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Friday, February 17, 2012 An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 109th year, issue 20

News, page 2

People & Clubs, page 5

Opinions, page 3

Sports, page 6

Study Break, page 4

Unexplained death silences ambitious mind Sophomore philosophy student Dieter Seltzer died Tuesday, fighting depression but looking forward ZACH CRIZER editor-in-chief Virginia Tech sophomore Dieter Seltzer was entertaining ideas for the future Monday night as the freethinking philosophy major sought to chart a course toward political and academic achievement. But the next day, Michael Seltzer found his son Dieter lying on the floor of their Manassas, Va., home. Police investigation and an autopsy by Prince William County officials have not determined what caused Dieter’s death. Family members said Thursday that Dieter had been openly seeking treatment for depression, but police have assured them the death was almost certainly not a suicide. “The detectives are 99.9 percent

sure it was not suicide,” Michael said. “There is no evidence to suggest that he took his own life.” Dieter was found in a small hallway outside the family’s kitchen. A small abrasion on his head indicated he fell down or passed out, but Michael said the fall would not have been enough to contribute to his death. “He was lying down on the floor on his back, and he looked really peaceful. He had his legs crossed, like he was resting,” Michael said. Michael speculated that his son most likely died as a result of a drug reaction that aggravated an unknown existing health condition or caused averse effects in combination with another drug. He said Dieter had seen a doctor three times in the past month.

“It wasn’t intentional,” he said. “He wasn’t trying to kill himself. He was just trying to feel better.” A final determination SELTZER will depend on toxicology reports and other tests that could take weeks to complete. Dieter had been at home in Manassas since January. He decided to take the remainder of the current semester off to deal with depression that had been worsened by a series of recent events, including the sudden departure of his stepmother. “A whole bunch of things happened at the same time,” Michael said. “My wife left in August — just abandoned the marriage, the family. That was kind of hard on everyone.” Gabi Seltzer, Dieter’s sister and a

Tech senior philosophy major, said her brother was particularly affected by the separation from their younger half-brother. “When she left our family, she moved to Alabama,” Gabi said. “And with her, she took our 11-year-old brother. They had always shared a room together, and they had been very close. He wanted very much to mentor our younger brother, Paul. So even though he didn’t show it, I think it was very difficult on him.” Gabi said Dieter became noticeably distressed, but was taking time to correct the issue. “He seemed overwhelmed by things that didn’t overwhelm him before,” she said. “I think he just needed a break from everything to recuperate.” Monday night, Dieter — who, along with Gabi, was a regular Collegiate Times opinion columnist — was taking steps to occupy himself for the rest of his time away from school.

Printing in new dimensions

“The night before, he was in a great mood,” Michael said. “He had been filling out job applications because he wanted to work and make some money while he was taking some time off. He was excited about that.” Gabi said he was also considering making a move to pursue his dreams of stirring discussion about politics, philosophy and economics. He was thinking about applying to Columbia University — the Ivy League institution in New York City — as a transfer student to improve his chances of attending a marquee graduate school. She said he was very satisfied with his education at Tech but saw an opportunity to boost his profile for a future in academia or elite politics. Michael described his son as a person who let the world’s problems “engulf him.” “When he was interested in something — like the stuff he was writing about and learning about with the

recent financial crisis — he just became immersed in it. It was like he was living it — what to do about, how to fix it,” Michael said. Now, Michael and Gabi are mourning the sudden loss of a “passionate, active person” who encouraged his wide circle of friends to think freely. Gabi said Dieter frequently sought to challenge conventional notions of the world. “He took it almost as a project for himself to be the most freethinking person he could possibly be, and he really challenged people around him to do the same,” Gabi said. “He didn’t like seeing people fall into what he thought were society’s misconceptions about things.” Dieter’s funeral will be held Saturday at 4 p.m., at the Pierce Funeral Home in Manassas. In lieu of flowers, the family has asked for donations to the Tech Department of Philosophy scholarship fund.

Everything you need to know about

FLU SEASON

by Madeline Gordon features staff writer

It’s that time of year... When the flu grips campus, it leaves many in fear, wondering whether they should have gotten the flu shot. Some may have avoided it because of all the myths and misinformation out there, while others may simply believe the vaccine is unimportant. The Collegiate Times spoke with Dr. Kanitta Charoensiri, an osteopathic physician at Schiffert Health Center to set the record straight about the flu vaccine.

Why is it important to get a flu shot? It helps prevent people from having serious complications that can result from the flu. There are those who may still come down with the flu, but the impact is less, since it’s a milder version.

Using 3D printers, students transform artwork from digital data to multidimensional structures in hours CODY OWENS news reorter

Steven Gethard came to studio one morning to find that his design for a platter had leapt off the page and into real life. In just a few hours, the sophomore industrial design major’s design had gone from a two-dimensional idea to a three-dimensional model he held in his hands, all thanks to the technology of 3D printing and rapid prototyping. “On a 3D printer, you can submit (a design), and overnight it can pop right out,” Gethard said. 3D printers, used by the College of Architecture and Urban Studies, as well as the College of Engineering, are machines that create 3D models from design data in a digital file. Complex plastic models can be made at a resolution of one one-hundredth of an inch in a matter of hours using the technology. Although some 3D printers scan an object to begin the production process, the Dimension SST 1200es printer owned by the CAUS requires a model to be made in a computer-aided design program, such as SolidWorks or Rhino 3D. Jeff Lang, the computing technology manager for the School of Architecture and Design, said the CAD model is exported to a file format that creates a mesh, which shows the model as a series of triangles. “It’s a mesh representation of all the surfaces and curves done as triangles,” Lang said. “The triangles are patched together to make smooth surfaces along the curves and the sides.” The file is then analyzed by a software program called Catalyst, which plans tool paths for the two building heads in the printer. The software projects the amount of materials needed and the time the build will take. For example, a six-inch-by-halfinch-by-three inch model would take five hours and seven minutes to create. The software also points out potential imperfections in the design. “Maybe someone made a wall too thin and it’s going to collapse and not be the right strength — this is print preview taken to the extreme,” Lang said. The file is sent next door to the

3D printer, which is about the size of a refrigerator. The bottom of the machine houses spools of building material, ABS plastic and support material, which is made of water-soluble, rendered animal fat. 3D printers work on the principle of additive manufacturing. Instead of physically removing excess material to produce a desired model, an additive process builds by adding material layer by layer. “If you were working in wood or metal, you start with a block and you cut away,” Lang said. “This is the opposite — it builds from nothing into what’s there.” Inside the 10-inch-by-10-inch-by12-inch build envelope, the materials are fed through the build tools. The ABS plastic is ejected out of one tool head in a liquid state and rapidly dries after being laid down. After the first layer of plastic, the second tool head lays the support material down. The process continues layer by layer, with the heads rising and lowering as the 3D materials begin to take shape. The building process depends on the design’s complexity and size. Models can be completed in a time frame ranging from a few hours to 48 hours — a rollerblade model with individual wheels, laces and buckles is an example of the latter. After the model finishes printing, the water-soluble support material must be removed by being placed in a water bath. This step can take 12 to 24 hours, and hopefully represents the intended design. “When you do something by hand using clay or wood, you get imperfections but this comes out exactly as it would be on your model,” Gethard said. While the ability to make intricate models relatively quickly is useful, it is not cheap. The Dimension SST 1200es printer used by the CAUS cost $35,000 at its time of purchase more than six years ago. Although innovations in technology have occurred since then, this model is still priced at $32,900. While 3D printing will save students time, it will not necessarily save their wallets. Utilizing the 3D printer incurs a base cost of $2.50 along with a cost of $4.60 per cubic inch of material. Despite the costs, 3D printing has made the creation of models a simpler

Should you get a flu shot every year, and can you skip years between flu shots? Flu shots aren’t like childhood vaccines where you get a series and then you are done. Flu shots are necessary every year. The strains are evaluated, and the vaccine changes from year to year.

When is the peak of flu season? We usually see the peak in February, this month. But this is not a typical flu season.

If you haven’t caught the flu by now, is it worth getting vaccinated? DANIEL LIN / SPPS

Jeff Lang presents a rollerblade that was made using Tech’s 3D printer. and quicker process. However, models are not the only uses of this emergent technology. Rapid prototyping found another use at the Kroehling Advanced Materials Foundry, a metal casting facility that opened last April on Plantation Road. A rapid prototyping machine there is used to produce molds in which molten metals are poured. The supporting mold is then removed, leaving behind the metal design. “There are a lot of different approaches to how people use this,” Lang said. These approaches extend beyond Blacksburg. The use of 3D printing at Virginia Tech indicates even greater potential for rapid prototyping in the future. Instead of relying on an assembly line to build a product step by step using hundreds of parts, a rapid prototyping machine could create complex products in a single step. This not only reduces manufacturing time, but also removes the need to order basic parts from other manufacturers. Specialized or rare parts could be produced using a 3D printer. In a “Popular Mechanics” article appearing in June 2009, talk show host Jay Leno explained how he used a 3D printing technology to repair one of his antique steam-powered cars. When an aluminum heater for his 1907 White Steamer wore out, Leno

scanned the part and created a plastic model using a 3D printer. After confirming that the design was compatible with his vehicle, he made a new part using metal wire as the building material. Thirty-three hours later, the part was finished, and his Steamer was fixed. “Any antique car part can be reproduced with these machines,” Leno wrote. “It’s an amazingly versatile technology.” This versatility has several companies, including Made in Space, working on bringing the technology into space. Last year, Made in Space made a 3D printer, which, in a test, fabricated a wrench using powder and a binder while in partial gravity. The hope is to send a 3D printer to the International Space Station. When repairs need to be performed, CAD data could be sent to the station and be used to fabricate the necessary tool, thus saving the time and funds needed to send up the physical tool. As rapid prototyping increasingly gains favor, many predict the prohibitive cost will decrease. “I think price will go down, it will be easier to use, cheaper and faster,” Gethard said. “At the end of the semester, everybody sends stuff in, and you can only do so much at a time, so we’ll probably need some more machines in the future.”

Probably. The flu season is a little bit later because of the weather. It’s a pretty mild winter, but the flu is still out there — it’s just not as much as what we would see in a typical winter.

Are college students at high risk for the catching the flu? The risk is that college students tend to live in residence halls, which have close quarters, and that causes the spread of respiratory illnesses quite quickly.

What are some tips for staying healthy during the flu season? The recommendation is to stay away from people who are sick, wash your hands and cover your cough — either cough into a tissue and dispose of it, or cough into your sleeve. Don’t share drinks with other people, stay hydrated and get enough sleep.

Is the flu shot still available at the Schiffert Health Center? We don’t have anymore because our clinics (ran out) last year, but they are still available in all of the pharmacies in the community and at the Health Department.


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news

february 17, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

Sallie Mae alters student loan policy PRISCILLA ALVAREZ news staff writer Sallie Mae, the nation’s largest private student-loan provider, recently changed its policy on forbearance fees in reaction to a viral online petition. Prior to the change, the lending giant charged a “good faith deposit” of $50 per loan for every three-month block. It was the only way students could avoid defaulting. The new regulations do not require graduates to pay the fees immediately, but they are instead applied to the remaining balance once payments are resumed. Patricia Christel, a Sallie Mae spokeswoman, told The New York Times, “We have been giving careful consideration to our policy for some time, and we are changing it to apply the good-faith payment to the customers’ balance after they resume a track record of ontime payments.” The change is largely credited to an online petition made by Hunter College graduate Stef Gray.

Upon graduation, Gray had three separate loan payments from Sallie Mae in addition to $300 in forbearance fees because she used her grace period in between undergraduate and graduate school. “Sallie Mae has a dual role as lender and collector. They don’t have any incentive to protect students from default because they profit from it. They give you the option of paying the fee or going into default,” Gray said. “They won’t work with you to lower your monthly payments or lower your interest rate.” Gray owes an additional $1,100 every three months in interest while still paying the $150 in fees. Her loans of $40,000 have now increased to $65,000 over two years because of interest costs. After paying $300 in charges, Gray started a petition to end the fees. She was inspired by Molly Katchpole’s Bank of America campaign. Katchpole went up against Bank of America for charging a $5 monthly debit card fee to debit card users.

Through an online Change. org petition, she gathered 300,000 signatures, and Bank of America subsequently changed its policy. Gray also used Change.org to raise awareness about her issue. She started the petition in November 2011, but did not get a huge response until January, when 77,000 people signed her petition. Wearing a cap and gown and accompanied by Katchpole, she delivered the petition to Sallie Mae’s Washington offices. However, Gray is not fully satisfied with Sallie Mae’s change. “It’s a partial victory,” Gray said. “It is still a fee for having economic hardship, but I am very optimistic and enthusiastic about the response so far. The fight is not over by any means.” The movement is gaining more followers daily — it is nearing 125,000. People can also post their stories about student debt on her website, OccupyStudentDebt.com. “Originally, when I started the website, I thought every-

one would be in their 20s and 30s. They’re (elderly citizens) going to be stuck with debt until they’re 96 years old,” Gray said. “They are left with no retirement and back hold student debt. The stories posted on the website are infinitely depressing.” Gray will continue her campaign against Sallie Mae. She hopes that if Sallie Mae changes its policies, then other student lenders will do the same. “They have to realize it’s not just about me or my story. There are very similar stories of Americans with student debt,” Gray said. Online petitioning is beginning to gain popularity and is proving to be effective. People can communicate through the Web about similar problems or complaints. There are several other websites dedicated to online petitions, such as GoPetition.com and PetitionOnline.com. “Nowadays, everything is done online, so I feel like it would be the best place to start,” said Chase Johnson, a freshman accounting major.

Congress cuts wind energy subsidies JULIE WERNAU mcclatchy newspapers CHICAGO — The wind industry is predicting massive layoffs and stalled or abandoned projects after a deal to renew a tax credit for wind production failed Thursday in Washington. The move is expected to have major ramifications in states such as Illinois, where 13,892 megawatts of wind projects — enough to power 3.3 million homes per year — wait to be connected to the electric grid. Many of those projects will be abandoned or significantly delayed without federal subsidies. Illinois is home to more than 150 companies that support the wind industry. At least 67 of those companies make tur-

bines or components for wind farms. And Chicago is the U.S. headquarters to more than a dozen major wind companies who wanted to take advantage of powerful midwestern winds and the fact wind power could be fed into the electric grid. Industry lobbyists fought hard to strike a deal this week in Washington that would have included an extension of the production tax credit — which provides an income tax credit of 2.2 cents/kilowatt-hour for the production of electricity from wind turbines. Wind proponents tried to tuck the tax credit extension in legislation aimed at extending payroll tax cuts, but congressional leaders did not include it in that bill. There is still a possibility the extension for wind power tax

credits could come through as a stand-alone bill or tied to other legislation. But Washington insiders say that is unlikely to happen before the election in November. By then, the wind industry says it will be too late to avoid massive layoffs and project delays since wind projects slated for 2013 should be traveling their way down the supply chain now. The tax credit doesn’t expire until the end of this year. But in order for developers to receive it, they must have their turbines up and running before year’s end. That deadline has 2012 shaping up to be a banner year, as wind industry developers race to complete projects. Few projects are slated for 2013. Developers say they either pushed projects back to

2012, or stalled those slated for 2013 because of the uncertainty over the tax credit. Industry consultants say new capacity is likely to return to lows this country hasn’t experienced since 2004. Contributing to the bleak outlook for 2013: Competition from cheap natural gas and anemic demand for power as the economic recovery struggles to pick up steam. “We simply have not seen that strong demand for new power generation,” said Daniel Shreve, director and partner of MAKE Consulting, a wind energy consultancy with an office in Chicago. “In the last four to five years, despite the fact that you haven’t seen tremendous load growth, new power generation is being added. Reserve margins have grown. We’re oversubscribed.”

editors: nick cafferky, michelle sutherland newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

what you’re saying On Syria requiring creative action

Arafat: "...there are greater and louder calls

for the United States to intervene."You've got to be kidding me.So we intervened in Libya and got a radical Islamist regime for our efforts.We intervened against Saddam Hussien and got the hatred of the entire Muslim world for it.We intervened agaonst the Taliban and now we're told we have created more volunteers because of our intervention.Anything we do anywhere in the Muslim world is greeted with criticism and hatred. But now we're told we must intervene in Syria. That's priceless!When will Muslims start tackling their own welf-inflicted problems on their own, or are they too incompetent to even consider that an option?

Arafat: “What is happening in Syria is heart

wrenching, tragic, inexcusable and cannot be ignored. The Syrians fighting for their freedom and human dignity represent tremendous courage and resolve.” Apologies for jumping to conclusions with my earlier comment. That said the assumptions made throughout this article are fanciful, in my opinion. Take the quote above for instance. Ausan is stating unequivocally that the Syrians are “fighting for their freedom…” But based on the results of the “Arab Spring” to date the opposite conclusion is closer to the truth. In Libya, for instance, a militaristic Islamic regime was replaced by a more Islamist militaristic regime. A regime whose first act in the international arena was to invite the genocidal leader of Sudan. Is that Ausan’s idea of a more free – or even a remotely freer country. In Egypt more of the same. Now tourists will no longer visit Egypt because of this “freer” country. More and more women are forced to wear burkas. More and more Christians are being killed and their churches burned. And on it goes.When will ALL of us get it through our heads that Islam and freedom are simply incompatible for Islam IS a repressive, oppressive institution and has always been so. Mohammed, Islam’s prophet, was so. He brutalized those who disagreed with him. He enslaved, tortured, raped and stole from others. The apple does not fall far from the tree.


opinions

editors: scott masselli, sean simons opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

february 17, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

Father of fallen student remembers son’s letter Dieter Seltzer, a student who passed away on Tuesday, wrote his father, Michael, a letter for his birthday. Michael wanted his words heard. 12/31/11 Dad, While this time of year is always exciting, and celebrating your birthday is always an event I anticipate celebrating, this year is a little different – there is a melancholy overtone looming in the background for a number of reasons, namely because this is ‘the big five zero’ for you. I could’ve MCT CAMPUS

bought you a card that says something like “Happy Birthday! Just like fine wine, as life ages it gets better,” but this is not true. Of course, there’s no reason to assume it ages the opposite way either, but there’s no denying turning 50 comes with some scary realizations – as does any landmark birthday, but this one more so than any previous (I imagine). However, just like Foucault and his German predecessor who influenced him (- sorry but I can’t help but talk about Nietzsche these days, although I’m sure you have no problem with that-), I don’t think we should anticipate the so-labeled ‘bad’ and ‘scary’ with dread or depression. Life is full of terrible things, and they are as necessary as the good ones, so we should not try to avoid them by dressing them up with patronizing falsifications. Of course, to call one’s 50th Birthday a ‘terrible’ event seems highly overdramatic and pessimistic – clearly it comes with its perks as well. Think about it – in 5 years you’ll be able to eat at IHOP and Denny’s on a senior discount. But this birthday is even a little hard for me, so I can imagine the type of thoughts that are running through your head. I remember telling myself one day, after realizing that I had never really experienced the painful death of a friend or family member, that the day you come to pass would surely be my hardest. Even thinking about the days when we won’t be able to play soccer or tennis together because you’ve aged too much puts a lump in my

Greed fuels 3D craze As

if raking in an all-time record of nearly $2.8 billion at the box office was not enough, the James Cameron epic motion picture “Avatar” now firmly stands as the king of 3D viewing technology, a format craze that has expanded beyond anyone’s wildest expectations. There have been countless attempts, in Hollywood and other industries, to match the film’s success. Movies are consistently offered with 3D and traditional audiences in mind. Electronics companies are furiously marketing 3D TVs, video cameras and video games. But viewers beware. This is not the end of the road, and the next slew of 3D moneymakers has already started to emerge — the cinematic re-release. In what is inevitably going to become the most obnoxious 3D push yet, Hollywood production companies are beginning to rerelease timeless classics with 3D effects in a greedy attempt to rake in millions from shameless moviegoers. George Lucas and his legendary namesake production company Lucasfilm have jumped on the bandwagon with a re-release of “Star Wars: Episode I” that debuted Feb. 10. The news was met with rampant excitement and anticipation, of course. But consider this — any sensible “Star Wars” fan had no problem forking over nearly $100 for the Blu-ray box set to get the classic saga in crisp high definition. It is nothing more than greed to ask fans to pay another $13 to see the film in 3D. This goes without considering that, with modest success from the first re-release, Lucasfilm

will have no problem releasing the other five films in 3D to capitalize on the craze. Cameron is rolling the dice as well. “Titanic,” which until “Avatar” was the highest grossing film of all time, will get another swing at box office history with a 3D re-release of its own on April 4. It is hard to remember the last time “Titanic” was not on TNT, raking in royalties and solidifying its generationspanning exposure. Cinematic experiences in 3D present a unique double-edged sword. Seeing the on-screen spectacle of Liam Neeson waving around a lightsaber or watching the “Titanic” split in two in 3D will be quite a sight. But the 3D re-releases seem to diminish the legends of the films. The 20-year anniversary of a film is a wonderful opportunity to benefit from the nostalgia of an older, classic film. A box set for “Titanic” 20 years after the fact makes for a wonderful investment for any movie buff, as well as a sure hit Christmas gift for mom and dad. However, with the feeling of just having seen the 3D version on the big screen, a high definition box set is a hard sell. Seeing the 3D release is also almost an insult to a filmmaker’s first attempt with a film. “Star Wars,” in its original showcase, was a visionary masterpiece — it had its flaws, but the legend comes from the era. “Star Wars” was immensely popular not just because of its dramatic story, but because of the on-screen achievements with rudimentary technology. Looking back, “Titanic” was a long film centered on dialogue and

romance — its visual spectacle, the purpose of a 3D experience, was impressive but minimal, with regard to most of the film’s tone. In the near future, movie-goers will have had the opportunity to see all of the classics re-issued in 3D, with the gimmick and greed swallowing box office dollars. Do not be surprised to see Indiana Jones cracking his whip right in front of your face or ET pointing at your heart when he wants to phone home. Perhaps films like these — clear classics that have stood the test of time — will be fine to see in 3D. But Hollywood never stops where it should. Every studio in the business will want a slice of the pie. Classics will be covered in a heartbeat, and of course, they will make money. However, studios tend to drive a current trend into the ground, and theaters everywhere will be filled with screens showing movies not 5 years old, but already re-released in 3D. Forget the “Spiderman” reboot — put Tobey Maguire back into rotation with the original flick and see the money pour in. “Transformers” seems like it came out just yesterday — do not worry, fighting robot fans, it will be in 3D soon as well. And when we see Zach Galifianakis get socked by Mike Tyson and Ed Helms singing about tigers in 3D, we will know that movie-goers have been fooled by the Hollywood machine once again.

ERIC JONES -regular columnist -junior -psychology major

throat. Many of the fondest memories of my childhood, along with my adventures with Tommy, are us playing sports together – that is where my love for them developed, and I will cherish those memories with my very being indefinitely. But as you, Foucault, and Nietzsche have taught me, life itself is a paradox – an attempt to look for meaning in an inherently meaningless world – a striving to create something lasting in a lifetime marked by brevity. So I ask you to look at this day with a paradoxical attitude: you are one year closer to becoming ‘old’, so celebrate this day with joy in your heart. After all, there is so much more to encounter, and so many memories to create and cherish. No one can take this away from you, not even the man in the black cloak carrying the scythe. If this day is meant for anything, it is meant for us to look back on your life with great fondness, appreciating all the accomplishments you’ve achieved. (Most notably – according to Joe – me and Gabi because of your unparalleled successes as a parent – something that is, in fact, lasting that you’ve created which will be passed down through generations for years to come). It should also be meant, however, to look forward as well, embracing the future as it lies before us – unconquered. Dad, you have been the inspiration for everything I have become and everything I want to achieve. Happy Birthday. Love, Dieter

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Teen fights against stereotyping G

aby Rodriguez was a 17-yearold high school honor student in Yakima, Wash., when she hit upon an imaginative senior project on teen pregnancy. She would declare she was pregnant. In the months that followed, as she bulked up with a home-made prosthesis, she would log the reaction of friends, family and classmates to her condition. Rodriguez got approval from her teacher and principal, even the schools superintendent. Only her mother, boyfriend and one or two intimates were in on the ruse. In April, after six and a half months, she came clean during a school assembly, where she passed out index cards on which she had recorded remarks she had overheard and had students read them aloud. Then she pulled the pregnancy bump from beneath her pullover. "I'm fighting against those stereotypes and rumors," she said, "because the reality is I'm not pregnant." She was warmly applauded by her fellow students, and lavishly praised by her teachers. After the local paper, the Yakima Herald-Republic, broke the story, it became a minor sensation, and was widely reported here and abroad. Rodriguez did celebrity turns on ABC's "Good Morning America" and NBC's "Today." She's writing a book. By the time she formally presented the results of her experiment in May, she was no longer speaking to reporters, on instructions of her literary agent. A Lifetime Channel movie, "The Pregnancy Project," starring Alexa Vega as Rodriguez, debuted last month. I had missed this affair until I got an email from a former colleague, Harris Meyer, an award-winning journalist and ex-city editor at the Yakima paper. Meyer was alarmed by the generally uncritical way in which the media had embraced Rodriguez's project, which, he noted, rested on a sweeping deception. It was "a case of unethical

human experimentation," he wrote, "ill-conceived and potentially dangerous." The media did swoon. "I admire her so much," her principal said on "Good Morning America." "Her courage, her creativity, her strength." The segment ended: "Gaby plans to present her findings to community leaders to help young women fight stereotypes and find the same quality she discovered along the way _ courage." Precisely what "stereotypes" she was battling aren't clear. The comments she related expressed little more than the dismay and disappointment you'd expect from the friends of a talented student who'd done something very foolish. Meanwhile, six of her seven siblings were left believing her pregnancy was real, as did her hapless boyfriend's parents, who thought he was the father, his five brothers and sisters and everybody but Rodriguez's best friend. All were part of what the Yakima paper called "a social experiment." Now, there has indeed been distinguished experimentation that relied on deception. A famous instance was Yale psychologist Stanley Milgram's 1961 experiment that tested obedience to authority. Students recruited to help run a "scientific study of memory" administered what they believed were electrical shocks to unseen people in another room who flubbed exam questions. But the students had been deceived: they weren't helpers, they were the test subjects, and the memory study was a sham. The real experiment was designed to see just how much pain they would inflict if ordered, whatever the screams next door. Unquestionably, the test subjects were tricked, and couldn't give the informed consent that ethical research normally requires. But Milgram's extraordinary study would have been impossible oth-

erwise, and we'd all be the poorer without his chilly findings about compliance with evil authority. If inquiries involve deceit, it's reasonable to demand that they be worth it. As lawyer and ethicist Jack Marshall wrote on his Ethics Alarm website: "Such dishonest exercises involving the intentional deception of hundreds of people carry a heavy burden of justification." If a reporter dissembles to infiltrate a nefarious place, it should be to illuminate important realities that can't be accessed otherwise. Gaby Rodriguez did nothing more than hoodwink her peers into conduct she could upbraid them for later. It's hard to imagine what she found she couldn't have learned by spending time with teens who were truly pregnant. To her credit, Rodriguez herself said on NBC's "Today": "I felt guilty through the whole process just because I was lying to everybody." But her elders almost uniformly ignored her misgivings. As Matt Lauer concluded breezily, "She set the bar pretty high here ..." Don't be surprised to see him fawning over the enterprising senior who feigns a crippling injury and wheels himself to school claiming to be paraplegic, all to "test" public reaction to disabilities. The new media world we increasingly inhabit offers more opportunity than ever to fabricate realities, to adopt online handles and deceptive pseudonyms, sometimes for what seems good cause. But there are reasons why basic morality deplores deceit. And it's a pity that none of the grownups in Gaby Rodriguez's case saw fit to explore in a serious and thoughtful way how honesty and trustworthiness should figure in the education of this extraordinary young woman.

EDWARD WASSERMAN -mcclatchy newspapers

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CHELSEA GUNTER / COLLEGIATE TIMES

editors: chelsea gunter, patrick murphy

people & clubs As

He said: Show employers confidence S

uit up, it is job fair season. This is stressful time of year, as students are trying to figure out where they want to work. Believe it or not, students pay to go to school to get a degree, helping them land jobs. The $20,000 tuition a year is not just a cover charge for a four-year party. Internships are the gateways to jobs. Most companies treat them as two-way, summer-long interviews. A company can see how well you perform and how much you enjoy working with the company. Many internships pay better than normal summer jobs and provide students real-life experience. Any student graduating with an internship — or two — under his belt is more likely to land a job over someone who lifeguarded all summer. I had the opportunity to work as an intern last summer, and it was an amazing way to not only apply concepts and skills I was taught in the classroom, but also learn things I never would have otherwise. The connections I made over the summer were invaluable. Plus, going to the career fair last fall was a more enjoyable experience because I could actually share information about my internship with other companies. By now, I am sure you have realized these internship things are pretty awesome. You can attain one by showing off your experience and utilizing your communication skills — with a

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bit of luck. Before going to a job fair, do as much research as you can on the companies you are interested in. They will definitely be impressed with this knowledge. I have even been known to practice my handshake with friends, as first impressions are everything. It can be nerve-wracking talking to recruiters, especially if you are doing it for the first time. Talking yourself up is not only acceptable, but essential — confidence is key. And make sure to bring plenty of copies of your resume, as you definitely do not want to run out of those. To land an internship or a job, you are also going to need persistence. I spent every hour I could talking to various company employers pretty much begging for at least an interview. When in doubt about talking to a company, do it. You definitely will not get an offer by not talking to them. But always be prepared for rejection. Even super involved students with perfect grade point averages do not get an offer from every company they talk to. So average students, like myself, are even less likely. And like I said earlier, it is going to take a little luck. Maybe you will find that you are family friends with the recruiter or perhaps they did similar things while they were in college. It is very hard to stand out as an applicant, so anything you can

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and advisers who genuinely care about helping students. I recently attended the career fair and was shocked at the amount of underclassmen. It was excessively crowded — a woman at a booth grabbed me and told me I had someone else’s nametag clinging to my back. Sorry Erick, I’m sure that was awkward when you walked up to your next booth. I do know one thing: I can definitely get used to seeing men in business casual on a daily basis. Can you say heaven? It was surprising how attractive the men of Tech can be when they put some effort into their looks and actually shave. I looked around and thought to myself, “Although I’m going to be your boss one day, we can still be — ahem —

foot forward at the career fairs, but I have also put myself out there for any opportunity I come across. I know what the dream internship would be, but I am also not naive. I am willing to grasp opportunities that could potentially lead me in directions I never imagined. With my history as a military brat, I am very used to packing up my life and moving to the next location every two years or so. My biggest fear is that I am going to be put into a career where I am stuck in one place for an extended period of time. This is the sole reason I chose marketing in the first place. The innovative and fast-paced atmosphere that surrounds the industry has always fascinated me, and I would have to say that my people skills are pretty Let us just hope To all of the graduating se- stellar. that there is a companiors — and to all the soph- ny culture that undermy sarcasm and omores and juniors trying to stands vast usage of cheesy obtain an internship — good metaphors. Hard work and motiluck with your future en- vation have led me to offers for the deavors. I have for words for numerous summer, and I cannot you all: Keep on keeping on.” wait to decide where I am going to accept. Wherever summer 2012 leads me, I know I’m friends.” going to meet people who I have a feeling I am going will inspire me to become to fit into the corporate world greater. just fine. I am a passionate, To all of the graduatdriven, self-starting, inde- ing seniors — and to all the pendent woman — hire me, sophomores and juniors please? trying to obtain an internReality then sets in and ship — good luck with your reminds me I must first future endeavors. I have four land the job to enjoy busi- words for you all: Keep on ness life. I needed a life- keeping on. Show the world line, connection or anything what Hokie Nation has to at this point. This is about offer. We are lucky enough the time I discovered that to be at a top-notch univerprofessors actually want sity, so we might as well utistudents to come into their lize our education to its fullest office hours and tell them potential. their aspirations and career goals. KELLEY By sharing that informaENGLISH tion, you are opening your-featured columnist self up for opportunities and -junior connections your professors have — if only someone had -marketing mantold me that two years ago. agement major I have tried to put my best

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do helps. Once you land an interview, you are more than halfway there. First off, do not lose that confidence. They are taking time out of their day to talk to you, so they are clearly a little interested. Be prepared to answer questions about any part of your resume. The final step is the follow up. I wrote a handwritten letter to the people who interviewed me last year. I thought this was a great idea, since I got an internship with one of the companies. But when I asked the interviewer over the summer if he received my letter, he said he never did. Apparently getting a letter to a person in a 500,000 plus square foot facility is harder than it looks. From here on out, I’ve stuck with the thank you email. Congratulations if you are so lucky to be granted a job or internship. As my friend says, “Welcome to the set-for-life club.” But the work does not stop here. Go to work with the same mindset when applying for a position — determination, drive and passion — to turn that summer internship into a full-time job offer.

much as I do not want to admit it, I am growing up. I still like to think sitting down and watching a Disney princess movie is an acceptable thing to do or that my bills are going to pay themselves. Newsflash: Not only did turning 21 open a portal to downtown, but it also hit me with a pillowcase full of bricks called “life.” As soon as you get to college, it is as if you have won. Your grades, extracurricular activities and volunteer work have done their duty to get you here, and it is all downhill from here, right? Wrong. The process starts all over again when it comes time to find a job. The biggest decision is how you will fill your summers. Do you get an internship or do you pursue other options? No one ever told me the worrying begins sophomore year. My Virginia Tech obsession drove me toward applying to be an orientation leader. In my perfect world, I would get the position and find an internship the following summer. I ended up getting the job and having the most incredible summer as an orientation leader. I met hundreds of incoming freshmen and can honestly say I learned more about myself than I expected. As I gallivanted around Blacksburg sharing my experiences with group 16 — best dream team ever — I could not help but wonder if I was missing out on an internship opportunity that all my peers had done instead. While I would not trade my orientation experience for anything, others were networking with future employers and a huge amount of worry began to build in the back of my mind. This is where Tech comes in. The university hires teachers

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She said: Open up during job search

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SAID

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february 17, 2012

solutions: “Rugrats” 1) Tommy 2) Chuckie 3) Angelica 4) Phil 5) Spike 6) Kimi 7) Lil 8) Dil

Send your information and a photo to the Collegiate Times at studybreak@collegemedia.com to make an announcement.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) There’s a test ahead, so sharpen your pencils. A respectful attitude and willing hands earn you new opportunities, and people are checking you out. Smile and wave.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) It’s getting busy now (and pro itable). Stick to the high road, since anything lower has muddy pitfalls. A friend brings news. There’s an amazing breakthrough in love.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Your friends really come through for you for the next few days. Take all the help that’s available. Your territory expands. Strange demands could arise.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) You may be tempted to stir up trouble, but leave that to others. Meditation helps you stay positive and centered. It’s so much better for your health.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Nurture your creative side. Continue working on the things that make you happy. Make beauty. Cook with honey. It all could be very romantic.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Work de initely takes priority for the next few days. Lots more business coming in. You’re attracting the attention of an important person. Good news from afar.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Find strength in numbers. Take suggestions. Practice listening to someone as if you’ve paid them a million dollars. You can let another take the wheel.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Home has a strong pull on you now. Perhaps it’s time to beautify your nest or throw a party with special friends. Poetry, anyone? Say the magic words.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Take advantage of your great discussion skills today. Pay special attention to successful friends... they have a lot to teach ou. Get a bonus. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) It’s not necessary to purchase things you want but don’t need to feel complete. You can ind satisfaction in a job well done. Explore and discover. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Being king or queen of the mountain comes with perks but also with responsibilities. Use your newly gained power wisely. Beware of tunnels that have no cheese.

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sports 6 Hokies return home to face Jackets

editors: matt jones, zach mariner

february 17, 2012

sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

COLLEGIATETIMES

DANIEL LIN / SPPS

Virginia Tech’s Victor Davila backs down against Georgia Tech’s Lance Storrs in last year’s 59-43 win over the Yellow Jackets in the ACC Tournament. Davila had six points.

After their battle against Florida State Thursday night, the Hokies come home for another ACC tilt BROOKS TIFFANY sports staff writer The Virginia Tech men’s basketball team will look to extend its home winning streak to three, as the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets come to town, trying to shed the dubious label of dead last in the ACC. The Yellow Jackets (9-16, 2-9 ACC) are on a terrible skid — they have lost eight of nine and 12 of 14, with their last win coming against fellow ACC bottom dweller Boston College. One of the only bright spots for the Jackets this season has been small forward Glenn Rice Jr., who leads the team in points per game with 13 and rebounds per game with 6.7. Despite Rice’s efforts, the Jackets have struggled and are in need of additional help on offense, as point guard Mfon Udofia seems to be their only other significant contributor, averaging 10 points per game and leading the team in assists. The combined offensive efforts of Rice and Udofia, along with the remainder of the Yellow Jackets

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squad, have them ranked 301st overall in points per game and 307th in the nation in assists. With such flat offensive production, the Yellow Jackets could be in for a rough night since the Hokies (14-11, 3-7 ACC) are consistent on defense, ranking 53rd overall in points allowed per game and yielding 62.2 to opponents. The Hokies will need to clamp down on defense — as they did against Clemson and BC — forcing the Yellow Jackets into offensive mistakes and turnovers to give themselves more opportunities to fire up their offense. Some of that offensive firepower could come in the form of freshman Dorian Finney-Smith, who had an outstanding game against BC, grabbing eight rebounds and scoring 17 points, including the game winner with 1.8 seconds remaining. In what was most likely his best game of the year, Finney-Smith showed a preview of what may be his future with the team. FinneySmith can make an impact for the Hokies against the Yellow Jackets by having another large showing in the paint, where he dominated BC with put-backs and rebounds.

Finney-Smith was not alone in his strong showing around the basket as senior Victor Davila, sophomore Cadarian Raines and freshman C.J. Barksdale joined him in outscoring the Eagles 38-28. The Hokies will look to do more of the same to the Yellow Jackets, who seem to be struggling in all areas. But sometimes switching it up is the key to success. Head coach Seth Greenberg is not afraid to shake things up when it comes to Tech’s lineup, giving Barksdale his first start this season against BC and reinserting Hudson on the front lines. Things will continue to shift this week due to Barksdale’s sprained ankle — an injury leaving his playing ability questionable, as he has been walking in a boot. Hudson, on the other hand, had a solid game with 11 points and will look to hold on to his spot in the starting lineup. The good news is the Hokies are starting to see multiple players break the double-digit scoring barrier that has seemingly only belonged to Erick Green all season. Green has struggled lately, but his double-digit scoring streak this season continues, as he extended it to 26 games with 10 points against BC. Although the Hokies may be seeing an upward trend in certain areas of the offense, they have started a new downward trend in free-throw shooting to go with it. The Hokies have done well all season from the line, shooting around 75 percent, but recently dropped off, shooting 67 percent against Miami and 60 percent against BC. Tech is a team that cannot afford to miss opportunities for free points as its fledgling offense continues to grow and mature. With only five games remaining in the regular season, the Hokies will be looking to keep the Yellow Jackets on the bottom of the ACC, while putting a little distance between themselves and dead last. Considering Georgia Tech does not bring much to the table — at least nothing more than Clemson or BC — this is a game the Hokies should win at home in front of a blackout crowd. Tip-off is tomorrow at 3 p.m. in Cassell Coliseum.

Friday, February 17, 2012 Print Edition  

Friday, February 17, 2012 Print Edition of The Collegiate Times