates supply bright ideas. Now’s a good time to set priorities.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) -- Entering a two-day pensive phase. Your ideas will reach farther, with exceptional patience. Your dreams are prophetic. Postpone travel for now.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- If you present a workable plan, you’ll accomplish it. It all starts with the irst step. Technology can help. Make necessary changes to the design as you evolve.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Get rid of the trash you’ve been accumulating. But keep the good ideas. You may even ind something of value as you clean up. Managing your time get easier. And you get busier.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- You gain a surprising advantage, inancially and otherwise. Go for it, while maintaining a realistic perspective. Slow down the pace for a couple of days, and replenish reserves.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Exceptional patience is required right now. Luckily, you have your friends when you need them. Continue to build up your assets, and increase your leverage.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Working on inances doesn’t have to dampen your enthusiasm. Look on the bright side, and end up on top. Give an unusual gift. Laugh until your sides ache.

“I use a slow-feeder bowl to slow him down when he's eating. Otherwise, he eats so fast and it's not good for him! Also, he has really scruffy and wire-y fur, so I like to bathe him about once a week so he stays soft and fluffy, not scrappy and greasy looking.” by Meghan M.

SUBMIT TO PET OF THE WEEK Want to see your cuddly cutie in the paper? Send us an email with a picture followed by the above information and we will publish your furry friend! creative.services@collegemedia.com


sports 6 Tech defeats Iowa, remains undefeated

editors: matt jones, zach mariner

november 28, 2012

sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

COLLEGIATETIMES

MATT JONES sports editor

The Virginia Tech men’s basketball team improved to 6-0 Tuesday night for the first time since the 198283 season, defeating Iowa 95-79. “We were fortunate; we came out ready to play, and our guys stepped up to the challenge tonight,” said James Johnson, head coach. After a 16-2 Hawkeyes run in the second half cut the Tech lead to three, the Hokies pulled away down the stretch thanks to the 24 points by Erick Green and 18 points from Robert Brown. “Coach Johnson just told us to calm down, and he told us at halftime that they were going to make a run like every team does,” Brown said. “He just showed us in the timeout that they made their run and it was time to us to make ours.” The Hokies again had a great shooting night, finishing 32-of-61 from the field (52.5 percent). Green, who has now scored 20-plus points in each game this season, is now averaging 24.3 points per game and was named ACC Co-Player of the Week last week. He did not heat up until late in the first half and after halftime. “I just led my team into the right spots and I was hitting shots,” Green said. “I just started being more aggressive than I was in the first half and I started feeling it.” The Hokies are now 3-5 all-time in the ACC/Big 10 Challenge, with all three

wins coming against Iowa. In coach James Johnson’s newly installed up-tempo offense, Tech has now gone over 80 points for the fifth time this season. The Hokies went over 80 points only three times in the 2011-12 season. “It’s fun, but it’s also a lot of hard work and conditioning,” Brown said. “The results are that the fans are happy, we’re getting wins and we’re happy. It’s fun playing for coach Johnson.” This season, the Hokies have scored over 90 points three times. “It’s the type of style we always play,” Green said. “We always want to score 70, 80 and anything above, and honestly, the way we practice…everyday in practice we run so much. It’s been paying off and we’ve been putting up a lot of points.” In the first half, the Hokies and Hawkeyes played an up-tempo and competitive 20 minutes. Tech, with a significant size disadvantage, was able to keep Iowa off the glass, outrebounding the Hawkeyes 18-14 in the first half. Trailing by one with 2:49 left in the half, the Hokies went on a 10-1 run to take a 46-38 lead. That run extended into the second half, as Green scored nine-straight points out of the break. After Iowa answered the run, the Hokies built their lead back up to as large as 21 points, ultimately taking home the win. “We said at halftime that they were going to make their run, but we just had to respond back, and we did a

BRAD KLODOWSKI / SPPS

Senior guard Erick Green lobs a shot over the outstretched arm of a Hawkeye defender in the Hokies 95-79 win over Iowa on Tuesday night. great job getting out run, we got some easy baskets and took the lead back,” Green said. Iowa, the first test for the Hokies, was a litmus test for Johnson’s squad. “We were really looking forward to (this game),”

Brown said. “We knew they were a good team, and playing against a good team like Iowa gave us another hurdle to get over. We did it kind of convincingly.” Tech now faces another test in Oklahoma State Saturday.

The Cowboys are 5-0 with wins over Tennessee and No. 6 North Carolina State. “It keeps going up, but I think we’re ready for that test too,” Brown said. “It’s another hurdle we

have to climb, and we have a couple days of practice ahead of us and we’re going to get better and ready to play.” Tip off against the Cowboys is set for 2 p.m. in Cassel Coliseum on ESPN3.


Wednesday, November 28, 2012 Print Edition