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Thursday, February 16, 2012

An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 109th year, issue 19

News, page 2

Weekend, page 5

Opinions, page 3

West End addition complete

Sports, page 6

Study Break, page 4

Student remembered as passionate thinker ZACH CRIZER editor-in-chief

TREVOR WHITE / SPPS

The new dining area of West End Market has added 102 seats to the facility, allowing more students to dine in, rather than use to-go containers.

Renovations to West End Market include larger seating area, private employee restroom, kitchen expansion NICK CAFFERKY & GINA PATTERSON news staff Although it has been open for a month, the new addition to West End Market had its ribbon-cutting ceremony last week to celebrate the end of construction. The changes, which cost the school approximately $7.2 million, were made in accordance with the opinions of many students who said the dining hall did not have enough seating. “We hired an independent consulting firm named Porter Khouw Consulting and they came in and surveyed more than 2,000 students on the campus through all facets of dining,” said Ted Faulkner, the director of dining services. “Some of the feedback for West End was rave reviews of the food and the services it provided, but they were frustrated with the crowding when they were trying to navigate through and seat

availability.” The new renovations added 102 more seats to the inside dining area, as well as 66 more seats in an extension to the outside patio area. “I personally think it was needed because there were plenty of times when I would come to West End and I would have to eat outside because there was no place to eat inside” said Sam Righi, a senior human nutrition, food and exercise major. The extra seating was also made in an effort to reduce the use of to-go containers that are bad for the environment. “A lot of the Styrofoam that’s used is because a student will come up and they’ll ask for something to go, even if they plan on eating it because they’re not sure if they’re actually going to get a chance to get a seat,” said Stephen Garnett, the assistant director of dining services at West End. Donna Ratcliffe, who was the interim director of dining servic-

es until Faulkner took over, said Virginia Tech has a sustainability coordinator who will be monitoring the number of to-go containers to see if the extra seating has an impact. But installing more seating was just one of three construction phases, as significant additions were also made to expand the kitchen and other facilities, making employees more comfortable. “We have almost 400 employees here, and they never had a restroom to themselves or a locker room to change,” Faulkner said. “Employing 150 to 300 students — sometimes, they come from class, and it was difficult for them to change from their everyday clothes to their uniforms, and we didn’t account for that in the original design.” Originally opened in January 1999, West End was expected to garner about $2 million and about 200,000 customers per year. Fast forward 12 years and West End is making about $10.5 million per year, serving 1.4 million guests. “We opened up with the understanding that we’d be a Monday

through Friday operation, and the building and the infrastructure behind the scenes was built as such,” Faulkner said. The lack of infrastructure has proved to be a difficult obstacle to overcome, especially when it comes to storing food. “We would get a truckload in almost every day to get us through the day and maybe into the next morning, but that’s about it,” said Mark Bratton, an executive chef of West End. Because of this, significant storage space has been added to the back of the dining hall, including a giant refrigerated space that is big enough for a fork lift to unload food. “(Before the renovation), we were getting a 600 to 700 piece truckload a day, and it had to be unloaded by hand, where all of the other dining facilities have a power jack to load everything,” Bratton said. The plans for the renovation date back to 2006 and construction began last spring. Sales dipped while the area was being built but have increased since its opening.

Virginia Tech sophomore Dieter Seltzer died of unknown causes Tuesday. He was away from the university at the time. Dieter, a philosophy major, was an active thinker remembered for s t i r r i ng thoughtful discussion. Joseph Pitt, a Tech philos ophy professor and SELTZER friend of the Seltzer family, said Dieter was simply interested in making the world a better place. “I think he added a real dimension of intellectual depth to the student body’s conversation,” Pitt said. “Dieter wasn’t content to talk about football scores — he did, he knew all the scores. But first and foremost in his mind was what’s wrong and what’s right in society, and how can we improve it.” Pitt’s ties to the Seltzer family run deep. He served as an academic advisor to Michael Seltzer — Dieter’s father — who attended graduate school at Tech. While Pitt was advising Michael, his son Dieter was born. Gabi Seltzer, a senior, preceded her brother Dieter in choosing to study philosophy with Pitt as her advisor. “I’ve known Dieter since he was two days old,” Pitt said. “They have been a family for me.” He said Dieter immersed himself in political and philo-

sophical discussions. “He was rather passionate about the world of politics, particularly what was wrong with this country and how to make it right,” Pitt said. “He had learned how to articulate those dissatisfactions.” Many of his points were made in the pages of the Collegiate Times. Dieter and Gabi wrote a recurring opinion feature this academic year called “Relatively Speaking,” where the siblings presented different perspectives on political and cultural issues. Gabi also served as opinions editor for the paper during the 2010-11 school year. The Seltzer family’s deep connection to Tech was evident in Dieter, Pitt said. “If you encountered Dieter, he was always in Virginia Tech clothing,” he said. “He thought Virginia Tech was a valuable place to be.”

I think he added a real dimension of intellectual depth to the student body’s conversation.” Joseph Pitt philosophy professor Dieter was involved in several clubs and athletic pursuits, including the Tech men’s water polo club team. Still, Pitt said Dieter’s sights were set much higher, on improving the world around him. “I think the world is going to be a poorer place without him. He was going to make a difference — a real difference.”

Fleet Feet walks children to school MICHELLE SUTHERLAND & SEAN HAYDEN news staff

The mentalist Blindfolded, mentalist Craig Karges writes the exact same word a random audience member wrote on the top of a white board. The Virginia Tech Union brought the entertainer’s show “Experience the Extraordinary” to the Burruss Hall auditorium last night. photo by Alison Neary

Elementary- and collegeaged students in the area are getting used to taking strolls together because of a new program called Fleet Feet. Every Friday afternoon, Virginia Tech students pick up about 20 students from Harding Avenue Elementary School and walk them to their respective homes. Kyle Gardiner, a senior political science and philosophy major, created Fleet Feet last spring to save energy, increase sustainability, and pull the Tech and Blacksburg communities together. The program has been positively received by those from Harding Avenue Elementary, including the school’s principal Meggan Marshall. “Kyle’s vision for the program is to make it something sustainable without having his volunteers here — that it becomes a cultural trend within the community that all of our kids are walking to school,” she said. Karen Hager’s son participates

in Fleet Feet. “The program shows the kids a way to get home without using gas, and it educates them about sustainability,” Hager said. Lindsay McKeever, a senior humanities, science and environment major, agrees. “Right now the town of Blacksburg only has programs for infrastructure,” she said, “and Feet Fleet is exactly what this area needs for providing awareness to the community about living healthier lifestyles.” Typically 15 Tech students participate, but more than 40 have in helped in the past. “The turn out for Tech students has been awesome so far,” Gardiner said. However, he said would like to see a greater turn out for elementary school kids, hoping the number of students doubles by spring. Most of the Tech volunteers are part of the Freshmen Leadership Experience, a program run through the SGA. The program is currently taking a break due to weather. Fleet Feet will resume March 16.


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news

february 16, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: nick cafferky, michelle sutherland newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Faculty encourage LinkedIn usage

what you’re saying On tightening texting and driving rules:

JENN BATES features staff writer Donna Wertalik believes LinkedIn is vital to students’ success. “Freshmen and sophomores must have it. Juniors and seniors — absolutely,” the marketing instructor who oversees social media for the Pamplin College of Business said. The online networking site encourages students to use the Internet for professional enhancement, Wertalik said. She believes any student in any major in any department should use LinkedIn. Statistics from Career Services support Wertalik’s beliefs — 85 percent of employers say positive online reputation via LinkedIn influences hiring decisions. “We are a connected society,” Wertalik said. “The professional society is no different. LinkedIn should be at the core of everything you do.” Some freshmen business classes require students to set up and use a LinkedIn profile because it

makes them competitive, she said. Jim Henderson, the associate director for employer relations in Career Services, agrees with Wertalik. “Everybody should use LinkedIn. Even if you’re not currently on a job search, you should still be on it,” Henderson said.

I want to work for.” LinkedIn’s website, which has been around for six or seven years according to Henderson, allows users to create a portfolio that includes a resume, special achievements, uploaded projects and internship experiences. Setting up and updating a profile on LinkedIn is easy, Henderson said. A student can be up and running in just five LinkedIn should be at minutes. However, Wertalik that the process doesn’t the core of everything said stop there. you do.” “The profile is just phase one,” she said. “Students Donna Wertalik should check it every day and continually update their promarketing instructor file so it showcases their core achievements.” Many students are already folAlthough a LinkedIn prolowing this advice, including file should not replace a paper Amanda Cassells, a sophomore resume, Henderson said a student communication major. should aim to build their profile “I personally started using over time so it is nearly identical LinkedIn because employers rec- to their actual resume. ommended it. I have found it to “A good resume should be able to be easy and straightforward to tell who you are and what you’ve use,” Cassells said. “It has defi- done in 10 seconds. In LinkedIn, nitely helped. I’ve already made you can do that,” Wertalik said. some connections with companies LinkedIn also serves as a net-

working tool, connecting students to alumni and corporations. Markets and employers look at professional networking sites, like LinkedIn, Wertalik said. It is a site where students can better market themselves to standout, and employers notice that. “It’s an internal referral. Word of maouth is the most powerful advertisement,” she said. Wertalik has seen students gain jobs and internships through LinkedIn that they may not have gotten without it. Companies such as ESPN, Nike, The Disney College Program and The Martin Agency have used LinkedIn to hire students. Students on the website can also choose companies to follow. Once following a company, a student can see the company’s recent hires and fires, job openings, as well as who filled those positions. LinkedIn is currently the primary tool for online professional networking, according to Career Services’ website, which also includes six videos to show students how to set up and better utilize their own LinkedIn account.

Anon and on: So, how would they know if you are texting, or looking at the time, or seeing who is calling you before you answer? Anonymous: While I agree that texting and

driving is dangerous, it is not the only way someone can be distracted while driving. I think overly specific rules banning texting on driving are simply not going to be effective as technology changes; it’s already taken us this long before we’ve started to legislate it. It makes much more sense to me to pass broader distracted driving laws that apply to other things too, like messing with an MP3 player or playing smartphone games.

On Tech upgrading to Gmail in the fall:

Erica: I hope that extra $100,000 a year they’re going to save goes towards financial aid to help students instead of putting it towards more new construction on campus. $100K is a lot of scholarships/grants.

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opinions

editors: scott masselli, sean simons opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

february 16, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

3

The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

Mourning Dieter Seltzer D

ieter Seltzer, a sophomore philosophy major and Collegiate Times opinion columnist, died Tuesday. Dieter, along with his sister, Gabi Seltzer, wrote the “Relatively Speaking” column that debuted this year. Without question, his tragic and untimely death saddens not only the entire opinions section, but also the newspaper as a whole. His section editors, Scott Masselli and Sean Simons, as well as his fellow staff members, will sincerely miss his kindness, good humor and incisive columns. Dieter was both a friend and a sibling to Gabi, who greatly enjoyed writing the joint column with him. With this in mind, we extend our sympathies to Dieter’s entire family as they cope with this loss. The world has lost a loving brother and wonderful person. We have no doubt Dieter’s thoughts have already enriched the knowledge of this campus. We are saddened that his quest to make a positive impact on the world has been cut tragically short. Dieter, may you rest in peace.

MCT CAMPUS

Ausan Al-Eryani featured columnist, junior, political science major

Syria requires creative action As

the blood of the Syrian people continues to flow from Damascus to Homs, there are greater and louder calls for the United States to intervene. The arguments for intervention against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s regime are rooted in a moral obligation to help those seeking freedom and for American strategic interests in the region. But direct intervention is dangerous, misguided and ultimately, the wrong approach to addressing the crisis in Damascus. Intervention is not the answer. There are, however, crucial actions the U.S. ought to pursue that will be best for itself and Syria. Let’s accept the reality. This is the Syrian people’s uprising, not the Arab League’s and certainly not ours. Yes, we can help, but if Syria wants a successful future, its people must do something. It would be great if outside influence could ensure democracy finally arrives in Syria, but that approach is not feasible. As Iraq has shown, no nation — no matter how powerful — can impose democracy on another. Democracy is a bottom-up, organic phenomenon. It owes its tremendous success not to external impositions, but on a population’s core belief that democracy is in its personal and community’s best interests. Yet, we cannot close our eyes to the brutality of Assad’s crackdown. Instead of contemplating putting “boots on the ground” or even imposing a no-fly zone, the U.S. should play a more indirect

role. First, the Obama administration should push Turkey to exercise its growing influence in the region. The democratic state, which has seen its powers growing recently, claims it wants to be a regional power — Syria is its most important test. Washington should encourage Turkey to create buffer zones on its border with Syria. The growing number of military defectors, as well as other political dissidents and rebels, there will have a safe location to collect, organize and continue their resistance. Currently, the rebels — consisting of the Free Syrian Army and the Syrian National Council — are fragmented and ineffective against the murderous Assad forces. Quite simply, they need to do a better job of getting their act together, and the U.S. can offer some help through Turkey. Some will say if we push for a buffer zone, why not supply the Free Syrian Army with military equipment as well? Should we decide to arm the opposition, we may be dealing with catastrophic consequences in the future. The Syrians are a hodgepodge of Kurds, Christians and Muslims — who are further divided among a minority of Shiites with Bashar alAssad’s clan representing a minority in the sect, and the majority Sunnis. Arming one side will certainly exacerbate sectarian tensions and may lead to political and social disaster. Again, look no further than Iraq for evidence. By the way, Syria is not Libya.

It was much easier to help the Libyans because their revolution was geographically divided with the rebels in the east and Gaddafi to the west. It would be immensely difficult to push weapons into a country that is not as (geographically) versatile as Libya was and still is. However, we can train the opposition. Granted, that is a form of intervention, but it has less risk associated with it than giving them guns. America’s intelligence capabilities are some of the best in the world. Surely we can provide the rebels with techniques that will help coordinate their efforts. Subsequently, as Assad continues to show he has no intention of ceasing his bloody campaign against his own citizens, the U.S. should make it clear that standing with Assad is not a wise investment. Specifically, we and the international community should pursue more economic sanctions. President Barack Obama has already started this, and he and the international community must continue to be strong in their resolve. One important aspect of the sanctions is their targets. Although the Assad family controls much of the nation’s wealth, part of the reason the regime retains support is that its significant (and wealthy) middle class fears that deserting Assad would mean opposition forces taking political, social and economic revenge on them. With specific sanctions, the U.S. (and the Syrian opposition) should make it clear that this is

about the blood on President Assad’s hands, not a witch hunt for his supporters. Next, we should follow the Arab League’s lead and isolate the Assad’s Syria to the fullest extent possible. China and Russia may never be quite on board, but when have they ever been? Here, the U.S. ought to help expedite the “tipping point” where, as the Libyan rebels showed, Assad loses his dwindling supporters and ultimately his grip on power. We should also make it abundantly clear that the U.S. stands against Assad. Furthermore, with a broad coalition uniting against the Assad regime, the U.S. can limit the Iranian government’s shameful support of Damascus. What is happening in Syria is heart wrenching, tragic, inexcusable and cannot be ignored. The Syrians fighting for their freedom and human dignity represent tremendous courage and resolve. Yet, Syria is immensely complicated. It has a diverse religious population and a regime willing to do anything to cling onto power. We cannot force our will on Damascus, but we may be able to help its revolutionaries. This will take a much lighter approach than the one we took toward Libya, and it should not go as far as direct intervention, but it will allow creative and indirect exertions of our influence. Hopefully, those fighting for their lives can once again take the lead.

Economics curriculum must emphasize humans F

or the past year, I have assisted with research on Iran in the Virginia Tech economics department. Some of the research encompasses what might be called standard economic indicators — calculating unemployment, estimating the rate of inflation — but it also delves deeply into what I consider a more human view of the Iranian economy. The professor I work for, SalehiIsfahani, is a strong believer in the Lucas-Becker approach to economic growth, which emphasizes human skills, knowledge, creativity, ambition and effort as determinants of a country’s economic success. The Lucas-Becker approach, especially as implemented by Salehi, stands in contrast to what I consider the more abstract approach to economics encountered in the economics 2005 and 2006 courses. In these courses, concepts such as physical capital, human capital, productivity and growth are introduced as general ideas, but their particulars are sometimes neglected or not fully emphasized. While every trained economist understands the importance of details, I have found that this point does not always make it to freshmen students, myself included. In my work as a tutor and in conversations in the honors residence

hall and economics department, I have found that students often give up on economics because they see it as the memorization of equations rather than an insightful depiction of social interaction. Until my junior year, I probably counted myself among this group, not seeing much difference between my math and economics classes. My view changed dramatically, however, when I began taking subject-specific economics courses. Health care, development and Middle East economics were among my three favorite classes, providing me with specific, practical knowledge. At the time, I had rarely encountered that type of social insight in courses outside of the economics department. I began to view math as a means and not an end, and I worked at understanding why certain variables appeared in an equation, rather than just memorizing them. Soon, I began considering the world in economic terms — in specific, logically consistent definitions and explanations. I had done this to some extent my whole life, but economics gave me a language for it. It was somewhat like discovering a new favorite author and wishing I’d found him sooner. My work now further focuses on

details. Because Salehi’s research is influenced by the Lucas-Becker approach, it deals with human issues, such as family structure, fertility, education, gender equality, the lives of rural poor and the impact of government policies on average people’s livelihoods. I have always felt human relationships and individual reactions to policy were more important for explaining economic growth than the introductory theory, and I have now found sympathy for this view. I have assisted with projects on the improving education prospects for Iranian girls, the effect of family planning on fertility of Iranian women, and the dramatic increases in access to electricity, water and indoor plumbing for rural Iranians since the 1979 revolution. I also encountered the plight of Iranian youth, where men and women face unemployment rates of about 23 percent and 46 percent, respectively. My work has been, in many ways about this generation, and these people generally have families and drive Iran’s economy, all while training the next generation to take over. The most common criticism of economics is that it is overly abstract and removed from reality. Some dismiss the application of economic practices to fields such

as psychology or politics, arguing that economics work is overly reductionist. Others dismiss economics completely. They think economists, perhaps because of their tendency to use mathematical or statistical analysis, are simply unfit to deal with the human realm. But this problem has more to do with misunderstandings than deep philosophical impasses. If economists could couch their narratives in the intuitive, human knowledge that provides the foundation for their work, they could win many converts to their field. Economists would also help themselves by more readily admitting the limitations of the standard approach. Economists and noneconomists should also help and learn from each other. The often criticized but rarely read John Maynard Keynes is an economist who surely agreed with all three of these points. I also encourage people outside economics not to view the profession as monolithic, but to search for economists who communicate clearly on issues they care about. Esther Duflo has used economic experiments to reduce poverty. Daron Acemoglu does important work on the role of institutions and political power in the development of democracy. Mark Thoma and Tyler Cowen

maintain blogs that act as aggregators of interesting economic stories that are worth reading regularly. The Tech economics program would help itself greatly by assigning more reading in its introductory classes. Well-read students have the context to challenge economists and are less likely to ignore them. Most of all, I encourage economic students not to give up. Although I took a political science course, went to talks dealing with the Middle East and read several books on the subject, I didn’t understand it until I began serious economic research on the region. Before my research, I thought of Iran as a large, abstract entity. Now I think of Iranians as nothing but exciting and compelling. If the department is willing to make adjustments to its introductory curriculum, it would greatly benefit those students, who might come to see economics, and perhaps the world, as a whole — not as a mathematical equation playing itself out, but as a set of relationship among real people. That is, they might just see human social interaction at work.

BRYCE STUCKI -regular columnist -senior -economics major

Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Zach Crizer Managing Editor: Lindsey Brookbank Design Editors: Danielle Buynak, Victoria Zigadlo Public Editor: Justin Graves Web Editor: Sarah Watson News Editors: Nick Cafferky, Michelle Sutherland News Reporters: Josh Higgins, Cody Owens, Erin Chapman News Staff Writers: Priscila Alvarez, Abby Harris, Gina Paterson, Ashley Seagar Features Editors: Chelsea Gunter, Patrick Murphy Features Reporters: Nick Smirniotopoulos Features Staff Writers: Courtney Baker, Torie Deible, Dane Harrington, Kevin McAleese, Andrew Reily Opinions Editors: Scott Masselli, Sean Simons Sports Editors: Matt Jones, Zach Mariner Sports Reporters: Michael Bealey, Josh Parcell Sports Staff Writers: Eric Avassi, Zander Baylis, Alyssa Bedrosian, Cody Elliott, Taylor Hay, Alex Koma, Ashleigh Lanza, Brian Marcolini Photo Editor: Daniel Lin Enterprise Team Editor: Liana Bayne Public Information Director: Dishu Maheshwari Training Director: Kelsey Heiter Copy Chief: Spenser Snarr Copy Editors: Nora McGann, Luther Shell Layout Designers: Bethany Melson, Alicia Tillman Online Director: Alex Rhea Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: Philipp Kotlaba Student Publications Photo Staff Director of Photography: Paul Kurlak Lab Manager: Austen Meredith College Media Solutions Ad Director: Brandon Collins Asst Ad Director: Matt Freedman Account Executives: Johnson Bray, Kevin Jadali, Alyssa Brown, Brian Dickson, Janssen Claudio Inside Sales Manager: Mario Gazzola Assistant Inside Sales Manager: Adam Shata Office Manager: Kayley Greenday Assistant Account Executives: Alex Perry, Kacie Nolan, Jordan Peugh Creative Director: Casey Stoneman Asst Production Manager: Colleen Hill Creative Services Staff: Danielle Bushrow, Michael Craighead, Alyssa Morrison, Molly Vinson

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february 16, 2012

Regular Edition Today’s Birthday Horoscope: Creativity and imagination lead to new responsibilities this year. Expression channeled onto pages, into color and words, not only releases an emotion, but it provides a release for someone else. Reap rich rewards in many senses.

It’s no puzzle what Blacksburg is doing on Thursday and Saturday night. 1470 South Main Street • Blacksburg, VA

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want your comics featured in the collegiate times?

submit them to: studybreak@collegemedia.com

Week ending Feb. 14, 2012

Top tracks

( ) Last week’s ranking in top five

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february 16, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

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How I learned to stop worrying, overlook the cynicism and come to love the ‘Linsanity’ ne of my fondest childhood memories is of watching “Raiders of the Lost Ark” and being awed by the idea that life held possibilities beyond my comprehension. The world had never seemed bigger than that moment when the Ark of the Covenant opened and the power of the heavens was unleashed. Somewhere along the path from wideeyed kid to lazy college senior, I lost that sense of wonder — most of us do. It’s hard to maintain childlike curiosity about a world that seems more predictable and mundane as we understand it further. What seems like a lifetime later, “Raiders” still entertains, but that wondrous thrill is gone, replaced by sober appreciation. All of this is a roundabout way of saying I’m one jaded son of a gun. There are few phenomena in this life that truly surprise me, and those that do, almost always turn out to have pedestrian explanations. As New York Knicks’ Jeremy Lin has taken the world by storm with his basketball heroics, I’ve sat in the back row with my arms crossed, waiting for the house of cards to collapse. It’s not that I don’t believe in underdogs; I believe more in logic, and logic screams this is as fluky as it gets. Basketball scouts at both the collegiate and professional level are paid handsomely to find the best prospects to help their organizations succeed. They may underrate players, but they never miss them entirely. For the Lin story to be real, for this overlooked player to turn out to be a legitimate basketball star, hundreds of Division 1 colleges and 29 NBA teams completely whiffed on their most important job. That Lin even wears an NBA uniform is something of an upset. A talented but lightly recruited Bay Area native, Lin spurned walk-on offers from schools like UCLA to play for Harvard — not exactly

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a basketball powerhouse. He became an Ivy League star and remained on the NBA periphery until signing a contract with his hometown Golden State Warriors. Reality set in quickly. Undrafted Harvard graduates don’t become stars in the world’s most competitive professional basketball league. His first two teams cut him, generally not a sign that a player is destined for greatness. Then there’s the question of race. The A-word is part of his story, despite ESPN bending over backward to insist it’s not. The surprise isn’t that an AsianAmerican is successful at the highest level of his craft. My favorite professor is a brilliant Taiwanese woman, and Asian doctors, lawyers and business professionals dot the landscape of every nation. There is virtually no precedent for Asian-American basketball players at the pro level, however. Only three have ever played in the NBA before Lin, and one of those, 5-foot-7-inch Wat Misaka, played only a few games in the 1940s. Lin succeeding as an NBA star wouldn’t just be flying in the face of history — he would be rewriting it. The can’ts, won’ts and shouldn’ts surrounding Lin kept me skeptical even as the nation swooned over his 25-point debut as part of the Knicks’ regular rotation. One good game doesn’t amount to much in a league where worthiness is determined by consistency. His remarkable follow-up performances still didn’t shake my belief that he was a flash in the pan. Even mediocre players can look like superstars against the hapless Wizards. Luckily, Kobe Bryant and the Lakers were coming to town to restore order. It had been a fun ride, but the clock was about to strike midnight. Lin failed to comply, however, dropping 38 points on a team only a season removed from winning the championship. My skepticism started working in over-

ANDREW REILLY -featured columnist -senior -communication major -@wrylyreilly

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drive trying to find some reason, some logical explanation for how a guy barely two weeks removed from the NBA’s minor league was accomplishing this. The excuses — porous defenses, lucky shooting — grew more strained as the improbable run continued. Even his weakest game saw another 20 points and more importantly, the Knicks’ fifth straight win. I would’ve dismissed his impact as media hype, but the facts speak for themselves — this is a team that had won just two of its previous 13 games before he received significant playing time. Lin isn’t just assembling gaudy stat lines — he has almost singlehandedly resuscitated a moribund team. The heavyweight blow to my skepticism came Tuesday night when ESPN cut into a college basketball game for breaking news: the Knicks had crawled back to tie the game — on a Lin drive, of course — and they had the ball for the final shot. At this point I should’ve known what was coming. With ice water running through his veins, Lin launched a threepoint dagger with 0.5 seconds left to win the game and add another chapter to his unbelievable story. I hope there are still seats on the bandwagon because Lin has taken my cynicism and carved it up like it was the weak pick-and-roll defense he feasts upon. His jaw-dropping plays remind me of watching “Indiana Jones” as a child and believing that anything in this world is possible. Maybe there doesn’t have to be a logical explanation. Maybe stars can emerge overnight to shine on the biggest stage. Call me Linsane, but I believe.

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Tyingtellthe knot? the world. Send your information and a photo to the Collegiate Times at studybreak@collegemedia.com to make an announcement.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You can really make it happen. Surround yourself with those who truly support your creative vision. No need for extravagance.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) A slow morning leads to big picture conversations with a broad outlook. Take notes. New doors are opening for greater leadership.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Enjoy peaceful moments. See yourself in a new light. Your enthusiasm and creativity are quite attractive. You’re more appreciated than you know. Aries (March 21-April 19)

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Continue developing partnerships in impossible places. In case of doubt, review the instructions. Put yourself in another person's shoes.

You've got tons of energy for making big strides toward inal outcomes. Don't worry about details right now. Your easy humor lets you coast to victory.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) As if you're not busy enough, there's more work coming. Someone shows you how to use technology to increase productivity. Two heads are better than one.

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Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don't wait until the last minute to inish projects. It's about to get intense, and you want to make it to the inish line. Relax with friends after a job well done.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) There may be morning grumpiness or frustration. Get into projects with diligence and passion, and afternoon energy relaxes. Look for beauty, and ind it.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You keep your family together with your capacity to see both sides of the story. Create better communication channels. Don't get too serious.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Put the pieces together. There's nothing that can stop you now. You can always get help for the puzzles you don't understand. A friendship thrives.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You get a morale booster. Now see if you can pass it on. There are many opportunities for growth, especially in your relationships. Let them know what you heard.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Enjoy the sunshine, if you can. A partner's encouragement empowers you. Face-to-face interactions produce great ideas. Follow your schedule.

dating since: July 4, 2008 he says: Kayleigh is my saving grace. Without her I don’t think I would have accomplished all I have done in the past three years. I thank God for her everday.

she says:

Billy is my rock. He helps me get through all the craziness of school. I would go crazy without him. their first date: We met in my best friend’s basement after my mother got remarried I was taking all the bobby pins out of my hair and he was sweet enough to ask if he could help me get all of the booy pins out. It took forever! But he didn’t complain.


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sports

february 16, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: matt jones, zach mariner sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Hokies face off against No. 20 FSU

AUSTEN MEREDITH / SPPS

DANIEL LIN / SPPS

Virginia Tech lost to Florida State, 63-59, on Jan. 10. Since then, the No. 20 Seminoles have beaten ACC powerhouses Duke and North Carolina, and appear to be well on their way to an NCAA tournament appearance.

The men’s basketball team has lost seven straight in Tallahassee, Fla., a streak that dates back to 1991 MATT JONES sports editor Coming off its win over Boston College Sunday, the Virginia Tech

men’s basketball team returns to play tonight at Florida State. The win — just the Hokies’ third in ACC plays this season — came at a price. Freshman forward C.J. Barksdale will like-

ly miss tonight's game with a sprained ankle. Head coach Seth Greenberg was not specific when discussing the injury Tuesday evening. “C.J.’s been in a (walking) boot,” Greenberg said. “It’s precautionary, and we want to make sure he’s OK and not put him in any situation where he could further harm himself.” Turning his attention to the Seminoles, Greenberg was complimentary of a team that has won some big games since facing the Hokies. “They’re a very good basketball team," Greenberg said. "You don’t beat Duke and North Carolina in the same year without having a pretty special team." The Hokies should have a good

idea of what they’re facing when they play Florida State. Tech fell to the Seminoles on Jan. 10, 63-59 — the Hokies’ second ACC loss of the season. In that game, Tech junior point guard Erick Green willed his team to a close loss, scoring a game-high 21 points and shooting a perfect 10-10 from the free throw line. “The focus has to be on the rebounds, not giving them second chances,” Green said. “We’ve got to get these guys in foul trouble and let the big (guys) go at them. The key is just to keep them off the boards.” As Green mentioned, the major factor in the first meeting was the Hokies’ ability to match the rebounding of the taller

Seminoles. That changed in the second half, when the Hokies were decimated on the boards, and Florida State grabbed 10 offensive rebounds to pull out the win. “We’ve got to rebound for 40 minutes,” Greenberg said. “They turned it over (20) times against us, and that’s (20) times they couldn’t get to the offensive glass.” The Hokies have a streak of seven straight losses at Florida State, dating back to the 1991 season. “Tallahassee, (Fla.) has been a tough place for us to play,” Greenberg said. “I’d like to put my finger on it, but the only thing I can point to is they’ve got really good players. They’re big,

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physical, long, athletic, and they defend.” Several times this season, Greenberg has pointed to toughness as a reason for the team’s struggles. Despite some impressive performances, the Hokies have been unable to string together victories. “I think our team is playing really tough, but sometimes we don’t go after the loose balls or we miss some block outs,” said guard Marquis Rankin. “Guarding the full possession, then at the end just kind of giving up. It’s tough, but we have to fight through it.” Rankin, a true freshman who missed the first seven games of the season with a knee injury, has started the last four games at point guard. The Hokies are 2-2 in those games. “I figured it would take a long time (to start), but coach just told me he wanted me to be a leader,” Rankin said. “Just get more of my teammates involved and just talk on the floor. It did kind of surprise me that he started me the past couple games.” Rankin starting at point guard means Green is now playing more two-guard, a switch very similar to what the Hokies did last year with Malcolm Delaney and Green. “It makes me look for my offense a lot more,” Green said. “Coming off ball screens, getting out in transition and running. I’m in the open floor where I do very well. It rests me a little bit too, instead of bringing the ball up the floor, it gives me a break.” For the Hokies to pull off a win over the No. 20-ranked Seminoles tonight, they’ll have to play one of their better games of the season. Florida State just recently lost to Boston College, showing that even the top ACC teams are susceptible to an upset. “(Florida State) had a little hiccup, but that happens in college basketball,” Greenberg said. “They’re not immune to it, just like anybody else.” The Hokies square off against the Seminoles tonight at 7 p.m. on ESPN2.


Thursday, February 16, 2012 Print Edition