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Campaign CountdownseeCoverage page two Tuesday, October 2, 2012

An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 109th year, issue 22 News, page 2

Carpooling community launches

Arts & Entertainment, page 3

Opinions, page 5

Sports, page 7

Study Break, page 6

Hokies drop heartbreaker to Bearcats

MIKE DEMSKO news staff writer

Hokies have a new way to travel this year. Virginia Tech has recently paired with the rapidly spreading Zimride.com, a service for students to search for and communicate with possible carpool opportunities. Users can browse online for rides to and from a certain destination. For instance, if students are trying to find a ride home for the weekend or to the away football game, they can just type in their starting point and destination. Rachael Zabkar, a freshman marketing major, hasn’t used Zimride yet, but anticipates it will be very helpful. “It was hard to find people you know (to carpool with), so more options are always welcome,” Zabkar said. Information available about a ride includes how many seats are available in a car, the names of other passengers and a drivers requested payment type. Deborah Freed, Virginia Tech’s alternative transportation manager, is responsible for the university’s pairing with Zimride. “I knew there were newer technologies out there that would improve the service from the original ride board, and I really felt like it was time for Virginia Tech to be able to offer that to students,” Freed said. A concern for students, however, is the possible danger involved when riding with a stranger. With regards to these apprehensions, Freed said there are precautions in place when people sign up for the service. “You have to log into the Central Authentication Service (CAS) on the Tech website, which confirms that you are, in fact, affiliated with Virginia Tech,” Freed said. In addition to the CAS’s protection, Zimride also prides itself on a heavy Facebook integration, giving users access to view profiles, exchange messages and spot mutual friends. Larkin Prendergast, a freshman majoring in business management, has used the service already. “It’s convenient and I’m not concerned about (safety),” Prendergast said. There is also added emphasis on the site as an environmentally friendly option. As growing concerns of carbon emissions become the focus of many environmental groups, Tech’s Zimride users, according to Freed, can attest to reducing emissions. With 678 Tech members since the program’s inception in midSeptember, the service at Tech boasts an eco-friendly record. According to Freed, just under 12,000 miles and 470 gallons of gas have already been saved. Currently, 159 rides are posted online and numbers have been increasing. Freed attributes this success partially to the company as a whole. “They’ve been a really wonderful company to work with,” Freed said. “Because Zimride is active at so many other universities they’ve really had a chance to iron out all the potential trouble points, and what we’ve got is a very polished product.” In Virginia alone, George Mason, University of Virginia, JMU, University of Richmond and VCU all provide Zimride services to their students. Follow this writer on Twitter @MikeDemskoCT

TREVOR WHITE / SPPS

Virginia Tech running back Michael Holmes is brought down by a host of defenders during Saturday’s 27-24 loss to Cincinnati at FedEx Field in Landover, Md. The Hokies dropped to 3-2 overall on the year, as they continued to show inconsistencies on both sides of the ball. The team continues ACC play this Saturday at North Carolina. see page SEVEN

University Council hears proposal for real estate major DEAN SEAL news reporter

Incoming freshmen next year may be able to dedicate their college careers to studying real estate. The University Council met Monday afternoon to discuss a resolution to approve the addition of a real estate major to Virginia Tech’s curriculum. This discussion is the first of several in line to have the major available to students by fall of 2013. The program offered by this resolution has been developed in collaboration by all six colleges at Tech, hoping to create an interdisciplinary learning opportunity unlike any other real estate programs offered to undergraduate students in the country. Kevin Boyle, department head of agricultural and applied economics, headed discussion of the new major. Boyle has led the charge in an effort that has spanned the last two years. According to Boyle, two efforts to create a real estate major have been made since 2005, but have proven unsuccessful. Since then, Boyle and his peers from every college at Tech have taken more precautions to ensure the same things don’t happen again. “It’s the first time six col-

leges on campus have come together to offer a degree, and it’s taken a lot of work to get everyone together,” Boyle said. “I would call this one an outgrowth of the previous attempt. We’ve made some steps, we’ve learned from it, and we’ve had to build from there.” According to Boyle, the appeal of a real estate major stems from job turnover in an already shaky, posthousing bubble property management market. A degree from this department may have lucrative potential for interested students. “One of the things we had to do for the proposal was look at the job prospects,” Boyle said. “If we look out for the next, say, ten years, a third of the management in the real estate industry are going to turnover, mainly because of retirement. The earnings are higher than average for college graduates, so there are good job opportunities and income potential.” Boyle fielded questions regarding several topics during the meeting. The Council made several inquiries about the program, including how Tech would provide the most beneficial setting for real estate knowledge, what

BRAD KLADOWSKI / SPPS

Kevin Boyle addressed University Council yesterday about a possible new major he’s been working on for multiple years. would make this program unique, and how the program would be carried out over the next two semesters. The Council will vote on the resolution on October 15; if approved, it will pass to the Board of Visitors meeting on November 5. From there, Boyle will seek approval for the resolu-

tion from the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, or SCHEV, where it can be officially declared a degree option for students. “We’ve been working with SCHEV in advance, and they’ve already seen this proposal, so we don’t expect any problems,” Boyle said. “For the issues they’ve

told us about, we’ve already worked on them.” According to the resolution, this Bachelor of Science in Real Estate will “prepare graduates for employment in industry sectors such as development, finance, Real Estate Investment Trusts, property management, appraisal, sales, and many global corporations with large property holdings.” Six brand new courses will be implemented if the resolution passes, which will join seven pre-existing real estate courses to create the new real estate department. The department will be headed by Boyle, who is confident the necessary steps have been taken in getting all components readied for the major to be added to Tech’s curriculum. “We’ve done all of our homework, and I think we’re in good shape,” said Boyle. “The challenge is that we’re putting something very aggressive on the table, and we have to go out there and implement it now. The challenge will be to realize the potential here.” Follow this writer on Twitter @jdeanseal


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news

october 2, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: mallory noe-payne, victoria zigadlo

collegiatetimes

#CAMPAIGNCOUNTDOWN Coverage of the issues that involve and affect YOU this campaign season.

Candidate plans for a possible term DONAL MURPHY news staff writer

Flaccavento is running against Republican incumbent Congressman Morgan Griffith.

Anthony Flaccavento is the current Democratic House candidate for the 9th District. He has been the Director of SCALE, Inc., a consulting firm for local economies, and started various community programs in the District, such as the Abingdon Farmer’s Market. He decided to get into politics after realizing his experiences could be most influential at the national level in the current economic climate. The Collegiate Times sat down with him this weekend to answer questions many college students are concerned with in this election. Collegiate Times: Why are students in so much debt? Anthony Flaccavento: We’ve allowed higher education to be defunded progressively at the state level. ... Over time, as the costs of higher education have risen, the proportion that’s being helped with or subsidized by state government has been declining. The share left for students to pay has been growing. ... The reality is the cost has been rising, students are paying a bigger share of it because federal and state governments have cut back their share. It was a small victory that we managed to keep interest rates on Stafford loans from doubling this past spring and summer... So I would like to see the interest rate on student loans come down another point to about 2.5 percent.

Check back next week for an interview with the Congressman.

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newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

WEEKS LEFT

can fi ll. It’s a disheartening time in many respects for young people, but I also think that we’re on the cusp of this new economy that needs young people. It’s coming as much from young people as it’s not, and we need to embrace that and let you forge the next economy, because we sort of had our chance and we blew it in a lot of respects and I’m all for you all taking over.

CT: How would you help to create these small businesses or create incentives for them? Flaccavento: The U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Commerce and U.S. Department of Energy all have a variety of grant programs that will help a business go from an idea to implementation. Start up grants, small amounts of capital, many community organizations then have micro loan programs.

CT: With all these grants, how would you help deal with the national deficit? Flaccavento: The reason that we would not increase the deficit is that I would fight for closing the loopholes. Right now we spend dramatically more money on subsidizing big national corporations. Those companies are not creating jobs, they’re not reinvesting in communities. The money we spend on start up entrepreneurs, small businesses, sustainable farms, it’s a tiny fraction of what we give to these companies who are not creatCT: What would you do to help make higher ing jobs. education more affordable? So I would close those loopholes, Flaccavento: It used to be a Pell grant reduce or end those subsidies, and pretty much paid for a community coltake some of that money, not all of BEN WEIDLICH / SPPS lege education; it paid for about 2/3 of it, and use that for investing in the the cost of a state school education. Now Democratic candidate for the 9th District Anthony Flaccavento sat down with the Collegiate Times this week- things we just talked about: the small it pays for about 2/3 the cost of com- end to discuss the upcoming election. business, the family farm, the community college and about 1/3 the cost munity capital. of going to a typical four-year state school. I would invest Flaccavento: Much of my work the last three decades has more in Pell grants. been around this idea of building a bottom-up economy, CT: You have three children of college age. Has having them put a I think we invigorate work study and other sorts of pro- building an economy that’s based on small to mid-sized perspective on the issues faced by college students? grams that allow students, because an awful lot of students businesses, on innovative entrepreneurs and manufacturFlaccavento: They all have debt actually, all three of them. work, and if they can work and help write down the cost of ... I see both the challenges they face and just how real it is. tuition through work study, we ought to look at invigoratBut I also see the opportunity, because two of the three We’re on the cusp of this new economy ing that as much as possible. kids, what they’ve done is they’ve worked in community work, they’ve worked on farms, they’ve sort of taken that needs young people. It’s coming as CT: What do you think of the Affordable Care Act? advantage of the fact that they’re not walking immediately much from young people as it’s not, and Flaccavento: I definitely support the major elements of it, into the career of their life and so they’ve done some internot every single bit of it, but I would fight efforts to repeal esting things that have broadened their skills. ... So I’d say we need to embrace that and let you forge it. The provision that allows students to stay on their parit’s not great times, my kids know it, but they’ve kind of the next economy.” ents’ insurance until they’re 26 is more critical now than made the most of it and I think that’s what young people ever — students are coming out with higher debt than any have to do. Anthony Flaccavento generation in history. Democratic Congressional Candidate There’s also, and this is something I know students are Follow this writer on Twitter @HokieRealist thinking about, a significant amount of attention in the Affordable Care Act paid to wellness and health and ers, on green energy, on businesses in energy efficiency. CHECK ONLINE preventative cares. A lot of young people are obviously What the government can do is help you make your way SEE FULL STORY ON healthy or are trying to get healthy. by investing in you, cutting down the cost of your debt, and then investing in these businesses and these entreCOLLEGIATETIMES.COM CT: How would you help improve the job market as it stands today? preneurs that can create these job opportunities that you

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

arrestees

status

9/2728/2012

12:30 PM - 6:20 AM

Vandalism/Destruction of Property

McBryde Hall

Inactive

12/04/2011

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Sexual Battery

Slusher Hall

Active

9/08/2012

10:15 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol X3

Lee Hall

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct

9/09/2012

2:15 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol

Slusher Tower

Inactive Reported by Student Conduct


editors: emma goddard, nick smirniotopoulos featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

arts & entertainment

october 2, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

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Music change produces disappointing album Music Review English rockers Muse released their sixth studio album, “The 2nd Law,” today. Lead singer and guitarist Matthew Bellamy jokingly stated the group’s new album would be a “Christian gangsta-rap jazz odyssey, with some ambient rebellious dubstep and face-melting metal f lamenco cowboy psychedelia.” “The 2nd Law” certainly showcases a notable difference from the band’s previous music. Although not to the extent of that quote, Muse does diverge into a new realm that is much more electronic. The mention of dubstep was no joke though; after being inspired by a Skrillex concert, the band has even gone so far as to create a dubstep track using guitars. Unfortunately, “The 2nd Law” fails to create anything exceptionally interesting or sonically groundbreaking. Muse sounds like a group wanting to take its music

in a new direction, but has no clue what direction that is. The first song off the album is “Supremacy.” The song sounds like a more traditional Muse song, showcasing the drumming of Dominic Howard and Bellamy’s guitar. The song has a riff that is eerily similar to Led Zeppelin’s “K a sh m i r,” a nd sounds like something out of a James Bond movie. “Madness” is the second track off the album and the first single. The song starts with a distorted electric bass line by Christopher Wolstenholme, and the repetitive nature of the song gives it a sort of dance-club feeling. “Survival,” which was chosen as the official song of the 2012 London Olympic Games, is featured on the album as well. The song received mixed reviews when it was chosen for the games, with some

calling it lyrically lackluster and against the spirit of the games. “ T he 2nd L aw : Unsustainable” is the dubstep song that was released on the Internet prior to the album’s release.

Also out this week... Matt and Kim, “Lightning” - Oct. 2 The duo, comprised of Matt Johnson and Kim Schifno, are releasing their fourth studio album “Lightning” this week. The group creates pop music with little more than Johnson’s keyboard and Schifno’s drums. They are known for their incredibly catchy and danceable tunes, energetic live performances, and insatiable cheerfulness.

The song had veteran fans of the band questioning the new direction that Muse was taking with the album. The song begins with fast strings and a chorus of people chanting before a wom-

en’s voice reads out parts of the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. Muse wanted to relate the physics law to the struggle of humanity living with an economy based on endless growth. The bold political statement unfortunately falls very short of creating anything worthwhile. Listening to the mindless droning of a robotic voice repeating “unsustainable” on top of screeching guitars replicating dubstep drops sounds plain disjointed. The song comes off as pretentious and unnecessary. “The 2nd Law: Isolated System” is the second half of the song continuing along the same theme. This track opens with piano, creating an extremely awkward transition from the electronic womping of the previous song, only adding to the disjunction of the album.

“War of the Roses” - Oct. 2 The latest title from Paradox Interactive highlights the English War of the Roses from the 15th century with classbased multiplayer and medieval combat “Frankenweenie” - Oct. 5 Tim Burton’s black-and-white homage to “Frankenstein” tells the story of a young boy who brings his dead dog back to life, only to see his zombie-dog start causing chaos in his town.

Sequal lends worthy competition Game Rating

Movie Rating

This is still a role-playing game crossed with a first-person shooter, and the gameplay will not feel very new to many people. That is not to say the game has not changed, but it is very similar to the game many of you enjoyed years ago. You will run around collecting quests while fi nding and earning hoards of loot. Luckily, the combat feels even better in “Borderlands 2,” with a clearer distinction between the various weapon types. SMGs feel less like inaccurate assault rifles and more like submachine guns. With four interchangeable weapon slots available by the end of the game, you will be able to mix and match weapons that are different types, and that have different elemental effects. All of these weapons, effects and areas themselves look spectacular. The iconic art style of the first “Borderlands”

returns with a sharper and more colorful look. Lighting has been noticeably improved and I actually found myself squinting in some sections of the game from the bright and beautiful sun. “Borderlands 2” is clearly a sequel to “Borderlands,” and although there are some minor improvements to it, it is still very much the same game. If you did not enjoy the first game, you probably will not have much fun in this one. That said, this is a more polished experience with an absolutely stellar soundtrack accompanying a story that is usually quite funny despite the many aging memes and references littered throughout. BEN KIM -featured game columnist -sophomore -communication major

JACOB WILBANKS -featured music columnist -junior -communication major

Actress makes poor film choice

Flying Lotus, “Until the Quiet Comes” - Oct. 2 Steve Ellison, known by the stage name Flying Lotus, fuses electronic and hip hop beats with a plethora of other styles to make experimental tracks. He has received nothing but positive acclaim since dropping his first album “1983” and has worked with numerous other artists. His new album “Until the Quiet Comes” is released today through Warp Records.

Millions of different guns inhabit the various boxes, chests, and weapon racks of Pandora in “Borderlands 2.” Fans of the original game will be hard pressed to find any significant changes in the sequel. The game still focuses on four-player cooperative play in a world fi lled with procedurally generated weapons. You will still be shooting endless waves of humanoid, robotic and alien enemies with an almost limitless array of weapons, but Pandora is now a much bigger place. Quests are spread out across the giant world, and fast traveling is pretty much a necessity. There is a huge cast of characters that accompany these quests, which are not very different from the fetch-and-kill quests found in “Borderlands.” The story definitely is not the highlight here, although there is plenty of it to be told. Handsome Jack has taken over the Hyperion Corporation and has declared himself dictator of Pandora. As a result, a mysterious figure named Angel convinces you you need to kill Jack. Along the way, you will end up meeting the four original vault hunters: Mordecai, Lilith, Roland and Brick, who return in “Borderlands 2” as staples of the storyline. The new characters are similar to those from the first game, but have slightly different special abilities. Zer0 is a sword-wielding assassin who appreciates a good sniper rifle while also enjoying close-quarters combat with his stealth ability. On the opposite side is Salvador, the balls-to-thewall Gunzerker who can dual-wield weapons while he is Gunzerking. All the characters feel similar, but are different enough to make them uniquely enjoyable.

This track standing alone is actually good, as it slowly crescendos into an orchestral mix of drums and haunting background vocals. The members of Muse have created some generally good tracks on the record, but a lot of them try to cram so much into one song that it feels overcrowded and teeming with unnecessary elements. The quick jumps between different styles and experimentation with alternate genres only worsens the problem of the songs containing too many elements. The problem for Muse on “The 2nd Law” is the band’s attempt to traverse so many genres on a single album results in an album lacking any cohesion and sounds like nothing more than a col le c t ion of songs.

In 2010, Jennifer Lawrence burst onto the acting scene with her starring role as Ree Dolly in the indie surprise hit “Winter’s Bone,” and has since seen ups and downs in her acting career — as most celebrities do. Lawrence and the film itself were deservedly nominated for numerous awards — most prominently with “Best Picture,” “Best Adapted Screenplay,” “Best Actress” (for Lawrence), and “Best Supporting Actor” (for John Hawkes, who played her uncle, Teardrop) at the Academy Awards. They also won “Grand Jury Prize: Dramatic Film” at the Sundance Film Festival. Lately, the term “indie” seems to have become a genre, rather than something simply designating that the movie was made outside of big Hollywood Studios. This genre is characterized by ephemeral characters and a tendency to meander around a story instead of diving straight into it. “Winter’s Bone” was the antithesis of a typical indie film, with its

look at the methamphetamine underworld of the poverty-stricken Ozarks, and the seventeen-year-old who has to f ind her disappeared father. So too, is Lawrence the antithesis of your typical Hollywood starlet. She is more than a bit socially awkward, obviously uncomfortable and disbelieving of fame and shockingly, a very talented actress. Perhaps that is why it was so surprising to see the one of the most promising young actors of today in such a runof-the-mill horror film as “House at the End of the Street.” Only a few weeks ago, Lawrence starred in this movie as Elissa — the daughter of Elisabeth Shue’s character Sarah — who moves to a new town after her mother’s divorce. Ryan (Max Thieriot) is their mysterious nextdoor neighbor whose parents were murdered by his sister, and Weaver (Gil Bellows) is a local police officer who has his eye on Sarah. Elissa and Ryan become close, despite her mother’s orders not to, and events predictably spiral out of control when it

becomes clear that Ryan, and the situation surrounding his parents’ murder, is not at all what it seems. This is an unoriginal premise, but that does not mean it had to be a bad film. The script, by Jonathan Mostow, director of “Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines” — which should have been a tip-off — and David Loucka, is particularly dull. Director Mark Tonderai does not help matters with his unimaginative camera-work and truly awful pacing. All in all, “House at the End of the Street” — or “HATES,” as the marketing people love to throw around on posters and trailers — comes off as little more than this year’s latest attempt by a novice director to re-create Alfred Hitchcock’s classic “Psycho.” There’s even a cross-dressing plot twist at the end. Lawrence’s acting is certainly enough to stand with Hitchcock, but even she cannot rise above the contrived and poorly conceived mess of gimmicks and cheap scares that is “House.” From a malfunctioning f lashlight to something scary peering out from the woods, there is little in “House” that has not been seen countless times before and been done i n f i n i t e l y better. “House at the End of the Street” was filmed in 2010, before “Winter’s Bone” gained much recognition. Since then, Lawrence’s choice of roles has been much better, with her parts as Mystique in “X-Men: First Class” and Katniss Everdeen in “The Hunger Games.” Both are big-budget blockbuster franchises that still maintained a fairly high level of critical support. Hopef u l ly “House” will serve as a lesson to Lawrence about which scripts to stay away from. As for audiences, that lesson is not worth price of a movie ticket. KATIE WHITE -featured movie columnist -junior -history major


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october 2, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

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p u d n u o R d n e k e We

editors: mallory noe-payne, victoria zigadlo newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

what you’re saying On Hokies drop heartbreaker to Bearcats 27-24

The quick and dirty on what went on this weekend in Blacksburg

Democracy Now, the national, independent daily news program, visited Virginia Tech on Oct. 1. Former Virginia Tech student and April 16 survivor Colin Goddard and journalist Amy Goodman talked about the focus of the upcoming election, the role of gun control, and the final chapter of Goodman's new book, which talks recent mass shootings and the US intransigence on a global arms treaty.

The Annual Campus Security and Fire Safety Report (main campus) is available on the Virginia Tech Police Department website. Extended campus compliance reports are available at the same website. If you would like to request a paper copy of the report, you can stop by the police department located in the Sterrett Facilities Complex or you can request that a paper copy be mailed to you by calling 231-6183.

Blacksburg police are seeking public help to identify two people from retail security camera footage as part of a credit card fraud investigation. Anyone with information on the individuals is asked to call 961-1150 and speak to Blacksburg police Detective Fred Carlson, or leave an anonymous tip at 961-1819. Information can also be sent to ciu@blacksburg.gov.

Frustrated fan for many years:

Nothing will change until Beamer retires and someone else who is in touch with todays game runs the team. Coach Beamer, thanks for all you’ve done for VT Football, but it’s time to step down and get that $250K “consultant” job... Will VT beat Duke @ Homecoming? Maybe they shouldn’t, maybe it’ll help in the long run!Tired hokie fan: It’s time for Beamer to go, no questions about it. He’s the root of the problem...he needs to step down and retire. Things will be like this for years otherwise.

Not so fast: Kicking Beamer out now won’t solve anything. We’ll just end up with some mediocre coach that doesn’t understand the Tech system and we’ll stop having our 10win seasons we’re so fond of. Case in pointMaryland. BUT-I recognize that we do need to consider the future. I vote for a new, young OC that can eventually take over when Frank DECIDES to step down. Just my opinion, of course.

Anonymous: They have lost their ‘swagger’. Gone is the healthy respect for the lunch pail and seeing on TV and elsewhere as the symbol of tough hard work and a winning attitude. Our quarterback is fine. The team is actually staffed with talented players and recruiting has improved in past 2 years with younger coaches who are in touch with social media ‘get it’. The issue is attitude. There isn’t any. We are too clean cut at the moment. Sure that doesn’t sound good but its the truth. You need swagger in the game. You need the lunch pail out front and center to be the honor it used to be. To be a top 10 defense you need the anger and the attitude. To be a top ten offense you need the swagger and attitude.... is this getting through?

e m o s e w a r u o y s u w o h S ate g il a T | o ti a P | e s u o H Apartment | Dorm | and you could win big! and a s e iz r p e iv e c e r Winners g! in iv L e t ia g e ll o C feature in lex and p m o c , ry o g te a c , e Email us your nam s.com e m ti te ia g e ll o c @ s pictures to crib FOXRIDGE • MAPLE RIDGE TOWNHOMES WINDSOR HILLS • TERRACE VIEW APARTMENTS


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opinions

october 2, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

Your Views

The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

[letters to the editor]

I was forewarned: coupon sites advertising discount tickets, fans bemoaning a nonmarquee matchup, and a sadlooking offense. That said, the sea of empty seats at FedEx Field on Saturday still came as a shock to me. But should it have? After digesting an ‘Enter Sandman’-free entrance — would there have been anyone to jump? — and an empty end zone without the Marching Virginians, I began to doubt myself for paying actual money to go to this soulless monstrosity of a stadium once more. The empty seats, however, signaled to me that we have reached the end of an era; ever-optimistic and excitable Hokies fans, once renowned for their ability to travel, have given up. It is not necessarily because the team is bad. On the contrary, it is full of some of the most talented and hardworking guys you will see anywhere in the country, but the guys upstairs — Beamer, Stinespring and Weaver — are taking both players and fans

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Collegiate Times Editorial Staff

for granted. A terrible offense with tremendously talented players points to one thing: poor coaching. While a conservative playbook might get us ten wins a season, it never wins the ‘big game’. Hokie offenses even put up reasonable numbers on average, but “reasonable” does not win championships. It is time to acknowledge the weak point in our system and fix it. It is time to fire Bryan Stinespring. Lastly, folks like Jim Weaver need to stop taking fans — and their wallets — for granted. Scheduling neutral-site games at places like FedEx Field, charging exorbitant prices for tickets, and expecting fans to show up and eat a predictable loss is not working. Weaver has shown tremendous business savvy over the years, but lacks heart. It is time for some changes. Saturday’s empty stadium was a signal the fans agree. Tyler Lopez Virginia Tech, Class of 2007

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Obamacare hurts economy, diminishes quality of health care T

he Affordable Care Act — also known as Obamacare — represents a dramatic expansion of public-sector intervention and control into one of the largest and fastest-growing industries. Healthcare currently makes 18 percent of the United States’ GDP. The “fatal conceit” is the belief that government is a more efficient provider of health-care services and it has the information, incentive, and motivation to run complex programs. History bears out the fatal conceit — one needs to only look at the rapid expansion and escalating costs of entitlement programs such as Medicare, social security and Medicaid. Europe, the U.K. and Canada have found that single provider health care systems burden middle class citizens, who drown in taxes, and provide poor quality health care, characterized by limited options and long waiting periods. Obamacare is a 2,600-page law which sets provisions on regulators, doctors, and insurance agencies. It intervenes

with the private sector in a way that is most detrimental to all our liberties, especially when it comes to choice of healthcare providers, insurance and doctors. Firms and individuals are required by law to have healthcare or face stiff penalties — additional taxes — if they do not. Although Obamacare includes several popular provisions — coverage for young adults under age 26 and coverage for children with preexisting conditions — it drives up the cost of providing medical services for individuals and insurance agencies, as well as doctors. But these costs are not confined to health care — it affects all parts of the economy. All citizens will pay directly and indirectly through closed businesses and businesses that do not open because of costly regulations. Entrepreneurs will not be willing to risk their capital. The Congressional Budget Office has increased the anticipated cost of Obamacare from $1 trillion to $2.6 trillion between 2014 and 2023.

The CBO’s projections falsify Obama’s claim the law would save the tax base $37 billion. The increase in costs will emerge as higher drug costs because of new taxes on drug companies and higher premiums for health insurance. This is already happening. According to a Kaiser survey from 2008 to 2012, families with employer-provided coverage experienced premium increases of 24 percent to $3,065. Obamacare’s individual mandate will lead to exponentially rising costs. The current provisions indicate the mandate will cost $325 for an individual in 2015 and $695 beginning in 2016. A family earning less than $110,000 per year will pay $2,085 per year, or 2 percent of their income, whichever is higher. Forbes magazine states the tax will likely end up being similar to the Alternative Minimum Tax — a tax that was initially meant to target upper income families, but has become a major tax on middle-income families.

Further, not only will it increase expenses for individuals and firms, it will also deteriorate the quality of health services individuals receive. The Affordable Care Act sets up Accountable Care Organizations — some call them “death panels” — to ration health care. Bureaucracies and bureaucrats will play a major role in dictating individual benefits. The quality of health care stems from the patient-doctor relationship that now will have bureaucracies and bureaucrats creating a barrier between the doctors and patients. Based on the nature of the government provision as expensive and inefficient, the best social option is to repeal and replace Obamacare. An option to consider is to allow health insurance to be offered and purchased over state lines. Letting health insurers compete across state lines will foster competition among providers. Individuals who have to pay for their own medical expenses will more likely make more

informed personal care decisions, like regular exercise, nonsmoking, and limiting alcohol intake. The opposite incentives would be true of individuals who do not have to pay for their own health care expenses. Individual responsibility and patient choice in health care decisions will lead to the best outcomes and lowest rates for individuals. A universal coverage system providing coverage to more Americans will not lead to cost containment. And it will also contain many avenues for fraud of the system. Countries with universal coverage see lower quality of care, longer waiting periods for service, as well as increasing taxes on the middle and upper classes to pay for the unsustainable and uncontrollable costs of the expensive public good: health care. SALLY BRADY -regular columnist -agricultural and applied economics -senior

Affordable Care Act reduces costs, protects individuals T

he United States currently sits with an international ranking of 37th in the world for healthcare. But with the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act earlier this year, it is well on its way to improving health coverage and moving up among other nations. The bill was a main focus for President Obama’s agenda during his term, and this legislation reflects his healthcare policies. Th is reform has strengthened our healthcare system as a whole, with national health-care spending and premiums rising at a much slower rate than before. There are roughly 50 million people in the United States who are uninsured — 16.3 percent of our national population. With this reform, every single American will be guaranteed health coverage. Not only that, but this bill also protects Americans against insurance companies by

eliminating discriminatory practices often used by insurance agencies. For the population as a whole, the bill no longer allows insurance companies to cancel policies if someone becomes sick, deny coverage to anyone with preexisting conditions, charge people with preexisting conditions a higher cost, or charge women more than men. The legislation bans lifetime caps, meaning there cannot be a limit on the amount of money an insurance company will pay out in medical benefits over someone’s entire life, and it also ends annual limits on coverage. Insurance companies are now also required to provide preventive care coverage on all new private health plans, free of charge. Young adults benefit in several ways. The bill extends coverage for young adults until they reach the age of 26, allowing them to stay on their family’s health plan

until that age. Insurance companies also cannot provide fewer benefits to adult children still on their family’s plan, nor can parents be charged more for adult children than younger children on their plans. Senior citizens benefit greatly from the Affordable Care Act, and this bill does indeed help Medicare. Th is healthcare system strengthens Medicare by cracking down on fraud, abuse, and waste, adding eight years to the expected solvency of the Medicare trust fund. Similarly, crackdowns in 2010 and 2011 resulted in $5.4 billion being returned to Medicare. The bill lowers out of pocket prescription medication costs, improves long term care services, and protects the private information of senior customers in order to protect them against identity theft . Additionally, new Medicare advantage plans cannot charge more than

original Medicare pays for certain services, and seniors qualify for annual wellness visits and different types of screenings at no extra cost. Small businesses receive benefits, as well. Some states will offer plans, called exchanges, tailored to meet the needs of smaller businesses. These exchanges, provided to businesses with up to 100 employees, offer a wide range of coverage plans, and they are required to provide essential medical benefits. Tax credits will be available to these businesses to aid in paying for health insurance for employees, and the bill creates grants to help these businesses provide workplace wellness programs. There are of course issues that have come along with this bill, such as the requirement of businesses and institutions, with the narrow exception of strictly religious institutions, to provide contraceptive coverage to employees, and the taxation

aspect of this bill. There is also a stark contrast between this policy, and that of presidential candidate Mitt Romney, who advocates for a voucher health-care and social security system. Th at policy would not, however, adequately protect American’s against insurance companies and could likely lead to a less regulated health-care system, which may result in lower quality healthcare and higher costs. President Obama’s healthcare policy greatly benefits the American society as a whole, and it will prove to be an excellent reform for America in the long haul. Everyone should examine this topic, as well as the presidential candidates’ healthcare ideas and policies to learn more about health care in America. RYAN PFEIFLE -regular columnist -university studies -freshman

Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes. com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes. com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints. collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2012. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


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october 2, 2012

Regular Edition Today’s Birthday Horoscope: You’re beginning a learning phase, in which travel, education and communication expand your mind to new levels. Your spirituality flourishes this year. Living sustainably within your means is your mantra. Simple joys delight.

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By Don Gagliardo and C.C. Burnikel

Week ending October 5, 2012

ACROSS 1 Wasn’t renewed 7 Fiend’s tail? 10 Biographical datum 13 World Cup chant 14 They’re “high” but not dry 16 Little shaver 17 *“The Music Man” number 19 Ginormous 20 Early computer 21 *Sweet stocking stuffer 23 Not quite a compulsion 25 W-2 info: Abbr. 26 Perceptive

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30 Predecessor of 33-Down 34 *Lead singer in No Doubt’s hit “Don’t Speak” 37 Bee fore? 38 Plate in a park 39 Took by the hand 40 Aptly named movie channel 41 Ernst contemporary 42 *Instrument using rolls 46 Grab ahold of, as an idea 48 Cross to bear 49 Trivial amount 50 Sandbox sight

52 *Seven-time Grammy-winning jazz singer 56 Tibetan capital 61 Showy wrap 62 Words in a classic game show that can be followed by the ends of the answers to starred clues 64 Lumber tree 65 Geological time division 66 Fare-minded one? 67 Family pooch

DOWN 1 Prime seating 2 Rickman of Harry Potter films 3 Prefix with meter 4 Miso bean 5 Extracts 6 Place to relax 7 Hoops legend Thomas 8 Penn of “Milk” 9 Like computer lab learning 10 Goya’s “Duchess of __” 11 Put on a spare tire? 12 Upper hand 15 Greets someone with more than a nod 18 LXX x X 22 MSNBC rival 24 Vietnamese holiday marking the arrival of spring 26 Ottoman big shots 27 Talked a blue streak? 28 Musical speeds 29 French article 30 Shade of green 31 Leaves for lunch? 32 Speak one’s mind 33 Successor to 30Across 35 Pizazz 36 Tina of “30 Rock”

40 Tree often brought into the house 42 Illinois River port 43 French pilgrimage site 44 DH’s stat 45 Can opener 47 When doubled, sister of Eva 50 A stripper takes it off 51 Arctic diver

52 Genesis shepherd 53 1970 Kinks classic 54 It’s perpendicular to a threshold 55 “The Time Machine” race 57 Vagabond 58 “Take a Chance on Me” quartet 59 Dressy duds 60 Thumbs-up votes 63 Former French coin

Friday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

9/28/12

WORDSEARCH: Downtown Blacksburg Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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sports

october 2, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

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Troubling questions plague Hokies A little over two years ago, former sports editor Garrett Ripa wrote the following after the Hokies lost to James Madison. “(2010) certainly isn’t the year where Tech football makes any kind of positive noise on the national stage or chases a national title.” The column, titled “Embarrassment in Lane: Hokies hit rock bottom” brought out some fiery reader comments. A boisterous few called for Frank Beamer’s job, for changes at the offensive coordinator spot and cried the season was effectively over. At the time, all three were valid claims. Saturday’s 27-24 loss to Cincinnati cuts the same way that 2010 JMU loss did. This time however, the questions being raised are slightly different. Sure, there were some positives in the loss, but overall, the team fans expected to see in 2012 has yet to show up. For that reason alone, many will look back on this season as TREVOR WHITE / SPPS a major disappointment. Here are three questions for Top left: Cincinnati running back George Winn stiff-arms Virginia Tech safety Detrick Bonner. Bottom left: Corey Fuller fumbles after a the Hokies heading into the short reception deep in Tech territory. Right: Cincinnati wide receiver Kenbrell Thompkins makes a leaping reception over Antone Exum. ACC schedule: 1. What’s up with the slow starts slow start on offense during “We had him isolated out Kyle Fuller was beat on the his interception Saturday. J.C. on offense? his teleconference Monday there, and he hung in there game-winning touchdown Coleman showed it after his The Hokies fi nished with morning, yet declined to offer pretty good.” and freshman Donaldven touchdown a couple weeks 402 total yards on Saturday, details. Fans know the talent is there Manning was beat twice on ago. James Gayle shows it after with most of those coming in “Well, we discussed that as a with Exum, the only ques- Munchie Legaux’s first touch- a big sack. Outside of that, there isn’t a the second half. This begs the staff and we’re going to keep it tion is if he is in the right down. question: Where was the pro- within our staff and try to do position to maximize that “He’s just got to use good whole lot of emotion. Some of that has to do with duction in the first half? better this week,” Beamer said. talent. technique,” Beamer said. In the postgame, Beamer 2. Is Exum overmatched at corLast season, Exum received “And I think the more he how the Hokies are playing and the fact there just isn’t a lot deflected those questions as nerback? second team All-ACC hon- plays it, the better he’ll get.” best he could. He pointed to Rarely is a player flagged four ors at safety. His hard-hitting If he’s going to stick at cor- of cheer about. But what got to the Hokies the play of Michael Holmes times, twice for pass interfer- style and aggressive nature nerback for the rest of the seathe national spotlight over the in the second half and the 17 ence and twice for facemask, fit Torrian Gray’s secondary son, he’ll have to. last decade, that lunch pail points the Hokies put on the and praised by his head coach perfectly at safety, but it was 3. Where is the fire? scoreboard in the fourth quar- following the game. decided in the offseason to The Hokies have come out attitude, has been absent so far ter. That’s exactly what Beamer move him to corner, allowing flat in their five games, but the this season. However, would the Hokies did during the postgame Detrick Bonner and Kyshoen lack of fire goes beyond that. have had to score all those Saturday on the topic of Jarrett to fill the safety posiAfter a big sack, a long recep- MATT JONES points in the fourth quarter Antone Exum. tion. tion or a key stop, where is -senior had they just been average on “I think Exum did a good The 392 passing yards by the celebration and joy past -sports editor offense in the first half? job most of the night,” Beamer Cincinnati don’t fall squarely Hokies teams had? -communication Kris Harley showed it after Beamer acknowledged the said. on Exum’s shoulders.

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LESSON 2: ROOF WEIGHT LIMITS

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QUESTION: I can’t fit everything in my car for a trip. Can I just tie it all to the top, even if it’s heavy?

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Your mind is full of creative ideas; apply them to the job at hand. Inspiration stirs your heart. The more you learn, the more attractive you become.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) An opportunity seems too good to be true. Wait for the inal signature. Finish an old job, and keep most of your treasure hidden. Recycle.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) It’s a good time to make money, but keep it in the bank. You can ind what you need for your home. Repair plumbing and everyone bene its.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Share what you’re learning, and provide support. Keep digging to ind the clue. Know who has what. Test all statements of fact. Confer about what you’ve discovered.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Your imagination soars. You’re learning quickly, in control. Repeat the essence of your message. Run the numbers for yourself, and ind out where to save money. Spiritual values emerge.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Sort out the facts you need. Put together a strong pitch. You have what you need, with more work coming in. They’re saying nice things about you.

Aries (Mar. 21-April 19) Take your friends’ encouragement to heart. Get the help you need, but that you were too shy to ask for before. It’s easier to go for the big prize together. Empower their dreams. Taurus (April 20-May 20 A shrewd investment increases your status. Stash away the surplus. A surprise visitor could pop up. Do what you promised for an authority igure. Share a powerful vision. Gemini (May 21-June 20) It’s easy to get distracted, if that’s what you want. Consider all the opportunities now, and get to work. All it takes is commitment and the irst step. Persuade very, very gently.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) Words have great power now, so watch what you say. Listen for extra points. Prepare for a gathering of friends. Your credit rating’s going up. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Balance mind, body and spirit. Meditation helps you stay present. Create enough room for big changes, even if they come in slowly. Think about what you love. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Opportunities present themselves. It’s best to stay true to yourself. Your imagination could distract or provide a solution. Keep ixing what you have, and provide support.

ANSWER: Never exceed your car’s roof load specifications or weight limits.You can find them in your vehicle owner’s manual. Check the weight limitation of your roof rack as well. Typically the range is from 150 to 200 pounds (68 to 90 kg). That’s the equivalent of eighteen 8-foot 2 x 4s (2.4-meter 38 x 89s) or three sheets of 3/4-inch (17-mm) plywood. If you have to deliver a heavy load from the home or garden center, consider having it delivered. It will save wear and tear on you as well as your car. -http://www.rd.com

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No. 16 Women’s soccer takes down No. 18 Maryland BRITTANY KEUP sports staff writer

The No. 16 Virginia Tech Hokies women’s soccer team brought home a win against the No. 18 Maryland Terrapins Sunday night at Thompson Field. The team pulled off the muchneeded 1-0 win against a highly aggressive Maryland team after losing consecutive ACC matches to North Carolina and Boston College. The Hokies controlled the pace of the game for much of the first half, but struggled to find the net. The midfield was inventive and gave forwards Shannon Mayrose and Jazmine Reeves many opportunities, but the Maryland defense consistently found an answer. With just over a minute left before the break, midfielder Ashley Meier found a lane to feed the ball to forward Katie DeTuro in the box, and DeTuro turned and sent it into the back of the net. “Ashley Meier did a great job of turning her head and slipping me in and then I think I just took a touch by the girl and shot it really quickly,” DeTuro said of the goal. The last-minute goal in the first half put the Hokies up 1-0 and all the team had to do was hold on and close out the game, but nightmares of last week’s game against Boston College loomed. Th is time around, though, the Hokies held onto their lead. “I think we did a better job of closing the game out the second half,” said head coach Chugger Adair. “We basically just sat an extra player in and we are a little bit more organized in closing the game out. We’re still learning ourselves.” The second half seemed to lead to more of a struggle for the Hokies, as they stayed

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

Virginia Tech Hokies’ forward Katie Deturo readies herself to score the game’s only goal just before the end of the first half. Tech’s 1-0 win over Maryland on Sunday brings its ACC record even at 2-2. The team faces another important contest against No. 4 Duke at home on Thursday. mostly on the defensive side. But the back four stayed strong, which defender Kelsey Mitchell attributed to better communication. “I think a huge thing in the back four is communication. Playing against a 4-4-2, they had two very strong forwards, so they’re all over the place,” she said. “I think we just had a better

game of communication and we made tackles and read the game much better.” In last weekend’s loss to Boston College, the Hokies ultimately dominated the first half, but changed their formation in the second half, leaving the defense tired. This week, the defense did a much better job of holding off Maryland’s offense.

“We got a little hectic; you know, when you lose the ball you’re having to defend more and more which is a frustration for us," Adair said. "But we did a better job as far as getting numbers in and organized and better defending, so that was good.” A win was critical for the Hokies, as their schedule only gets tougher from here on out.

“We needed this and we took last week to look at our team and look inside ourselves and we got together and we made sure that we were going to come out and we were going to win this game,” DeTuro said. The Hokies will continue ACC conference play later this week against No. 4 Duke at home on Thursday.

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Tuesday, October 2, 2012 Print Edition  

Tuesday, October 2, 2012 Print Edition of The Collegiate Times

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