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BASKETBALL Preview inside Friday, November 9, 2012

An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 109th year, issue 43 News, page 2

People & Clubs, page 6

Tech student with epilepsy tells story, asks for awareness

Opinions, page 3

Sports, page 5

Study Break, page 4

Heartbreak Hokies

DEAN SEAL news reporter

Epilepsy causes more deaths per year in the United States than breast cancer. And while October inundates our campus with pink ribbons, Virginia Tech’s walkways and classrooms will not be adorned with emblems of any awareness campaign this November. November is National Epilepsy Awareness Month, and while a push for epilepsy awareness may not appear as pertinent of an issue as more recognizable causes, its relevancy in the U.S. may be underestimated. According to the Center for Disease Control’s estimates, roughly 2 million Americans have epilepsy, with almost 140,000 news cases developing each year. In Virginia, over 70,000 people are diagnosed with epilepsy. Despite such prevalence, the disorder gains little attention from the media. “There’s a lot of misconceptions about it,” said Aaron Bradner, a Tech graduate student studying crop and soil environmental science. “It is a real issue, and I think people think it’s more uncommon.” Bradner was diagnosed with epilepsy when he was a sophomore in college, though he remembers his first experiences with the disorder when he was much younger. “I’ve had it at least since I was 11, and I didn’t tell anyone then because I had no clue what it was at the time,” Bradner recalled. “No one else seemed to be having the issue, so I wasn’t going to bring it up.” Since his first seizures, Bradner grew up trying to determine what he was suffering from. Neither he nor any of his friends or family could determine the attacks he suffered from were seizures, due to the distinctive nature of his disorder. “I have complex partial epilepsy,” Bradner said. “The way it’s been described to me is I stop paying attention and stare off into the distance. If I’m holding something, usually I’ll drop it. Then my breathing starts getting really heavy.” According to Bradner, the effects of his seizure would wear off after around fifteen minutes, before he would fully regain consciousness. Bradner’s attacks occurred sporadically until he came to college. “They used to usually only happen every three weeks or so, and I could go five weeks without any issues, but then I’d have one, and it would kickstart a whole bunch,” he said. “You don’t know what it is, so suddenly, you get stressed about it. Then you get more, and it’s a snow ball effect.” Bradner said several influences could induce a seizure, including lack of sleep and stress. For him, the attacks were triggered in a somewhat unusual fashion for epileptics. “I started getting them a lot when I would go on runs, see EPILEPSY / page two

TREVOR WHITE / SPPS

(Above) Linebackers Alonzo Tweedy (28) and Bruce Taylor (51) sack EJ Manuel (3). (Below) WR Marcus Davis (7) bobbles and hauls in a long ball.

Students plan flash mob to pump up Hokie fans CATIE CARRERAS news staff writer

Virginia Tech students started jumping earlier than expected on Thursday. A spontaneous effort to start a morale-boosting flash mob yesterday afternoon began with a Facebook group, where 457 people agreed to participate in a Hokie-themed rally on the Drillfield. “I’ve always wanted to start a flash mob,” said Thomas Patchen, event organizer and junior civil engineering major. “People are getting down on the team, so I just wanted to do something to pump them up.” The turnout on the

Drillfield, however, was not as expected. Only about 20 of the expected students turned out for the event. The participants that did arrived with speakers and a portable generator to play “Enter Sandman.” “I had fun anyway,” said Jack ie Lopez-Bogg io, a freshman chemistry major. “Watching people run to join in was cool even if only a dozen or so people showed up.” “It was a team effort, and I think we could use a morale boost before the Florida State game,” said Evan Baker, a senior geology major.

CATIE CARRERAS / SPPS

Junior Thomas Patchen organizes “Enter Sandman” flash mob on the Drillfield yesterday afternoon.


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news

november 9, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: mallory noe-payne, victoria zigadlo newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Epilepsy: Nov. focuses on education

upcoming events Friday, Nov. 9

from page one

which sucks for me, because I was a marathoner,” Bradner said. “I’d do eight-mile runs every day, and I started noticing that rather than once every two months, every day, eight minutes in, I’d have a seizure. So sophomore year I started getting four or five a day. I was still able to function, but I had no clue what was going on.” From Bradner’s research, exercise-induced epilepsy is rare, with only three other documented cases. Though he fi rst misconstrued the seizures as anxiety attacks, a psychiatrist quickly diagnosed him with epilepsy. Since the diagnosis, Bradner has tried three different medications to help minimize the effects of the epilepsy, having only found success in the most recent prescription. Bradner considers himself lucky, as medication for epilepsy is under-researched and sometimes ineffective. “There used to be only a handful of drugs that could potentially treat epilepsy and most of them were sedatives that reduced quality of life,” Bradner said. “They have gotten better in the past 20 years, but there’s no one drug that works for everyone. Everyone has different side effects, and medication isn’t typically effective for a third of people diagnosed anyway.” With the disorder under control, Bradner has tried to reach out to the Tech community in hopes of finding people he can discuss the issue of epilepsy awareness.

London Calling 2013 - Information Session: 12:00 p.m. at Shanks Hall, Rm. 370. All

majors welcome!! This will be an informational get together regarding the London Calling 2013 Study Abroad program scheduled for May-June 2013.

Chalk Talks Season 4: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. at D2 at Dietrick Hall. Virginia Tech Men's Basketball Coach James Johnson or his assistant coaches share strategies for the next big game during lunch.

KEVIN DICKEL/ SPPS

Aaron Bradner was diagnosed with epilepsy as a sophomore in college and hopes to raise awareness. “I’ve been putting stuff on Facebook, and said, ‘If anyone has any family members, or friends who have it, please let me know so I can contact them,’” Bradner said. “And it still took four years to find one person to talk about it. People just don’t want to talk.” Bradner feels more awareness might help eliminate fallacies associated with epilepsy and bring more attention towards helping research the disorder. “It’s a huge area just waiting for somebody to research it, but it’s not being discussed,” Bradner said. “The whole ‘epilepsy’ bit about the flashing lights inducing seizures,

Cosmic Bowling: 9:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. at The whole ‘epilepsy’ bit about the flashing lights inducing seizures, or that all seizures have to involve convulsing… there are more than twenty different kinds of seizures. (There are) just a lot societal misconceptions.” Aaron Bradner, crop and soil environmental science major

or that all seizures have to involve convulsing. … There are more than 20 different kinds of seizures. (There are) just a lot societal misconceptions.” Bradner recognizes sufferers from the disorder have to make a conscious effort to get the word out about epilepsy. “Educate yourself on the

facts, learn a little bit about it,” Bradner concluded. “Just because you don’t see someone have a seizure on the Drillfield, doesn’t mean no one here has epilepsy. It exists, so just be aware of it.” Follow the writer on Twitter: @jdseal92

Basketball tickets stop using lottery DONAL MURPHY news reporter

Those hoping to get a season basketball ticket this year will have an easier time than before. Season tickets for Virginia Tech men’s basketball are no longer being sold through a lottery system this year, and are now being sold online and to anyone.

This change in policy comes after the demand for season tickets was lower than in previous seasons, and the lottery to decide who was able to buy was not necessary. Despite this change, many students still do not plan to buy the $91 season tickets. “I was just going to do the lottery,” said Cara Webb, a

Woyzeck by Georg Buchner: 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at Squires Studio Theatre. Tickets $10 general; $8 senior/student. Woyzeck is the story of a poor soldier who is subjected to humiliation and exploitation in the hands of society. Jealousy and mental fatigue cause Woyzeck to murder his common-law wife in a tragic ending to this tale that explores poverty, desire, and morality. A free adaptation by Neil LaBute of Georg Buchner classic work, which Buchner based on a true account.

junior animal and poultry science major. “I’m still not going to buy season tickets. It probably won’t change whether I buy season tickets or not because I don’t like basketball enough to pay for it.” Despite the lack of demand, students still think that it’s advantageous for those who would be interested in such a

deal. “I would have to care more about basketball to have an opinion, but I think it’s positive that you wouldn’t have to put in for the lottery,” said Megan Gileza, a sophomore in architecture.

BreakZONE. $20/lane.

Saturday, Nov. 10

TEDxVirginiaTech: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at

The Inn at Virginia Tech. Twenty-one speakers, representing faculty, students, and alumni who are inventing the future with ideas worth spreading, will represent the university at the first TEDxVirginiaTech event. They will share ideas, insights and inspiration centered around the theme - Knowing. Requires ticket.

Admissions Open House: 10:15 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. at 2150 Torgersen. Information session for Pamplin College of Business. Student ambassadors and Finance faculty member greet and speak to prospective families. Woyzeck by Georg Buchner: 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at Squires Studio Theatre. Tickets $10 general; $8 senior/student. Delta Omicron Musicale: 8:00 p.m. to 9:30

p.m. at Squires Recital Salon. The students of the Gamma Mu chapter of Delta Omicron, an international music service fraternity, perform solos and ensemble music in an afternoon recital. Student recitals are free and open to the public.

Follow the writer on Twitter: @HokieRealist

what you’re saying Walking the line

Anonymous: This is a weekly occurrence on

twitter. Overreaction to something that happened resulting in tweets that most people generally regret. This isn't a new issue nor should it be a surprise.

Adam: Well put, I was shocked to see some of

the things I did on facebook. Grow up people and respect your President and your country

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

status

10/26/2012

10am

Follow up to harassing phone calls

Lane Hall

Inactive

11/6/2012

2:35am

Follow up to computer harassment

Ambler Johnston Hall

Inactive

10/6/2012

2:45am

Underage possession of alcohol x5

Slusher Hall

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct

arrestees


editors: josh higgins, bethany melson opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

opinions

november 9, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

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The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Michelle Sutherland Managing Editor: Nick Cafferky Design Editors: Andrea Ledesma, Alicia Tillman Special Section Design Edtitor: Danielle Buynak Public Editor: Erin Chapman Web Editor: Chelsea Gunter News Editors: Mallory Noe-Payne, Victoria Zigadlo News Reporters: Priscilla Alvarez, Cody Owens Features Editors: Emma Goddard, Nick Smirniotopoulos Features Staff Writers: Ben Kim, Katie White, Kara Van Scoyc, Allie Sivak, Jacob Wilbanks Opinions Editors: Josh Higgins, Bethany Melson Sports Editors: Matt Jones, Zach Mariner Special Sections Editor: Cody Elliot Copy Chief: Nora McGann Copy Editors: Allison Hedrick, Kristin Gunther, Mackenzie Fallon, Alexis Livingston, Kayleigh McKenzie Photo Editor: Kevin Dickel Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: Ryan Francis Circulation Manager: Travis Neale Student Publications Photo Staff Director of Photography: Brad Klodowski Lab Manager: Trevor White MCT CAMPUS

Four years of crucial planning passes quickly

T

hey say the four years in college are supposedly the best of our lives, but what they don’t tell us is that depending on how these years go, it determines how the next 80 years will pan out. Coming into college as a 17-year-old freshman, the last thing on my mind was my cumulative GPA or the fact I was entering a major that has a 40 percent job outlook without graduate school or medical school. In my mind, freshman year was supposed to be no more than a newfound freedom, which included highlighter parties, meeting new

A career is not like deciding whether you should get the chocolate or the original yogurt at sweet frog; it is a lifelong decision.”

friends and eating until you realized you just gained 36 pounds. We don’t realize how quickly the time passes and, before you know it, it’s your junior year and you still have no idea what you want to do. Universities prov ide a chance for students to explore their options by setting up career fairs; graduate school visits and a plethora of professional organizations are at our disposal. However, in the midst taking a full class load, along with working and sororities and fraternities, the professional organizations get pushed aside. This procrastination catches up to you when you realize you are three semesters away from graduating and have no idea what is next. While professionals do come onto collage campuses and discuss with students how the “real world” operates, these discussions are hardly motivating enough to convince one to take a life long career. Internships are a great way to narrow down the possibilities but, they too, come with a catch. The catch happens to be the fact that internships are sparsely available and highly competitive. As far the competition goes its

difficult to say employers offering these internships should not be so selective, because in today’s day and age, everybody wants the best and the brightest. However, once the best and the brightest students are chosen, what happens to those who are still lost and have a desire to explore? Institutions and advisors suggest students shadow different professionals to get an idea about a perspective career. However, once again, shadowing can be just as hard to organize. Professionals today have hectic schedules and may not necessarily want the burden of helping you figure out what you want to be when you grow up. Nevertheless, if you meet someone kind enough and they let you follow him or her around for a one day, is that one day even enough? Honestly the answer is no. As an inexperienced student, you can barely judge your future based on a single day. What if the one day you picked to shadow this professional, he was preoccupied with family matters, was sick or the day was just slow and uneventful? For a life long decision, one day is just not enough to decide. My advice to freshmen and sophomores is to first focus on your GPA. However, also start your search now for internships, get involved in professional organizations and line up different shadowing opportunities. If you don’t, all you will have is that one-day to figure out the rest of your life. A career is not like deciding whether you should get the chocolate or the original yogurt at sweetFrog; it is a life- long decision. My parents always said the two most important decisions of your life are going to be choosing your husband and picking your career because those are the two things you are going to live with forever. However the fact is that we don’t have enough time or opportunities for either of those because four years move as quickly as four minutes. JP SINGH -regular columnist -biological sciences -junior

U.S. historical greatness calls missing leaders to act I am frustrated with the current status of our political system, but my frustration is not due to feeling like my elected officials have failed to act in my interest. My frustration derives from my growing sense that politicians do not act within the interests of steadfast principles and the progress of history. Over time, the individuals who have been designated as “great” are those who have stood up in the face of adversity in order to re-form history by acting on absolute principals. These individuals have given up their happiness, comfort and in many cases, their lives for the benefit of others and history itself. In doing so, have solidified a place for themselves in the pantheon of historical greatness. While it always has been difficult to survey the contemporary situation in hope of finding greatness, it seems ever truer today that this desire is even more difficult than it was in the past. American politicians today seem more concerned about the progress and destruction of careers or the advancement and destruction of specific policies than the attainment of an eternal principle in practice or the re-forming of historical progress. Both conservatives and liberals currently speak about the importance of specific beliefs or policies, but seldom about the way history

should progress or the eternal truths that should be protected. For instance, instead of defending human rights, modern liberals defend same-sex marriage; instead of fighting for authentic capitalism, modern conservatives fight for lower tax rates on the wealthy and less regulation. Beyond this, however, the discourse of politics as a whole in the U.S. currently only allows for the debate of platform policies or the worth of a specific individual instead of the paradigmic models that a principled person may seek to see implanted in history. What our politicians should be debating is not whether or not taxes should be lowered, businesses should be de-regulated further, whether or not abortion or same-sex marriage should be legal, or any other issue that politicians enjoy quibbling over. Instead, our politicians should be debating the serious question of what we want the paradigm of our socio-political structure to be in the coming decades, and thus, what kind of a country we want the United States to be. Should we fight for a nation that respects human and social rights in order to secure a more communally connected society than we have, or is unbridled individualism and pure Darwinian

mechanics of selection all we can hope for in a populace? Should human and civil rights be continually expanded to every possible sector of our citizenry or should we disqualify certain sectors in order to insure a certain level of moral constraint? These are serious questions, which deserve to have serious debate. But such a debate can only be conducted by mature and rational individuals, who genuinely see themselves as the shapers of history. To see oneself in this light is one of the most difficult perspectives one can hold on oneself. It requires recognition of one’s place in destiny and to see oneself as not merely floating through fate’s river but instead as forging the path it takes. There are few responsibilities and many privileges that come from being an elected official in this nation, but there are many responsibilities and few privileges that come from being a person of historical greatness. Perhaps this is why the United States has such a high deficit of greatness and such a large surplus of politicians. JASON CAMPBELL -regular columnist -philosophy -senior

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College Media Solutions Assistant Ad Director: Carla Craft Account Executives: Elizabeth Dam, Emily Daugherty, Taylor Moran Inside Sales Manager: Amanda Gawne Assistant Account Executives: Andrew Newton, Jordan Williams Creative Director: Danielle Bushrow Assistant Creative Services Director: Alyssa Morrison Creative Staff: Mary Dassira, Chloe Young, Cameron Vaile, Diana Bayless Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes. com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes. com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints. collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2012. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


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november 9 2012

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Today’s Birthday Horoscope: This is your year. It’s a time of transformation, a shift toward your higher purpose. Career and finances grow steadily. Exploration (through travel, study or training) beckons after June. Take on new well-being practices, and gain energy to take advantage of opportunities.

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Complete the grid so that each column, row and 3x3 box contains the numbers 1-9. For a greater challege see how fast you can complete the puzzle. Copyright 2007 Puzzles by Pappocom Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com

By Don Gagliardo and C.C. Burnikel

Week ending November 9, 2012

ACROSS 1 Windy City paper, familiarly 5 Baroque musical family 10 “__, can you see ...” 14 Like molasses 15 “Snowy” bird 16 Nevada gambling city 17 Visit the local watering hole 20 Honda Accord, e.g. 21 In concert 22 San Diego attraction

Top Tracks Gangnam Style • PSY

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Die Young • Ke$ha

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One More Night • Maroon 5

23 “I can’t remember it, Miss Ilsa. I’m a little rusty on it” speaker 25 Give a barbiturate to 27 Breaks, as in a wall 30 Lambs’ moms 32 Arctic dwellers of Scandinavia 35 Shortened, as a dict. 36 Yaks 37 Lovers’ lane pace 38 “Let’s try a different approach”

11/9/12 41 Ship with rich cargo 42 Feature of many Viking helmets 43 Immigrant’s subj. 44 Longtime senator Thurmond 45 “What __ got here is a failure to communicate”: “Cool Hand Luke” 46 Private’s group 47 Draw out 49 Smidgen 51 Hef’s party garb 53 Mother-of-pearl 55 Smidgen 59 “Pay attention”

62 From the U.S. 63 Implied 64 Rain hard 65 Neat as a pin 66 Signed 67 It may follow You online DOWN 1 Distribute the dressing on 2 Mechanical learning 3 Polo rival 4 Detour 5 Affleck of “The Town” 6 Belgium-based imaging company 7 What one does after observing reminders that start 17-, 38- and 59-Across 8 Parade honorees 9 Witness’s place 10 Bruin great Bobby 11 Successfully stage a coup 12 __ Domini 13 Beatle bride 18 Words with pickle or jam 19 Traded, as goods 24 Substantial 26 Hold hands? 27 Dance balls, e.g. 28 Call off the launch 29 Got somewhere

31 Teens conflict: Abbr. 33 Proto- finish 34 With cunning 36 Tea-flavoring flower 37 Rip to pieces 39 Smoke with menthol 40 “Mazel __!” 45 Certain goddess worshiper 46 Sudden

48 “Pleeease?” 50 Justice Dept. raiders 51 Land map 52 Guitarist Hendrix 54 Spooky-sounding lake 56 Baseball family name 57 Night spot 58 Brontë’s Jane 60 Take a stab at 61 JFK update

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Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

WORDSEARCH: That’s Showbiz Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid. S

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WORD BANK 1 Action 2 Audience 3 Backstage 4 Camera 5 Cast 6 Costume 7 Director 8 Film 9 Hollywood 10 Lights 11 Movie 12 Producer 13 Prop 14 Scene 15 Script 16 Spotlight 17 Stge 18 Star

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sports

editors: matt jones, zach mariner sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

november 9, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

5

Tech opens NCAA Tournament against No. 13 Georgetown JACOB EMERT sports staff writer

Almost three weeks ago the Virginia Tech women’s soccer team needed Florida State’s help to reach the ACC Tournament. When it didn’t get it, the future of the season was in question. Shortly after 4:30 p.m. on Monday night, the Hokies received news of a different tone: they earned a spot in the upcoming NCAA Tournament, meaning their season would continue. Plenty has happened since the Hokies last took the field on Oct. 24, but nothing can distract the team from its task ahead. “Eighteen days is a long time to have off,” said head coach Chugger Adair. “We are trying to push them a little bit in training, and we’re replicating games as best we can. This group has done a great job of focusing — I think we’ll be alright.” The task starts Sunday with a Georgetown team that is 15-3-3 and is ranked No. 13 in the nation. Daphne Corboz, Georgetown’s most productive offensive threat, ranks seventh in the nation with 17 goals on the year. The Hoyas are playing well of late — 9-2-2 in their

last 13 games — and are a formidable opponent, but the Hokies are confident they have the right pieces in place to get the job done. “Every single one of our seniors is a leader on the field, and we all look up to them for the leadership they provide,” said Ashley Meier. With senior midfielder Kelly Conheeney missing almost the entire season with concussion symptoms, a significant portion of playing time needed to be redistributed. Meier was the answer, and she has filled Conheeney’s large shoes better than anyone could have imagined. Meir has scored seven times, which ties her for the team lead, and has recorded TREVOR WHITE / SPPS three assists while playing Redshirt-senior defender Amanda Gerhard performs a successful slide tackle on a Boston College midfielder in a 2-1 loss on Sept. 23. 1,300 minutes. Her play hasn’t only garnered the attention of the thankful they don’t have to ry, the Hokies went unde- nothing. Sunday starts said. locals. Meier was named to leave Blacksburg. feated in non-conference a new season, one that “That’s one of our goals the All-ACC second team “Just the fact of traveling play. means much more than and as a team we talked and the ACC all-freshman itself is tiring,” the junior Furthermore, they were the one that ended weeks about it at the beginning of team. midfielder said. ranked in the top-25 nation- ago. the season.” Sunday marks the fifth “Staying here will be help- ally in every week except for The Hokies have accomWhen the Hokies take consecutive season the ful and we’re used to our one. plished one of their team the field Sunday night for Hokies have reached the field, we’re comfortable But, the team was also goals by earning a spot in the first time in 18 days, tournament, but the first in playing here.” just 4-5-1 in ACC play the tournament, but they they won’t be thinking which they have earned a The Hokies are 6-3 at and missed out on mak- know they still have work about the recent events or home-bid. Thompson Field this sea- ing the conference tourna- left to do. missed opportunities; rathAside from the benefit of son. ment by mere percentage “Trying to make it a step er they will be focused on playing in front of the home Tech’s year was one full points. further than we did last the chances at hand and crowd, Jasmine Reeves and of ups and downs. For the At this point, the team year would definitely be reaching the goal that lies the rest of the Hokies are first time in school histo- knows the past means an amazing feat,” Reeves before them.

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Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Take the roundabout route when necessary. Spend and invest later. Make sure you understand all of your options. Spend time with visiting friends. Feast and be merry!

Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Let the love carry you away, and be pleasantly surprised. You may encounter a dip in the learning curve, which becomes an educational experience in itself. Appreciate your home.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Indulge in a treat. Don’t entertain yet. Take control of the details. Expand your horizons. Your career path is illed with optimism, and the outlook is positive.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Don’t launch just yet (but soon). Your family is there for you, and friends help make connections. Others are feeling generous. Eat well to support new responsibilities.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Your past work speaks well for you. It’s not a good time to travel. A beautiful dream enchants; grab a constructive opportunity. Acknowledge your team’s efforts. Optimism increases. Let someone else set the agenda.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) -- Postpone travel. Notice the beauty that surrounds you. Light candles at dinner. Save and invest in home and family. Enjoy simple pleasures.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Gather in what you need. Accomplish your dream by providing excellent service. Stay out of someone else’s fuss. You could fall in love now, or discover hidden bounty.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) -- There’s more money coming in, but things don’t add up. Question old assumptions, and

couple

improve working conditions. A loving friend makes an excellent suggestion. Then a miracle happens. Ask. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Pass the test and win a promotion. Working at something you love brings abundance. Listen for the ring of truth. You don’t have to control everything. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Your gold is on the rise ... add to reserves. Do the research on a home project. Past good deeds bring new bene it while you play with friends. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Make your own luck (and pay cash). Balance work and fun by rewarding progress with play. A temporary setback could stall things. A generous offer requires thought. Question authority.

OF THE

week

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- You’re energizing each other. Don’t worry about money. Find treasures in your closets and trade. Restate each party’s goals. Get a good recommendation from a friend. Reaf irm a commitment.

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so much. She is the most amazing woman with the purest heart and you don’t find this kind of girl every day. I want to make her happy for the rest of my life.

she says:

He is such a great person inside and out. I love the way he makes me feel safe and how mothing could ever hurt me. He is such an ambitious man and I know that whatever he does, he does with passion.

their first date: We went Midnight Bowling in Christiansburg with some of our mutual friends. It sounds pretty lame and cheesy but it was actually a really great night. After that we went for late night milkshakes and just talked about how much we sucked at bowling.


6

people & clubs

november 9, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

he she

editors: emma goddard, nick smirniotopoulos featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

SAID

she said: There is a trashy TV show for every occasion

ALICIA TILLMAN/ COLLEGIATE TIMES

He said: For every Dexter, there’s Gossip Girl Before this past year, I never would have considered myself a big T.V. kind of guy. For the first 20 or so years of my life, I had always enjoyed reading and movies much more than television shows that you have to watch week in and week out to make sure you don’t miss any major happenings. That phase of my life ended when I started watching the show Dexter. I was gripped by its dark humor and plot twists. Soon after that came Game of Thrones, followed by Sons of Anarchy and now Grimm. I was pleasantly surprised by the amount of great stories that were so readily available at the click of a button. I’ve got to admit, though, it is exhausting watching all those shows. Trying to keep up with that many characters on a personal level is tough. Because of Hulu, I usually just wait and watch my shows in a one day stretch on Friday, back to back to back. I laugh, I cry. It’s an emotional roller coaster. But it’s a good emotional roller coaster because all of those shows are intriguing and (somewhat) thought provoking. In fact, at this point I like to consider myself

as something of a T.V. aficionado. Hopefully my familiarity will spare you having to experience miserable 30-minute segments of your life whenever you want to try a new show. Alas, with good comes evil and along with my discovery of great television I’ve also discovered some shows that are less than satisfactory. This summer, my roommates got in the habit of watching “House Hunters” and “Property Brothers” on HGTV. I don’t know what drove grown men to want to watch young couples visit different houses along the east coast, but I hope it never affects me. Every time HGTV comes on, I feel like I’m at my grandmas house, because that was literally the only channel she ever watched. I’m not sure if the shows are bad, or if it is still a negative connotation from when I was seven, but if HGTV is on I’ve got to leave the room. I’m going to go ahead and be judgmental and say that both Pretty Little Liars and Gossip Girl are bad. I’ve never seen either (thankfully), and I’m sure my esteemed she said counterpart

will probably write an expose on how watching these two shows should be mandatory and I’m a sexist pig, but I stand by my comment. If the commercials are annoying, the show is bound to be (i.e. the recent Presidential election). That’s really all I’ve got. All shows are still stories, and stories aren’t automatically bad if they aren’t Harry Potter; they’re just mediocre. The same is true with television; not every show is going to be a Sons of Anarchy, but that doesn’t make it a Gossip Girl. But now, armed with the knowledge of the very best and worst shows on television, grab the remote, kickback and watch a story unfold before your very eyes. Who knows, you may end up being pleasantly surprised.

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JAMES HARRIS -featured columnist -senior -history major

Trashy T.V. shows and the best times to watch them: Say Yes to the Dress Watch on Sunday mornings with your little sisters while you eat more bagels than you care to admit and scroll through Pinterest picking out things to post on your secret wedding board that you hide from the world because you don’t want your boyfriend freaking out. The Amazing Race This is for Sunday nights with your Dad when you get back from church group where you spent an hour and a half in awkward silence with all of the other kids whose parents made them go to church group. Pick one team to focus all your left over church-group hatred on and complain about them while your dad makes cheese fries. Days of Our Lives This is the soap you get in to during that first month of summer between school and the start of your job when you’re essentially unemployed but no one says anything because they think you’re still a kid. Must be watched while squinting at a tiny TV screen you set up outside so you can work on your tan without actually having to do anything of substance outdoors. Grey’s Anatomy Start this one when you’re alone in your room after breaking up with your first boyfriend, and then watch every week afterward in the dead of the night so no one can see how ridiculously emotional you get. For the big season finale episodes, it’s acceptable to watch during girls’ night with your personal box of wine. Pants are neither required nor recommended. Gossip Girl

Watch this one whenever you feel like a catty high school girl again, but can’t act on it because you’re technically a grown woman. Block discount designer sites before you start or risk blowing half your paycheck on a Blair Waldorf look-alike headband, and then feeling pathetic for not only knowing who she is, but for being able to pick out matching accessories. Make no mention of exposes or sexist pigs because you are not a tasteless charicature of feminism from the ‘70s. Big Brother Watch constantly, because you’re one of those people that not only sticks through all 14 seasons of a reality show, but also subscribes to the show’s live feed so you don’t have to wait for updates in the two days between episodes. Dance Moms Never watch it. Because even though your mother insists so vehemently that it’s the funniest show on television, what she doesn’t realize is it’s even funnier to watch her get angry at you when you refuse to watch it with her. Lockup Watch this while writing letters to your prison pen-pal and browsing the list of free cats on Craigslist, naming them after your favorite fonts. Immediately afterward, begin reassessing your life choices. VICTORIA ZIGADLO -news editor -senior -english major

Friday, November 9, 2012 Print Edition  

Friday, November 9, 2012 Print Edition of The Collegiate Times