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Thursday, November 8, 2012 An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 109th year, issue 42

News, page 2

Weekend, page 5

Opinions, page 3

Study Break, page 7

TEDx Virginia Tech has first event

NOT SETTLING FOR

LESS

TERESA LU features staff writer

After finishing fifth at Nationals last year, Pete Yates is going for it all this season

LUKE MASON / SPPS

ADAM NORMAN sports staff writer

This past weekend, the Virginia Tech wrestling team hosted the 5th annual Hokie Open in Salem, Va. The Hokies had various wrestlers place in the tournament, including first place finishes by Pete Yates (165) and Devin Carter (141). Carter wrestled unattached, meaning he did not represent Tech, after deciding to redshirt this year. Besides going undefeated at the tournament, Yates — a redshirt senior — recorded his 100th career win in his third match of the day against Appalachian State’s Zack Strickland. He became one of only six Hokies to ever reach the 100-win milestone. “I mean, it feels great,” Yates said. “I wasn’t really aware of it until afterward, but it feels great to be in the same elite group as those other five guys.” Redshirt senior Jarrod Garnett (125) will also likely join the 100 career wins club this season. Garnett currently sits at 97 wins after going 3-1 at the Hokie Open, finishing in second place. However, his

focus is elsewhere. “It obviously means that you are successful and it obviously means that you are very good at winning matches, but my main focus right now is getting All-American,” Garnett said. “I know with getting 100 wins, that will come, but I am just focusing on winning one match at a time right now.” Yates currently sits at 102

already notable 28-7 record from last year. Although it seems like a longshot to get 32 more wins this season, Yates and head coach Kevin Dresser both believe he is more than capable. “Pete proved last year at the NCAA tournament that he is the real deal and you can’t walk into 100 wins,” Dresser

is a big deal, but it is not the ultimate goal,” he said. “The ultimate goal is to be a national champion, so that is what I am going to focus on. If the wins come, then they come. “My goal is definitely to be a national champion this year. I’m not settling for anything less.” Becoming a national champion is no easy task in itself.

Right now on paper, Pete is at one of the toughest weight classes in the nation. There really is no reason to think that Pete Yates has a reason to be a national champion, except that fact that Pete Yates thinks he can be a national champion.” Kevin Dresser, head coach

wins for his career, only 31 wins shy of tying the all-time career wins record set by Sean Gray from 1997-2002. Gray, Virginia Tech’s first two-time All-American, has the number one career winning percentage at .875. Yates was an All-American last year, taking 5th place at NCAA Nationals and entered the season ranked fift h in the nation at 165 lbs. To be able to catch Gray in total wins, Yates will need to improve on his

said. “You know he will probably end his career with 130+ wins. It is exciting, it is something for him to go for, it is still early in the season, so he definitely has a shot.” However, becoming the winnningest wrestler in Tech history is not the main thing on Yates’ mind. He has higher aspirations that include another All-American season and a shot at becoming Tech’s first ever national champion. “I know that having 133 wins

Add into the fact that there are two defending national champions wrestling at 165 lbs. Not to mention Cornell senior Kyle Dake is going for his fourth national title in a fourth different weight class. “Right now, on paper, Pete is at one of the toughest weight classes in the nation,” Dresser said. “There really is no reason to think that Pete Yates has a reason to be a national champion, except that fact that Pete Yates thinks that he can be

a national champion, and I think that he can be a national champion.” Yates knows that he is a clear underdog for national champion, even though he’s currently ranked No. 4 in the nation at 165 lbs. “Well, I mean I am an underdog,” he said. “The two guys ahead of me are pound-forpound the two best guys at any weight. It is just an honor to be that underdog and have an opportunity to compete against them.” Becoming Tech’s first national champion is not the only legacy Yates wants to leave behind at Tech. Helping to build the program into the success that is today, compared to when he arrived as a freshman, has given the redshirt senior a sense of pride. Whether Yates knows it or not, when he leaves Tech, he may very well be considered the best wrestler to ever wear the maroon and orange. “Pete is very skilled; he may be the best pure wrestler that we have on the team,” he said. “He is going to leave Tech as one of the most decorated wrestlers to ever come through here. He is, as coaches say, special.”

Band sponsors annual canned food drive MAX LUONG news staff writer

For the 16th year in a row, the Marching Virginians and New Life Christian Fellowship will sponsor an ambitious campaign to help the Blacksburg community’s less fortunate. The annual Hokies for the Hungry canned food drive will take place at tonight’s football game. “I think planning it during such a huge game is the best way to get the most food,” said Jaclyn Meuleners, a sophomore communication major. With the motto “One Can from Every Fan,” the drive has a goal of collecting 66,233 cans of food — one for every seat in Lane Stadium. Their past collection record stands at 10,379 cans, in 2003. While starting quarterback Logan Thomas will be the focus during Tech’s game against Florida State University, he has also had a leading role behind the food drive as well.

As this year’s Honorary Chairperson of Hokies for the Hungry, Thomas has helped generate buzz between both Tech and Florida State fans for the charity on Thursday. Despite this, some students have missed the information. “This is a great cause, but I didn’t know about this beforehand,” said freshman engineering student Rashad Assir. “The results would be better if they advertised more.” The New Life Christian Fellowship is serving as a main sponsor for the event. NLCF leader Mike Swann was also a former member of the Marching Virginians. He and current band director David McKee have worked together as primary organizers of the event this year. Drop-off points for Hokies for the Hungry are at all entrances to Lane Stadium and various locations near the stadium where Tailgate Pep Bands will be performing COURTESY OF HOKIES FOR THE HUNGRY prior to kickoff. Logan ThomaS has teamed up with the Marching Virginians in an attempt to curb hunger in Blacksburg.

Inspiring people is a challenge when you only have 14 minutes. But this Saturday, 21 speakers will aim to defy the odds and share their “ideas worth spreading.” Virginia Tech is hosting its first ever TEDx event at the Holtzman Alumni Center from 8:45 a.m. to 4 p.m. This event’s speakers comprise Tech students, faculty and alumni. According to the T E D xVi r g i n i aTe c h website, “TEDx is a program of local, selforganized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience.” Unlike the renowned TED conference held annually in February in CA, TEDx events are fully planned and organized independently on a community basis. Some of the speakers include John Boyer, instructor in the department of geography, women’s basketball assistant coach Chantelle Anderson, and Dan Goff, a senior geography and meteorology major. More than 200 speakers have been nominated to speak at TEDxVirg iniaTech, making the candidate selection process long and difficult. Each speaker will have seven to 14 minutes to convey his or her message to the audience, cramming all their expertise and personal stories into such a short time. TED is notorious for having short speaking times, done in the hopes of having clearly defined messages and capturing the audience’s attention. Speakers come from a wide range of occupations and roles in an effort to be representative of Tech’s community. “Virginia Tech’s hands-on, minds-on approach to education, spirit of invention, and leadership in research make our university a perfect match to host this prestigious program,” said Melissa Richards, co-chair of the T E D xVi r g i n i aTe c h steering committee and director for marketing and publications for University Relations. The topic of TEDxVirginiaTech is “knowing.” How do we represent knowledge and knowing? How do people know things differently? These are the questions that T E D xVi r g i n i aTe c h hopes to answer. Tickets for the event were allocated between late September and early October, allowing see TEDx / page six


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news

november 8, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: mallory noe-payne, victoria zigadlo newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

BOV approves new real-estate major

what you’re saying

“Democrat of Chilhowie” goes against The new program will be a collaboration between this interdisciplinary pro- applied economics and the grain

six of Tech’s colleges, two years in the making CODY OWENS news staff writer

It’s been said that the best investment on Earth is earth. Starting in fall 2013, students will be taught how to pursue that investment. On Monday, the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors approved an undergraduate degree program in real estate. GOSS K e v i n B o y l e , department head of agricultural and applied economics, spearheaded the initiative for the program along with faculty such as Rosemary Goss, a professor in the department of apparel, housing and resource management.

Alumni had a large role in the planning of the program, with members of the industry giving input into what is lacking and what is needed for graduates interested in real estate. “Some of the alumni that have been involved in shaping the curriculum are saying that there is no one out there preparing graduates who can do or who will know about all the things that will go in a real estate profession,” said Mark Owczarski of University Relations. Goss added that many alumni are interested in developing students toward the real estate industry. “Virginia Tech has lots of alumni who are active all over the U.S. in all aspects of real estate,” Goss said. “They’re very excited about

gram and getting involved and supporting. I think our students will have opportunities for jobs and internships.” The interdisciplinary program is the result of collaboration between six colleges within the university, with classes being taught from professors across the board. “While there are real estate programs across the country, none are as broad based as this and pull from the expertise of six different colleges,” Goss said. “It’s truly an interdisciplinary program that you don’t see anywhere else.” The real estate curriculum will teach students about all aspects of property development, from preplanning to management, and will include courses on architecture, engineering, property and natural resources management,

business. Additionally, an emphasis has been put on practical gains which alumni have noted are needed in the industry. “We want to put emphasis on communication, both oral and in writing,” Goss said. “We’re going to be using a lot of industry people and speakers to give students real world experience.” The hope is that students will exit with a degree and skills that are very attractive to employers. The final stage in the process is for the State Council for Higher Education to give its approval for the major. Provided that happens, classes will be offered in fall 2013. “We’re preparing graduates to be extraordinarily relevant in this industry defined as real estate,” Owczarski said.

anonymous: What a great article about a

interesting young man. Following your own heart and mind is central to being an American citizen.

BK: Andrew makes us all proud! Growing

up in Chilhowie (or any part of Southwest Virginia) and realizing you're a Democrat is tough. This article depicts Andrew very well, he's a pleasure to know, and an inspiration to those who don't necessarily fit the ideological stereotypes.

Travis: Also a Chilhowie democrat! Keep it up buddy!

Amanda Whitley: Andrew has represented the citizens from Southwest Virginia well. We should all be proud, whether a Republican or Democrat. He has passion about his beliefs, and while making his beliefs well known, he does not force them on other people. He respects everyone and their opinions. You make us all proud.

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10/15/2012

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Follow up to Larceny of Money

McBryde

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11/06/2012

2:35 a.m.

Computer Harassment

Ambler Johnston

Active

11/06/2012

3:25-4:15 p.m.

Harassment

Eggleston

Active

THE

Virginia Tech Basketball is ready for a New Reign. Use the Collegiate Times’ Centerfold Pull-Out at Tip Off on Saturday November 10th to explain why this season is going to be a changing factor in Hokie Nation. As a student body, we need to breathe and bleed Maroon and Orange for every sport. We need to show our competitors how strong we are, because we are all Hokies!

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editors: josh higgins, bethany melson opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

opinions

november 8, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

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The Collegiate Times is an independent studentrun newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Michelle Sutherland Managing Editor: Nick Cafferky Design Editors: Andrea Ledesma, Alicia Tillman Public Editor: Erin Chapman Web Editor: Chelsea Gunter News Editors: Mallory NoePayne, Victoria Zigadlo News Reporters: Priscilla Alvarez, Dean Seal, Cameron Austin, Donal Murphy Features Editors: Emma Goddard, Nick Smirniotopoulos Features Staff Writers: Ben Kim, Katie White, Kara Van Scoyc, Allie Sivak, Jacob Wilbanks Opinions Editors: Josh Higgins, Bethany Melson Photo Editor: Kevin Dickel Sports Editors: Matt Jones, Zach Mariner Special Sections Editors: Cody Elliot, Danielle Buynak Copy Chief: Nora McGann Copy Editors: Allison Hedrick, Kristin Gunter Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: Ryan Francis Circulation Manager: Travis Neale Student Publications Photo Staff Director of Photography: Brad Klodowski MCT CAMPUS

Newspapers still serve purpose in journalism In today’s society, reading the news often carries different connotations. When I read “the paper”, I feel like I retain more information rather than reading it from the small screen of my iPhone. The element of tangibility makes it seem more authentic to me. Oftentimes, the elder generations tend to be late in keeping up with new technology; albeit this is not always the case. I know two elderly people of the same age; one has an iPad and is a subscriber to her favorite magazine, while the other does not own a computer and prefers to read the news in a traditional format. But as a contemporary in the 21st century who follows recent trends in technology, it is easy to foresee the beginning of the end for print journalism. Although I would hate to see it go, I think at some point, with the current movements in environmentalism and constantly striving for a minimal carbon footprint, the print medium may soon go to the wayside. Print media is something I think should stay in print. With the current technological revolutions, content that can be uploaded online in a snap just detracts from the pain-staking editing process, allowing for compromises in grammar and solid writing, which in turn leads to poor quality journalism. I know I sound like a whiny Luddite, but sometimes, the news is just more sacred than that. I can’t imagine saying, “Oh, let’s write a brilliant story and ceremoniously upload it to a webpage!” When an important story emerges, I think its impact is best translated on an actual newspaper with its proverbial obnoxious headlines. In terms of effectual purposes, the obnoxious and imposing headline is a better method of conveying news.

Although I do agree we can benefit from both print and online access to media, it saddens me to know that someday, the print newspaper will be a by-gone, a relic. To some, the demise of print journalism could possibly lead to the end of the world, a website devoted entirely to the decline of print journalism, newspaperdeathwatch. com, is chronicling the slow demise of print media around the globe. In defense of alternative methods like the Internet, the effort that is put into uploading a simple Word document just makes a lot of sense logistically. By skipping the print editions, money and time saved could be exponential. Could a world where the news is accessible by means of the Internet and television mean something entirely new? Probably not, but the demise of print journalism is something I think will be unfortunate because we have been using it so long. It would be like bidding goodbye to an old friend. I think we should learn to use them both together, as we are now. Sometimes it is not convenient to carry around a newspaper or magazine when I can access it on my phone or computer, and other times it is more enticing to read a hard copy of a newspaper while enjoying a cup of coffee. It is all a matter of preference I guess. In the end, I do not think we will be seeing the end of print media anytime soon; some say it needs to go, while some of us cherish the feel and intimacy from reading a good old-fashioned newspaper. ANDREW WIMBISH -regular columnist -English -junior

Election brings optimism, potential for productivity President Barack Obama has won a second term in office. At approximately 11:30 p.m. on election night, it was announced Obama was projected to win Ohio, and in turn, the election. Not only did Obama win the election as a whole, but he also won every swing state with the exception of North Carolina. In total, Obama received 303 electoral votes, while opponent Gov. Mitt Romney won only 206 electoral votes. In addition, Obama won the popular vote, but only by a relatively small number of votes when compared to the total ballots cast. For this election, the results could be viewed in two ways: via the Electoral College and the popular vote. Looking at the Electoral College, by the time California was counted, there was more of a snowball effect with the remaining states and it became more of a landslide in the President’s favor. For the popular vote, this election was certainly too close for comfort for either side, and until this morning, the numbers showed the candidates were tied in percentages. As of Wednesday morning, the current numbers reveal Obama has 50.3 percent of the popular vote, compared to Romney’s 48.1 percent. In Virginia, Gov. Tim Kaine won the senate seat, narrowly defeating Gov. George Allen, while 9th District Congressman Morgan Griffith retained his seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, crushing his Democratic challenger Anthony Flaccavento. Numerous other states also held their U.S. Senate elections, with many states replacing current Republican officeholders with Democrats. After this

election, at least 19 Senate seats will be held by women, more than any other time in our history. History has been made in Massachusetts with the election of its fi rst female senator, Elizabeth Warren, and in both Wisconsin and the U.S. Senate with the election of Democrat Tammy Baldwin, a disclosed lesbian. In addition to the two

What this election has brought about is fresh blood into the government on both sides of the political spectrum, with several newcomers pledging commitment to bipartisan agreements and interactions.”

listed above, Deb Fischer, a Republican from Nebraska, and Mazie Hirono, a Democrat from Hawaii, will also be joining the Senate. The six Democratic Senate seats held by women that were up for reelection were retained by their holders. As far as the House of Representatives is concerned, Republicans maintained control over the House. Groundbreaking amendments and legislation were passed in numerous states last night. Washington, Maryland and Maine voted to legalize gay marriage, while legislation to defi ne marriage between a man and a woman in Minnesota was struck down. Marijuana was legalized in Colorado, Washington, Ma ssachu set t s , a nd Montana.

An amendment to prohibit the use of public funds for abortions was struck down in Florida, and a voter identification amendment in Minnesota was struck down as well. Montana also passed an initiative stating corporations are not entitled to constitutional rights, as they are not human beings, a crucial step toward the overturning the Citizens United case. Additionally, Colorado passed an amendment, which asks lawmakers to propose and support an amendment to the U.S. Constitution limiting campaign contributions and spending. Puerto Rico has voted to become a U.S. state and, having appointed a governor, is now awaiting approval from Congress. In general, this election has produced very little change in the demographics of our government. The president has been elected for a second term, the Democrats control the Senate, and the Republicans control the House. What this election has brought about, however, is fresh blood into the government on both sides of the political spectrum, with several newcomers pledging commitment to bipartisan agreements and interactions, something largely unseen in Congress over the past couple of years. Bitterness may be felt on all parts of the political spectrum, but this election should be embraced with optimism and determination for productivity, rather than irrationality and obstructive tendencies. RYAN PFEIFLE -regular columnist -university studies -freshman

College Media Solutions Assistant Ad Director: Carla Craft Account Executives: Elizabeth Dam, Emily Daugherty, Taylor Moran Inside Sales Manager: Amanda Gawne Assistant Account Executives: Andrew Newton, Jordan Williams Creative Director: Danielle Bushrow Assistant Creative Services Director: Alyssa Morrison Creative Staff: Mary Dassira, Diana Bayless Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue.

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november 8, 2012

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Today’s Birthday Horoscope: A new world of invention, innovation and forward momentum awakens. Jupiter in Gemini favors career until entering Cancer, after which educational growth calls. The spotlight shines on you for 2013. Take your big dreams public.

Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham Quote of the Day

“There's a fine line between genius and insanity. I have erased this line.” - Oscar Levant

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XKDC by Randall Monroe

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61 Me-tooer’s phrase 62 Teen outbreak 63 Noises from ittybitty kitties 64 Online status update limited to 140 characters 65 ’Vette roof option

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Complete the grid so that each column, row and 3x3 box contains the numbers 1-9. For a greater challege see how fast you can complete the puzzle. Copyright 2007 Puzzles by Pappocom Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com

By Jeff Chen

ACROSS 1 Cheryl of “Charlie’s Angels” 5 Screwdriver liquor 10 “Logically, then ...” 14 The “height” part of a height phobia 15 Have __ to pick 16 Red Army leader Trotsky 17 Terrified Detroit baseball player? 19 Vietnam neighbor 20 Cuts off 21 Architect I.M. 22 Advantage 23 Very long time

Week ending November 9, 2012

Top Tracks (1) 1

Gangnam Style • PSY Locked Out of Heaven • Bruno Mars

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Die Young • Ke$ha

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11/8/12 24 Indy 500 entrant 26 Tippler 27 Memo-directing abbr. 29 Actress Sorvino 30 Voice below soprano 32 “Don’t make me laugh!” 33 Embarrassed Carolina football player? 36 Boeing competitor 38 Strolls down to the saloon 39 Depressed Miami football player? 43 Gun, as a V6 44 Ran a tab

45 Mine products 46 Talk like Daffy 47 __ Lanka 48 Went off course, nautically 50 “Little Red Book” writer 51 Prefix with directional 53 “Community” network 54 Sealy alternatives 57 Arp’s art movement 58 Jealous San Francisco baseball player? 60 Take too much of, briefly

DOWN 1 Cops enforce them 2 Yen 3 Fast food pickup site 4 Pamper 5 Chocolate factory vessels 6 __-Wan Kenobi 7 Where boxers and pugs play 8 Leg joint protector 9 Cliffside nest 10 Cosmo rival 11 Reprimands 12 Looks that lovers make 13 Beginning 18 Bird by the beach 24 __ Tin Tin 25 Yakked and yakked 27 Starbuck’s captain 28 Like a custom suit 29 Soup with sushi 31 Capt.’s subordinates

33 “I tawt I taw a __ tat!” 34 French friends 35 Letters on reply cards 37 Drone or worker 40 Unsophisticated 41 Come before 42 “If __ only listened!” 46 Rope at a rodeo 47 City destroyed by fire and brimstone

49 Common teen emotion 50 Ryan of “When Harry Met Sally...” 52 Actors McKellen and Holm 54 Agitated state 55 A.D. part 56 Armstrong’s “small” stride 59 Fair-hiring inits.

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(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

11/07/12

WORDSEARCH: More Than Elephants and Donkeys Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid. J

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WORD BANK Marijuana Pirate Workers Socialist Nazi Christian Citizens Independence Jefferson Green Whig Labor Communist Constitution Libertarian Objectivist Independent Reform

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weekend

editors: emma goddard, nick smirniotopoulos featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

november 8, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

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I MAY BE WRONG, BUT I DOUBT IT

Bad day turns to worse with Twitter election aftermath At approximately 11:30 p.m. on Tuesday night, Twitter exploded. This wasn’t a fun explosion, like seeing a fat kid belly flop into the pool; no, this was an explosion of ignorance that made the usual Ku Klux Klan meeting seem like a thoughtful, and understanding, forum of opinions. Tweets such as @beccafisherr’s, “I always confuse Obama with Osama but is there really a difference? They both destroyed our country... #Romney2012,” made me ashamed to be a part of the same species as her. Others, such as @TomTomsguns1996’s, “Anyone who voted for obama needs to be hunted down and killed #Nobama #loadinmyguns,” made me simultaneously question the first and second amendments of the Constitution. People I normally would consider quiet and sheltered were coming out of the woodwork and saying things that would offend Lewis Black. Seeing all of these tweets and realizing that I was on the same side as these people, politically speaking, was a sobering thought and the cherry on top of the most shameful 48 hours of my life. It all started on Oct. 30, when I was looking at the form to apply for an absentee ballot. Stressed out from exams, I listened to the little devil on my shoulder, who convinced me that the form was scary looking and I didn’t care enough about the election or the candidates to fill it out and vote. It took me a grand total of three days to realize what I had done; I had sacrificed my morals and just about everything I believe in because — in a stroke of weakness — I got lazy. Upon realizing this, I made just about every

attempt to reorganize my schedule so I could drive back to Northern Virginia and vote, but a test on Tuesday afternoon made it impossible. My fate had been cast. It’s a mistake I’ll never make again. And before you say it, I do realize the immense irony behind my laziness impacting my will to vote after I wrote my satire piece, “Stay in and sleep.” Feel free to let me hear it in the comments. I deserve it. Following my personal pity party, I had the honor of being the only person in my room of friends rooting for Romney as returns started to roll in. So when it was announced Obama had won Ohio, I had the privilege of being the only one sulking in the corner while others around me rejoiced. And while I’ve come a long way since bawling Adam Morrison-style when I lost my house league championship in basketball in the sixth grade, I wouldn’t say I’m a good sport when it comes to losing. The only highlight of the night was the realization that, for a span of about 15 minutes, the Tech student body clearly cared more about the announcement that Dunkin’ Donuts would not be opening Wednesday as scheduled. Come to think of it, maybe it’s a good thing Obama has four more years; the first lady has some serious work to do with fighting obesity. After all of the commotion though, I took a deep breath and checked Twitter to relax, only to completely lose faith in humanity. The movement to ruin the idea of civilized discussion wasn’t done solely by Republicans though; it was truly a bipartisan effort, and tweets such as @SheemaSheem’s, “…MY

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PRESIDENT IS STILL BLACK AND Y’ALL HATERS GON HATE. DON’T BE MAD MITT ROMNEY DIDN’T COME THROUGH YOU GOT 4 YEARS TRY HARDER,” prove that point. For the record, any time you make homage to a song by Young Jeezy, you aren’t helping yourself. But to everyone rabbling away and butchering the English language, I implore you to stop yelling profanity on Twitter and come to grips with the results. Whether you like President Obama and his policies or not, the man is your Commander and Chief for the next four years. He is the face of democracy and the leader of the greatest country in the world. Show the man some respect. You can still respect someone without agreeing with them. I don’t like New York Yankees or Derek Jeter, but I sure do respect them. At the end of the day, Obama and Romney both had the same goals: to decrease America’s deficit and help the country prosper. I may not like the way Obama aims to accomplish those goals, but we’re on the same side. If more people realized that, instead of bashing him on social media sites, our country would be better for it. Now, if you will excuse me, I have a ton of people to go unfollow on Twitter. NICK CAFFERKY -senior -managing editor -communication major

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Keep the law

101

on your side.

Lesson: Reasonable Suspicion Can the police pull you over for no reason?

ANSWER: There may be a reason even if they didn’t tell you. The burden of proof to stop someone is called “reasonable suspicion”. The burden of proof to search someone is called “probable cause”.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Stay practical, and let your partner do the talking. An opportunity for an amazing bonus arises. You have more friends than you realized. Take home something unusual. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -Career matters emerge for your consideration. Stay current, and get the other side to do the talking. Release physical tension with exercise. Water igures in this scenario. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- You’re entering a phase of thoughtful consideration, complete with plenty of tests. Write up your ideas. You can really advance now. Hold out for the best deal.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Prepare to negotiate. Ask an expert for practical advice. Listen, but don’t be stopped, by a critic. Join forces with a female to get the funding. Share your dreams. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- It’s getting interesting. Avoid distractions. Postpone a romantic interlude. Form a strong working partnership. Reality clashes with fantasy. Your success is assured. Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Get back to work for the next few days, and make the big bucks. Rely on a friend to ind the missing link, or the error in the chain. Strengthen your family.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Plan some fun for today and tomorrow. A stubborn moment makes travel tricky. An older person presents alternatives. Add imagination to your arrangement, and get ready to party. Gemini (May 21-June 20) -- There could be some confusion. Stick close to home for the next two days. Postpone travel in favor of study. Money is tight. Talk about what you love. Cancer (June 21-July 22) -- You’re entering a learning phase. Discuss the details. Work to make friendships stronger. If you don’t have a business, start one. You’re exceptionally intelligent for the next week.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- The next two days could be quite pro itable. Hold out for the best deal, and monitor expenditures closely. Erase clouds of worry with productivity. All ends well. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- You’re empowered. Wait until you’re sure what the customer wants before you try to provide it. An old friend can help you realize a dream. Postpone travel. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Finish up old business today and tomorrow, and speculate on new directions with friends. Being thrifty takes practice and concentration. Respectfully proceed with caution, and level up.

When it appears that you have been stopped for no reason it is called a “Terry Stop”. The name comes from the standards established in a 1968 case, Terry v. Ohio. Remember, all the police need at this point is a ‘reasonable suspicion.’ Police will use a Terry Stop as a tool if he or she observes unusual conduct which leads him or her to reasonably suspect that criminal activity may be occurring. This is a gray area and left to interpretation. In the case of a moving vehicle, a stop can be made even with the most minimal of infraction or safety issue. The police have the right to make inquires and they will ask if it is OK to search your vehicle. This is where your fourth amendment rights come in. If you don’t care if the police search you or your vehicle then you can give them permission. In some cases this may be a signed waiver. -law-faq.com


6

weekend

november 8, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

YMCA brings artisans to community

featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

MADDI GORDON features staff writer

For many people, especially college students, the holiday season marks the beginning of the quest for the perfect gift — a gift that is thoughtful and unique, but will not break the bank. This weekend, the Virginia Tech YMCA is giving locals a head start on holiday shopping with its 43rd annual craft fair. The craft fair, which will be held in the University Mall, offers a variety of unique gifts for every price range, said Anne Gouiller-Moore, the YMCA Operations Coordinator. “There’s a lot of really neat stuff you can get as gifts for family and friends,” said Ayla Wilk, the Student Programs Coordinator. “There is a large variety of very adorable Hokie-themed jewelry and knick-knacks that make great gifts.” According to GouillerMoore, the fair includes everything from trinkets to furniture, and the prices range from $2 to $500 and $600. Booths will feature artwork such as jewelry, metal and glass art, woodwork, photography, fine arts, soaps, candles, furniture, pottery and textiles. ‘Making the cut’ According to GouillerMoore, approximately 80 vendors will fill University Mall from Friday to Sunday. The craft fair showcases a variety of artisans that are either local to Virginia or hail from the surrounding states. In addition, the craft fair is a juried show, which means all the featured vendors had to apply and be accepted into the show by a jury. “In order for a crafter or artist to be accepted, they have to fill out an application and submit a photo of their work, their workplace, and a booth, if they have set one up before,” Gouiller-Moore said. The artisans must also

editors: emma goddard, nick smirniotopoulos

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Introduction Mitzi Vernon Caitlin Floreal Peter Vikesland Steve Matuszak

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Ishwar Puri Marie & Keith Zawistowski Shane McCarty Alex Endert Dan Goff Eddie Boes

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Ben Knapp Jenni Sigler Justin Graves John Boyer

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MADDI GORDON / COLLEGIATE TIMES

Amber Cannaday, junior, (left) and John Purcell, freshman, (right) volunteer for the YMCA Crafts Fair meet certain criteria, including products selfmade by the vendors. The jury also takes into consideration the innovation of the product and the variety of craftsmen, so not all the booths will be one type of art, says Gouiller-Moore. “It increases the quality of the art that you’re going to find at the fair and gives the fair a little more weight,” Wilk said. ‘Fundraising for programs’ The craft fair is a longstanding tradition for VT YMCA, as it has been an annual occurrence for 43 years. According to Wilk, the craft fair is one of the largest fundraisers for the YMCA and one of its most established. “The fair provides financial support for our various community programs, especially the YMCA st udent prog ra ms,” Wilk said. “It helps facilitate service learning opportunities for Tech students to get out into the community and develop meaningful service projects.” According to Wilk, the craft fair also raises funds

CHECK THE BASKETBALL PREVIEW THIS FRIDAY TO SEE IF YOU’VE WON!

to support other YMCA activities like afterschool and tutoring programs, programs for the elderly, sustainability initiatives, and alternative service breaks. “The YMCA is a nonprofit organization, so all of our money comes from fundraising and donations,” Gouiller-Moore said. ‘Engaging the culture’ Not only does the craft fair benefit the YMCA, but it also helps support local artisans. “We really want to promote the local artists and not just the Blacksburg artisans, but people, like jewelers and potters, who are making a living (as an artisan),” Gouiller-Moore said. Wilk believes the craft fair is a good opportunity for students to experience the local artisan talent and interact with the local community. “If you’re coming back and forth from the Empo, students can see a little slice of what the New River Valley and the surrounding areas have to offer,” Wilk said. “It brings the community

to the students.” ‘Volunteer support’ The fair has enlisted the help of about 200 volunteers, with the goal of having around 250 volunteers for the weekend. Volunteers help with the unloading, set up and take down of the fair, as well as help to provide breaks and refreshments for the artisans. Visit vtymca.org to sign up and for more information about volunteering. According to Wilk, the craft fair is a unique, cultural and artistic opportunity, which brings the community together in a casual, social setting while benefitting a great cause. “People can really feel good about shopping at the craft fair because they know that their money goes to support youth development and leadership development throughout the community,” Wilk said. The craft fair will be held inside of the University Mall Friday from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

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Moises Seraphin Chantelle Anderson John Sangster Jerry Gaines Jake Socha Kathleen Alexander

TEDx: Speakers hope to inspire students to act from page one

only a hundred attendees, including volunteers. Few people were invited to this event in an effort to create a more intimate setting for the audience and the speakers. More than 100 people were turned down for ticket request. Anton Dahbura, freshman biology major, was one of these people. “It’s not like just a football ticket; if you don’t get one of those — whatever,” Dahbura said. “I truly feel like I’ll be missing out on something great happening at Tech.” However, those who wish to view the event can attend live screenings in Newman library, the Art and Architecture Libraries, the Theater of Learning in East Ambler Johnston, and the Lyric. “Hosting a live streaming event gives access to the presentation in a smaller setting, a more intimate setting, potentially with the people you’re interacting

with on a particular topic,” Richards said. “If you are a student organization, it would give you the opportunity to watch these as a group and talk about how it is relevant to your organization and your mission and what you do”. TED was started in 1984 with the principal ideas of Technology, Entertainment and Design, but since then has grown broader. TED believes in the power of ideas to change attitudes, lives and even the world. TED talks aim to inspire individuals to act. Even Richards has been inspired by a TED talk about impromptu “popup” activities set up for a day. “I worked to have a popup children’s museum for one day and we had more than 1,000 people come through in five hours,” Richards said. “So we watched the TED talk, we were inspired by it, and we did something. Ultimately, that’s the goal of TED talks — that people do something and are inspired to take action.”


Thursday, November 8, 2012 Print Edition