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Wednesday, September 5, 2012 An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 109th year, issue 7 News, page 2

Food & Drink, page 3

Committee splits on Terrace View ruling CODY OWENS news staff writer

Terrace View’s proposed expansion was the main topic at the Blacksburg Planning Commission meeting Tuesday night. Ultimately, the planning commission was split with a 3-3 decision. Since the hearing was just to get the commission’s recommendation, the issue will move forward to the Town Council for a decision on October 9. During the public hearing, Blacksburg zoning commissioner Andrew Warren explained the proposed offer. Terrace View wants to construct 119 bedrooms within its complex, which is in line with the town’s plan to increase multi-residential living without increasing sprawl. However, the topic of parking is what caused the most uproar. Under its current zoning designation, Terrace View is classified as a medium density multi-unit residential area. The town standard for parking is 1.1 parking spaces per bedroom, so with the addition of 119 new bedrooms, there would need to be a total of 130 new spaces. However, Terrace View’s proposed plan aims to have a ratio of 0.77 spaces per resident. Jeff Danford, a representative of Terrace View’s management Iconic Development LLC, said a parking study was conducted on a Wednesday and Saturday last March, which found there was a surplus of 105 parking spaces. The study indicated the apartments had a surplus of parking while the townhomes had a deficit.

Originally, Terrace View planned to build 163 apartments and build no more parking spaces. However, after dialogue with residents, Danford said the number was changed to 119 apartments along with the construction of 32 spaces for townhomes, the housing he said needed the space the most. However, Terrace View was not the only apartment complex voicing its opinion. Scott Wise of University Management, which manages Collegiate Suites, Hunter’s Ridge and Maple Ridge, explained Maple Ridge had a similar growth in years past and increased its parking; he suggested Terrace View do the same. “Terrace View’s parking right now is not adequate,” Wise said. “I was at a tailgate and spoke to several students; they claimed that there was not enough visitor’s parking.” Wise, along with a representative of Stonegate Apartments, said residents of Terrace View would park at their properties and walk to their apartment because of the need for parking. Danford said a survey sent to Terrace View’s residents found more than 60 percent of them rode the Blacksburg Transit busing system. This information goes along with the plans to construct 15 new bicycle racks for a total of 60 new bike spaces, improve bus shelters on Progress Street and Toms Creek Road, and build a new shelter along Patrick Henry. “We’re making alternative transportation more attractive,” Danford said. Follow this writer on Twitter @ CodyOwens_CT

Opinions, page 5

Sports, page 7

Study Break, page 8

Hokies win in ugly fashion

CJ YUNGER / SPPS

Quarterback Logan Thomas celebrates after a 20-17 overtime victory over Georgia Tech in the season opener. See VICTORY/ page seven

SweetFrog tops off town froyo market

Goode wins independent spot on Virginia ballot MALLORY NOE-PAYNE news editor

Former Congressman Virgil Goode qualified for the presidential ballot in Virginia yesterday after a challenge from the state’s Republican party. Running as a third-party candidate for the Constitution Party, Goode submitted over 20,500 signatures, far above the requisite 10,000 needed to qualify for the ballot.

I think it’s an effort to squelch persons who have different views... Some in the Romney camp believe that we will take votes from Romney, but we will take votes from Romney and Obama.” Virgil Goode presidential canidate

However, the eligibility of many of the signatures was challenged in a 28-page report filed by McGuire Woods Consulting Firm on behalf of the Republican Party of Virginia. The report approximated 36 percent of Goode’s signatures had material omissions and could not be counted. Additionally, the report makes claims of fraud in signature-gathering efforts. While third-party candidates rarely have a chance of winning an election on a national scale, their involvement can affect voting numbers for Republican and Democratic candidates. Current poll numbers have Obama and Romney nearly tied in the state, and according to a poll report produced by Public Policy Polling in July, Goode could garner 9-percent

of the vote in Virginia. Goode supports smaller government and the end of “Obamacare;” he opposes amnesty programs for illegal immigrants and abortion. These positions leave him most likely to draw voters away from the Republican Party. Goode claims the Republican Party’s challenge to his campaign is merely political tactics. “I think it’s an effort to squelch persons who have different views,” Goode said in a phone interview Tuesday. “Some in the Romney camp believe that we will take votes from Romney, but we will take votes from Romney and Obama.” Goode recollects one individual who signed the petition, stating they would have voted for Obama if there were no thirdparty options. Goode said his campaign will bring people to the polls that otherwise would have stayed at home, disillusioned with the involvement of large money and corporate sponsered Super PACs in traditional campaigning. Although the State Board of Elections did qualify Goode to be on the ballot, it also voted unanimously requesting the Office of the Attorney General further investigate allegations of petition fraud. Other third-party candidates who qualified for the ballot include Libertarian Gary Johnson and Green Party candidate Jill Stein. Neither will be investigated. Goode spent 12 years in Congress representing Virginia’s Fifth District, comprised of southern and middle portions of Virginia, including Charlottesville and Bedford. He lost his seat to Democrat Tom Perreillo in 2008. He also spent 24 years in the Virginia State Senate. Follow this writer on Twitter @ MalloryNoePayne

BRAD KLODOWSKI / SPPS

Students such as freshman human nutrition, foods and exercise major Allyson Fiery site a variety of toppings as sweetFrog’s main draw. ABBY HARRIS news staff writer

Blacksburg got a little sweeter Aug. 30 with the opening of a new sweetFrog location in University Mall. SweetFrog is a frozen yogurt shop allowing you to hand-create your own concoction of soft-serve frozen yogurt flavors and toppings. Flavors range from strawberry and white tea peach to snickerdoodle and red velvet. Additionally, a large variety of toppings allows for many different possibilities. “Compared to the other frozen yogurt places I’ve been, their toppings are better,” said Allyson Fiery, a freshman human nutrition, foods and exercise major. “We’re really thrilled to be here,” said Ingrid Lupica, the owner of 12 sweetFrog locations, including the stores in Blacksburg, Christiansburg and Charlottesville. “We welcome Tech and all of our customers.” Lupica believes the shop

will thrive in its location despite the recent closing of Yogi Factory, another frozen yogurt shop, which previously resided in University Mall. “A lot of the student body is there, and it’s a good loca-

We’re really thrilled to be here. We welcome Tech and all of our customers.”9-5-1 Ingrid Lupica Blacksburg sweetFrog owner

tion for the customer base that we are going after,” she said. However, sweetFrog may have to compete with the downtown location of the Frosty Parrot, a frozen yogurt shop with a similar setup. “I haven’t gone to sweetFrog yet, but I go to the Frosty Parrot a lot,” said

Andrea Long, a senior communication major. “It’s easier because it’s downtown and I can walk to it. Also, downtown you’re more likely to see people you know, and that’s great if you’re really social.” Long admitted she will often forego quality for convenience. “Even if one place is better — or has more options — than the other, I will go to whichever one is more convenient for me to get to,” she said. Alternatively, sweetFrog’s location could be convenient for students who live off campus or frequent the Math Emporium in University Mall. “It’s my motivation for coming to the Math Empo,” said Maureen Haynal, a freshman HNFE major. Lupica said the progress sweetFrog has had with branding itself will be a big contributing factor to its success where Easy Chair Coffee Shop was previously located.

“SweetFrog has become such a great brand,” Lupica said. “It’s like comparing Starbucks to Easy Chair. Starbucks does coffee, and what they do, they do really well. They’ve become the pioneers of coffee. And I think, in business, whatever you choose to do you have to do it really well.” The “Frog” in the store’s name is an acronym for “fully rely on god,” an indication of the religious principles on which the company was founded. According to its website, sweetFrog believes in bringing happiness and a positive attitude into the lives of its costumers. The Blacksburg location is open weekdays from 11:30 a.m. until 10:30 p.m. Weekend hours are still being determined, but the store will stay open later — until either 11 or 11:30 p.m. — according to Lupica. Follow this writer Twitter @abbyharrisct

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news

september 5, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

Study offers look at CA two-year programs CARLA RIVERA mcclatchy newspapers

More than 470,000 community college students are beginning the fall semester on waiting lists, unable to get into the courses they need, according to a survey of California’s two-year colleges that captures a system struggling amid severe budget cuts. The survey, to be released Wednesday, quantified the myriad problems affecting the system, many of which have been anecdotally reported by students on many campuses. The colleges expect steep declines in enrollment and class offerings compared with last fall. California’s community college system, the nation’s largest, has suffered about $809 million in state funding cuts since 2008. It faces another $338 million hit midyear if voters reject a tax measure on the November ballot supported by Gov. Jerry Brown. The system has a dual role: It educates students who intend to transfer to fouryear schools and it offers job training for others. College officials have been grappling with how to best continue its mission with lower funding but increased demand. Although they hope for the best, many campuses are planning for the worst. They are taking steps, for example, to negotiate union contracts that include reductions in compensation and employee working hours pending further spending cuts. “There is no question that the system is shrinking in terms of the number of students we’re serving but not shrinking in terms of demand,” Chancellor Jack Scott said in an interview Tuesday. “The real problem is we don’t have the financial resources to offer the courses that we could fill. In the long

run, it’s going to be hurtful to the economy. These are the individuals who are going to make up the future workforce of California.” These students also tend to be among the neediest: They typically require remedial classes, financial aid, tutoring and counseling. And many are juggling school with jobs. Yet 70 percent of colleges in the survey report having reduced hours for such support services, and 87 percent have reduced staff. In addition, 82 percent said they planned to offer no winter

A whole group who had planned to go to the University of California or Cal State but can’t afford to, and with the economy, all of these people coming back to college because they need skills” Ann Garten El Camino College spokesperson

session this year. Of California’s 112 two-year colleges, 78 responded to the survey from the chancellor’s office. The colleges represent a cross section of the system, including Yuba College in Marysville, San Joaquin Delta College in Stockton and Santa Monica College. The colleges predicted a grim year if further cuts are required in January. Administrators said they would need to further reduce class offerings, lay off fulltime faculty, postpone building and classroom maintenance, and borrow to manage

cash flow needs. Already, budget cuts have had a deep effect. Overall enrollment dropped about 17 percent, from about 2.9 million in the 2008-09 academic year to 2.4 million in 2011-12, and officials have estimated a further decline this year. The number of class sections decreased 24 percent from 522,727 in 2008-09 to 399,540 in 2011-12. The colleges say they are being forced to cut into vital services that for many students can mean the difference between success and failure. Nearly 67 percent of colleges reported that students have had to wait longer for financial aid, counseling and other appointments since 2009-10, with an average wait time of 12 days. West Los Angeles College reported that it had eliminated tutoring and field trips to four-year universities and stopped publishing a student handbook. El Camino College in Torrance is offering about 1,922 class sections this fall, down from 2,027 last year. Nearly every class has a waiting list, said spokeswoman Ann Garten. “We have all of these students who want to take courses — high school graduates, then a whole group who had planned to go to the University of California or Cal State but can’t afford to, and with the economy, all of these people coming back to college because they need skills,” Garten said. But, she said, “we’re all being forced by the state to offer fewer courses for students.” Nearly 85 percent of the colleges reported having waiting lists for classes this fall. In all, about 55,000 classes have such lists, the schools reported. The number of students on those rosters averaged 7,157 per campus.

Pasadena City College will offer about 500 fewer sections this fall compared with last year after taking a $6.7-million funding cut, said President Mark Rocha. The campus has been forced to prioritize registration so that students close to graduating or to transferring can get the classes they need. Local high school graduates who are fulltime students also have priority. “It’s the most difficult funding situation I have ever seen for community colleges,” Rocha said. But he said students should not give up hope. “I see the lines of students, but it’s not impossible,” Rocha said. “No student is being turned away. Can you come and take any course you want any time you want the way you used to? No. But I try to tell students not to be discouraged.” It’s a tough message to spread. With community colleges having started Monday, students across the system are reporting feeling frustrated and discouraged. Rogelio Cervantes Jr., for example, said he arrived for a math class this week at East Los Angeles College and found more than 40 students lined up trying to add the already full class. “You walk through the hallways and it takes five minutes to get from point to point because there are so many students trying to get classes; it’s chaotic,” said Cervantes, 20. He couldn’t get the class times he wanted and was forced to put together a schedule that runs from 8:20 a.m. to 10 p.m. He plans to remain on campus and nap in his car so he doesn’t lose his parking space. “I’m shooting to graduate next summer,” Cervantes said. “But that’s if I’m able to get all the classes in time.”

editors: mallory noe-payne, victoria zigadlo newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

what you’re saying On Six year old Wallis thrives in “The Beasts of Southern Wild”

Britton Watkins: This is a surprising, amazing movie. I really recommend seeing it on a big screen. It's really kind of unbelievable-impossible almost--for a 6-y-o to have delivered this performance. Yet, there it is, right in front of your wide eyes as you sit there, transported... On GPA misrepresents low-fund high schools grads

Anon: While the author makes some good

points, I would like to know how this idea of grade inflation or weighting contributes to a "level playing field." Coming from a small public school, our grade system was based on 4.0 max. Many students, myself included, were heavily invested in the AP program with some students completing up to 9 exams by graduation. The average GPA was not anywhere near the 3.98 of today's entering class. Enrolling in a rival school with weighted grades and fewer AP options would have earned us much higher marks. Would VT have preferred that latter for fear of reducing their average grade? Would schools really be so blind as to place faith in grade numbers that continue to inflate despite growing evidence that fewer and fewer high school graduates meet basic competencies? How would VT respond to non-traditional students who graduated high school 10+ years ago when no one ever heard of a 5.0 weighted GPA?


editors: emma goodard, nick smirniotopoulos featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

food & drink

Drink of the Week: Cuba Libre

september 5, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

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Origami fries up a tasty meal

BY JIMMY HUDNALL | features staff

CJ YUNGER/ SPPS

Origami has recieved a large amount of attention for its unique environment and appetizing entrees.

The new Japanese steakhouse in Turner Place at Lavery Hall stays true to the Asian culture.

KEVIN DICKEL/ SPPS

Looking to impress someone with your knowledge of history while also displaying a false proclivity towards drink culture? The next time you’re in the mood for the standard rum and coke, order its Cuban twin, the Cuba Libre, while trying to look sophisticated. You might also hope the other person hasn’t read this article. The Cuba Libre differentiates itself by calling for fresh lime juice, giving the drink a more exotic flavor. Although the exact origin is disputed, the most widely accepted recount starts in a Cuban bar in the early 1900s. An American captain is said to have requested his favorite Bacardi rum be mixed with Coca-Cola, which had recently been introduced to the island. The drink was an instant hit, and has snowballed in popularity into what many today consider the world’s most popular cocktail. Variations include the Cuba Pintada (one part rum, two parts club soda and just enough cola to tint coloring), Cuba Campechana (one part rum, equal parts club soda and cola) and the Witch Doctor (dark rum and Dr. Pepper instead). To spice up — or actually bitter down — the original, you can simply drop the lime shell over the ice cubes after squeezing. Ingredients: 2 ounces light rum 1 lime 10 ounces Coca-Cola Ice Directions: 1. Fill a glass with ice and squeeze the lime juice over the cubes. Drop the remaining wedge if you desire. 2. Add the light rum first, then fill the remainder of the glass with the cola. 3. Give the mixture a gentle stir and enjoy.

After many months of anticipation, I finally had the chance to stop by Turner Place at Lavery Hall and sit down for a meal. I chose Origami, the Japanese steakhouse on the second floor. The restaurant is equipped with four teppanyaki grills, which are gigantic iron griddles suited to cook for tables of 10 around each station. The restaurant’s decor is bright and modern, touting a clean stainless steel interior. Despite the first week’s rush, the floor was quiet and separated from the bustle of the crowded dining hall. The menu is simple. The restaurant offers three options for the main dish: beef, chicken or shrimp. Each meal comes with miso soup, fried rice and mixed vegetables. The menu also features green tea gelato for dessert, but unfortunately it was unavailable when I visited. I opted for the beef entree. As we were seated, our waitress brought out the miso soup — a satisfying appetizer after the long wait. The savory miso soup was well balanced with a garnish of green onion and tofu. The miso flavor was not overpowering or too concen-

trated, but clean and subtle. Once everyone had finished the first course, the dishes were gathered up as our cook was busy setting up his station. We were greeted with a smile and the typical, “How’s everybody doing?” After reviewing everyone’s orders, he proceeded to heat up the enormous grill. First onto the grill were the vegetables and rice. They were quickly fried and seasoned lightly with ginger, soy sauce and green onions — typical Japanese flavorings. While working on the food, our cook facilitated small talk amongst the table even though we were not a particularly talkative group. Throughout the meal he chimed in to conversations, without being too assertive or overbearing. Accompanied by the fried rice and mixed vegetables, the beef was an excellent main course. It was tender and flavorful, fi nished in a garlic tomato sauce. The richness of the beef was complimented well by the lighter flavors of the fried rice and fresh vegetables. The full meal was well balanced and satisfying. Our cook cleaned the grill and

hurried off to prepare for his next table, leaving us to finish our meals. On a separate date, I had a chance to try the sushi bar. With its limited hours and bar seating, it was difficult to get a seat without waiting for up to an hour. After surveying the menu, I decided on the Turner Roll and the Tuna Nagiri. The tuna was fresh and presented neatly — a clean, light plate well suited for the summer time. While I enjoyed the Nagiri, the Turner roll was the main attraction. The scallop sushi roll with scallions was complimented wonderfully by a tangy sauce. Despite the long wait and the crowd of students, I thoroughly enjoyed my first meals at Turner Place. Origami has a quiet feel to it, which is a nice change from the hectic eateries in West End and Owens dining hall. With the sushi bar and reserved seating, the restaurant has a unique set of offerings not available elsewhere on campus. Origami does a proper rendition of the Japanese steakhouse and lives up to the hype of Turner Place. BRIAN CROMER - features staff writer - junior - animal and poultry sciences major

Recipe: Potato gratin with hamburger BY BRIAN CROMER | features staff writer Adding hamburger to a classic potato gratin makes for a heartier, meat-and-potatoes dish. Affordable and simple, this recipe is perfect for students on a budget. Prep time: 10 minutes Cook time: 1 hour Ingredients: 1/2 pound button mushrooms 2 pounds ground beef 1 pint heavy cream 1 cup cheddar cheese 1 medium onion 3 cloves garlic 3 large potatoes 1 bay leaf Directions: 1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. 2. Dice the onion, quarter the mushrooms and mince the garlic. Over low heat, sweat the onions and garlic until translucent, about 10 minutes. Add the mushrooms and saute until softened, about five minutes. 3. Reserve the vegetables and add the ground beef to the pan. Increase the heat to medium and cook the ground beef until evenly browned, about 10 minutes. 4. Return the mushrooms and onions to the pan. Add the heavy cream, cheddar cheese and bay leaf. Simmer for 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. 5. Using a sharp knife, thinly slice the potatoes into rounds. Toss the slices of potato in vegetable oil, salt and pepper. 6. Pour the hamburger mixture into a 12-by-8 baking dish. Layer the potato slices on top of the hamburger mixture. There should be enough slices to make two layers over the baking dish. 7. Bake for 35 minutes or until potatoes are tender. BRIAN CROMER/ COLLEGIATE TIMES


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september 5, 2012


editors: josh higgins, bethany melson opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

opinions

september 5, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

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The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Michelle Sutherland Managing Editor: Nick Cafferky Design Editors: Andrea Ledesma, Alicia Tillman Public Editor: Erin Chapman Web Editor: Chelsea Gunter News Editors: Mallory Noe-Payne, Victoria Zigadlo News Reporters: Priscilla Alvarez, Cody Owens Features Editors: Emma Goddard, Nick Smirniotopoulos Features Staff Writers: Ben Kim, Katie White, Kara Van Scoyc, Allie Sivak, Jacob Wilbanks Opinions Editors: Josh Higgins, Bethany Melson Sports Editors: Matt Jones, Zach Mariner Special Sections Editors: Cody Elliot, Gina Patterson Copy Chief: Nora McGann Copy Editors: Allison Hedrick, Kristin Gunter Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: Ryan Francis Circulation Manager: Travis Neale Student Publications Photo Staff Director of Photography: Brad Klodowski MCT CAMPUS

Our Views [staff editorial]

Terrace View expansion needs more efficient plan for additional parking Terrace View should not add its proposed 125 bedrooms without addressing visitor’s parking first. Its attempt to encourage greener transportation is shallow at best, and in no way does it solve anything. On weekends, many buses only run hourly. For people who have to take more than one bus to Terrace View, this can take well over an hour if the schedules do not line up nicely. This is a logistical nightmare. Additionally, some guests are not able to get to a bus at all, and are too far to walk or bike. While there will continue to be some spaces, there will not be nearly enough, creating inconvenience for everyone. It seems like an easy way to save money, and calling it a green initiative looks like a cop-out. If Terrace View is indeed passionate about encouraging greener transportation, it needs to take a new route. Working with the town to improve the Blacksburg Transit or incentivizing ride sharing will solve the problem, whereas refusal to add visitors spaces will only irritate everyone.

Despite expansion, Hokie spirit remains unchanged V irginia Tech has grown at a rate that parallels some of the country’s most well-known metropolitan areas. When it was founded in 1872, it had a meager student body of 132. Since then, the student body has grown to last year's 30,936 and the Tech administration has been trying to keep up with demand by placing the university into a state of constant construction. This is absolutely necessary if Tech is to keep up with growing enrollment and climb the ladder of the best schools in the country. Currently, the two most visible points of construction are the Center for the Arts, and the Signature Engineering Building. These two buildings exemplify the balance all colleges must strike between liberal arts, and science, technology, engineering and math education — also known as STEM; and Tech seems to be doing a great job on that front. Both of these buildings are enormous and will be extravagant inside and out. The ever increasing rate of expansion at Tech seems to be following the same mathematical model student enrollment is. It’s an odd thing to come back to Blacksburg after spring break and see the campus has physically changed in the span of a week. Academic buildings are not all administrators have to consider, however. Managing a university this big is parallel to managing

a mid-sized town, only there is a greater demand for improvement due to the competitive nature of colleges. The basic infrastructure of the university is in need of constant servicing — from roads, to internet service. Perhaps the most interesting infrastructure project planned is an upgrade to the entire fiber optic backbone at Tech. A huge project involving the laying of wire encircling Tech. Campus already has blazing fast internet, but it's apparently not good enough — we need more. This is really a look towards the future, where we will interact with more complex information online and in classes, which will require larger files, and we will have the bandwidth to handle them. Some people may see this expansion as a bad idea; they may say a massive Tech will destroy the small town cheer we have here. I would disagree. There is a clear correlation between the size of the town of Blacksburg and the student population of Tech, but that doesn’t mean Blacksburg is going to lose its charm. It’s up to the students to maintain a friendly, helpful atmosphere, and ensure Ut Prosim remains clear. In addition to an array of new buildings, expansion brings new jobs to Blacksburg. The Corporate Research Center is also in a state of almost constant construction. Some of the companies in the CRC are mas-

sive global entities like Science Applications International Corporation, but there are others like Harmonia — founded by a Tech professor — which are smaller, more focused entities. Big and small, they all have one thing in common; they were drawn to Blacksburg to employ the great minds of Tech. The CRC brings more high tech jobs to Blacksburg, but the ability to handle a greater number of students requires the town itself to expand to accommodate the influx. This opens up avenues for entrepreneurs in all fields: dining, real estate, bookstores and more. However, the battle between franchises and small local-run stores lies within the community to choose what it wants. If a local store opens up, a communal decision must be made on if it wants that store to succeed. Over the summer, Blacksburg, Old & Used Books decided to close up shop. But thanks to a bit of Hokie support, some facebooking, and some Reddit-ing, the bookstore is still open and will be for the foreseeable future. These are the kinds of choices which will define the atmosphere surrounding Tech and Blacksburg in the future. Size doesn’t matter, just the Hokie spirit. ETHAN GAEBEL -regular columnist -computer science major - junior

Stadium Woods prove academics come first U niversity President Charles Steger's decision to save Stadium Woods is admirable, and it is the culmination of campaigning of Friends of Stadium Woods, solid research by an independent panel and the support of many in the Blacksburg area who did not wish to see such a valuable resource diminished. This is a great win not only for environmentalists, but for the average Virginia Tech student who may not completely understand the symbolism of the woods. These woods served as a challenge to unite students to take up a cause that directly affected them. Although they may not use the woods on a daily basis, anyone who cares about the image and reputation of our school can at least empathize with the opposition to the facility’s construction. When you look at the issue a bit deeper, you see an identity struggle emerge. This struggle

is between the images of Tech as a leading, champion football school, and its serious academic structure, which includes competitive engineering and life sciences programs. When the school begins to prioritize an indoor training facility over a historical and priceless natural resource, you have a problem. The Tech master plan, which was developed in 2009 and outlines any future construction projects on and around campus, designated Stadium Woods as a “cultural greenway,” a term also designated to the Drillfield and Duck Pond. This means it is a reservation of natural area meant to be preserved and enjoyed by future generations. This designation itself should have set off some warning bells within the university’s own internal building committees. The convenience of having an indoor facility right next to the practice field and locker rooms does not outweigh the cultural

and historic importance of the woods, which have been a defining aspect of the university’s landscape for generations. Not only are the woods home to centuries-old white oaks, but it is also used by the forestry department for teaching purposes. Construction of the proposed indoor facility within the woods could have potentially caused widespread damage to the fragile ecosystems surrounding the facility. Now, I am not a forestry major, nor do I even know exactly what in the curriculum involves using Stadium Woods. I do know, however, that if building in the woods could have a detrimental effect on the ability of students to learn, or for the professors to teach, the idea should most definitely be scrapped. I also understand Tech is home to a first-class football program, which generates massive amounts of revenue and a lot of beneficial publicity; how-

ever, Hokies football is something uniting the community and gives us something to cheer for week in and week out. The importance of football should not be underestimated, and as such the indoor practice facility that has been determined necessary should be built. But, compromising a valuable resource that serves many students and the community at large is not acceptable. The combination of factors described above leading to the decision were probably only a fraction of the many discussed by the independent panel, Vice President Wilson and Steger. The fact it came to a decision to move the location of the facility is not only a testament to the resilience of the student body, but also to our school’s administration. It made a decision that kept the school’s integrity intact and set a precedent which established the priorities of the school. The credit should not go solely to

those who campaigned for the woods, but also to our president and the administration who correctly put the students first. I would like to add a caveat to the praise I’m heaping onto the administration. The secondary site after the Woods is the tennis court and roller rink area. The roller rink — the only one in the region, believe it or not — has already been torn down once before in order to build a basketball practice facility, and the tennis courts are used by many students as well as the club tennis team. I hope in choosing the new site for the facility, the administration takes into account the students using the rink and courts before they move ahead with construction. SHARATH REREDDY -regular columnist -economics, science major - junior

College Media Solutions Assistant Ad Director: Carla Craft Account Executives: Elizabeth Dam, Emily Daugherty, Taylor Moran Inside Sales Manager: Amanda Gawne Assistant Account Executives: Andrew Newton, Jordan Williams Creative Director: Danielle Bushrow Assistant Creative Services Director: Alyssa Morrison Creative Staff: Mary Dassira, Chloe Young, Cameron Vaile, Diana Bayless Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes. com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes. com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints. collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2012. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


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news

september 5, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: mallory noe-payne, victoria zigadlo newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

status

arrestee

7/19/2012

1:54pm

Follow Up to Larceny of a Microscope

Smyth Hall

Cleared by arrest

Patricia Gundrum, 57

9/23/2012

10pm - 9am

Larceny of signs

SPH Housing

Inactive

9/3/2012

9:44am

Larceny of signs

SPH Housing

Inactive

9/23/2012

6pm - 9:30am

Larceny of signs

SPH Housing

Inactive

9/3/2012

3:39pm

Simple Assault

Derring Parking Lot

Active

9/3/2012

6pm

Appear intoxicated in public

B-Lot

Cleared by arrest

Alec Jones, 21

9/3/2012

7:36pm

Appear intoxicated in public/Underage possession of alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Jacquelyn Best, 20

9/3/2012

6:52pm

Appear intoxicated in public/Underage possession of alcohol

Duckpond Drive

Cleared by arrest

Travis Warren, 19

9/3/2012

7:47pm

Appear intoxicated in public/Underage possession of alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Michael Biondo, 18

9/3/2012

7:40pm

Appear intoxicated in public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Richard Hudson, 25

9/3/2012

8:10pm

Appear intoxicated in public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Emily Martin, 22

9/3/2012

8:11pm

Assault and battery/Appear intoxicated in public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Sarah Hartley, 21

9/3/2012

10pm

Appear intoxicated in public

Drillfield

Cleared by arrest

Jacob Modzelewski, 23

9/3/2012

8:19pm

Appear intoxicated in public/Underage possession of alcohol

Spring Road

Cleared by arrest

Kristin Gunther, 19

9/3/2012

8:26pm

Appear intoxicated in public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Taylor Aughenbaugh, 22

9/3/2012

8:19pm

Appear intoxicated in public/Underage possession of alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Sean O’Connor, 20

9/3/2012

8pm

Appear intoxicated in public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Joseph Depasquale, 22

9/3/2012

8:20pm

Appear intoxicated in public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Mitchel Kelley, 21

9/3/2012

8:30pm

Appear intoxicated in public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Vanessa Alphonse, 24

9/3/2012

8:40pm

Appear intoxicated in public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Jason Deane, 28

9/3/2012

8:45pm

Appear intoxicated in public

Engel Parking Lot

Cleared by arrest

Timothy Franco, 36

9/3/2012

8:37pm

Assault

Washington Street

Inactive: Prosecution declined

9/3/2012

8:37pm

Possession of Fake ID

Washington Street

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

9/3/2012

8:37pm

Appear intoxicated in public/Underage possession of alcohol

Washington Street

Cleared by arrest

Juvenile Offender

9/3/2012

8:37pm

Appear intoxicated in public/Underage possession of alcohol

Washington Street

Cleared by arrest

Jordan Matusevich, 19

9/3/2012

9pm

Obstruction of justice

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Tracy Buchanan, 45

9/3/2012

9pm

Appear intoxicated in public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Adrian Buchanan, 24

9/3/2012

9pm

Appear intoxicated in public/Attempt to flee

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Gregory Connell, 30

9/3/2012

9:15pm

Appear intoxicated in public/Underage possession of alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Christopher Waddell, 20

9/3/2012

9:20pm

Appear intoxicated in public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Christopher Ryder, 24

9/3/2012

9:17pm

Fraud (Football Tickets)

Lane Stadium

Active

9/3/2012

9:46pm

Appear intoxicated in public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Ryan Glavas, 21

9/3/2012

9:40pm

Appear intoxicated in public

Litton Reaves Parking Lot

Cleared by arrest

Aaron Parker, 22

9/3/2012

9:45pm

Appear intoxicated in public

Chicken Hill Parking

Cleared by arrest

Martin Aguilera, 29

9/3/2012

10:03pm

Appear intoxicated in public/Underage possession of alcohol

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Sally McCoy, 18

9/3/2012

10:40pm

Appear intoxicated in public

Lane Stadium

Cleared by arrest

Joseph Wilson, 24

9/3/2012

10:50pm

Appear intoxicated in public

Washington Street

Cleared by arrest

Herbert Snipes Jr., 30

9/34/2012

7pm - 12:24am

Larceny/Destruction of property

Golf Course

Inactive

9/4/2012

2:40am

Larceny of a sign

Lane Stadium

Active

8/5/2012

N/A

Underage possession of alcohol

Ambler Johnston Hall

Report to Student Conduct

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sports

september 5, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

7

Victory: Hokies get win, need to improve POST-GAME REPORT: HERO:

Jack Tyler The former walk-on from Oakton, Va. tallied a game high 17 tackles, a key part of a Hokies defense, which held Georgia Tech to just 288 total yards. Tyler got the starting nod after regular mike linebacker Bruce Taylor moved to the backer spot in place of the injured Tariq Edwards.

ZERO:

Tevin Washington Although the senior quarterback led his team down the field for a go-ahead touchdown in regulation, he also threw an ill-advised pass on third down in overtime that was picked off by Kyle Fuller to doom the Yellow Jackets.

TURNING POINT:

0:07 fourth quarter Virginia Tech wide receiver Corey Fuller, already with 59 yards on the day, broke open on a slant pattern, picking up 23 yards on fourth and four. The gain set up Cody Journell’s game-tying field goal as time expired. TREVOR WHITE / SPPS

Redshirt-freshman Michael Holmes breaks into the Georgia Tech secondary. Holmes rushed for 54 yards on 13 carries in the Hokies victory

Virginia Tech eeks out win in season opener, but won’t stay undefeated unless offense gets better Logan Thomas was the first to shoulder the blame after Monday night’s game. Heck, he kind of had to. The redshirt-junior quarterback, whom many have hailed as a first round draft pick, pushed himself through a 21-of-38 performance, making just enough plays to pull out the win. “I would say that I was the one holding us back,” Thomas said. Going into Monday’s game, many expected the exact opposite. Thomas looked like the only sure thing on an offense that had to replace its top two receivers, two running backs and four offensive linemen. Simply put, quarterback was not a position anyone was worried about. Thomas’ two most inexperienced receivers, Demitri Knowles and Corey Fuller, looked like seasoned veterans under the bright lights of Lane Stadium, finishing with a combined six catches for 124 yards.

Knowles hauled in a fourthquarter touchdown after Marcus Davis went out with a minor injury. Fuller had 45 yards, including a 23-yard fourth down conversion, on the final drive of regulation. In those situations, Thomas stepped up. For much of the night, his legs were all the Hokies had, as he ran the ball 15 times for 52 yards. It wasn’t pretty by any stretch. However, the Hokies stayed away from two problem areas — turnovers and penalties. They didn’t turn the ball over, and had just three penalties for 15 yards. Georgia Tech’s lone turnover cost them, as Kyle Fuller intercepted Tevin Washington in overtime. No Heisman Trophy watch lists will highlight Thomas’ performance Monday night. Even during the game, Thomas was just worried about getting out with a win. “I was joking with (quarterbacks) coach (Mike) O’Cain, and I said, ‘If I don’t win this game, I might not be here

tomorrow,’” Thomas said. Seeing his first action, redshirt-freshman tailback Michael Holmes, getting 13 carries while splitting time with fellow freshman J.C. Coleman. Holmes’ day was pedestrian, until he struck it big in overtime. After a six-yard carry on the first play, Holmes broke several arm tackles for an 18-yard gain, putting the ball at the one-yard line. It was his longest gain of the day, and essentially locked up the win. Thomas and the offense undoubtedly have work to do. Bud Foster’s defense on the other hand, might be better than advertised. While the offense struggled to move the ball much of the game, the Hokies stuffed the Yellow Jackets at the line time and time again. Four defensive linemen tallied five-plus tackles, including Derrick Hopkins, who had 11. Even without injured linebacker Tariq Edwards, the defense seemed to meet its hype. Sliding into Bruce Taylor’s mike linebacker position, former walk-on Jack Tyler proved he’s more than

capable, fi nishing with 17 tackles. Paul Johnson’s triple-option attack was thwarted, even though the Yellow Jackets dominated the time of possession. Eight-plus defensive linemen rotated in for the Hokies, constantly throwing fresh bodies into the trenches. Tyler was covered in blood and sweat following the game. Thomas wore the face of a man who came close to letting down thousands of fans. For head coach Frank Beamer, it was just another grind-it-out ACC affair and win number 252 in his coaching career. “It is kind of like what I told you guys at the start: we are not as good of a football team right now, but we have the potential to be a really good football team,” Beamer said. A loss would’ve been catastrophic. An overtime win? Well, that might be who the 2012 Hokies are. MATT JONES -senior -sports editor -communication major

THEY SAID IT:

I leave extremely encouraged. I know we didn’t play our best game the first three quarters, but the fourth quarter we turned it on. I know what we can do, and the rest of the season hopefully we can show up.”

BIG NUMBER:

Logan Thomas Quarterback

326

Virginia Tech’s lackluster performance on offense was the fewest total yards the Hokies have had in a winning effort since a 16-15 win over Nebraska in 2009. In that game, the Hokies amassed just 278 yards of offense, including an 88-yard drive, which began with 1:44 left in the fourth quarter.


8

september 5, 2012

Regular Edition GET INSIDE THE GAME

Today’s Birthday Horoscope: This year is perfect to clear out clutter

and focus on fundamentals. Your creativity and influence grow at work, and so does your bank account with careful planning. A research quest arises around October and could involve siblings or cousins.

Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham Quote of the Day

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Week ending September 7, 2012 By James Sajdak

ACROSS 1 Henri’s here 4 Sci-fi psychic 10 Druid’s sacred hill 14 What a D.C. wall commemorates 15 Craps table tactic 16 Like some terrible reviews 17 Wee 18 Bandit feature? 19 Watch lights, briefly 20 Easy-to-use sock drawer organizer?

Top Tracks We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together • Taylor Swift

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One More Night • Maroon 5

(3) 2

Some Nights • fun.

(4) 3

Whistle • Flo Rida

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Good Time • Owl City & Carly Rae Jepsen

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23 Emphatic words 24 Run-of-the-mill 27 Track position 28 Dog show eyecatchers? 32 Cornerstone abbr. 34 Just outside of 35 Rolls in the grass? 36 Feline alpha groups? 40 Palm Sunday carrier 43 German battleship Graf __

44 1945 “Big Three” conference site 48 “Bohemian Rhapsody” and “We Are the Champions”? 52 Slangy negatives y 53 14th-century Russian prince 54 Retro tees 56 Winter Olympics winner’s wall hanging? 60 Prussian pair 62 Stimulate 63 36 for nine, often 64 Votes for

DOWN 1 Fire up 2 Set pieces? 3 Cry from one reaching the top 4 Lyrical poetic form 5 Zealot-plus 6 Appearance announcement 7 Gain __: get further ahead in the race 8 Empty weight 9 Mass music 10 “Honor Thy Father” author 11 Grows 12 Purged 13 Spots with slogans 21 Egg toss miss indicator 22 Light carriage 25 Flap 26 Dr. Leary’s turnon 29 No right __ 30 Jasmine neckwear, perhaps 31 Wicked 33 Sarajevo’s region 37 Forgetful writer’s letters? 38 Louvre Pyramid designer

39 Subj. of an ’80s’90s financial crisis 40 EPA concern 41 Toyota RAV4, e.g. 42 Navy builders 45 Expose 46 St. Louis team, familiarly 47 Ancient kingdom on the Tigris

49 Sign on 50 Star of France 51 Bakery utensil 55 Discharge 57 Price or Battle 58 Genesis grandson 59 H.S. courses 60 Cook quickly, in a way 61 Three-switch railroad track section

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

9/4/12

WORDSEARCH: Hokie Nation Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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ARE YOU READY FOR THE CAREER FAIR? MAKE SURE TO PICK UP THE COLLEGIATE TIMES CAREER GUIDE FOR TIPS, TRICKS AND ADVICE ON HOW TO PREPARE YOURSELF. SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 - DON’T MISS IT

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editors: mallory noe-payne, victoria zigadlo newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

news

september 5, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

9

Transfer student weighs value of associate experience SEAN HAYDEN news staff writer

Th is past spring, in addition to the 5,000 freshmen admitted to Virginia Tech, 1,030 students were admitted as transfer students, the highest number in university history. Of these students, 66 percent of the transfers came from Virginia community colleges. Tyler Key, a senior communication major, learned fi rst hand the challenges coming with transfering from a community college to a four-year university when he moved fromJohn Tyler Community College’s Midlothian campus last year. “I got into plenty of schools out of high school, but I wanted to go to Virginia Tech,’” he said. “I thought it would be better to just wait, go to a community college, save some money then transfer to Tech, which is the only school I wanted to attend.” Mildred R. Johnson, Director of Undergraduate Admissions at Tech, explains the relationship her department has built with students like Key at Virginia community colleges. “We do a great deal of upfront advising for students who perhaps did not get in as freshmen, did not attend for fi nancial reasons, or found the affordability of a community college better when they graduated high school,” Johnson said. When transfer students apply, they go through the same admission process as incoming freshmen. They are required to submit applications in addition to high school transcripts and any transcripts from colleges or institutions they previously attended. Tech admissions tends to give priority to students who have completed the prerequisite English, mathematics, and science courses based on their particular major, Johnson explained.

$

BRAD KLODOWSKI/ SPPS

Students from New River Community College, as well as all other Va. community colleges, have the opportunity for immediate acceptance to state schools if grades qualify. There is a very extensive credit transfer guide from the university registrar website and admissions works very closely with the community colleges to accept the majority of the credits students are taking, especially if they earn an associate degree. In those instances, students come in with junior standing and a majority of their curriculum of liberal education completed. “If you earn an associate degree with a satisfactory

Follow this writer on Twitter @shayden

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certain prerequisite classes to be accepted. “Getting settled in somewhere then having to transfer would be tough,” Key said. “Going to community college fi rst made it an easier transition for me, and I probably wouldn’t have transferred if I had started at another four year university.”

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catch up by taking summer classes and now I am on schedule to graduate this spring.” Right now, Tech and the admissions department are doing preliminary work on a transfer summer academy, which would be modeled like the current freshmen summer academy. The academy will allow Tech to admit some transfer students in some of the more competitive or space-limited programs where they need

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school of their choice. As Johnson explained, it is easy to make certain course recommendations for students at community colleges more so than transfers from four-year universities because they know they are going to transfer — especially from one of the 23 Virginia community colleges. “They have a list of classes that match up to the Tech curriculum,” Key said. Although all my credits did not transfer, I was able to

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curriculum of transferable credits, and achieve a certain GPA, you can get into any Virginia school,” Key explained. “Two representatives came into my community college from Virginia Tech, checked my transcript, and told me I was accepted on the spot.” With this program in place, students who achieve certain academic standards and receive an associate degree after two years, are automatically admitted to the Virginia

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nam // romeo name info // golden retri retriever, 12 years inte interests // chasing afte after squirrels, slee sleeping, eating, rubb rubbing against the side of the couch

Pet Advice of the Week: “Dogs do dream, so if yours barks and kicks his legs in his sleep, he may be having nightmares - or trying to catch a Frisbee in some dog park of subconcious.” Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Find the perfect thing in your own closets or by networking. Then step out of your comfort zone and go for it. Show others what you’re capable of. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- You’re very popular, but your social life could cause a problem at home. Your career could bene it from the new contacts you make. Balance. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Quick thinking solves a household problem. Friends make the connection. Your holdings are gaining value. Revise plans, and get your inances in line. Gather info to reap rewards.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Solve a puzzle at home. Improve household communications with a new tool to get the word out. Think fast, and work faster. Postpone a decision to savor a moment.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Discuss a work project with an expert for a solution to an annoying problem. Invest in educational material you’ll use at home. Expand your in luence. You are triumphant.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) -- Knowing what you want and expressing it clearly is a plus. If at irst you don’t succeed, try again later. Apply what you have learned. It will be easier the second time.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Everything seems possible. Talk it over. Some things may have to be left behind. Success is your reward. Increase your family’s comfort. Discuss; don’t argue. You’re gaining wisdom.

Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Your actions speak louder than words, especially now. It may require more concentration and effort, but it’s worth it. You’ll get more for your money. Stash away savings.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) -- When in trouble, use the pen, not the sword, to be mightier. Calculate risks. You have more abundance than you realize. Put your subconscious to work on it.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- More work is required. Learn from your competition and a trusted partner. Decide what to spend and what to save. Give your word and follow through.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Patience helps getting things done. It’s easier to motivate and inspire. Love inds a way. Failures can accelerate growth faster than successes; they illustrate the road to avoid.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Get into the competition to win, but don’t be attached to results. In the end you’ll have a great story and hopefully have a blast. Write it down.

“Early morning whines could just be your dog alerting you to the fact that he hast to ‘use the bathroom.’” -Country Living

Have a question you need answered about your pet? Or want your pet featured in next week’s paper? Email your questions to studybreak@collegemedia.com with the title ‘Pet of the Week.’


10

september 5, 2012

Wednesday, September 5, 2012 Print Edition  

Wednesday, September 5, 2012 Print Edition of The Collegiate Times

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