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Wednesday, May 2, 2012 An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 108th year, issue 58

News, page 3

Features, page 6

Opinions, page 5

Hidden in plain sight

Sports, page 4

Study Break, page 8

Tech prepares for commencement

BY MATT JONES | sports editor

MCT CAMPUS

First lady Michelle Obama will speak at Tech’s graduation on May 11

University, students, families prepare not only for ceremony, but high-profile graduation speakers PRISCILLA ALVAREZ news staff writer

BRAD KLODOWSKI / SPPS

New men’s basketball head coach James Johnson answers questions during his introductory press conference.

Jim Weaver announced Tuesday that James Johnson will succeed Seth Greenberg as coach After 19 years as an assistant coach at nine schools, James Johnson was introduced Tuesday as the new Virginia Tech men’s basketball coach. Alongside Director of Athletics Jim Weaver, Johnson took the stage for the first time as the head coach of the Hokies. “It is my pleasure to introduce and announce to you our new head men’s basketball coach here at the university, James Johnson,” Weaver said. “He’s earned his stripes and it’s time he become a head coach. I am pleased and proud that he’s here with us in Blacksburg as a Hokie.” After the dismissal of former head Seth Greenberg on April 24, Weaver searched high and low for a candidate to fill the vacancy. On April 17, Johnson had left the Hokies as their associate head coach to take an assistant coaching job at Clemson. Just over two weeks later, Johnson is back in Blacksburg as a head coach. “Virginia Tech and the Hokie nation have a special place in my heart and I am blessed and excited for the opportunity to become the head basketball coach,” Johnson said. “I look forward to working with a great group of young men and moving forward with this program.” This being Johnson’s first head coaching position at any level, there will be some doubters. However, Weaver believes he got the right man for the job. “He knows and has recruited most of our current players,” Weaver said. “We believe that he is the right person at this moment in time. All of the things I’ve alluded to have led me to think we’ve struck gold.” Even Johnson, who doesn’t have the head coaching experience of any other coach in the ACC, isn’t worried he’ll have see JOHNSON / page four

I go from being a suggestion maker to a decision maker. Instead of me being one of the four (assistants) yelling in the head coach’s ear, I have four guys yelling in my ear and I have to be the decision maker on which of those things we’re going to do.” James Johnson, Men’s Basketball Coach

Many details concerning Michelle Obama and Mike Warner’s appearance at this year’s commencement ceremony have not been determined, so the university is encouraging families to check the webpage consistently for updates. “We don’t have the specific instructions from the White House and the Secret Service,” said Mark Owczarski, university spokesman. “They have yet to send their advanced team to provide counsel and advice.” However, the university does have a few assumptions as to what they may be. According to Owczarski, there will probably be wand metal detectors for guests coming in, as well as restrictions in parking areas and road access. What those restrictions will be, or how those will look like, have yet to be determined. Due to this, families are encouraged to travel the night before to avoid any potential traffic with the arrival of the first lady and Senator Warner. “We’re working with the White House, state police and local enforcement to figure out what specifically it’s going to look like and what specific aspects and elements will be affected, so that we can convey that to graduating seniors, family, and so on,” Owczarski said. To keep families informed, the commencement website,

which can be found on the VT home webpage, provides updates and tips for the ceremony. For example, families are encouraged to arrive early and leave large packages, such as gifts, behind to save space for more seating. Because of the popularity of the two commencement speakers, more people are expected to attend the ceremony, which creates a concern for seating. Like previous ceremonies, it will be open to the general public and there is usually a turn out of 20,000 people. This year, however, that number is expected to rise. Seating shouldn’t be an issue, though, as Lane Stadium seats more than 60,000 people. “I don’t think it’s the case of people being turned away because it’s a sell out,” Owczarski said. “It’ll be more crowded we believe, but we don’t really have a way of knowing that until the day of.” There is also the possibility of there being a different entrance for families and the general public. Those details have not been set yet, but the idea would be to keep groups together. Brittany Gilligan, a senior biology major, is not concerned about any special problems with seating due to the special speakers. “Virginia Tech is a large university anyways, so I figured there would be problems with seating already,” Gilligan said. Lane Stadium will be open four hours in advance, so the public can find seating.

Students call on ‘Colbert Report’ to help save Stadium Woods CODY OWENS news reporter The Hokie Nation and the Colbert Nation came together yesterday for the naming of a 300-year-old white oak after Stephen Colbert, host of television show, “The Colbert Report,” in order to bring further attention to the Stadium Woods issue. Crowds gathered to watch the event and hopefully appear on TV surrounded the oak, rooted between Cranwell International Center and the Washington Street tennis courts. Assistant mayor Leslie HagerSmith was on hand to introduce the tree. “This great tree was aged even when the first European arrived in the Virginia wilderness, making this surrounding forest older and more historic than Williamsburg, Mount Vernon, Monticello, and the rest of the commonwealth’s historic treasures,” Hager-Smith said. The assistant mayor then christened the tree as “Quercus Omnipotens Colberticus,” Latin for “the Almighty Colbert Oak,” as a banner bearing the name and Colbert’s likeness was unfurled

from a bough. The push for the event came a week-and-a-half ago when a stranger proposed the idea to Erika Largen and other members of the Virginia Tech Environmental Coalition — the organization that sponcored the event — at a Relay For Life table. “We got into contact with the communication director of ‘The Colbert Report’ and we’ll be sending her our footage as soon as we get it packaged with VTTV,” Largen said. “People neglected their studies and had to skip a few classes, but it’s important that we stand up for the things that we believe in.” Largen said the scramble to organize the event was time wellspent, although a camera crew from The Colbert Report did not come. Some participants in the event were mixed on whether or not Colbert will air it. “I think it’s a good idea, but I don’t think it will make it on,” said Tyler Morris, a sophomore mechanical engineering major. “I don’t know how he will segway into this little event at Virginia Tech.” Others, like sophomore market-

ing major Austin Himes, were hopeful. “I honestly believe that Stephen Colbert will support this,” said Himes. “I know that he puts a lot of money into the geology department of College of Charleston (and) I’ve seen him at events with Bill McKibben. He’s very much an environmentalist.” Some Colbert fans present predicted the tree naming would end up on Colbert’s “Tip of the Hat, Wag of the Finger” segment, where the host praises one party and scolds the other. Himes, though, wants to see “Colberticus” appear on “The Word,” a segment where Colbert mentions a new word related to recent news. While the banner on the tree will be taken down and sent to Colbert, a wooden plaque denoting the new name will remain on the tree’s trunk. Another group, Friends of the Stadium Woods, will present President Charles Steger the petition against the woods development, which has a total of 6,477 names, on Thursday, May 3. The Board of Visitors will select the proposed athletic practice facilBRAD KLODOWSKI / SPPS ity’s location on June 1. Concerned students rally beneath the ‘Almighty Cobert Oak’ in support of perserving Stadium Woods.

THE COLLEGIATE TIMES WILL CEASE PUBLICATION UNTIL MAY 27


news

editors: nick cafferky, michelle sutherland newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

may 2, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

Y-Toss recycles unused student goods KATIE WHITE features staff writer Over the past six years, The YMCA at Virginia Tech has kept more than 81 tons of goods out of the local landfills. Y-Toss, a YMCA program which collects gently used goods, works every year to collect items from Tech and Radford students that might otherwise get thrown in the trash when students move out of their dorm rooms. According to the YMCA’s website, the purpose of Y-Toss is “to foster a culture of social responsibility at Virginia Tech and Radford University, while creating a more sustainable campus community.” During spring move out, students can donate items they no longer need or want, which are then sold to other students during fall move in. Laura Cohen, a freshman university studies major, was a direct beneficiary of this program. “I got some furniture for my room at Y-Toss in the fall,” Cohen said. “It was just really convenient and super cheap.” Y-Toss has raised more than $30,000 for the YMCA’s community outreach and leadership programs. Alternative spring break trips, tutoring programs at local elementary schools, and educa-

tional classes on topics such as pottery or foreign languages, are just some of the many opportunities the YMCA provides at low costs for the Blacksburg community and surrounding areas. From May 4 to May 10, students can drop off items at any of the nine locations on campus: Miles/Johnston, Pritchard, Oak Lane, Owens Quad, Barringer, Shanks/Upper Quad, West Ambler Johnston/West End, Payne and War Memorial. New to the event this year is the creation of collection points at off-campus sites; there will be two in Smith’s Landing, one in Terrace View, and one at the YMCA on North Main Street. Allison Rizzetta, a junior environmental resource management major, is president of the YMCA and co-director of Y-Toss. Changes like the off-campus sites and longer hours are part of the modifications to Y-Toss that Rizzetta anticipates will bring the event to a wider audience, ultimately resulting in more items being donated. “Hopefully, this will allow upper-classmen and community members to become involved within the environmental movement, as we foster a culture of sustainability in Blacksburg,” Rizzetta said. Anything gently used — like

books, electronics, furniture, clothing, bedding, and appliances — can be donated; lofts, however, are not accepted. Non-perishable food items are also an encouraged donations. After May 10, these items will be collected, cleaned, and stored until the fall sale.

staff. This year, the YMCA has a schedule of more than 300 volunteer shifts totaling more than 726 hours of service for the Y-Toss collection — and that’s just for Tech’s campus. Radford needs an additional 120 volunteer shifts totaling 240 hours. To raise awareness about the importance of living sustainably — and hopefully to drum I got some furniture for my up a few volunteers along the way — room at Y-Toss in the fall. It the Y-Toss committee has been workwas really conveneint and ing to increase the super cheap. event’s profile on Laura Cohen campus. university studies Just last week, the Y-Toss committee put out 100 little green flags across the Drillfield, each one representing For Tech, the fall sale will be 200 pounds worth of items that August 22-23 in McComas Hall; were collected and kept from for Radford, items will be avail- landfills during last year’s event. able at the YMCA’s thrift shop The Y-Toss event is one of in Radford. many sustainability initiatives Between the planning and on Tech’s campus recently; Earth implementation of the actu- Week ran from April 17-22 and al collection event, the sort- the VT Eco-Olympics concluding of items during the sum- ed on April 13. mer, and the sale in the These green projects have fall, Y-Toss requires hun- helped contribute to Tech dreds of hours of work each winning several sustainabilyear. ity related accolades, including For instance, volunteers in being ranked as a silver memthe 2010 event logged 1,130 ber of the Association of the hours, excluding the time put Advancement of Sustainability in by the YMCA professional in Higher Education.

crimeblotter

3

what you’re saying On the Thomas Hall health debate:

2014_Hokie: This is a great article to put everything into perspective. I'm all for green development as well, but have agreed that it's not financially feasible nor practical for Virginia Tech to 'upgrade' the plant (which would be a downgrade in efficiency as the article points out). Anyone with any background experience would know that Miss Fuller's illnesses could not be caused by the coal dust, it's caused by pathogens and viruses. Now, if she were to come back with some form of lung cancer a few years down the road we might have a different story. But, in the end it comes down to this. Thomas Hall is the cheapest housing on campus, as in the real world, you get what you pay for. In the real world, cheap housing isn't in the most ideal locations, and will be next to things you may or may not agree with and you either have to deal with it or find somewhere else to live. Former Thomas Resident (to 2014_ Hokie): Unfortunately, the university doesn't give you the option to live elsewhere. I was "assigned" to Thomas hall. Also, do you really want some of your colleagues to be living in a situation where there is even a slight chance they could develop lung cancer? Seems pretty drastic.

Thomas Hall 2010-2011 (to 2014_ Hokie): You don't "choose" to be in Thomas

Hall, you're assigned there. Also I'm pretty sure all housing on campus is the same price. Trust me, if it was up to the students Thomas Hall would be empty.

date

time

offense

location

status

4/04/12

11:30 a.m.

Follow up to harassment

Derring

Inactive

4/17/12

9:30 a.m.

Follow up to cursing/obscene language

Price Forks Rd

Inactive

4/20/12

11:07 a.m. -1:15 p.m. Follow up to larceny from a building

McComas

Inactive

4/20/12

12:00-5:00 p.m.

Follow up to larceny of a pocket book and contents

Squires

Inactive

4/30/12

11:30-7:12 a.m.

Vandalism/Destruction of property/enter property with inent to damage

SPH New Construction

Active

4/30/12

12:00-11:00 p.m.

Larceny of a bicycle

Outside Payne

Active

arrestees


may 2, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

4

Johnson: Green, Eddie approve of the change

DANIEL LIN / SPPS

Hokies guard Erick Green is comfortable with the coaching change to James Johnson from Greenberg. from page one

problems in his first year on the job. “I do believe that I’m ready for the position,” Johnson said. “I go from being a suggestion maker to a decision maker. Instead of me being one of the four (assistants) yelling in the head coach’s ear, I have four guys yelling in my ear and I have to be the decision maker on which of those things we’re going to do.” Part of the reason Weaver went with Johnson is his bevy of experience under some coaching legends. Johnson has been an assistant under Jim Larranaga at George Mason, Ed DeChellis at Penn State, and Jeff Capel Sr. at Old Dominion. “I’ve been fortunate to work with some very good coaches and I think that I will take a little bit from every one of those programs and bring it to my program,” Johnson said. Johnson’s contract has a base salary of $245,000 with a retention incentive of $375,000 for radio, television and personal appearances. He’ll make a total of $680,000 a year over his fiveyear contract. Current Hokies Erick Green

and Jarell Eddie also spoke about what it means to have someone they’re familiar with back in charge of the program. “We have a lot of faith in him,” Green said. “He’s coached a couple times in practice and we liked what he did, the methods he did, and some of the styles he did. We just really felt confident.” Green went on to say he believes Johnson will push all the right buttons. “He’s a competitive person, and that’s going to bring the best out of all of us,” Green said. “He’s exciting; he’s got a swagger to him that he’s going to bring to the team. We’re going to be energetic, upbeat and ready to go.” Last week, Weaver and Tom Gabbard (the associate director of athletics for internal affairs) met with the men’s basketball team to get a gauge on what it wanted from its new coach. Green, Eddie, and others spoke in favor of Johnson. “Because we were comfortable with Coach Johnson, it solidified everyone wanting to stay and be a part of the program,” Eddie said. “If we can’t have Coach Greenberg, we’d like to have

Coach Johnson to make it as smooth as possible.” Johnson’s first year won’t be a cakewalk. The Hokies went 16-17 last season, and just 4-12 in the ACC. He also has the task of holding together the 2012 recruiting class of Montrezl Harrell (Tarboro, N.C.) and Marshall Wood (Rustburg, Va.). “We feel like they’re part of our basketball family now,” Johnson said. “We want guys that are excited to be at Virginia Tech.” Putting the Hokies on top will be a process. “This is going to be a good ride throughout this process,” Johnson said. “As things developed with this situation, I thought about my years here at Virginia Tech, and I don’t think there was any better person for the job than myself.” The Hokies, who haven’t made the NCAA Tournament since the 2006-07 season, have the pieces to make noise in the ACC next season. “We’re competing to be the best,” Johnson said. “We’re not trying to play second fiddle to anybody. We have everything in place to take this program to the next level.”


opinions

editors: scott masselli, sean simons opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

may 2, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

5

The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Zach Crizer Managing Editor: Lindsey Brookbank Design Editors: Danielle Buynak, Victoria Zigadlo Public Editor: Justin Graves Web Editor: Sarah Watson News Editors: Nick Cafferky, Michelle Sutherland News Reporters: Josh Higgins, Cody Owens, Erin Chapman News Staff Writers: Priscila Alvarez, Tauhid Chappell, Abby Harris, Sean Hayden, Gina Paterson, Ashley Seagar, Kelsey Jo Starr Features Editors: Chelsea Gunter, Patrick Murphy Features Reporters: Nick Smirniotopoulos, Emma Goddard Features Staff Writers: Courtney Baker, Jenn Bates, Torie Deible, Chelsea Giles, Madeline Gordon, Dane Harrington, Jimmy Hudnall, Kevin McAleese, Andrew Reily, Kara Van Scoyoc, Allie Sivak, Kaila Taylor, Jacob Wilbanks Opinions Editors: Scott Masselli, Sean Simons Sports Editors: Matt Jones, Zach Mariner Sports Reporters: Josh Parcell Sports Staff Writers: Eric Avassi, Zander Baylis, Alyssa Bedrosian, Cody Elliott, Taylor Hay, Alex Koma, Ashleigh Lanza, Brian Marcolini Enterprise Team Editor: Liana Bayne Training Director: Kelsey Heiter Copy Chief: Spenser Snarr Copy Editors: Nora McGann, Luther Shell, Kristen Gunther, Brittany Kelly, Jordan Davis Layout Designers: Bethany Melson, Alicia Tillman, Tanja Vogel Online Director: Alex Rhea MCT CAMPUS

Our Views [staff editorial]

Tree-naming ceremony is embarrassing PR

On

Tuesday, the Virginia Tech Environmental Coalition continued its effort to save Stadium Woods by naming one of the several-hundred-year-old white oaks after comedian and television host Stephen Colbert. The event was put together to raise awareness for the ongoing battle with the athletic department over whether to tear down a section of the wooded area to build a new indoor practice facility. While it is understandable VTEC wants to continue generating awareness for its cause, this recent attempt reeks of desperation. VTEC has decided to name a tree after Colbert because “the Almighty Colbert Oak is the essence of American patriotism,” but the link between the oak trees and patrio-

tism is a stretch at best. The trees have been alive during the Revolutionary War and the Civil War, but being alive during a period of time doesn’t necessarily make you a part of something and certainly doesn’t qualify you to be a symbol for it. It seems to us the only real reasoning behind choosing Colbert was he has his own TV show and the thought, “If we name a tree after a celebrity students like, maybe they won’t want it cut down.” And although the angle of patriotism is no doubt playing off Colbert’s antics on his show “The Colbert Report,” it seems counter productive to name a tree after a comedians punch line when your objective is to be taken seriously. Opinions on Stadium Woods aside, this was tackiest of public relations moves.

Students need general education V irginia Tech is a university, but not “the university.” The university is not a campus with buildings; it is a metaphysical ideal, a Platonic form, an abstraction, an unattainable perfection. It is the embodiment of education and learning. Philosopher Robert M. Pirsig states the university is “that great heritage of rational thought that has been brought down to us through the centuries.” All colleges possess some of its traits; however, one can never possess them all. Its values are the expansion and proliferation of human knowledge in its entirety. The university should strive to awaken and catalyze the innate curiosity present in all — the quest for all knowledge. In order to achieve the goals of the university in a pragmatic way, specificity of knowledge is required. The fragmentation of knowledge is a necessary evil. Without independent subjects, learning would be a futile

If

you’ve been holding your the Northeastern tradition of breath to see whether Mitt big-government conservatism; it Romney would pivot to the was “tea party” Mitt, the evercenter now that it’s a two-man more-conservative Romney who race between him and President endorsed the stringent House Obama, you can exhale; he won’t. budget of Rep. Paul D. Ryan, Romney made that clear in his R-Wis. victory speech after last week’s priIn that sense, Romney’s speech maries in the Northeast. confirmed something we already Instead, at least for now, the pre- knew. sumptive nominee’s campaign will Even though both candidates focus relentlessly on what he sees in this year’s presidential election as the president’s wrongheaded were once described as moderates, approach to the economy. this will be as polarized a battle as His message boils down to this: we’ve ever seen: between a minObama favors government inter- imum-government conservative vention in the economy, “a path who sounds increasingly like Ayn where our lives will be ruled by Rand and a newly unreconstructbureaucrats and boards,” a path ed liberal who sounds increasingly that “leads to chronic high unem- like Rachel Maddow. ployment, crushing debt and stagThere are three theories about nant wages.” why Romney isn’t pivoting to the Romney, by contrast, stands center, and they’re probably all for unfettered free enterprise and true. smaller government, for “free peoOne is that after a career of ple, pursuing happiness in their changing positions, Romney own unique ways ... (to) employ simply can’t afford anothmore and more Americans.” er flip-flop. A second is that In other words, Romney, who presidential elections can’t be won earlier in the campaign described only by swaying a tiny number of himself as “severely conservative,” undecided voters in the center; hopes to win the White House by victory requires mobilizing true doubling down on that conser- believers in a brutal competition for vatism. turnout. The Romney who claimed victory in five primaries last week DOYLE MCMANUS wasn’t Moderate Mitt, heir to -mcclatchy newspapers

respect for knowledge encourages an individual and personal desire to learn. The student is imparted with the most valuable stimulus, and the pupil will yearn for information even without external motivation. General education at Tech is an essential facet of every student’s instruction. The curriculum for every major should require a large degree of focus on knowledge as a whole. Every student should be instructed within a framework that encourages the student to see information as simply partitions of a larger idea. The Curriculum for Liberal Education requirements provided by Virginia Tech is beneficial to the goals of the university. Tech’s general education system is necessary, but perhaps able to be improved.

RICHARD HART -guest columnist -computer science major -freshman

Gulf Coast recovery needs addressing It

Romney needs to lay out presidential vision

exercise. No student can possibly learn all of human knowledge, and in order for humanity’s knowledge to be expanded, the practical university requires concentration in a single field. While these imperfections are unavoidable, it does not mean a university should not strive to approximate and approach the values of the university. The objectives are still the same, and students should be bestowed with as much knowledge and exposed to as many subjects as possible. When anything is learned, it is contributing to the achievement of all knowledge. However, when a student understands how a specific piece of knowledge fits into the encompassing canvas of all-known information, it ignites the passion for education — similar to how individual pieces of a puzzle are meaningless unless the resulting picture is viewed beforehand. Unless human knowledge is viewed as a whole, specific subjects are meaningless as well. A

seems like there are few issues that can weather the current political storms to bring together a large bipartisan consensus in Congress. Yet, the U.S. Senate — in a vote last month hailed by members on both sides of the aisle — overwhelmingly passed a twoyear, $109 billion transportation and infrastructure authorization bill by a bipartisan vote of 74-22. Included in the measure were vital provisions to fund environmental restoration projects in the Gulf of Mexico in the wake of the 2010 oil spill and an ambitious program to support conservation projects in coastal communities around the country. House and Senate leaders are negotiating a final transportation package. However, the fate of these crucial proposals to address the health of one of our nation’s most valuable natural resources, our oceans, is far from certain. By the numbers alone, the impact of the Deepwater Horizon tragedy is sobering. During the 87-day disaster in 2010, nearly 5 million barrels of oil spilled into the Gulf. It’s also been estimated that the potential three-year loss of tourism revenue to Gulf coastal communities could surpass $22 billion, and scientists still are uncertain what the long-term ecological damage will be. The Pew Environment Group commissioned a task force of 18 scientists to examine the issue of Gulf restoration. In a report published last September, the investigators found that the Deepwater Horizon blowout

was just the most visible, recent problem. Chronic overfishing, poorly planned coastal development, and pollution — according to the researchers’ final report — had already seriously degraded the area’s ecological resilience. Consequently, to move toward effective long-term recovery, federal and state managers must apply a holistic approach to restoration across the region. A dedicated funding source and associated management mechanism are needed, though, to facilitate this change. In March, the Senate did just that. The measure it passed — known as the Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourism Opportunities, and Revived Economy Act — would ensure that 80 percent of the Clean Water Act fines associated with the Deepwater Horizon spill are used to address the economic and ecological damage to the Gulf region. This proposal was added to the overall Senate transportation and infrastructure authorization bill by an overwhelming vote of 76-22. Gulf communities aren’t the only ones watching the outcome of the debate over the transportation measure. Also at stake is another bipartisan provision, the National Endowment for the Oceans. Co-sponsored by Sens. Olympia Snowe, R-Maine, and Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., it would fund regional coastal improvement projects by using some

of the interest derived from investment of Clean Water Act fines from the spill. More specifically, the endowment would support activities such as fisheries management and coastal restoration through a system of grants to states, universities, nonprofit organizations, and other local institutions. And this program could have impacts far and wide, with 35 states potentially eligible for the program’s benefits. Our combined ocean and coastal areas economies contributed more than 2.6 million jobs and more than $222.7 billion to the U.S. gross domestic product in 2009. Projects funded by the National Endowment for the Oceans would help promote the long-term health of these economic engines. Yet while there may be significant support for these two vital ocean proposals in Congress, it’s uncertain whether House and Senate leaders will be able to overcome their differences on the larger bill to pass the provisions. April marked the second anniversary of one of the largest environmental disasters in our nation’s history. Passing the RESTORE Act and the National Endowment for the Oceans would be an excellent way for Congress to show that America hasn’t forgotten the ongoing environmental and economic impacts of the Deepwater Horizon spill.

CHRIS MANN -mcclatchy newspapers

Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: Philipp Kotlaba Student Publications Photo Staff Director of Photography: Paul Kurlak Lab Manager: Austen Meredith College Media Solutions Ad Director: Brandon Collins Asst Ad Director: Matt Freedman Account Executives: Johnson Bray, Kevin Jadali, Alyssa Brown, Brian Dickson, Janssen Claudio Inside Sales Manager: Mario Gazzola Assistant Inside Sales Manager: Adam Shata Office Manager: Kayley Greenday Assistant Account Executives: Alex Perry, Kacie Nolan, Jordan Peugh Creative Director: Casey Stoneman Asst Production Manager: Colleen Hill Creative Services Staff: Danielle Bushrow, Mary Dassira, Alyssa Morrison, Molly Vinson Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Student Media Phone Numbers Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. Subscription rates: $65 semester; $110 fall/spring. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2011. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


6

features

may 2, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: chelsea gunter, patrick murphy featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

String Project advances music education Students in the Virginia Tech String Project obtain handson practice with music education, teaching elementary school students in the community KATIE WHITE features staff writer

CJ YUNGER/ SPPS

Hank Skutt and Ingrid Beers of the Junonia Cello Quartet perform in the Perspective Gallery Tuesday.

The Virginia Tech String Project has made learning musical instruments easy and affordable for local elementary school students. Starting in 2007 under the leadership of director Vernon Burnsed, the VTSP started with 38 students from Montgomery County and was made possible through grant money from the National Association of Music Merchants. Now, that number has grown to over 80 students and includes many from all over the New River Valley. Every semester, students in the program get to showcase their newfound talents in a free concert for the community. This year’s students will perform Thursday, May 3, at 7 p.m. in the Squires Recital Salon. One of the primary goals of the String Project is to make music education affordable for every student. With the help of the NAMM, the National String Project Consortium, the New River Valley Friends of the Roanoke Symphony Orchestra, and Tech’s School of Performing Arts & Cinema and School of Music, it has succeeded in doing just that — students pay $50 to take two classes a week for an entire semester, making the cost for each lesson only $2. When students advance to their second year, the cost rises to $55. To ensure each student receives the most effective education, the group is divided into three orchestras: first year, second year, and advanced. Yi-Wen Evans, the master teacher for the String Project, says having experience is not required to participate in the program. “(Most children) come without any experience,” Evans said. “We have to start with how to hold the instrument,” Students can choose between the four major string instruments: violin, viola, cello and bass.

Recipe: Blueberry Cheesecake Bars BY EMMA GODDARD | features reporter

They must rent or buy their own instruments. However, if a student accidently breaks his or her instrument, the String Project does own several instruments available for loan. Following the end of the first semester, the children perform several recognizable songs, like “Twinkle-Twinkle Little Star” and the “CanCan,” at a winter concert. Last December’s shooting, though, resulted in the cancellation of that concert, which was rescheduled for a spring show. Now the students will complement the songs from the winter concert with the more advanced songs they have learned in their second semester. The orchestra’s set will span several genres such as Americana and folk music, as well as the classical greats like Bizet and Wagner. The String Project also has a second goal in addition to enriching the lives of elementary students through music — the training of future strings teachers. In her position as master teacher for the past three years, Evans has not only been responsible for teaching some classes, but has also been responsible for preparing lesson plans, deciding who will teach each class, and mentoring the student teachers and student assistants. “I watch (the student teachers) teach large groups, and then I give them feedback or step in to help out with something,” Evans said. The students that help make up the VTSP faculty include many music majors, but there are also several students that have an alternative major and have simply chosen to continue a lifelong passion for music. It is a collaborative process that ultimately results in learning for both the pupils and the teachers — a fact that will surely be evident when you watch elementary school-aged children play the work of classical music’s greats. “I’m really looking forward to the concert,” said Divya Suresh, a sophomore classics major. “I like listening to classical music, but it’s more about seeing these nine-year olds play things that I can’t.”

drink of the week:

Pineapple Bomber BY JIMMY HUDNALL | features staff writer

EMMA GODDARD/ COLLEGIATE TIMES

Summer is near and sometimes the best warm weather treat is something cool and refreshing. While this snack requires more effort to make, it’s definitely worth the extra hassle. Sweet, light, and airy — you can’t go wrong with this cheesecake treat. Prep Time: 30 minutes Cook Time: 50 minutes

Ingredients: 2 cups frozen blueberries 1/2 cup sugar 2 tablespoons corn starch 2 tablespoons cold water 3 cups graham crackers, crushed 1/2 cup butter, melted 3 tablespoons sugar 1 tablespoon brown sugar 32 ounces cream cheese, softened

heat and allow mixture to cool down faster.

1 cup sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla 4 eggs

4. Combine graham crackers, butter, sugar and brown sugar. Press into bottom of baking pan.

Directions: 1. Heat oven to 325 degrees and line a 9-by-13 baking pan with parchment paper.

5. Beat cream cheese, sugar and vanilla together until well combined. Add eggs one at a time until mixture is smooth.

2. Add frozen blueberries in medium saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. Cook for about seven minutes, or until blueberries have begun to thaw and release juices. Stir in sugar until well combined. Cook for an additional five minutes or until mixture starts to bubble.

6. Pour cream cheese mixture over graham cracker crust and top with dollops of blueberry topping. Slowly pull a knife through the dollops of blueberry to make designs. 7. Bake for 50 minutes or until the center is set. Center should jiggle but should not be liquid in the middle.

3. Mix together corn starch and water to form a paste. Add blueberry mixture and remove from heat, stirring occasionally to release

8. Let cool, cut into bars and enjoy.

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features

editors: chelsea gunter, patrick murphy featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

may 2, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

wryly

e R ILLY DELIGHTFULLY OFFENSIVE.

Goodbyes might not be my area of expertise, but bear with me one last time “Comes a time when you’re driftin’, comes a time when you settle down.” Neil Young’s distinctive ragged voice echoed through my head as I soaked in the scene around me. A Blacksburg sky turned radiant orange by the setting sun, bathing the Drillfield in light as students filled the grassy expanse with soccer and the joyful sounds of youth. In my earphones, the wistful harmonica melody of “Comes a Time” — Young’s reflection on the journey of life — seemed more poignant than ever as I watched this youngest generation of Hokies frolic around campus. It’s their campus now, I thought. Not mine. I was wandering the Drillfield in search of a cure for writer’s block. After several unproductive hours staring slack-jawed at a blank document, I had decided to let Virginia Tech itself be my muse with the hope something on campus would remedy the creative emptiness. Surely the school to which I was writing goodbye could offer some final morsel of inspiration. Farewell columns are a tricky proposition. You have to simultaneously pay tribute to the experience you’re leaving behind and gaze forward at an unknown future, all while attempting to rein in the inherent schmaltz that comes with the territory. I feel a bit like a fish out of water, juggling these elements, seeing as my writing usually downplays earnest emotional reflection in favor of snarky pop culture references and boob jokes. Even if I suddenly acquired the eloquence of Fitzgerald and the insight of Hunter S. Thompson, the challenge remains daunting: How can you possibly do justice to four of life’s most meaningful years in one column? I still don’t know, but for one last time, I’m going to give it the old college try. “Comes a light, feelings liftin’, lift that baby right up off the ground.” Four years ago marked the end of the first phase in the class of 2012’s journey through life. While many of our childhoods had already met untimely demises the moment Jar-Jar Binks waddled onto movie screens, high school graduation was the official expiration date of our youth. Regardless of where we went afterwards — work, military, further education — society

now expected us to contribute. Members of the class of 2012 have been lucky enough to make a collegiate pit stop on our transition to adulthood. Whether college tuition is paid for by parents, student loans, yourself, or any combination thereof, we are among the fortunate few in the world given the chance to attend an institute of higher learning. That Tech ranks among this country’s most prestigious universities only further illustrates our blessing. Many of us take this experience for granted, no one guiltier than myself. Looking out beyond the Drillfield at the armada of Hokie Stone buildings in the distance, I feel a pang of regret for not treating school more seriously. What so many times seemed just burdensome “college,” was really the opportunity of a lifetime. I don’t consider it an opportunity squandered — an undergraduate degree is nothing to scoff at — but I’m sure there will be moments ahead where I think back to skipped classes, half-assed projects and lectures spent surfing Facebook and wonder how much more could have been accomplished. Those voices in my head will never linger long, though. Not when so much else was gained in four short years. “We were right, we were giving. That’s how we kept what we gave away.” College for me was never totally about academics, much to my parents’ chagrin. Oh, I’ve learned plenty of things, received educations from first-class professors who have expanded my worldview. I think of classes by Dale Jenkins, Yvonnes Chen, Mike Ellerbrock, and countless others and feel richer for having the opportunity to study under them. Now that it’s time to take inventory of college, though, coursework seems almost a perfunctory aspect of the experience. It’s the hoariest of cliches to say what truly matters are the people in your life and yet nothing could be more true. What I will always value most about my time at Tech was the Hokie family that helped every one of us develop into the best man or woman we can be. I think of the “Collegiate Times” and all that its cast of undergraduate students accomplishes under pressure and constant critique. My con-

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tribution to this wonderful paper has been minimal compared to so many figures behindthe-scenes who make this publication happen and I, along with the rest of the student body, owe them gratitude for their unseen service to this university. I think of the lovable band of rapscallions I call my fraternity brothers. They took in a clueless, socially stunted freshman and tough loved me into improving myself, to the point where they were somehow comfortable electing me as their president for one memorable year. There were good times, there were bad times, and there were downright stupid times, but looking back, it was all time spent well. Faces of friends past and present flooded my mind as I made my way to the Duck Pond. The crowd there seemed to be standing in for recollections of my time in Hokie nation. Runners conjured images of so many hours playing pickup basketball at McComas. A young couple holding hands produced flashbacks to romances, some joyous, some painfully unrequited, but all contributing to a rich tapestry of memories. All the while, Neil Young sang his hymn of life in my ear. “Oh, this old world keeps spinning round. It’s a wonder tall trees ain’t layin’ down. There comes a time, comes a time.” There comes a time for everything. For the class of 2012, it has come time for us to bid farewell to college and embark on the next phase of our journeys through this strange, wondrous adventure called life. Amazing things await each of us in this world, and though we may be leaving Blacksburg, no one ever truly leaves Hokie Nation behind. Tech is family and no matter what direction life takes, family will always be a part of you.

ANDREW REILLY - featured columnist - senior - communication major - @wrylyreilly

7


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may 2, 2012

Regular Edition Today’s Birthday Horoscope: Your people are your true wealth, and

your health is your greatest treasure. You could make a lifetime commitment this year. There’s more money coming in after June, so keep temptation at bay with a budget. Take special care of your well-being this year. Education could prove transformational.

Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham 9

2

3

8

5 6 6 2 8 7 1 5 7 6 3 8 5 3 7 2

Complete the grid so that each column, row and 3x3 box contains the numbers 1-9. For a greater challege see how fast you can complete the puzzle.

7

8 1

8 9 5 6

Time Record:

5

4

Copyright 2007 Puzzles by Pappocom Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com

XKCD by Randell Munroe Grab a partner and another paper and duke it out over the rough Hokie seas. Setup: Each player places their ships on “My Board” by filling in the required number of cells. Ships may not be placed diagonally or on top of each other. Gameplay: Each player takes one shot at a time. If the player calls the coordinates of a space where a ship is located, his opponent tells him so by saying "hit." If he missed, his opponent says "miss." Players mark the shots they take on their "Opponent" grid, a circle for a hit and an ‘x’ for a miss. A ship is sunk when all of its squares have been hit. When this happens, the player whose ship was sunk says, for example, "You sank my battleship." The first person to sink all of their opponent’s ships wins.

My Board Battleship:

Crossword

Carrier:

Submarine:

Destroyer:

My Opponent’s

word

WORDSEARCH: Science Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid. W W I

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WORD BANK 1 ECOSYSTEM 2 ENERGY 3 CONDENSATION 4 DIGESTION 5 FREEZE 6 ATOM 7 PROTON 8 MOLECULE 9 BOND 10 FORCE 11 MASS 12 VELOCITY 13 ACCELERATION 14 EVAPORATION 15 AQUARIUM 16 BEAKER 17 MICROSCOPE 18 CHEMICALS

UNSCRAMBLER

P

Unscramble the letters to solve the category “Hunger Games” Have a set of words you want to see in puzzles section? Email your lists to ctadsproduction@gmail.com.

Week ending April 26, 2012 Somebody That I Used to Know Goyte

1.

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Boyfriend Justin Bieber

Wild Ones (Feat. Sia) Flo Rida Payphone (Feat, Wiz Khalifa) Maroon 5

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Check out tomorrow’s paper on page 5 for the answers!

CONGRATS CLASS OF 2012


news 9 Students, staff say goodbye to Shultz may 2, 2012

editors: nick cafferky, michelle sutherland

COLLEGIATETIMES

newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

PHOTOS COURTESY OF DINING SERVICES

With Shultz closing its doors forever on May 9, members of the Tech community take time to share their memories, experiences of the campus’ oldest dining hall GINA PATTERSON news staff writer The Virginia Tech community will say goodbye to Shultz Wednesday, May 9, as it closes its doors for the last time. The 55,390-square-foot building was first used in September 1962 and has gathered many memories over the years. One of Shultz’s most popularized memories emphasized the world of pirates. The Pirate Meal was one of the biggest events Shultz has ever hosted and even won a National Grand Prize for its outstanding efforts. For the event, Shultz was decorated with everything from ship-resembling tables, to a Captain Jack Sparrow impersonator. “He actually went around campus all day, and I believe he used that (videotape) as an audition for Vegas,” said Jason Ludy, Shultz’s assistant manager. In addition to the Pirate Meal, Shultz had a memorable moment occur during a Thanksgiving meal a few years ago. “We had this Styrofoam turkey as a part of the decoration,” said Luther Moseley, the assistant

$

director of Shultz. “About half way through the meal, a couple of cadets escorted a man in and they had the turkey with him. Apparently this guy had stolen it. They walked him down and made him turn around and turn himself in.” Moseley said there was never a whole lot of trouble in the dining center and the amount of morale from the students was honorable. Although there have been many memorable moments, the current staff has known about the closing of Shultz for a while now. “We were getting ready for (it),” said Melissa Farley, food production supervisor. “We knew a couple years ago Shultz was going to close.” The different staff ’s at Shultz have made a growing relationship with the customer’s who eat at Shultz on a regular basis. “We build a little bit of that comradely with the corps,” Farley said. “So we’ve been learning their names — I like to interact with the customers, corps or not, a customer is a customer.” Some of the staff even took

Lifestyle & Community have a big announcement, selling things, need help? Free for VT students! Place an ad or announcement at collegiatetimes.com, visit our business office at 618 N. Main St. 9 am- 5pm Monday-Friday, or call (540) 961-9860. Students can come into 618 N. Main St. to place a free ad. Rates as low as 32 cents per word, contengent on the number of days to run. Prepaid. 15 word minimum. Cash, check, Visa, Mastercard, Discover, and American Express. Deadline: 3 pm 3 business days prior to publication.

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S R O I N SE

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the extra effort to know the student’s on a first name basis. “We had a lot of the same customers here and you get to know a lot of them by name,” said Meladie Daigneault, a housekeeper at Shultz. “I at least recognize them by face every day.” The fact that Shultz will close next week has started to hit some of the staff and students that frequent the dining hall. “It is more sad now than it was then,” Farley said. “Now it’s like a week and a half and we are finished.” One of the most missed characteristics of Shultz is the cheap buffet breakfast students can get in the morning. “My best memory at Shultz is every morning, with my best friends, (we would eat) a great breakfast to start off the day,” said Steve Hamilton, a sophomore majoring in history. Breakfast, according to the staff, has been a student favorite. “Everybody is going to miss the breakfast,” Farley said. “And hopefully they will miss

THE YEARBOOK OF

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Taurus (April 20-May 20) Don’t let a minor disagreement mess up all your plans. Compromise. Take a breather. It’s about to get busy. Save time by sticking rigorously to the rules.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) There’s more money coming in, thank goodness. It’s not a good time to travel, though. Studying and research goes well, as you have keen focus and concentration.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You have the resources you need, even if it doesn’t seem like it. Worrying is no good. Better learn quickly. Remain lexible, yet attentive. Smile (whether you mean it or not).

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Accept romantic challenges and be rewarded. Life’s too short to waste with doubts and fears. So what if you fail? Then you fail. You can accomplish far more than you think.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) There’s more of what you want at home. Listen to others, and spend on durable rather than momentary pleasures. You’re lucky in love for the next two days.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You’re on ire. No time to brag about recent accomplishments. Besides, increased arrogance could mess with your romance levels. Drink a dose of modesty.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Expect a heavy workload. It’s helpful to make room for diverse points of view. Your adaptability plays in your favor. When confronted with a decision, choose love over money.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) The time is not right for lirtation. If you stumble, get back up. A loved one could be obstinate. Get into a homebody phase, and make some long-awaited changes.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Accept the compliments as well as the criticisms with grace. You have the resources you need. Laughing, especially at oneself, is great therapy.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Find support and work in your own community. Allow others to be generous, and be generous yourself. Use your network. Stay frugal and avoid traveling, if possible. Give thanks. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your universe is expanding. New opportunities are popping up all around you. Grab the ones that feed your heart. Be lexible in romance. Give and take.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Consult with experts on negotiations and strategy. It’s getting romantic. Let a partner take the lead while you make something delicious.

Maggie showed up as a st stray at the barn where I ride when she was 6 months old. As she got older, she spent more time inside rather than outside. My trainer wanted to find her a forever home where she could be pampered and loved. She came home with me in November 2010 and has been with me ever since!

Have a question you need answered about your pet? Or want your pet featured in next week’s paper? Email your questions to studybreak@collegemedia.com with the title ‘Pet of the Week.’


Wednesday, May 2, 2012 Print Edition  

Wednesday, May 2, 2012 Print Edition of The Collegiate Times

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