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Tuesday, February 14, 2012An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 109th year, issue 17

News, page 2

Arts & Entertainment, page 5

Law students suing schools many factors students should take into account when looking at law schools, one being the amount of money needed to pay for Frustrated with their unemploy- tuition. ment, law graduates are suing On average, law graduates face their alma maters, accusing their $100,000 in debt due to student schools of false employment and loans, according to U.S News salary data. Education data. Earlier this month, eight law “I think it’d be a mistake to say firms took to the allegations one should not go to law school and banded together to sue 12 categorically if it required to go law schools. The main allega- into debt,” Moore said. “It’s an tions revolve around the prem- individual decision to make. By ise that these law schools lured the same token, the amount of in graduates with high per- debt is something to consider.” centages of employment postMoore recommends students graduation and inflated salary take into account a school’s locastatistics. tion and reputation, as well as These class action lawsuits the current job market because join three others that were filed “perceived tightness in the job in 2011 against New York Law market is manifesting itself in School and the Thomas M. these lawsuits to the extent that Cooley Law School. In total, more people are not happy about than 70 graduate students and 15 the fact that their not getting law schools dispersed across the jobs.” country are involved. “Not everyone who graduates Included in the new lawsuits law school gets a job — that’s a are Albany, Brooklyn, Hofstra new fact pre-law students have to and John Marshall law schools. get used to,” said Erica Largen a All reported an employment junior environmental policy and rate higher than 90 percent, planning and communication according to AboveTheLaw. double major. com. However, some graduates Largen plans to apply to law are not finding jobs despite the schools depending on her LSAT numbers. score. The pending lawsuits reflect During the 2009-10 acaan increase in graduates who are demic year, 87 Tech seniors and pursuing careers in an indus- 139 alumni applied to 173 law try where employment and schools, according to university salary data produced doesn’t data. Seventy-four percent of always reflect the current job degree holders were admitted into market. 123 different law schools. And “It’s like stock markets,” said 83 percent of graduating seniors Wayne Moore, a pre-law adviser were admitted to one or more law at Virginia Tech. “You can report schools. the past performance of stock But even if a student gains admission to their selected school, there is no guarantee they will find a job after graduation. All Tech students inter- “Many people consider as a career choice ested in a future career in law in large part due to the law should be concerned expectations of a high upon graduating, with the outcome of these income and when law students lawsuits.” fail to find jobs within a poor job market and are tens of thousands dollars Jake Adams in debt, it really places a political science major huge financial burden on these graduates,” said Jake Adams, a senior political markets, and often times there’s science major. a disclaimer at the bottom saying Adams plans to take his LSATs past performance is not a guar- in the fall and said the current antee of future performance. So lawsuits affect Tech students who I think it’s kind of like that in may want to study law after graduterms assuming that the data is ation. accurate, which is in question, “All Tech students interested in doesn’t necessarily mean the pat- a future career in law should be terns over the past 10 years or so concerned with the outcome of would replicate themselves in the these lawsuits and should fully future.” consider all of the information Moore helps Tech students, who associated with law schools when are interested in pursuing a higher contemplating law as a career,” he education in law, make intelligent said. and informative decisions when There has been no set trial date considering law schools. There are for the lawsuits.

Sports, page 6

Study Break, page 4

NO LIMIT ON GUNS There are 10 key state laws that

curb illegal gun

VAHAS 4 trafficking CURRENTLY OUT OF 10

TAUHID CHAPPELL news staff writer

Opinions, page 3

OF THESE LAWS

New legislation is expected pass, eliminating a law that limits the number of guns someone can purchase to one per month BY CODY OWENS | news reporter

S

ince 1993, Virginia has had a “onegun-per-month” law, limiting handgun purchases. But last week, the Virginia General Assembly decided to repeal the law, exciting gun rights advocates and rousing concern from gun-control proponents. “In my opinion, we should have never even had the law in the first place,” said Philip Van Cleave, the president of the Virginia Citizens Defense League, of the law signed by former Gov. L. Douglas Wilder more than a decade ago. The law was initially implemented to curb illegal gun trafficking between Virginia and other states. But after a 21-19 decision in the Senate last week, along with a 66-32 vote in the House of Delegates, the repeal will advance to Gov. Bob McDonnell, who said he will agree to sign off on it, according to a Washington Times article. “Guns were showing up in crime scenes in New York City, for example,” said Omar Samaha, who has done advocacy work for Mayors Against Illegal Guns and whose sister was killed during the April 16, 2007, Tech shootings. “Traffickers would come down to Virginia, buy dozens of handguns, and distribute them up and down the East Coast. Virginia became known as one of the biggest gunrunning states, if not the biggest, so they passed the one-handgun-per-month law so they could limit the trafficking of handguns.” However, the law’s effectiveness since 1993 has been debated. “I don’t think it succeeded,” Van Cleave said. “I think it has been increasing. The whole idea of thinking that this would stop a criminal is a joke. If they’re willing to steal guns, they’re not going to follow the onegun-per-month law.” Samaha, however, said repealing the law could have negative consequences. “The thing about the one-handgun-permonth law in Virginia is there are already many ways to get around it,” he said. “People who have gone through some serious background checks will be able to buy more than one handgun a month. But this is going to open it up to anyone to be able to come into

Virginia and buy multiple handguns.” Law enforcement officials and people with concealed carry permits are exempt from the one-gun restriction, according to a Washington Post article. However, Van Cleave thinks laws will not prevent criminals from acquiring guns. Additionally, he said traffickers sometimes have individuals with clean backgrounds purchase guns for them, rendering the law ineffective. “There’s no real way to stop it. It’s just not possible,” he said. Virginia had the seventh highest rate of gun exports in 2009 and was labeled as a “net exporter,” meaning more crime guns were trafficked out of Virginia than into it, according to a study by TraceTheGuns.org. In addition, the study found 27.2 percent of the guns recovered have short “time-tocrime” rates — these guns were recovered in a crime within two years of their original sale. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, a division of the Department of Justice, compiles data on the number of firearms recovered and traced in each state in the United States. The number of firearms recovered and traced in Virginia has been on the rise, according to the bureau’s data. In 2006, 7,571 guns from Virginia were recovered. Each year since then, the number of guns recovered has increased. There number of guns recovered increased from 7,817 to 8,222 between 2007 and 2010. Samaha said the increase isn’t necessarily the result of more criminals gaining access to guns. “I think part of it is because the tracing of guns has improved. The way they trace guns now and the technology we have now makes tracing guns much easier,” he said. However, he also said the repeal is concerning. “We’re not just going to see this make Virginia less safe,” Samaha said. “You’re going to see this throughout all the states around Virginia. You’re going to see Virginia guns showing up at crime scenes.”

Victoria Zigadlo/Collegiate Times

27.2

percent of Va. guns have a short timeto-crime rate, the percentage of guns recovered in a crime within two years of original sale — a strong indicator of gun trafficking. National average: 22.6 percent

Virginia is a NET EXPORTER More crime guns are trafficked out of Virginia than into the state. 2600 2557 2080 1560

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s or t p x E

Museum gets OmniGlobe Ryan Brandon, a master’s student in hydrogeology and a Virginia Tech Geoscience Museum employee, shows off the OmniGlobe. The OmniGlobe is a new technology that can double as a teaching and research tool — helping people understand the Earth’s systems. The museum purchased the globe with funds donated by Northrop Grumman. photos by Brad Klodowski


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news

february 14, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

Military Ball

editors: nick cafferky, michelle sutherland newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

what you’re saying On state debates abortion procedures:

Valkyria: The procedure *is* unnecessary and invasive.This bill is awful - the only bearable part of it was the amendment introduced to make men have a rectal exam before they got a prescription for ED. The two aren’t nearly equal, but it was a start. (Six of the seven women women in the Virginia senate voted for it. The other woman was the one who introduced this awful bill to begin with)

The Military Ball wrapped up the Virginia Tech Military Weekend.

Karen: Agreed - let’s jack up the cost of healthcare by adding a medically unnecessary ultrasound.Depending on the timing, it DOES impede a woman’s right to have an abortion. *IF* the ultrasound is performed immediately prior to the ultrasound, then the woman just takes one day off of work. But if it needs to be done at least 24 hours ahead of time like in TX, then that’s two days or at least part of two days.For the record, I’m anti-abortion and pro-choice (for other women, not for me). Let’s limit the number of abortions using education and by making contraception available.

Top: Senior cadets are escorted onto the floor by their dates through a sword archway.

Bottom: A cadet reflects in front of a mural painted by cadets in Golf Company.

Grad fair comes tomorrow GINA PATTERSON news staff writer The Virginia Tech Graduate Fair will be held on Wednesday from 11:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. to help seniors with all of their graduating needs. “It’s basically like one-stop shopping for all the graduation stuff you might need,” said Gwen Harrington, the assistant director of Alumni Relations. The fair, which is sponsored by the Tech and Volume II book-

photos by Daniel Lin

CORRECTION

Middle: Each company painted a mural honoring the armed services.

crimeblotter

stores, will be held in the Holtzman Alumni Center, where free pizza and drinks will be offered. There will be a variety of information provided about diploma frames, caps, gowns and class rings. In addition, there will be a trivia wheel that students can spin to potentially answer a question related to the Alumni Association and receive a Hokie Zone T-shirt. Students can also find out more about joining regional alumni chapters to stay involved with the university post-graduation.

In several of last week’s XKCD comics, the artist is Randall Munroe, and the comics are attributed to xkcd. com. In “Internships provide students with valuable experience,” (CT - Feb 3.) Christine Routzahn is the Director of Professional Practice at UMBC’s Shriver Center. In “El Rodeo opens new restaurant,” (CT - Feb. 8) the restaurant actually Justin Graves opened Jan. 13. public editor The Collegiate Times regrets these errors.

date

time

offense

location

status

arestees

2/9/2012

7:45 p.m.

Follow Up to Vandalism / Destruction of Property

Bookstore Parking Lot

Inactive

N/A

2/10/2012

7:45 a.m.

Follow Up to Vandalism / Destruction of Property

Robeson Hall

Inactive

N/A

2/10/2012

10:36 p.m.

Possession of Marijuana / Drug Paraphernalia

Washington Street

Cleared by Arrest

Hayley Joanne Chapman, 20 Wyndum Preston Childress III, 21

2/10/2012

11:09 p.m.

Assault and Battery (simple) / Appear Intoxicated in Public

Outside Owens Hall

Cleared by Arrest

Sarah Dick, 22

2/10/2012

11:09 p.m.

Underage Possession of Alcohol

Outside Owens Hall

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

N/A

2/11/2012

1:31 a.m.

Appear Intoxicated in Public

Pritchard Hall

Cleared by Arrest

Jan Helgeson, 18

2/12/2012

1:38 a.m.

Appear Intoxicated in Public

Outside Theater 101

Cleared by Arrest

Conor Battle, 22

2/12/2012

12:14 a.m.

Appear Intoxicated in Public / Underage Possession of Alcohol / Fake ID

Slusher Hall

Cleared by Arrest

Jeffrey Sears, 19

2/12/2012

4:44 p.m.

Intimidation

Media Parking Lot

Active

N/A

2/12/2012

3:00 p.m.

Larceny of a Coat

West End Market

Inactive

N/A

2/12/2012

11:32 p.m.

Trespassing

Pritchard Hall

Inactive

N/A


opinions

editors: scott masselli, sean simons opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

february 14, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

3

The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

the water cooler onValentine’s Day Valentine’s Day not worth hype

Singles should celebrate solo

To

E

be perfectly honest, I have never completely understood the point of Valentine’s Day. I realize why people celebrate it and — to an extent — why some enjoy celebrating the holiday. But most of the time I just don’t see the point. This is surprising, since I enjoy holiday celebrations because they involve spending time with loved ones. And Valentine’s Day is all about love, right? I even have a wonderful boyfriend to celebrate with this year, but I still can’t comprehend the American romance with Saint Valentine. If you’ve read my previous columns, this may surprise you, as my enjoyment in the celebration of holidays stems from the special time that I’ve spent with my loved ones. And Valentine’s Day is all about love, right? While this is true, and I have a wonderful boyfriend to celebrate with this year, I still can’t comprehend the American romance with Saint Valentine. Many people say they celebrate the holiday to show their significant other love and affection. Feb. 14 is a day to make an important person feel special and cared for. I am all for this kind of celebration. It is a great feeling to know someone deeply cares for you and is willing to show you that. But people in relationships express their loving feelings every day — isn’t this what keeps relationships in existence? Others say it is not every day that couples spend extra time, money and effort to demonstrate their feelings — a lot of college-aged people can’t afford to go out to fancy dinners or on special dates on a regular basis. If partners want to celebrate their relationships, why don’t they do so on their anniversaries? After all, anniversaries take place on days that are special to each couple, rather than an arbitrary day designated by others. What is more troubling is that society tells people that celebrating Valentine’s Day deals directly with spending money. The more time and money people spend, the more they care about someone — right?

It is almost a requirement for boyfriends to buy their girlfriends candy, flowers and expensive dinners. And females expect big gestures and pricey gifts — I even find myself thinking this way. But when I stop to think, I realize small gestures — friendly text messages, surprise visits or even hugs — mean more to me than frivolous presents. People are taught to think about Valentine’s Day in terms of money from a young age. Children are forced to celebrate the holiday, when most of them don’t even understand what they’re celebrating. As early as kindergarten, students are told to give their friends — and crushes — small, gender-targeted cards and candy. Why? These are nice gestures, but mainly classmates make them because they are told to. When I was in elementary school, I only cared about the candy I received and ate on Valentine’s Day. Yes, I made my classmates valentines. But I only did so to fit in with the school’s culture — not because I actually cared. And I don’t think anyone else in my classes cared either. Although children, at the time, may not care about the holiday, they learn what to expect from the day’s celebrations as adults. People are taught to show their feelings through purchased items. We all saw “those girls” in high school who insisted that their boyfriends buy them giant teddy bears and dozens of roses, which they carried from class to class, rubbing their gifts in everyone’s faces. Even though some people fall into society’s trap, we should try to remember what is important about Valentine’s Day — celebrating loved ones and special relationships.

Gabi Seltzer -regular columnist -senior -philosophy major

veryone hopes they will find that special someone to celebrate Valentine’s Day with. But, as I would know as a single woman, many don’t stumble upon a love interest before the inevitable Feb. 14 comes along. However, being single on this holiday doesn’t mean you have to feel as if you’re a part of an Egyptian plague or a zombie outbreak. When I was invited to a Single Awareness Day party on Facebook, I thought for a split second that I should feel slightly bad about the invitation, but I didn’t. Of my three roommates, only one is in a relationship. And while the others are going behind her back to help her boyfriend plan a romantic date, they too are putting together a single’s party. In some ways, Valentine’s Day is a way for corporations to exploit the ideas of romance, love and all things red, pink and heartshaped to make money. But in reality, you could substitute those ideas with iconic images of any holiday, and the statement would still make sense. No one is given a hard time about purchasing egg-shaped chocolates for Easter or carving pumpkins on Halloween. The difference between this holiday and others is that it seems to make people define themselves as one thing or another. Did you notice how I started this column by defining my relationship status? For many, Valentine’s Day is no longer a fun holiday. I know several people in relationships who are boycotting the holiday because they don’t want to participate in the hype. To each their own, I suppose. But I celebrate Valentine’s Day every year, regardless of whether I’m dating someone. I am not afraid to say it — I love this holiday. And I love it for the same reasons we all did in elementary school, when everyone in class would get sick from consuming too many cookies with pink frosting. It was just another holiday that ended learning time early. My first valentine was a little boy named Logan who was in my kindergarten class. It was the only year my school had a dance, and Logan and I were the only

ones to actually participate — mainly because I made him. At that time, dancing consisted of us holding hands, jumping up and down, and forcing him to spin me around. My mother has video evidence. I still buy cheesy valentines from the children’s aisle for all my friends. This year they came with magnets, and needless to say, I’m pretty stoked about them. It’s not just greedy, corporate Americans who celebrate this holiday. Cultures all over the world have their own customs and traditions. For example, I recently learned people in Spain exchange books instead of cards. If I had enough money, I would buy everyone books instead of little cards, or maybe both. This year, I will not be going out with a special valentine, attending any single’s parties, crying in my room alone with a bottle of wine, or buying a box of tissues and going to see the “The Vow.” I will be babysitting, so that a little girl’s parents can go out together on Valentine’s Day. The last time that I watched her, she made me a card with red hearts. However, she made it very clear to me that it was not actually a Valentine’s Day card, because it wasn’t time yet. Instead, she called it a “before card.” But I’m still considering it a Valentine’s Day card. If I wasn’t babysitting on Valentine’s Day night, I would buy myself some chocolates and work on homework. But I’m actually kind of glad to be spending the holiday with a little girl. Maybe I’ll never have that exact enthusiasm for the holiday as I did when I was younger, but I can spend it with someone filled with excitement. And she is definitely getting a Disney princess valentine. People like to place other people in boxes, but they don’t like to place themselves in them. The purpose of a holiday is to unite people, not alienate them. It’s time to take back Valentine’s Day and just enjoy it as another fun holiday.

Shelby Ward -regular columnist -senior -English major

Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Zach Crizer Managing Editor: Lindsey Brookbank Design Editors: Danielle Buynak, Victoria Zigadlo Public Editor: Justin Graves Web Editor: Sarah Watson News Editors: Nick Cafferky, Michelle Sutherland News Reporters: Josh Higgins, Cody Owens, Erin Chapman News Staff Writers: Priscila Alvarez, Abby Harris, Gina Paterson, Ashley Seagar Features Editors: Chelsea Gunter, Patrick Murphy Features Reporters: Nick Smirniotopoulos Features Staff Writers: Courtney Baker, Torie Deible, Dane Harrington, Kevin McAleese, Andrew Reily Opinions Editors: Scott Masselli, Sean Simons Sports Editors: Matt Jones, Zach Mariner Sports Reporters: Michael Bealey, Josh Parcell Sports Staff Writers: Eric Avassi, Zander Baylis, Alyssa Bedrosian, Cody Elliott, Taylor Hay, Alex Koma, Ashleigh Lanza, Brian Marcolini Photo Editor: Daniel Lin Enterprise Team Editor: Liana Bayne Public Information Director: Dishu Maheshwari Training Director: Kelsey Heiter Copy Chief: Spenser Snarr Copy Editors: Nora McGann, Luther Shell Layout Designers: Bethany Melson, Alicia Tillman Online Director: Alex Rhea Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: Philipp Kotlaba Student Publications Photo Staff Director of Photography: Paul Kurlak Lab Manager: Austen Meredith College Media Solutions Ad Director: Brandon Collins Asst Ad Director: Matt Freedman Account Executives: Johnson Bray, Kevin Jadali, Alyssa Brown, Brian Dickson, Janssen Claudio Inside Sales Manager: Mario Gazzola Assistant Inside Sales Manager: Adam Shata Office Manager: Kayley Greenday Assistant Account Executives: Alex Perry, Kacie Nolan, Jordan Peugh Creative Director: Casey Stoneman Asst Production Manager: Colleen Hill Creative Services Staff: Danielle Bushrow, Michael Craighead, Alyssa Morrison, Molly Vinson

Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Student Media Phone Numbers Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com.

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february 14, 2012

GUMBY’S

PIZZA & WINGS

Regular Edition

Blacksburg’s Legendary Late Night Pizza

Today’s Birthday Horoscope: Your circle of friends keeps expanding,

from your heart outward. This year it advances your dreams. Being polite is a virtue to practice; “please” and “thank you” go a long way. Sometimes a respectful protest is in order, too. Share and celebrate love.

4PM-2AM MON-THURS • 11AM-4AM FRI-SAT • 11AM-2AM SUN

MEDIUM PIZZA 210 A PRICES FORK ROAD

540.552.3200 VIEW OUR ENTIRE MENU ONLINE

Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham 4 5

6 2 1 6

3 8 3

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7 4 5

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XKCD by Randell Monroe This could be you . . .

Crossword

want your comics featured in the collegiate times?

submit them to: studybreak@collegemedia.com

Week ending Feb. 14, 2012

Top tracks

( ) Last week’s ranking in top five

I Will Always Love You • Whitney Houston

1

Rolling in the Deep • Adele

2

We are Young(Feat. Janelle Moneae) • Fun

3

Set Fire to the Rain • Adele

(2) 4

Someone Like You • Adele

5

word

WORDSEARCH: Valentine’s Day Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

UNSCRAMBLER

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WORD BANK Presents Date Cupid Hearts Chocolate Candy Be Mine Kisses Flowers Valentine Sweetheart February Love Romance Boyfriend Girlfriend Doves Flirt

in tomorrow’s paper for

Unscramble the letters to solve the category “Valentine’s Day” Have a set of words you want to see in puzzles section? Email your lists to ctadsproduction@gmail.com.

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Check out tomorrow’s paper on page 5 for the answers!

HUNGRY? 540.552.3200 GUMBY’S 210 A PRICES FORK ROAD

VIEW OUR ENTIRE MENU ONLINE

It’s no puzzle who you should call.

PIZZA & WINGS

MEDIUM PIZZA


editors: chelsea gunter, patrick murphy featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

‘The Vow’ falls below bar ‘The Notebook’ established

arts & entertainment

february 14, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

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Grammy winner to play at the Lyric Violinist Mark O’Connor will also share knowledge with Virginia Tech String Project, master’s students CHELSEA GILES

ho doesn’t love a good chick flick? Even though people know the plots are predictable and unrealistic, they watch and live vicariously through them. Regardless of whether audience members are hopeless romantics, they continue to pay $10 to watch characters fall in love — again and again. The first time I saw the preview for “The Vow,” I was reeled in. How can you not love Rachel McAdams, and how could you skip out on a chance to admire Channing Tatum? I’m not a Tatum fanatic, and he’s not the best actor, but I think he does a pretty good job. I admired his breakout performance in “Step Up” (2006), and his popularity has only continued to surge. Some of his other well-known performances include “She’s the Man” (2006) and “Dear John” (2010). I, among many other females, watched “She’s the Man” an absurd amount of times once it was released. However, “Dear John” let me down. I have read several Nicholas Sparks books and was excited to watch the movie. Audiences continue to cheer for the innocent Amanda Seyfried, known for her roles in “Mean Girls” (2004) and “Mama Mia” (2008). I couldn’t wait to see the novel come to life, but the film was a letdown. Although some may disagree, but I never felt the chemistry between Seyfried and Tatum. The flow was awkward, and the ending was a bust. The film had nothing on “The Notebook” (2004). When the preview for “The Vow” was released, I thought this might be it — this movie might be the first to compete with “The Notebook,” one of the most popular love stories of all time. The film has everything going for it and is based on a true story. Thousands of women will pay money to see Tatum, clothed or unclothed, and McAdams, the woman we all have fallen in love with onscreen. So, it only seemed appropriate for her to star in a film with the potential to outdo “The Notebook.” I couldn’t wait to stand in line to buy my ticket and compare the two films. The film is about a girl named Paige (McAdams) who loses her memory after a severe car crash. Instead of remembering her life in the city as an artist with her husband Leo (Tatum), she wakes up thinking she’s in law

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school engaged to her previous boyfriend Jeremy (Scott Speedman). Leo is faced with the daunting task of making his wife fall back in love with him. It might have been because I had to sit in the front row of a full theater, but I was extremely disappointed. The movie was just OK — satisfactory even. I enjoyed it, but it doesn’t even compare with “The Notebook.” McAdams and Tatum have great chemistry, so I can’t blame them. The progression of the storyline just fell flat. The transitions were awkward, and many scenes were forced and cliche. There were two specific scenes where the background is set up to be picture perfect, yet natural, and it didn’t work. There’s a scene with a father pulling his child on a sleigh in the middle of the street, as well as a scene where McAdams awkwardly storms into the picture on a bicycle. I understand what was trying to be done, but it was just stereotypical — too perfect. We all want to vicariously live through the actors, but no one bought it. I truly wanted this movie to be great. Maybe my expectations were too high going into the film. I’m sure this is one of those movies I will like more the next time I watch it because my expectations won’t be as great, but I am still disappointed. I am one of the many that fell in love with “The Notebook.” The chemistry between McAdams and Ryan Gosling, who recently starred in “Crazy, Stupid, Love” (2011) and “Drive” (2011), seems to be unbeatable. Perhaps the reason the film is untouchable is because McAdams and Gosling fell in love onscreen, and I secretly hope they get back together in real life. Whatever the reason, “The Notebook,” yet again, remains on top. To sum it up: If you’re low on cash and craving a love story, watch the preview of “The Vow” on YouTube and that should suffice.

CHELSEA GUNTER -features editor -junior -communication major

COLLEGIATE TIMES: Your music has been described in a variety of ways from jazz to bluegrass and even classical. In your own words, how would you describe it? MARK O’CONNOR: I generally start narrowing it down to American music. I feel like American string playing, which involves all those loose languages of music, is all cross-pollinated anyway. I think that really is an asset I wanted to play up in my music making. CT: Many reviews consider you a pioneer of American classical music, particularly describing your own method you created. What your method’s core focus? O’CONNOR: I’m actually going to be featuring a lot of my method at Virginia Tech and at the concert. The focus of the method is learning to play the instrument by using American literature and what I’m calling the American system of music. This involves a slightly different set of core principles in how music evolved and developed in the Americas, as opposed to Europe. CT: Do you enjoy teaching or performing more? O’CONNOR: I enjoy performing the most. I do more and more teaching as I get older. I enjoy it more with my method. The hat I wear for the most part is the author of it. I have teachers who teach my students while I author the material and organize workshops like we will be doing at Tech and the Lyric. Daniel Strange is playing piano with me and a guest teacher is coming up from Florida — Ashley Liberty. She is one of the teachers in my method. We’re going to play a lot of tunes from the method book three. That is just coming out this week in fact. CT: Is there a certain message you send with your performances or teaching? O’CONNOR: What I hope to inspire is this idea that we need more children playing music. It only happens if they have access to it. A musical life, all the things we do with music, is such an intrinsic part of our humanity that sometimes, I think we need to remind people to nurture it in participation — not just listening to it on the iPod. CT: While you are here, you will be working with the Tech String Project and some of the master’s students. What advice do you give to young aspiring musicians? O’CONNOR: They can’t ignore the central fact that this should be a joyful experience. It really is about humanity. There is selfdiscipline and providing a goal for yourself, but it’s also a way to reach out to people. It allows us to come outside our own box and

COURTESY OF MARK O’CONNOR

Mark O’Connor, who began playing violin at age 11, will stop in Blacksburg on his global tour to debut his method book. be able to spread that joy. It’s a way to meet people, play together and have fun. Remain curious and optimistic about what the future holds. CT: You just returned from an artist residency at the University of Miami. Did you have a main focus while there? O’CONNOR: Well some of my favorite things I’ve done while down there are to perform and work with the salsa. There are big salsa bands at the school, and I played the violin with them. CT: Reflecting on your career, is there one memory or performance that stands out? O’CONNOR: Probably the best and most significant of my adult career was when I debuted at Carnegie Hall as a soloist. I was playing an original composition. CT: Looking into the future, do you have plans for touring or goals? O’CONNOR: The Hong Kong visit will be interesting. I’m invited to be on a composer’s panel. I’m going to try to meet some people there about my method for an in-road for the American string method in China. There’s always something to try to accomplish. One of my desires for the next five years is to devise several camps around the country — really expand out. The camps I’ve been holding for a long time have catered to advance study. With the method, I’m able to open that to beginners and young children. So it would be possible to have camps for kids all over the country.

Save the date Mark O’Connor will perform at the Lyric Theatre this Friday at 7 p.m. The Center of the Arts coordinated the Grammy-winning violinist’s concert.

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Taurus (April 20-May 20) Expand your mind and heart with an adventure, perhaps a rendezvous at a secret spot, followed by a puzzle to untangle or an art project to enjoy.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Step into the emotional limelight. “Respectful” and “willing to be of service” get you the farthest. If the recipe falters, add a dash of “love.”

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Complete tasks earlier in the day. You’re a powerhouse. Later, reward yourself with relaxation and delicious food. Remember that pampering works best when it goes both ways.

Aries (March 21-April 19) A productive morning leaves space for a romantic evening; make what you will of it. You can have whatever you’re willing to stand for: Love is worth it.

The Lyric Theatre will be hosting Grammy award-winning violinist and orchestrator Mark O’Connor this Friday at 7 p.m. for a debut of material from his new violin method book. The Center of the Arts has coordinated the concert with classes and seminars for the Virginia Tech String Project and master’s students. Besides Blacksburg, O’Connor’s tour list includes major cities ranging from New Orleans to Hong Kong. But for O’Connor, the Lyric is a major circuit and a “wonderful place to play.”

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features staff writer

UNSCRAMBLER

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Cancer (June 22-July 22) You’re busy and getting busier at work, and that could interfere with your love life. Communication is key. Travel could be slow. Research holds crucial clues.

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ANSWER: If alcohol is freely available at the party, and money is collected at the door (for any reason), you will be charged for illegal sale of alcohol. You are not selling red cups, you're selling alcohol.

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Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don’t overspend on luxuries. Who needs them when you’ve got love? Celebrate with dear ones, and be lexible about how it looks. Your true love holds you to your highest.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Your capacity to listen makes you more alluring. Stay in contact with loved ones. You’re getting more powerful, so you might as well raise the stakes.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You’re just on ire. New pathways are revealed. Plan to indulge the places where your heart is. Your con idence is quite attractive.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) It all works out (if you’re willing to do the work). You’re in top gear, and improving, but remember that Valentine’s Day is not all about you. Share.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) There could be a clash between love and money. It’s not a good time to get extravagant. Don’t push yourself too hard. You have super study power. Share kindness.

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Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Plan a special day together with a loved one. It doesn’t need to be expensive. Go ahead and give your word. It’s okay to be quiet, too.

The police busted our party, confiscated the keg, and gave me a ticket. No one was arrested for underage drinking, how can they do that!

ANSWER: Kegs can be confiscated for two reasons: a) the keg is not registered to the correct address (or the registration is missing), or b) there are underage persons consuming alcohol at the party.

l 4U a g le ’s it N E H W choose to drink


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sports

february 14, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: matt jones, zach mariner sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Struggles should make for less stressful March In

a season that has been almost painful to follow, Sunday’s win over Boston College came as a sigh of relief for the Hokies, as they can officially say they no longer have the worst record in the ACC. However, the passing of Feb. 12 also means something else — something that has gone over the heads of most of the Hokies’ faithful. We are now less than a month away from Selection Sunday. Over the past three years, the month before Selection Sunday has been one of the most nerve-racking times of the year. In those four weeks, Virginia Tech takes pride in being Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde to keep things interesting. Beat No. 1 Duke? Why not follow it up with a blowout loss at home against Boston College? Still too much of a lock? Let’s lose at home to Clemson, too. Because of that tragic roller coaster play at the end of the season, Tech has been the epitome of a “bubble” team and has been on just about every “last four in/last four out” graphic ESPN bracketologist Joe Lunardi has produced. And then, when the selection committee has the audacity to select someone else and leaves the Hokies to play in the Not Important Tournament (OK, it might be called the “National Invitational Tournament,” but my name is more poignant), we have to hear conspiracy theories as to why we were possibly left out. Yeah, I’m sure we missed out last year because the selection committee enjoys watching Seth Greenberg’s vein pulsate — it had nothing to do with the two losses to Virginia (138 RPI) and the loss to Georgia Tech (166 RPI). But for the dozen of you who still follow the men’s basketball team closely, I have some good news for you: This is going to be a stress-free month.

TREVOR WHITE / SPPS

DANIEL LIN / SPPS

ALISON NEARY / SPPS

The Hokies beat Boston College on Sunday at home, 66-65. Although the win brought the team out of the ACC’s cellar, it’s unlikely it will help Tech earn an NCAA tournament bid. With the Hokies sitting at 14-11 (3-7 in the ACC), it is safe to say the only airtime the team will get preceding

March Madness will be if it spoils the chances of another team, such as U.Va. or Florida State.

Heck, Tech is so bad right now that it is likely it won’t even make the NIT — which is probably for the best. After all, if you show me someone who was legitimately excited to go to Tech’s first-round game against Bethune-Cookman last season, I’ll show you a liar. Perhaps best of all, we’ll be able to fill out our brackets without the bitterness of think-

ing the Hokies should be on one of those little lines. To think I had friends who boycotted the NCAA Tournament because we weren’t in it still depresses me. Now, we can enjoy the tournament. When a bubble team makes it to the Final Four, you don’t have to be bitter and scream things like, “They didn’t even deserve to be there,” while throwing something at your TV.

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Cinderella stories can be fun again. Tech being in the dregs of the ACC is a new phenomena for most students on campus, but it is important to keep in mind that this season isn’t a sign of things to come. The team uses an eight-man rotation that includes four freshman and two sophomores who got very little playing time last season. This is a rebuilding year, by every definition of the term, and fans who have only seen Tech basketball the last few years don’t realize exactly how bad the program has been historically. Tech will most likely never be more than an average team in the ACC that perpetually rides the bubble heading into March, so I’ve decided taking a year off from the situation might be good for my emotional well being. And with no postseason to really pay attention to, Tech fans can concentrate on the one thing that really matters: the Spring Game. It’s only 67 days away.

NICK CAFFERKY -news editor -junior -communication -@NickCaffCT


Tuesday, February 14, 2012 Print Edition