Page 1

NOTRE DAME JOINS ACC

see page seven

Thursday, September 13, 2012 An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 109th year, issue 12 News, page 2

Weekend, page 4

Opinions, page 5

Sports, page 7

Study Break, page 6

Reaching new heights

Business grows in Blacksburg DEAN SEAL news reporter

A Blacksburg business was recently recognized by the governor of Virginia for it's entrepreneurial spirit. Heyo, a small, rapidly growing social media company formerly known as Lujure Media Inc., has announced it will be expanding its enterprise in Blacksburg. The expansion comes in the form of a $100,000 investment and an estimation of 50 jobs to be created over the next two years. The announcement was made in a release from Governor McDonnell’s office Tuesday, where the governor himself expressed praise for the startup’s entrepreneurial roots and quick growth. "2012 is designated as 'The Year of the Entrepreneur,' and I can't think of a better example of why Virginia is the best place for entrepreneurs than Heyo's rapid success in Montgomery County,” said Governor McDonnell in the release. “This student-founded company was born in a spare room in Blacksburg nearly two years ago, and has taken off. It is gratifying to see these innovators in our commonwealth bring an idea to fruition that results in venture capital flowing into Blacksburg and Montgomery County." Heyo provides an application that helps the owners of small and medium sized businesses build and customize Facebook fan pages, mobile apps and websites. It is marketed with a focus on ease and quality, allowing business owners with minimal experience in web design to create effective page layouts. According to the release, Heyo has had more than 100,000 businesses utilize its application to make more than 120,000 fan pages, sites, and apps. While no location has been specified for where Heyo plans to set its headquarters, Mayor Ron Rordam of the Town of Blacksburg is excited for the group’s impending entrance into Blacksburg’s tech business scene. “Blacksburg is really already a hub for tech-based entrepreneurship, Heyo being just one of the newest choosing to expand and grow here,” explained Rordam. Rordam is also ready for what opportunities this may afford students of nearby universities. “What we find so often is students, when they go to a nearby university, they become part of a community,” Rordam said. “If you have progressive, growing companies in the localities, it attracts students to stick around after graduation.” Creator Nathan Latka, a former Tech student, and technical co-founders Josh Gunter and Brian Putt started the company in 2010. As they move forward with the development of their company, they have received more than $550,000 in funding from angel investors. Its latest group of investors includes TechStars, a company with top venture capital firms, and the Center for Innovative Technology, a non-profit organization that commercializes and funds technology companies.

TREVOR WHITE / SPPS

The women’s soccer team’s 8-0 start has helped them rise to No. 9 in the nation — the highest ranking they have ever seen BY JACOB EMERT | sports staff writer The Virginia Tech women’s soccer team has played eight games thus far in the young 2012 campaign, with each one resulting in victory. The ninth-ranked Hokies are not simply winning the games — they are dominating them. Through these first eight games, the squad has scored 17 goals while allowing just two. Furthermore, it is outshooting opponents by 12 shots a game and has taken more than three times as many corner kicks. Most thankful for the frequent offensive opportunities is true freshman Ashley Meier, who scored her first collegiate goal in an August 31 victory over Mount Saint Mary’s. She’s scored twice more since then and was placed on the All-Tournament Team this past weekend in Wake Forest, the only freshman to receive the honor. Meier, however, refuses to take credit for her success. “It was because of the balls I received,” she said. “I honestly think it’s just due to the great team I have around me.” The most successful part of that “great team” Meier refers to is possibly also the most under the radar: the defense, as both goals scored on it were in a 3-2 overtime victory over the University of Nebraska.

Anchoring that defense to start the season was Caroline Kelly, the team’s starting keeper and another true freshman standout for the Hokies. Kelly earned the starting role for the first five games of the season while last year’s starter, Dayle Colpitts, was competing overseas in the U-20 World Cup. Kelly, admitting to early nerves, knew she was in a special position and made the most of the opportunity. “When the first save came in I knew this was it,” she said. “It was happening.” Kelly played magnificently in her five starts, but on September 2, the Hokies found themselves with a more familiar face in goal. Colpitts, having returned from Japan, had no trouble continuing what her understudy had started. “I was lucky to be a part of (the World Cup) and compete for Team Canada,” the former freshman All-American said. “But I’m really excited to be back here playing for Tech.” Colpitts acknowledged the difference in the international game and the collegiate one, but she said the two are more similar than one would think. see SOCCER / page seven

PINK tailgate arrives to subdued hype SEAN HAYDEN news staff writer

After Virginia Tech students dominated the Victoria’s Secret Collegiate Showdown last spring, PINK is coming to campus with a whole new spin on tailgating. Nearly 17,000 students have already RSVP’d on Facebook to “PINK takes Tech”, and it is hard not to notice the massive stage that has been under construction on the Drillfield this week. Not only will PINK models Elsa and Jessica be making an appearance, but Gym Class Heroes, Chiddy Bang and DJ Irie will also be performing. “I know some people have expressed that they BRAD KLODOWSKI / SPPS were a little disappointed Event preparations, including a stage and pop-up store, began early in the week for the concert held by Victoria’s Secret later today. because Gym Class Heroes graphic of college students one more popular was play- top four and finally the top ly tried to promote the has already been to Tech,” and are currently popular. ing at the event, but added it two. The final two were Collegiate Showdown by said Katie Smith, a senior “I was kinda disappointed,” will be fun regardless. Virginia Tech and Texas, posting on Facebook and English major. “I personally said Jessica Chau, a senior “Any event that’s held at with the Hokies coming out Twitter, while also speaking love Gym Class Heroes, so I chemistry major. “I was Tech is a lot of fun, so it as victors. in several classrooms and would love for them to come hoping it would be some- should be really cool,” Cox Shannon Collins, a senior organizations in Oak Lane,” again, and I didn’t get to see thing really big. Gym Class said. marketing major and cam- Collins said. them the first time so I’m Heroes is okay, Chiddy Bang The Collegiate Showdown pus representative for The event is being is being excited.” is alright, but it’s nothing consisted of several rounds Victoria’s Secret, explained advertised as more than just According to Victoria’s special.” of school face-offs, much like the promotion process for a concert on it’s facebook Secret public relations, artVictoria Cox, a sophomore the NCAA national champi- the showdown. event page and on the PINK ists were selected that they communication major, also onship model. Schools were “Last semester, the other website. thought fit the age demo- expressed she wished some- matched up for the top eight, campus reps and I realsee PINK / page three


news 2 Bollo’s to open new gluten-free market september 13, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

ABBY HARRIS news staff writer

Bollo’s Cafe & Bakery's will be raking in the dough when it opens its new gluten-free bakery in Blacksburg later this semester. “I think it’s a great idea because more and more people are finding out that they have issues digesting gluten,” said Sara Black, a junior international studies and Spanish double-major. “I think it’s really important that they’re opening up a market just for gluten-free people.” Bollo’s, which has been a part of the Blacksburg community for 18 years, has already been selling glutenfree items, but on Saturdays only. Owner Ranae Gillie hopes the new market will open up more possibilities for gluten-free products. “We can only do it one day a week because we have to clean all the pans, every utensil,” Gillie said. “We only have a few hours to accomplish as much as we want to. It’s a lot of work, a lot of prep for what we put

editors: mallory noe-payne, victoria zigadlo

newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

out.” ucts from Bollo’s pasBol lo’s tr y manCafé & ager and Bakery head baker, before, B a r b a r a and was Wright, said glad to the new marhear there ket will make will be preparamore varitions easier ety at the because the new markitchen will ket. be completePatchans ly devoid of also pointgluten. ed out that “It will be it's good fun, and it’ll to have a be a relief,” close-by she said. option for “Also, we’d those stuhave more dents with time, so we PHOTOS BY CJ YUNGER / SPPS (LEFT) AND BOLLO’S (RIGHT) C e l i a c could provide Bollo’s cafe, located on Draper Road, currently sells home-made baked goods both in their store and at Gillie’s around the corner. d i s e a s e , a better proda genetuct, a safer product, and new market will have bulk ocean engineering major. ic condition affecting the more products.” bins with coconut, almond “The biggest thing that I intestinal wall, causing an In addition to the gluten- and rice flours, which cus- have against completely increased sensitivity to glufree bakery products already tomers can buy by the ounce gluten-free menus and res- ten. sold at Bollo’s Café & Bakery, or pound and use to make taurants is that usually it’s Gillie said the concept Bollo’s Gluten-Free Market their own gluten-free foods more expensive, so that for the gluten-free store will offer entrees and items at home. would be my only concern.” has been in the making for such as pastas, pizza crusts, “I think a lot of people Junior civil engineering two years, and she is happy pie crusts, lasagna, salads, probably will utilize it,” said major Thomas Patchans has to have found a home for quiche, and pot pie. The Katie Plummer, a junior purchased gluten-free prod- the market at 139 Jackson

Street, around the corner from the downtown post office. She hopes to have Bollo’s Gluten-Free Market open by late October or early November, but a grand opening on the first of the new year is also a possibility. Gillie said Bollo’s first began making gluten-free products after a customer asked if it could make a gluten-free cake. “We’re the kind of bakery that won’t say no to anything,” Gillie said. “Once that person got their cake and they liked it, we started getting more requests, and it has grown.” According to Gillie, Bollo’s gluten-free products — particularly the bread — sell out very quickly on Saturday mornings. She hopes that will be indicative of the new market’s success. “I’m thinking it’s going to be successful,” Gillie said, “but in life, you never know.” Follow this writer on Twitter @abbyharrisct

Kevin Hart tickets sell out quickly Students eagerly wait in line at the Squires ticket office for Kevin Hart’s stand-up comedy performance. Through in-person and online sales, the Burruss Hall auditorium sold out all 2,755 seats in just over two hours. photo by Kevin Dickel

The Collegiate Times Media/News/Publishing 3,796 like this

The Collegiate Times 2012

Become a fan of the Collegiate Times on Facebook to get your news as soon as it happens! Like • Comment

The Collegiate Times 2012


news

editors: mallory noe-payne, victoria zigadlo newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

september 13, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

PINK: prepares Drillfield for concert

take a shot at change

from page one

“A lt hough ‘PINK takes Tech’ will have many aspects of a typical concert, it will have more of a party and tailgate feel to it,” Collins said. “Students can also visit the popup truck, which is like a mobile store. The store is selling items from the holiday collection, which is not in stores yet, the VT PINK collection and the limited edition ‘Pink takes Tech’ shirts.” Coordinator of Event Planning at Tech Kevin Ayoub said the preparation and planning process was extensive and involved negotiations with Victoria’s Secret and the marketing company company they employ, Relevant. It’s also Tech policy that a concert or event needs to be sponsored by a campus organization. “The Virginia Tech Union, the largest student programming board, essentially acts as the sponsor so that the university can work directly with Relevant and Victoria’s Secret,” Ayoub said. The main role of the event planning office with any event is to make sure all parties involved follow the proper policies, procedures, and protocols.

3

IMPORTANT BUS ROUTE INFORMATION blacksburg transit will close some stops, change timechecks and detour many of its routes from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. tomorrow because of the concert. burruss, mcbryde, war memorial, davidson and west campus/perry northbound stops will all be closed during this time. these changes will affect the harding ave, hethwood 7 & b, ucb, umall, hokie express,

“Eve r y one at (Tech) involved with the event has been very positive, putting forth a tremendous amount of effort to make sure this plays out not only smoothly, but safely, which is most importantly,” Ayoub said. “We are doing all of this to make sure that the students get to have a great experience.” In mid-May, Victoria’s Secret and Relevant came to Tech’s campus for a site visit and discussed their ideas for “PINK takes Tech” with the Tech student events office. “They thought the Drillfield would be an excellent site for (the event),” Ayoub said. “They also showed us what they

for specific details on each line, visit www.btransit.org

have done at other universities in the past and gave us some references to contact other schools to see what they thought about the program and event.” The event will include concessions, a photo booth, games, free giveaways and other prizes. There will also be a station at the Women’s Center where students can donate toiletries, which will be given to a local Blacksburg charity. There’s one more obvious draw for some students.

“Obv iously p e ople a re going to want to see Victoria’s Secret models,” said Corey Caulfield, a senior geochemistry major. “I think it’s good, it’s definitely going to get a lot of people’s attentions.” Gates open to Virginia Tech students and faculty at 5:30 p.m. Students can download the virtual invite into their phone at vspink.mobi/tech, or show their Hokie passports for entry.

check the Collegiate Times every Wednesday for the drink of the week

Follow this writer on Twitter @shayden Abby Harris contributed to this article

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

arrestees

status

09/0710/2012

3:00 PM - 12:00 PM

Burglary/Destruction of Property

Davidson Hall

Active

08/05/2012 2:00 PM

Underage Possession of Alcohol

Ambler Johnston Hall

Inactive: Reported by Student Conduct

08/26/2012 12:00 AM

Underage Possession of Alcohol X 2

Pritchard Hall

Inactive: Reproted by Student Conduct

MAKING THE CUT The numbers are in! According to the Princeton Review and U.S. News and World’s “America’s Best Colleges 2013,” Virginia Tech ranks: #2 for Best Campus Food #3 for Students Love These Colleges #4 for Town-Gown Relationships #6 for Best Quality of Life #16 for the College of Engineering #18 for Best Career Services #18 for Students Pack the Stadiums #28 among the Top 30 public national universities #40 for the Pamplin College of Business Keep up the great work Hokies!


4

weekend

september 13, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: emma goddard, nick smirniotopoulos newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

I MAY BE WRONG, BUT I DOUBT IT

Replacing a legend is never easy to do

As

pretty much everyone is aware of at this point, what Christopher Nolan has done with the Batman franchise over the last seven years is absolutely stunning. All three movies — Batman Begins, The Dark Knight and The Dark Knight Rises — were cinematic masterpieces with the trilogy atop many people’s list of best ever (including mine). Nolan has said he’s done with Batman and has become a director who didn’t ruin greatness by prolonging it past its expiration date for a few bucks. See Lucas/Speilberg and Indiana Jones. Unfortunately, because of the way Hollywood works, in about 20 years, Warner Brothers will undoubtedly reboot the series to make another billion dollars or so, and I sure as hell don’t envy the poor soul it decides to hand the responsibility to. It will be a train wreck people will compare to Superman Returns because of expectations alone. I bring up the scenario because I find myself in a similar situation — trying to replace Andrew "Wryly Reilly." I volunteered to step into the spot (with his blessing), but I still feel I'm just like whoever is tapped on the shoulder to make the next Batman. Expecatations are a little loft y; wish us both luck. Last year, I started reading Reilly’s columns and thought I wasn’t a far cry from him as far as the topics he wrote about. But honestly, on a good day, I’m a poor-man’s version of Wryly Reilly. Editing his columns, I usually went through an inner dialogue that went something like this: “He really doesn’t like Newt Gingrich, does he? … This is good, but I bet I could write this … Wait, what is a ‘braggadocio?’ I’m calling shenanigans. There’s no way that’s actually a word.” It was always a word. His vocabulary surpasses mine. But enough about the past; here’s my attempt to spin off of “Wryly Reilly,”

and I’ll start by looking at something that used to be one of the small reasons summer being over is a good thing, but is no longer: the fall TV schedule. Over the last decade, it seems networks have transitioned from at least trying to produce quality dramas and sitcoms to focus on reality television — a trend I believe is the sole cause of the decline of America. It isn’t a $1 trillion debt (or whatever it is now), it isn’t Obama or Romney and it isn’t China. It’s Snooki. The fact Snooki actually wrote a book is beyond belief, because I’m only 17 percent kidding when I say I legitimately thought she was illiterate. And even though it didn’t sell very well, the fact she gets to say she’s an author kills me inside. By the way, what was the marketing research that said her book was a good idea? Someone should have sat back and said, “Hmm … I feel like the only people interested in what Snooki has to say are more likely to use it as a free weight than to actually read it.” Yes, the Jersey Shore is finally over, but the damage has been done. By the end of the first season, I found myself feeling bad for people from New Jersey — something that hasn’t happened ever. I don’t know why, but people born in Virginia unanimously hate the Garden State and treat it like America’s armpit regardless of if we’ve ever been there. It’s an emotion handed down from our parents, who taught us it smelled and was “fi lled with people from New Jersey,” as if that were a reason to hate it by itself. Yet, despite a lifetime of being taught to hate Jersey, I started to pity its population because every week, millions were “learning” that Jersey was nothing but trashy guidos, even though the shows entire cast is almost exclusively from other places. And with Jersey Shore off the air, the scene isn’t much improved. Real Housewives of (insert any city name here), Real World, Big Brother and that

show based on the fat, annoying girl from Toddlers in Tiaras are all just as bad. I can proudly say I’ve never watched any of these, but I know enough from commercials and my friends to know my IQ is higher from avoiding them Why do stations go this route? Because it it’s easy and costs about $20 to select a group of people that you know will piss each other off, put them in a small room, and hire a camera guy. Television stations are just getting lazy. But you know what else is easy? Making a sitcom. Have you ever thought about the similarities between our generation’s most successful sitcom, How I Met Your Mother, and Friends? Both have an awkward love-puppy with a nerdy job (Ted/Ross), a smoothtalking player who actually carries the show himself (Barney/Joey), the adorable couple (Marshall and Lily/Chandler and Monica), and the one girl who seems to date everyone in the group (Robin/Rachel). The only difference between the two is HIMYM’s random inclusion of Bob Saget as a narrator — even though he sounds nothing like Ted, yet is supposed to be future-Ted (I assume this means Ted hits a second puberty sometime in his 40s that changes his voice again?). Regardless, all you need for a successful sitcom is to copy Friends. It may be more costly, but it will prevent me from having to ask the girl next to me why the person on the cover of Us magazine is famous while I’m in the checkout line at Kroger. And, honestly, it’s usually all about me. NICK CAFFERKY -senior -managing editor -communication major

Israeli native drawn to Tech for varsity soccer EMMA GODDARD features editor

At the age of 18, Daniel Amar joined the military right out of high school — and he knew it was inevitable. Although it is common for young men and women to embrace this patriotic act in the U.S. and in countries throughout the world, in Israel, it is a requirement. But after serving for three years, Amar, now 21, finally has the opportunity to move on. Knowing he would continue to pursue his education after life in the military, Amar moved from his hometown of Dimona, Israel, to the U.S. With major life changing experiences under his belt, he recently came to Virginia Tech for a fresh start. Students in Blacksburg are most likely familiar with the study abroad program offered here at Tech. But there is a chance that unless they are taking World Regions or majoring in international studies, they have not met the Italian student who sits next to them every day, the South African who takes their 8 a.m. engineering class, or even Amar himself. International students are present all over campus and, like Amar, they are here to get a taste of what it feels like to live

overseas. The Collegiate Times sat down with Amar to talk about his experiences. CT: What are you studying while you are at Tech? Daniel Amar: I’m majoring in business and I’m trying to get a high GPA to get accepted into the business school. I want to study business in marketing; I’m very interested in the marketing part because I like to communicate with people. I think this job will be the best fit for me. CT: When did you arrive in the United States? Amar: I’ve been in the states four times and this is my fifth. But I’ve been in (Blacksburg) since the beginning of August. I’ve been to New York — I have a big family there — and I was there for a week before I came here. This is my first time studying in the States. CT: How long are you staying here for? Amar: The scholarship is for five years. I practice with the Tech soccer team, but I can’t play this year because I played professionally. When I was in the army, I played professionally for the last year and a half of my service. The NCAA didn’t allow me to play this year, see ISRAEL / page eight

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

Virginia Tech mens soccer player Daniel Amar heads to the field for practice, enjoying facilities far different from the ones he used in Israel


opinions

editors: josh higgins, bethany melson opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

september 13, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

5

The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Michelle Sutherland Managing Editor: Nick Cafferky Design Editors: Andrea Ledesma, Alicia Tillman Public Editor: Erin Chapman Web Editor: Chelsea Gunter News Editors: Mallory Noe-Payne, Victoria Zigadlo News Reporters: Priscilla Alvarez, Cody Owens Features Editors: Emma Goddard, Nick Smirniotopoulos Features Staff Writers: Ben Kim, Katie White, Kara Van Scoyc, Allie Sivak, Jacob Wilbanks Opinions Editors: Josh Higgins, Bethany Melson Sports Editors: Matt Jones, Zach Mariner Special Sections Editors: Cody Elliot, Gina Patterson Copy Chief: Nora McGann Copy Editors: Allison Hedrick, Kristin Gunter Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: Ryan Francis Circulation Manager: Travis Neale Student Publications Photo Staff Director of Photography: Brad Klodowski

MCT CAMPUS

Facebook needs business leader

Parties limit citizens’ choices

E

W

very generation has its one revolutionary innovation that stands above the rest. That single invention alters the way society works, changing the way we think and molds the future. For our generation, that designation goes to Facebook. We all know how popular and impactful Facebook is, so I won’t bother belaboring those details. But that same sweeping popularity is what ushered the company into the public market on May 18 this year. According to a Bloomberg Businessweek article, Facebook has lost a colossal $50 billion in market value since its initial public offering four months ago. The corporation needs to stop the bleeding on Wall Street, which is why on Tuesday, CEO Mark Zuckerberg made his fi rst speech to investors since the IPO. But is that what Facebook really needs? Last year, I wrote a column about the Facebook IPO and why I was keeping my money in my pocket. I’m quite glad I did. However, I don’t think anyone foresaw the catastrophe that ensued. The Facebook IPO will be remembered as the worst in history, due to the alarming amount of money lost by the company and its investors in such a short time frame. Why did the IPO fail? It’s simple. The company was astronomically overpriced because of the seemingly boundless hype generated by the announcement of an IPO. Investors saw the hundreds of millions of users and took that as a potential for huge profits, but it just didn’t add up. To put it in perspective, Brian Hamilton, CEO of Sageworks, told Fox Business News that if the valuation methods used with Facebook’s $100 billion IPO were applied to Apple’s IPO in 1980, Apple would have been valued at an estimated $2.7 trillion. A market value of this magnitude is unheard of on Wall Street, and is honestly laughable when regarding an IPO. People put too much faith into a company that currently has a meager-at-best business plan. The money Facebook raises is from advertising and licensing, but that simply is not enough to compete with the likes of Google. In Zuckerberg’s speech, he addressed the sullen state of

Facebook’s stock by talking about the company’s future plan. The plans include a revamped mobile application that will increase revenue through more frequent usage. Whether it was his delivery or the content, I was left unimpressed and uninspired. The performance of a company profoundly affects the performance of its stock, but there is defi nitely a discrepancy. Wall Street-billionaire Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks, made a statement on the Huffington Post about his purchase of Facebook stock and his subsequent losses. He said that Facebook’s management was not to blame but that he, the investor, was. He reasoned that, “No one sells me shares of stock because they expect the price of the stock to go up”, and that, “You look for the sucker. When you don’t see one, it’s you.” Regardless of the reason for Facebook’s plunge, both business and stock performance must improve. Mark Zuckerberg, although a technical genius, is not whom Facebook needs to conduct all public matters. What they need is someone who will give the company a strong personality. Someone needs to motivate potential stockholders to invest in the company. They need someone to share responsibility for the company’s performance and inspire the skeptics into giving Facebook a chance. Who this person should be is a mystery, but I do know he or she is out there. Many of the America’s most successful companies were or are controlled in tandem. Google has Larry Page and Sergery Brin, Apple had Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, and Microsoft had Bill Gates and Paul Allen, just to name a few examples. Investors across the nation, myself included, who refrained from investing in the beginning stages of Facebook’s stock, are watching the markets with itchy trigger fingers. We are all looking for the bottom of the ravine Facebook has tumbled into. We just need to be inspired and take the plunge, but Zuckerberg needs help in doing so. DAVID LEVITT -regular columnist - junior - finance major

hen the founding fathers came together in 1776 to create one of the most powerful nations in history, we can safely assume they would not have expected America to be what it is today. Despite a foundation of principles thought to revolutionize government, our government is in disarray. As time has gone on, political gridlock and division have only intensified. By far, the largest factor in our government’s inability to get anything done is the two-party system. How many times do we find ourselves asking the question, which is the lesser of the two evils in regard to our elections? Sometimes the choice may be clear-cut, but all too often even the candidate who holds the same party affiliation as you is undesirable. When the choice of candidates is narrowed to two, you are presented with the issue of both candidates having opinions that fundamentally differ from yours. Maybe you like the fiscal policies of one candidate, but prefer the social ones of the other, or vice versa. Obviously, it would be unrealistic to expect a candidate to perfectly fit your expectations, but our government is the other extreme. Even more depressing, how truly different are our two candidates? In campaigns, all we ever hear about are either the different tax plans or social issues. Sure, other issues definitely enter the political sphere, such as guns, border control and healthcare, but how often are new ideas presented? Recently, President Barak Obama proposed and passed a health care reform bill. Other than that, politicians rarely bring new ideas to the table. Brainstorming is stagnant. There are obviously huge issues we need to deal with, such as balancing the budget, controlling the border (both in regard to drugs and illegal immigrants),

civil rights, etc. And yet, even though only two years ago we once again reached the debt ceiling, and even though there is uncontrolled drug violence raging throughout our country, it seems that the two parties dance around these issues, unwavering, unwilling to make compromises and get things done.

people have never heard of these candidates. Did you know that Gary Johnson is running in this election for the Libertarian Party or Tom Hoefling from the American Independent Party? How about Jill Stein from the Green Party? Unfortunately, because our country is so rooted in the two-party system, these candidates never get any media coverage. If you find bith the Even Ron Paul, a libertarian tryDemocratic and Republican ing to run on the candidates insufficient, Republican ticket, was effectivewhere do you turn? The ly shut out by his answer is simple: We need party. The second to break the two-party issue is the winsystem." ner-take-all rule for the Electoral College. Instead George Washing ton of electoral votes directly warned his colleagues corresponding to citizen about such a system. votes, it runs on a winnerIn his farewell address, he take-all system. said, “I have already intiConsequently, if a thirdmated to you the danger party candidate wins 15 of parties in the state, with percent of the vote, the particular reference to the Democratic Party wins founding of them on geo- 45 percent of the vote, graphical discriminations. and the Republican Party Let me now take a more wins 35 percent of the comprehensive view and vote, neit her t he warn you in the most sol- Republican Party nor emn manner against the the third party gets any baneful effects of the spirit “credit” for those votes. of party, generally.” Obviously, having 16 So what is there left to popular parties would do? If you find both the spread votes too Democratic and Republican thin. candidates to be insuffiHowever, having three cient, where do you turn? to five powerful parThe answer is simple: ties would present so We need to break the two- many more options for party system. us. It is incredibly rare for It is quite clear that we a third-party candidate to need some real change in win an election. this country, and we are An independent presi- not getting it. dential candidate has never Therefore, I strongbeen elected. ly encourage you all This reality is unexplain- to explore all your ably depressing. Third- options. party candidates who deviEvery vote counts, and ate from the two-party if everyone takes the system typically have the time to investigate the kind of revolutionary ideas choices, there is a conthat could break the seem- siderable chance that a ingly endless stalemate on third-party candidate Capitol Hill. cou ld be elected So why has one never been president. elected? There are two main fac- DANNY HARTZOG tors that contribute to the lack of success of third -regular columnist -sophomore party candidates. The first issue is that many -computer engineering major

College Media Solutions Assistant Ad Director: Carla Craft Account Executives: Elizabeth Dam, Emily Daugherty, Taylor Moran Inside Sales Manager: Amanda Gawne Assistant Account Executives: Andrew Newton, Jordan Williams Creative Director: Danielle Bushrow Assistant Creative Services Director: Alyssa Morrison Creative Staff: Mary Dassira, Chloe Young, Cameron Vaile, Diana Bayless Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes. com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes. com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints. collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2012. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


6

september 13, 2012

Regular Edition

GET INSIDE THE GAME

Today’s Birthday Horoscope: You’re favored this year with steady career growth and bright prospects. Continue budgeting to grow your nest egg. Prioritize what’s most important, and clear out what’s not. Get together with neighbors, siblings, cousins and friends this autumn. They’re listening.

Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham Quote of the Day

Nurture your minds with great thoughts. To believe in the heroic makes heroes. - Benjamin Disraeli Send us your quote and see it here! creative.services@collegemedia.com

XKDC by Randall Monroe

5

9

8 4

6

9

3

6

3

8

4 5

2

1 8

1

4

2

1

7

3

5 6

8

7

68 Lavish affection 69 1830s revolution site 70 Grand jeté, e.g. 71 Go bananas

Week ending September 14, 2012 By Pancho Harrison

ACROSS 1 Some rentals, in ads 5 “Gimme just __” 9 Chew the scenery 14 Aquatic bird 15 Rowlands of “Gloria” 16 Deteriorate 17 Sign some new sluggers? 19 Word with time and space 20 __ nous 21 Like some nests 23 Wartime submachine guns 24 Henna and such? 29 Giant legend

Top Tracks We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together • Taylor Swift

(1) 1

One More Night • Maroon 5

(2) 2

Some Nights • fun.

(3) 3

Whistle • Flo Rida

(4) 4

Home • Phillip Phillips

(5) 5

9/13/12 31 Nagpur native 32 Granola grain 35 1805 Vienna premiere 39 Lambs: Lat. 40 Stand-up gig for Richard? 43 Old wrap 44 Original Speed Stick maker 45 Children’s author Asquith 46 Composer/violinist who taught Menuhin 48 U.S. Army E-5 50 Instrument in need of cleaning?

54 Sci-fi character whose first name, Nyota, was first revealed in film in 2009 58 Did a little courting 59 Like some denim jackets 60 Flop with fins 64 Augustine, for one? 66 Best Actress nominee for “Ordinary People” 67 Miss Megley’s charge, in a Salinger story

DOWN 1 More than twinges 2 Salient feature 3 High-calorie cake 4 Jellied fuel 5 Past word 6 Hemmed but didn’t haw 7 Ones not with you 8 __ diem 9 He voiced Disney’s Mad Hatter 10 Drop-line link 11 Mil. training site 12 Ink spots, briefly? 13 Center 18 Bedevil 22 “M*A*S*H” procedures 25 Queso relleno cheese 26 Peak in an Eastwood film 27 Chin Ho coworker, in a TV cop show 28 Miffed states 30 Vibrating effect 32 Made a choice 33 Product suffix created in San Francisco in 1958 34 Blake title feline 36 “A Chorus Line” song 37 Starter: Abbr. 38 Axe 41 Hops drier 42 Swallow up

47 Economic series 49 Bs in the key of G, e.g. 51 Sing “The Lonely Goatherd,” say 52 Entrepreneur inspired by Hershey

53 Fluid buildup 55 U.S.S.R. part 56 Gaucho’s rope 57 One concerned with the spot market? 60 911 respondent 61 Female rabbit 62 Chi-Town team 63 Historical span 65 __ rally

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

9/12/12

WORDSEARCH: Murder Mystery Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid. A

E

E

F

K

X

U

N

G

O

H

E

X

C

J

J

V

Z

B

R

G

S

J

K

E

T

L

B

E

W E

A

P

O

N

O

X

C

R

D

H

M

C

C

S

Y

D

V

V

O

O

J

M

K

P

S

A

E

I

I

I

R

P

V

I

W I

K

U

B

K

X

E

R

H

R

S

J

B

F

E

T

V

E

D

P

K

P

O

D

R

P

C

E

U

T

R

P

C

J

G

O

E

T

I

U

Y

D

P

U

T

L

Y

N

R

E

B

M

R

E

N

H

G

E

B

K

E

K

Z

Z

U

M

T

J

A

F

X

J

C

U

B

V

T

M

T

E

C

N

A

E

V

U

P

F

O

R

E

N

S

I

C

G

R

C

J

D

D

R

H

X

C

U

T

J

E

X

N

T

M

C

A

I

F

T

L

K

O

V

R

D

S

O

L

V

E

O

V

K

T

L

Y

G

P

S

Q

D

I

Y

R

E

T

S

Y

M

F

F

O

O

L

H

X

U

O

P

M

B

E

Z

N

H

E

Y

B

W

R

P

L

D

W S

I

B

I

T

W P

A

T

D

D

F

Q

Q

R

N

P

W P

X

M

N

L

O

N

U

Z

E

T

Z

Q

M

C

J

G

X

E

G

W A

B

A

D

V

Q

C

N

W S

N

S

A

M

Q

C

O

F

L

B

X

J

I

K

F

F

C

R

I

N

V

E

S

T

I

G

A

T

I

O

N

P

K

U

I

E

WORD BANK 1 Arrest 2 Charge 3 Clue 4 Crime 5 Criminal 6 Detective 7 Evidence 8 Forensic 9 Investigation 10 Motive 11Mystery 12 Perpetrator 13 Plot 14 Police 15 Sentence 16 Solve 17 Suspect 18 Weapon

GET INSIDE THE GAME WITH PITTSBURGH - SEPTEMBER 14, 2012


sports

editors: matt jones, zach mariner sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

september 13, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

Soccer: Women ranked No. 9 to start conference play from page one

“In the World Cup, you’re playing with the best players in the world,” she said. “But in the ACC we’re playing with the best players in the country, so it’s very comparable.” Both goalies were quick to give credit to their defenders, a unit that has permitted 25 shots all season long. “Our low-goals-against (.25 per game) is definitely a credit to our back line and defensive organization,” Colpitts said. “This year more than any other we are all on the same page and committed to our goals.” With the following game being the first of ACC play for the Hokies, second-year head coach Chuggar Adair knows his team’s perfect start is just that — a start. “It’s nice where we are at,” he said, regarding the team’s highest-ever national ranking. “But we haven’t accomplished anything, and we know that.” However, his team realizes the toughest part of the season lies

Women’s Soccer 2012 Schedule

Fighting Irish join ACC in all non-football sports ZACH MARINER sports editor

Sun., Sep 16, 2012

NC State*

1 p.m. Thompson Field

Thu., Sep 20, 2012

at North Carolina *

7 p.m. Chapel Hill, N.C.

Sun., Sep 23, 2012

Boston College *

1 p.m. Thompson Field

Sun., Sep 30, 2012

Maryland *

5 p.m. Thompson Field

Thu., Oct 4, 2012

Duke *

7 p.m. Thompson Field

Sun., Oct 7, 2012

Oklahoma

5 p.m. Thompson Field

Thu., Oct 11, 2012

at Florida State * 8 p.m. RSN

Sun., Oct 14, 2012 Thu., Oct 18, 2012

at Miami * at Clemson *

1 p.m. Coral Gables, Fla. 7 p.m. Clemson, S.C.

Sun., Oct 21, 2012

Virginia

5 p.m. Thompson Field

Wed., Oct 24, 2012

at Wake Forest *

7 p.m. Winston-Salem, N.C.

Sun., Oct 28, 2012

at ACC Tournament

TBA

ahead of them. “We accomplished the first part of our goals,” Kelly said. “But now it’s ACC time. A new season is starting.” The ACC, widely regarded as the paramount conference in

women’s soccer, boasts half the teams in the most recent top-10 rankings. The Hokies will look to continue their winning ways, and start off conference play on the right foot this Sunday against

Tallahassee, Fla.

TBA North Carolina State. The Wolfpack has won five of its last six and will face the Virginia Cavaliers Thursday night before coming to Blacksburg. You can follow the writer on Twitter at @jacobemert

Lifestyle & Community have a big announcement, selling things, need help?

7

Notre Dame announced on Wednesday morning it would join the ACC in all sports except football. However, the Fighting Irish will still play five games annually against ACC opponents. When exactly this move is to take place is unclear, but the date has been preemptively set for the 2015-16 school year. In order to leave its current conference, the Big East, it will have to pay the $5 million exiting fee and wait 27 months before being able to leave. The Fighting Irish join Syracuse and Pittsburgh as schools that have left the Big East for the ACC in the last year. “Today is a great day for the

University of Notre Dame and our athletics department, including the football program,” said Brian Kelly, head football coach, in a statement. “Speaking strictly from a football standpoint, we have further solidified our future as an independent in college football, maintained our unique ability to schedule nationally and greatly improved our postseason bowl game options.” The ACC also announced it has increased its exit fee to three times the conference’s annual operating budget — which comes to over $50 million. Virginia Tech and Notre Dame have never met on the football field. The Irish’s new contract will require them to play each ACC team at least once every three years.

Free for VT students! Place an ad or announcement at collegiatetimes.com, visit our business office at 618 N. Main St. 9am - 5pm, Monday - Friday, or call 540.961.9860. Students can come into 618 N. Main St. to place a free ad.

Rates as low as 32 cents per word, contingent on the number of days to run. Prepaid. 15 word minimum. Cash, check, Visa, Mastercard, Discover, and American Express. Deadline: 3pm 3 business days prior to publication.

Volunteers Wanted VIRGINIA JAYCEES Gain Management Experience while helping your community. The Jaycees are coming to Campus and the New River Valley this fall. Join today! E-mail jayceemembwershipvp@gmail. com

Furniture for Sale BRAND NEW mattress sets: twin $89, full $99, queen $119, We can deliver 540.260.9091

Health & Fitness COLLEGE DANCE CLASSES

Join Today! College at Dance.tech. Jazz, First Class FREE fee! Call 961-6666 dance-tech.com

dance classes Tap and Ballet. no registration or visit www.

Notices GOT STUFF? Storage units available today! Squared Away Storage, located minutes from VT on N. Main St., offers indoor, climate controlled

Keep the law

storage space. 24-hour access available. Call 540.961.5949

Help Wanted $BARTENDING$ $300/ Day Potential No Experience Necessary. Training Available 1-800-965-6520 EXT210

HIGH QUALITY BEER CONSULTANT

Must love beer! This full-time position will sell and manage craft and specialty products. The successful candidate must be able to communicate the craft story. This person must be passionate and enthusiastic about craft and specialty products; have excellent communication and people skills; have a flexible schedule and be able to work fairs and festivals on the weekends. 540.450.0130 TECHNICAL EMPLOYEES NEEDED Applicants need above average attention to detail, computer skills, and a desire to work with their hands. We offer flexible work hours. Apply @ quickstopauctions. com 540.381.3011

For Rent ROOM FOR RENT Master bedroom in Rutherford; all utilities included in rent. $500/mo. 540.429.6731

101

on your side.

Lesson 1: Illegal Sale of Alcohol Last weekend, the police gave me a ticket for illegal sale of alcohol. We were only collecting money at the door to pay for the DJ.

ANSWER: If alcohol is freely available at the party, and money is collected at the door (for any reason), you will be charged for illegal sale of alcohol. You are not selling red cups, you're selling alcohol. The police busted our party, confiscated the keg, and gave me a ticket. No one was arrested for underage drinking, how can they do that!

ANSWER: Kegs can be confiscated for two reasons: a) the keg is not registered to the correct address (or the registration is missing), or b) there are underage persons consuming alcohol at the party.

Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Creative juices low to an ocean of possibilities. Images from distant realms add just the right touch. All turns out quite well. Your efforts greatly bene it your home and/ or family. Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Listen to the voice of experience and to your intuition. Do the extra work and grasp a golden opportunity. Use locally sourced materials. Optimism wins out. Gemini (May 21-June 20) -- A short hike replenishes your reserves. Discover something you didn’t know you were capable of. Patience is a virtue to be practiced now, especially around inances.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) -- Keep searching and you’ll make more than you really need. Actions speak louder than words. Respect the experienced ones. Improve working conditions. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- The world is your oyster; take good care of it, so that it keeps providing you with ideas and oxygen. Think long term. This is where your dedication and passion pay off. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Consult with your partner before addressing an important concern. Scout the territory before committing. Don’t worry about it once the decision is made. Just make it happen.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- You’re gaining status, even if it doesn’t always seem so. Focus on the positive, and earn a nice bonus. Your friends are there for you. They provide motivation. Discipline gives you more time to play.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- While you’re there, keep an eye out for bene icial developments. Let a wise friend help you with the structure of what you’re building. Make promises you can keep.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Your past deeds speak well of you, and the skills you learned now lead to new income. You’re very popular now. Friends look to you for guidance. Emotions run high concerning a partner.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Your actions behind the scenes create great connections. The circumstances require extra effort, and it’s worth it. Get farther together than you could alone.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Enjoy today’s roller coaster, which could be very fun. Include the possibility of outside funding. Read the ine print before signing. Consult with somebody you trust.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Expand your business territory with imagination. Expect delays or disagreements. Even a theory you can’t explain is charming. Someone falls in love.


8

weekend

september 13, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

Israel: Amar reflects on military from page four

but next year hopefully, I will play. CT: I noticed that you said you were previously in the army. Tell me about your experiences. Amar: In Israel, it’s mandatory for boys to attend the army and to serve for three years straight from high school — like a month after graduation. I learned a lot and became more mature; it’s a transformation for an 18-year-old boy to become a man. You have to take care of yourself; there’s no one to look after you, you have your own schedule, and you have to face difficult sights. Actually, I just finished a month and a half ago and after finishing, I came here. CT: What influenced your decision to study at this school specifically? Amar: I decided to learn in the United States — to go to a Virginia university to study and play soccer. I got a lot of offers from different places and Virginia Tech came to me and talked to me about joining them. The coaches came to Israel to watch me play. I decided to come to Tech because it feels like a “home” place and it makes me feel good that they came to Israel to talk to me personally. I’m so glad I made this choice and I’m so happy right now. CT: What is it like living in Israel? Amar: Living in Israel is not like what you see on TV — war and all that. Everybody asks me about that. Yes, there are things that are not, and will never be, accepted (in the U.S.), but the situation is not as bad as it seems. But I’ll tell you a story. I was practicing with a team 45 minutes away from my home-

town. I travelled 45 minutes each day to go to practice because it was the best team in my region. But this place was under the attack of the rockets from the Gaza Strip. So every time we had practice, there was an alarm, and we’d have to take cover in the middle of practice. We’d wait for a couple of seconds and hear the bomb explode and then we’d go back. Then another alarm … we’d take cover and wait. So there are a couple things that aren’t nice or pleasant, but I wish it was quieter and that there was finally peace. In my military experience I’ve encountered face-toface (interactions) with people from the Gaza Strip, and Arabs from everywhere. I can tell you for sure that they all want peace. They all want to get along. The (war) is all political and that’s it. CT: I can tell that you speak English fairly well. How did you learn the language? Amar: I didn’t learn from visiting here; I just improved it here. When I was a little boy, I would watch shows like “Friends” and “Seinfeld” all the time. But especially in Europe and in Israel, there is a lot of English influence in our lives. The language is all around us. But for me personally, I developed my English by watching American TV. CT: How is school in Israel compared to school in the U.S.? Amar: What has impressed me so far is that everybody here has one goal: to study. At Tech, in class, there’s no talking and people don’t mess around. They are here to listen and study. In Israel it’s different; people talk to make friends. (But here) you don’t talk in class, you don’t fool around, and you focus

on learning. I like that a lot. CT: What surprised you the most about our school? Amar: Well I can tell you about the athletic department. It’s very professional and very organized. Everyone does their part and they have a lot of knowledge. Also, the school is huge — it’s like a city. CT: Speaking of sports, as you probably know, our school loves football. Did you go to our first game? Amar: I went to the first game against Georgia Tech. It was amazing — wow. There’s nothing like that. (There were) 60,000 people, everyone wore orange and maroon, and were crazy about football. It’s completely different. The biggest stadium in Israel holds 40,000. Everybody here loves the football team, and the most amazing thing that I noticed is that even if the team loses or the quarterback (makes a mistake) the crowd is still cheering and is supportive anyway. That’s amazing. CT: Is there any advice that you wish someone had given to you before studying abroad? Amar: Before I came here I thought, “OK, no problem. I’m coming here and it will be OK.” But you don’t think about the real things that affect you during the day. The real tough things — no one can prepare you for that. It’s not like a movie; it’s not short. It’s real life and it will be a struggle school-wise and socially. If I could go back and give myself advice, I’d say prepare and be ready because it’s not going to be a game, and it’s not going to be easy. Stay strong.

Immediate.

Unfiltered.

Linkalicious.

21st century news doesn’s wait for a print run. The Collegiate Times regularly updates its news blog with breaking news, interesting info, guest blogs and commentary.

editors: Emma Goddard, Nick Smirniotopoulos featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Thursday, September 13, 2012 Print Edition  

Thursday, September 13, 2012 Print Edition of The Collegiate Times

Advertisement