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Friday, February 10, 2012 An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 109th year, issue 16 News, page 2

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Opinions, page 3

Sports, page 8

Hard knocks

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Tech student group goes with the flow

DANIEL LIN / SPPS

Virginia Tech, Wake Forest perform some of the first ever research on youth football helmets and their protection against concussions BY CODY OWENS | news reporter Stefan Duma takes the issue of helmet safety head on. For nearly a decade, the head of the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences has researched head impacts in football. His research has been covered by The New York Times, ESPN and U.S. News and World Report. After receiving widespread attention for changing the way college and high school football helmets are rated and reviewed, Duma started a new study with a new group of hard-hitting athletes. However, he had to make sure it was OK with their parents first.

BRAD KLODOWSKI / SPPS

football. Although he has now received his doctorate, Rowson continues the research. “The initial purpose was to look at what fine mechanical forces cause concussions,” Rowson said. A grant from the National Institute of Health funds Duma’s research, which includes programs at Brown University and Dartmouth College. Other schools, such as the University of Oklahoma, the University of North Carolina and Wake Forest University, have also adopted the research.

receive a signal when a player receives a potentially injurious hit. Forces of 80 Gs will notify the team physician to check on a player. This is a relatively low force level for concussions, but notification allows for safety when taking into account the different tolerances found among different players. “If you look at the average concussion, the average (force) is right around 100 Gs,” Duma said. “You’ll have some as low as 70 Gs, you’ll have some as high as 130 to 140 Gs.” Surprisingly, however, some of the large forces were recorded during practices as well. This has provided information as to how If you look at automobile safety or drills might be changed and how practices can be modified. you look at military crash events, To improve safety, Duma outhow we understand injuries in lined three layers of protection for players. The first deals with those environments is how we un- coaching. If practices are modified, then player safety can be derstand sports environments.” improved. Secondly, the rules and design Stefan Duma of the game are influential. Duma Equipment safety researcher used the NFL as an example of where rule changes have made the All the data can be pooled together game safer. Despite some protest from to allow for a greater amount and a fans that the game is not the same as more diverse selection of information. it used to be, Duma said more rules At Tech, 150,000 impacts have been about hitting are beneficial to players. recorded, while the total number of The third layer is the helmet. recorded impacts is nearly 2 million. Research found that each Tech player ‘The best helmet’ receives between 10 and 50 impacts Standardized tests for football helper game, with offensive and defensive mets, as well as other sports equiplineman receiving the most hits. ment, are overseen by the National Most impacts were recorded between Operating Committee on Standards 10 and 50 Gs, or 10 to 50 times the for Athletic Equipment. These tests force of gravity at sea level. Twenty study the protection that helmets give Gs was the average impact force, but against skull fractures, but not concussome hits registered at 100 Gs and were sions. similar to the forces felt in a car crash. “Our study is the first that has come Implanted on Worsham Field beside see IMPACT / page five the 50-yard line are antennas that

An impacting force Duma primarily researches military and automobile safety. Despite differences between the fields, he says the same general principles translate between consumer and military products and sports equipment. “We look at head injuries for a variety of applications,” Duma said. “If you look at automobile safety or you look at military crash events, how we understand injuries in those environments is how we understand sports environments.” His research with the Tech football team began in the 2003 season. Accelerometers and wireless transmitters were placed in helmets and given out to the players of various positions. The sensors measured the impacts players received during practices and games. Working alongside Duma was Steve Rowson, a then-graduate student studying biomedical engineering at Tech. He was working on a dissertation about head acceleration in college

State debates abortion procedures Dispute arises over whether bill requiring women to have ultrasounds before abortions is necessary KELSEY JO STARR news staff writer A bill is currently being debated by the Virginia General Assembly that would require women to get an ultrasound prior to receiving an abortion at any time throughout the pregnancy. The original bill was first brought before the Virginia Senate as SB 484 by Republican Sen. Jill Vogel. It was passed on Feb. 1 to the Republican-controlled Senate. It will now have to pass the House of Delegates before being sent to Gov. Bob McDonnell, who has expressed support for the bill and is expected to sign it into law. At the moment, there is no assigned date for the vote in the entire House of Delegates, but

it will have to be put to a vote by next Tuesday, according to Joe Yost, Republican delegate for the 12th District, which includes Blacksburg. “I have not taken a stance on the bill itself,” Yost said. “I’m still studying the legislation.” The House bill, HB 462, is currently being put to a vote in the Courts of Justice committee, according to Richmond Sunlight, an online website that tracks the process of bills in the Virginia House of Delegates. The bill states pregnant women must get an ultrasound, but are not required to view the image and listen to the fetus’ heartbeat. The results of the ultrasound will permanently be on the woman’s medical record. Planned Parenthood argues

the ultrasounds are not medical necessities. “These health care decisions are best made by individuals and their medical providers, and it is not a politician’s place to play doctor,” said Tanya Semones, a field coordinator for Planned Parenthood Southwest. Sen. John S. Edwards said the bill would also require women to get a specific type of ultrasound known as a transvaginal ultrasound. Edwards said the procedure is unnecessarily invasive for women, and does not support the bill. “(The ultrasounds are) ideologically driven,” Edwards said. “They’re not supported by sound science, the restrictions are wholly unnecessary from a medical standpoint, they run up the cost of the procedure and they may be unconstitutional.”

Edwards is concerned the bill directly opposes the 21st Amendment, more specifically, the right to privacy women derived from Roe v. Wade. But, Vogel argues her bill does not impede on a woman’s right to an abortion. “It absolutely does not infringe on her right to have an abortion,” she told The VirginianPilot. “All it says is you’ll have an ultrasound. It doesn’t compel you to see the results.” Currently, the law, as protected by Roe v. Wade, allows a woman to receive an abortion during the first three months of pregnancy. States cannot restrict women until the second trimester. Virginia allows abortions during the second trimester provided they are in hospitals and not abortion clinics, according to Edwards.

Yvonne Yee, a student, and Thandiwe Ogbonna, an alumnus, are raising money for the procurement of clean well water in Africa.

Well Water, a new student organization, seeks to provide drinking water for developing countries KARA VAN SCOYOC

and Dj Manndibles, raising $275. They have also chipped in One in six people do not money from their own pockhave access to safe drinking ets. water. About 4,500 people die “I did a sort of giving-up-mydaily due to diseases associ- Christmas-for-donations thing ated with lack of access to and raised $75 for doing that,” safe drinking water and inad- Ogbonna said. equate sanitation. In Africa In addition to the concerts, alone, people spend 40 billion Ogbonna and Yee are working hours every year walking for on setting up an art auction water. and open-mic night. Various It is startling facts like these artists would donate items to that interested Virginia Tech be auctioned off, and all the alumnus Thandiwe Ogbonna proceeds would go directly to and Yvonne Yee, a senior busi- Well Water. ness management entrepreThe club is small, composed neurship major, into starting of just two members, but Yee an organization called Well and Ogbonna are looking to Water. expand, so it can continue at Well Water seeks to pro- Tech for years to come. vide clean drinking water to “Tech is such a big school, developand it’s ing counreally big tries and on philanimprove My father is from Nige- thropy, so sanitation there are a ria, so I have a personal lot of peoin these a r e a s . connection, and I’ve got- ple who Ogbonna are really ten to the point where I interested and Yee formed helpneed to help people and in the club ing other for a class make a difference in the p e o p l e project. out, and world.” I know “I took a global eththat this ics class in Thandiwe Ogbonna is a place the spring Well Water co-founder where a lot where we of money discussed poverty throughout could be raised for this cause, the world and unequal access so I definitely want it to conto resources,” Ogbonna said. tinue,” Ogbonna said. “Our assignment was to come Well Water is looking for up with a simple fundraising other students to get involved idea that could make a big dif- with the club. ference.” “We are trying to find youngThe money Well Water raises er replacements who we can goes to a larger nonprofit orga- depend on to uphold the misnization called Charity Water. sion,” Yee said. “Charity Water is an orgaFor Ogbonna, the club’s nization that provides clean efforts hit close to home, as drinking water to many devel- Charity Water reaches all oping nations,” Ogbonna developing nations with a said. focus on Africa. “I decided to use them “My father is from Nigeria, because 100 percent of the so I have a personal connecdonations they receive go tion, and I’ve gotten to the to the water projects alone, point where I need to help which I thought was really people and make a difference cool because people won’t have in the world,” she said. to worry about where their And this isn’t an issue money is going.” Ogbonna can ignore. The funds needed for over“It’s not something I want head and administration costs to let go or say I don’t have is derived from grants and time for,” she said. “This is other sources specified for that of great importance to me so purpose. I want to make sure it gets “I really like Charity Water done.” because all of our donations It only takes $5,000 to proare matched by private donors vide a community with a well known as ‘angel investors,’” Yee that allows access to free water said. for a lifetime. Through fundraising “Imagine your life without efforts, Ogbonna and Yee clean water. It affects everyhave raised $350 for Charity thing you do. Clean water is Water. important for preventing a In September, the duo lot of diseases, so for me it’s organized two donation- like, ‘How would you feel if based concerts featuring you didn’t have access to clean the bands Mey Mey Fresh water?,’” Yee said.

features staff writer


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news

february 10, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

Partnering up for yoga Morgen Plaza and Jennifer Sayre teach partner yoga. Partner yoga creates a unifying workout experience between two people, while offering a physical challenge. It consists of exercises requiring support from partners to maintain positions and balance. The breathing techniques also help yogis reduce stress and boost energy. photo by Luke Mason

Farmers fight for immigrant workers MICHAEL DOYLE mcclatchy newspapers WASHINGTON — California and Southern farmers renewed their case Thursday for some kind of an agricultural guestworker program, but they’re sailing against the wind. Make that a hurricane. Buffeted by campaign-season currents and the inherent complications around immigration, the farmers this year face excruciatingly long odds as they seek a guest-worker goal that’s eluded them since at least 1995. Still, they lobby on. “You have to be optimistic, don’t you?” said Modesto, Calif.-area farmer Paul Wenger, president of the California Farm Bureau Federation. “Stranger things have happened.”

Wenger joined H. Lee Wicker, deputy director of the North Carolina Growers Association, and Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black in urging a House panel to overhaul an existing worker visa program and boost farmers’ access to foreign labor. Without the fix, they say, growers’ problems will proliferate. “Experience shows us there is no realistic prospect of a domestic work force for agriculture,” Wenger told the House subcommittee on immigration policy and enforcement. “We in California have learned the hard way that few Americans seek agricultural jobs.” Nationwide, farmers are estimated to employ somewhere between 900,000 and 1.2 million illegal immigrants.

Farmers widely denounce the current program, called H-2A, which enables farmers to legally hire foreign workers. Although North Carolina growers this year will legally employ more than 7,000 foreign workers with H-2A visas, Wicker called the program “costly, unpredictable and administratively flawed.” In California, the nation’s biggest farm state, farmers only secure about 3,500 workers annually through H-2A. In Florida and Texas combined, the visa program provides a total of only about 8,600 workers annually. The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, agreed Thursday that the current visa program is “plagued with problems.” That’s about where the

consensus stops. Following fits and starts in the 1990s, advocates for farmers and farm workers in 2003 unveiled a grand political compromise they dubbed AgJobs. The measure would have streamlined H-2A and granted legal status to upward of 1.5 million illegal farm workers, potentially putting them on the path toward U.S. citizenship. At one point, as many as 63 senators publicly supported the AgJobs proposal. In 2007, though, congressional efforts to move a broader immigration bill that included AgJobs collapsed, in part under weight of the claims that the bill offered “amnesty.” “We don’t use the term ‘AgJobs’ anymore,” Wenger said. “It became so tainted.”

editors: nick cafferky, michelle newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

what you’re saying On a garden being built by Norris Hall

Engineer: There is a lot of engineering history

and honor society symbols. I sure hope they don’t destroy that history.

Anonymous: As being one of the landscape architecture students working on this project, we recognize there are elements referring to engineering out there. Could you be a little more speci ic on which elements you are referring to so as not to remove them? There will be two meetings, one on Feb. 15th from 4-5:30pm in Burruss 121, and the next on Feb. 16th at 7pm. Please come and voice your thoughts!

CPSVP: The Center for Peace Studies would never attempt to erase the considerable legacy and history of Engineering on this campus. I don’t even believe that would be possible, since any construction project on campus has to be approved on high levels. People from Engineering are enthusiastically encouraged to offer input on this garden concept and design.

Anonymous: How many people actively walk through there for class on a regular basis. I don’t know how anybody could feel comfortable sitting in and contemplating on their own so publicly. the ‘solitude’ aspect doesn’t seem likely to be achieved unless they build some kind of large hedges to quarantine it off. regardless of the intended purpose, I’m all for beauti ication of the campus. I’m sure a garden will look nice. Anonymous: Why would they want to destroy something belonging to Engineering? That doesn’t make sense. On He Said She Said needing to end

Agreed: Don’t listen to the posters on here.

Good article and good point. I don’t necessarily think HS/SS needs to go, but the writers could certainly be a little more creative and respectful..

Adam: We should also get rid of the opinions sections. The articles there always seem too opinionated.


editors: scott masselli, sean simons opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

opinions

february 10, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

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The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Zach Crizer Managing Editor: Lindsey Brookbank Design Editors: Danielle Buynak, Victoria Zigadlo Public Editor: Justin Graves Web Editor: Sarah Watson News Editors: Nick Cafferky, Michelle Sutherland News Reporters: Josh Higgins, Cody Owens, Erin Chapman News Staff Writers: Priscila Alvarez, Abby Harris, Gina Paterson, Ashley Seagar Features Editors: Chelsea Gunter, Patrick Murphy Features Reporters: Nick Smirniotopoulos Features Staff Writers: Courtney Baker, Torie Deible, Dane Harrington, Kevin McAleese, Andrew Reily Opinions Editors: Scott Masselli, Sean Simons Sports Editors: Matt Jones, Zach Mariner Sports Reporters: Michael Bealey, Josh Parcell Sports Staff Writers: Eric Avassi, Zander Baylis, Alyssa Bedrosian, Cody Elliott, Taylor Hay, Alex Koma, Ashleigh Lanza, Brian Marcolini Photo Editor: Daniel Lin Enterprise Team Editor: Liana Bayne Public Information Director: Dishu Maheshwari Training Director: Kelsey Heiter Copy Chief: Spenser Snarr Copy Editors: Nora McGann, Luther Shell Layout Designers: Bethany Melson, Alicia Tillman Online Director: Alex Rhea MCT CAMPUS Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: Philipp Kotlaba Student Publications Photo Staff Director of Photography: Paul Kurlak Lab Manager: Austen Meredith

Gay civil rights extend California circuit court beyond United States does not consider voters P

roposition 8, which placed a ban on homosexual marriages, was recently declared unconstitutional by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in California. Meanwhile, the Washington state legislature sent a bill legalizing gay marriage to its governor’s desk. In other parts of the world, however, the situation for homosexuals didn’t go as well. A bill was passed in Uganda making any activities “promoting homosexual activity” punishable by life imprisonment. In St. Petersburg, Russia, a measure was passed making any form of “homosexual propaganda” a criminal offense. These events show that the homosexuality issue will remain a polarizing and powerful issue throughout the world, regardless of your personal feelings toward the matter. But it is comforting to notice that the United States has made dramatic progress in the fight for homosexual rights. During an era in which the phrase “the land of the free” is used more commonly as a punch line than a statement of principle, it is uplifting to see such powerful steps forward in the cause of liberty. However, there is an antithesis for every thesis, and the progress of homosexual rights is no exception. Presidential candidate Sen. Rick Santorum decried the Prop. 8 ruling as an outrage and immoral. He said the Obama administration is “systematically destroying” institutions such as marriage and continues to uphold his view that gay marriage is, by “God-given” authority, an institution between one man and one woman. Some Americans believe in separation of church and state. Therefore, it is simple to disregard Santorum’s comments as being merely a part of his typical hateful rhetoric. Beyond this, Americans hold that the rule of the people must be beyond any governmental authority. Therefore, it is easy to see how many — even those in favor of homosexual marriage — are angered by the court’s overruling of the decision made by the people of California. The essential aspect of the United States Constitution that people cannot trample on the inalienable rights of minorities is lost in this

argument. This is why the Founding Fathers established a government with a Bill of Rights and why separation of powers is paramount to the workings of our political institutions. I am a steadfast advocate for democratic process and of the rule of the people in this nation. But I am also a steadfast advocate for the protection of minority rights and, more importantly, of a government that functions under the principle of the fair treatment of its populace. With that said, there is no justification on political, legal or moral grounds for a majority of people in a state to alienate a minority group from an institution that everyone, especially Santorum, believe is a fundamental one to social structure. As our civilization has evolved, so has our understanding of terms and institutions. In 1910, no one in America considered women as voters. Those who attempt to hold back progress that seeks to bring more people into the vox populi of society are not merely laughable, but dangerous. There have been people who have attempted this at every step of progress made in any issue throughout our history, and homosexual rights is no different. The judiciary in this nation stands as an institution beyond personal bias or mob mentality, and thus serves primarily to protect those who lack a strong voice. And so it is that this past week, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals told the people of California they lack the right of discrimination and institutional hate crime. We will be judged by future generations on the progress and lack thereof we make for our civilization. Will we live in the era that declares marriage as being about love and not procreation? Will we live in the era that declares minority rights, fairness of laws, and freedom for all citizens to pursue their own happiness as being more essential to the dream of America than the ability of a mob to create their own laws? The answer rests in a mirror.

JASON CAMPBELL -regular columnist -junior -philosophy major

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his week, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled California’s Proposition 8 — which defined marriage in the state as between one man and one woman — was unconstitutional. Quite frankly, I am not even going to bother with the whole “Is gay marriage right or wrong?” debate. This court case was not even about that. So let us set aside the moral versus immoral mess, be civil with each other and discuss what actually matters: the constitutionality within the decision. Here is a little history on the same-sex marriage debate in California. In 2000, 61 percent of California voters voted in favor of Proposition 22, which prohibited same-sex marriage within the state. In 2004, then-Mayor Gavin Newsom chose to ignore the state law, and he opened San Francisco City Hall to same-sex marriages. The state Supreme Court later ordered Newsom to stop and invalidated all the marriage licenses he issued. In 2008, the California Supreme Court, in a 4-3 decision, ruled marriage is a fundamental right for all. That same year, 52 percent of California voters passed the well-known Proposition 8 at the ballot box. Prop. 8 was an amendment to California’s Constitution, defining marriage between one man and one woman. The next year, the state Supreme Court upheld not only Prop. 8, but also supported the right for Californians to write their own state Constitution, since the document did not address same-sex marriage. A federal court in 2010 struck down Prop. 8. This week, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld that decision to strike down Prop. 8, declaring it unconstitutional. The real question here is if Prop. 8 is in fact unconstitutional. I would argue it is not. Under the California Constitution, the people have the right to bring such ballot initiatives forward. They also have the right to write their own constitution and constitutional amendments. Since the state constitution does not specifically define marriage, the people have the right to define it and not the courts. People are considered sovereign. There are also two major issues with the 9th Circuit ruling. First, the decision said “marriage” is merely a subjective term society gives

to certain relationships, and anyone has a “right” to use the term to define their own relationship. This creates a very slippery slope. Our government generally follows the notion that if something is a “right,” then it is also an entitlement (see Obamacare). So what if somebody can’t find a spouse? They have a “right” to marry, so should the government find a spouse for that person? Of course not. I hate to belittle such a complex issue like this, but we have to remember how our government likes to operate. The wording is very important. Second, the judges did not base their decision on solid grounds. Two of the 9th Circuit judges made their decisions believing Prop. 8 took away a right that already existed. Let us be clear on this: the people of California cannot take away, say, the right to speak freely, which is already guaranteed by the state’s Constitution in Article 1, Section 2. There was no guaranteed right of same-sex marriage that Prop. 8 had taken away. The only right that existed was to get a marriage license from Mayor Newsom in the San Francisco City Hall, which went against state law, so it wasn’t valid anyway. The lone dissenter on the 9th Circuit pointed out that the federal courts should defer to state law if they are given no other option. There was no other option, because the only “option” was Mayor Newsom. Therefore, the judges saying that Prop. 8 “took away” something isn’t really true. So, like I said, this decision is not about same-sex marriage being right or wrong. Instead, it is about whether the people voting for Prop. 8 is constitutional. I believe same-sex marriage is a state issue, not a national one. I also believe it is not the courts, but the people, as a sovereign entity, who have the authority to make that decision. I will respect any decision the voters of a particular state make on this issue. Just do not tell me the voters do not have the right choose because they do not sit on a bench and hold a gavel.

MATTHEW HURT -regular columnist -junior -political science major

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february 10, 2012

Be my Valentine?

Regular Edition

Ask that special someone.

Today’s Birthday Horoscope: Friends and partners usher in this new year with open arms. Your values have shifted from material pursuits to ideals like liberty, justice and equality. Studies and research prove to be fruitful. Creativity leads to profit, which grows inside a budget.

Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham 5 9

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XKCD by Randell Monroe

This could be you . . .

Crossword

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submit them to: studybreak@collegemedia.com

Week ending Jan. 21, 2012

Top tracks

( ) Last week’s ranking in top five

What Doesn’t Kill You • Kelly Clarkson

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Set Fire to the Rain • Adele

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Give Me all Your Love • Madonna

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Turn Me On • David Guetta & Nicki Minaj

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Sexy and I Know It • LMFAO

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in tomorrow’s paper for

Unscramble the letters to solve the category “In the Shower” Have a set of words you want to see in puzzles section? Email your lists to ctadsproduction@gmail.com.

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Check out tomorrow’s paper on page 5 for the answers!

Give that special someone a shoutout on Valentine’s Day ay Send your message to studybreak@collegemedia.com to see it printed in the Collegiate Times on Feb. 14th


february 10, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

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Impact: Youth football helmet study is first of its kind

DANIEL LIN / SPPS

Stefan Duma points out differences between various football helmets available on the market. His study shows that the most expensive helmets are not necessarily the best at protecting players from concussions.

Researchers found youth football head impacts could be as strong as those in college football from page one

out that said we can go another step further, and we can take all of this acceleration data, and we can understand what is going to reduce the risk of concussion,” Duma said. Inside Duma’s lab in the Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science, helmets are placed on prop heads and dropped from five different heights to measure impact force. The maximum height for the drop is 60 inches, and, according to the researcher, the distance brings a lot of energy into the helmet. The heads can be set to impact in different directions to measure how well a given helmet takes hits from different angles. Rowson plans to add equipment to measure rotational acceleration using 12 accelerometers, double the amount used to measure linear accelerations. Rotational forces are a major source of con-

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cussions. The data gathered from the millions of impacts from players and from the lab showed the researchers where and at what frequency players were being hit. This knowledge of accelerations and exposure gave them the guidelines for helmet design. One of the results from the research was a new helmet safety rating system. Helmets are tested in the lab and assigned a star according to how well they protect from impacts. The better the protection, the more stars. “We’ve learned quite a bit, not only on what causes a concussion, but (also on) the impact exposure these players are experiencing on the field,” Rowson said. “By understanding both of those, we were able to create the star evaluation system to evaluate helmets.” Football helmets are generally considered simple designs. However, how these parts were

level,” Slusher said. “The most important thing we learned was 35 out of those 38 hits happened in practice.” Some of the forces registered between 40 Gs and 100 Gs, which is the same force college players are being hit with. Slusher said a lot of these hits were due to old hitting drills such as the Oklahoma or the middle drill, both of which see players hit each other repeatedly after acceleration. Part of his response will be to modify practices to better protect the children. This is just the beginning of Duma’s research with youth football. He hopes to continue it for many seasons. “We need to collect more data for at least one or two more years before we can accurately say because we only have this first layer,” Duma said. “Obviously, a 13-year-old is different than a 7-year-old, but they’re all wearing the same helmet. Before we make any change to the youth helmet, we need to map that out and really understand it.”

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For the kids This past season, Duma partnered with the youth football league of Riner, Va. to expand his research. “There are only two types of

helmets — adult and youth — and that threshold is about 14 years,” Duma said. “The adult helmet is in general well understood. (With) the youth — 6 years up to 13 — there is a complete unknown.” Duma soon contacted Chris Slusher, the athletic supervisor for the Montgomery County Parks and Recreation department. “He contacted us about outfitting a team with brand new helmets, seven of which would have sensors in them to record what kind of impacts the helmets take throughout the season,” Slusher said. These helmets were provided to the Auburn Eagles, a team of 15 players ages 6 to 8 years old. The entire team received new helmets, with only seven containing sensors. About 750 impacts were registered in the youth season. What was found concerned many individuals. “The most startling thing was that out of 700 and some hits he recorded, 38 were in concussion

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University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences volunteered to use its own funds to purchase 40 maroon helmets to replace the players’ VSR4s. While Duma’s research has seen praise from many, it is not without critics. Schutt, a sporting goods maker, said they did not see a relationship between the tests and field performance, while Xenith told The New York Times they were “unmoved by this information.” Ultimately, the helmet rating system is providing information about helmet safety that was previously unavailable and is contributing to fewer player concussions. Rowson and Duma will continue their long-term study, but will also divert their attention to another research project started this past fall.

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brought together varies. “It is plastic and foam in different combinations,” Duma said. “The methodology for how to design the best helmet is what we presented.” The details in these helmets were what separated the four and five stars from the lower-quality equipment. The Xenith X-1, which received a four-star rating, used 18 airfilled shock absorbers to reduce the impact force. At $329, the Xenith X-1 was the most expensive helmet tested. The only helmet to receive a fivestar rating, the Riddell Revolution Speed, featured foam of different composition and hardness in the front and on the sides. Additionally, a ridge on the back of the helmet added strength to the design. The Revolution Speed costs $249. The only helmet to receive a one-star rating was the Riddell VSR4, which did not offer adequate protection. Tech used this helmet as of last season, but the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest

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Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Get ready for an adventure that could last into the weekend. Tie up the loose ends from older projects so you can launch a new one without looking back.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Consult with partners over the next few days. Brainstorm and gather info. No need to make big decisions yet. Leave your money buried. Stay and inish up.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) The pressure increases, but you have what it takes. Follow a strong leader. Everything starts to make sense. Don’t pour money down a hole. Review work before sending.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Time to get your hands dirty with an art project. Find your creative side. What do you love? What tickles your fancy? If you’re lost, let a partner take the lead.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) It’s easier to concentrate now, especially in the inancial realm. Why not get your taxes done early? Or at least go over the paperwork to see where you can save.

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Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Get farther than expected, and discover new things about yourself. You’re entering a lucrative phase, but stick to your blueprints. Your actions speak louder than words.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Romance requires patience and lexibility now, but it’s well worth it. Balance short-term goals with longterm sustainability. There’s a test.

Aries (March 21-April 19) There’s some urgency. Imagine the project in its completed form, and stay active. Delegate the help from partners and friends. Give up control, and accept contribution.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Your team is ready. Put their ideas into practice. The next two days are good for making changes at home. Save enough for the highest quality.

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Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) New energy propels you to create goals for the future and take action. Find a quiet place where you can concentrate, and think up some revolutionary ideas.

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february 10, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

he she

people & clubs

SAID

remember when I was younger and got the chance to cover a shoebox with tissue paper, glitter and hearts made out of pink construction paper. My dad helped me cut a slit on the top big enough for classmates to slip sweet nothings into because I was not to be trusted with the “big knife.” My box would always have the right amount of bling to scream, “Hello there! This is Kelley’s box. You know you want to put that Blow Pop in here,” to my classmates. Desperado, right? But I was in second grade, give me a break. I remember one year, my class went all out, and everyone’s boxes were overflowing — it was the most special Valentine’s Day of them all. However, while I can’t remember if my box was incredibly full this particular Valentine’s Day, I do recall rummaging through it to see if I received anything from the boy of my dreams. This was the same boy I drew a big heart around with my pink gel pen in my yearbook — the one who was my closest friend but with whom I was in puppy love. You know, the usual scenario of a second-grade girl crush. His card was extensively more personalized than any of the others’. After searching through my box, I found the Batman valentines card with Nerds attached to it, signed “Zac F” — this was hands down the best gift I received that day. And sadly, although we have grown up, girls are still that easy to please. In the movies, a female is completely smitten by any amount of flowers, candy or stuffed animals. In reality, you don’t need to be flashy — it is the thought that counts. If the gift is handmade, she’ll be in the palm of your hand. If you are debating “starting your kiss with Kay” or giving her any other jewelry for that matter, save your money for another occasion. In my opinion, jewelry is an even tackier gesture than chocolates. On Valentine’s Day, it says, “I have no creativity, but knew I couldn’t go wrong with diamonds.” If you’re in a relationship, this will most likely make her feel guilty for not buying you such an extravagant gift. And if this is a random valentine, what is wrong with you? Jewelry is best received when it is given on a random date. It makes her think you couldn’t wait for a reason like a birthday or holiday to give it to her. I’m extremely easy to please. The usual handmade card, a personal poem or even a few homemade chocolate-covered strawberries are sure to make my day. We can dress up and go to West End. I really don’t mind. I can do without the candy though. Spring break is coming up, and if there is a pink box of chocolates on my desk, I’m going to uncontrollably make like Forrest Gump and

featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

He said: Be thankful, show others you care L

She said: Get creative this Valentine’s Day I

editors: chelsea gunter, patrick murphy

find out what, “I’m gonna get.” I have, however, always wished someone would surprise me with a Valentine’s Day scavenger hunt. I know it is cheesy, but I am a hopeless romantic — I love the spontaneous nature of it all. Maybe one day my husband, or perhaps my kids, will take pity on me. I am obviously not a good male gift giver — we established that over the holidays. However, I interviewed some male friends and asked what they would want on the big day. A lot of them said Valentine’s Day is not for the men and tried to convince me it was all about pleasing the ladies. I completely disagree. Women are just as excited to spend time with their men and ensure they have an incredible night. Once I convinced them they can be spoiled as well, they came up with an answer none of them could disagree with: food. Ladies, this is not the same as, “Woman, get in the kitchen and make me a sandwich!” I am about meeting the men half way. If he has dinner covered, I’ll make my favorite dessert so we both win at the end of the day. If cooking is not your thing, order the triple chocolate meltdown from Applebees to go, slip it on a plate with two spoons and enjoy heaven. I offered to make dinner last year, and it was such a hit, we broke up. Just kidding. He ate it up. Make your date something delicious, and you cannot go wrong. Simply find out his or her favorite candy, tie a card to it with a ribbon and call it a day. I live by the quote, “Things are only awkward if you make them awkward.” I see no reason for Valentine’s Day to be upsetting. Yes, it is a glorified holiday turned materialistic to make huge bucks for no reason. But if you try to catch a glimpse of what it symbolizes, it is actually kind of beautiful. Love is all around us in our friendships, relationships and families. Take a moment to share it with those you love, even if it is just your girlfriends going to watch “The Vow” together, eating Deet’s ice cream, or studying for a huge business law exam. Oh, and send your momma flowers. It will make her day.

KELLEY ENGLISH -featured columnist -junior -marketing management major

ong gone are the days when you would spend hours long as you put in effort to show you care, you can’t really writing each of your classmates’ names on your mess up. Valentine’s Day, while exploited by candy, flowSpiderman Valentine’s Day cards and then fastening er and card companies, is rooted around love — which Blow Pops to each one. No longer are the days when you is almost hard to believe these days. Anything done to would save your favorite flavor for that cute girl who sits prove this love should be enough. at the end of your seating row. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. I delivered Growing up has exited us from the age of equality — flowers to women for a fundraiser last year on Valentine’s not everyone is guaranteed a valentine anymore. Now, Day for a local floral company. The arrangements some guys must dig deep to think of creative ways to impress people got were incredible, but I was amazed when more the woman in their lives — that is if they even have one. than half of the women receiving them weren’t grateful. For those of us single men out there, we must decide A handful were extremely delighted and taken back between building up the courage to ask out that cute by the gestures from their men. But I have seen more girl we’ve had our eye on or spending the day in a mild excited looks while delivering sandwiches at my job for state of depression watching happy couples celebrate Jimmy John’s than I saw the day I delivered flowers. their love. I am in no way, shape or form saying a majorSingle life on Valentine’s Day — something I have ity of women don’t appreciate flowers. I just ask that grown fairly accustomed to — isn’t as bad as you think. any girl who receives a gift or nice gesture from her Dinner for one at a fast food restaurant is a hell of a lot man this holiday show appreciation. It can be stresscheaper than a candlelit dinner for two at a nice bistro ful for a guy deciding what to get a girl, and even downtown. All those hours of planning surely could if the gift is not perfect, reach out and tell him you be spent doing something else. But alas, all these costs care. can’t compare to spending a day with the owner of your And those complaining about being alone this holiday, affection. I promise you, it gets much worse. Being single and So this year, why not take a leap and ask out the girl of delivering flowers to taken girls is not the most uplifting your dreams? Afraid of rejection? If she says no, you are thing a person can do. right back where you started. But if she happens to say Girlfriend or not, use this day to show the ones in your yes, you can be in for one of the best nights of your life. life you care. And hey, at least you can get candy for 75 Though I must admit, I am somewhat of a hypocrite. percent off on Feb. 15. During my junior year of high school, I failed to execute my plan to ask a special someone to be my valentine. I DANE had the speech planned out and the chocolates in my HARRINGTON backpack. We always walked together after AP U.S. his-featured columnist tory. All I had to do was pull the trigger and ask her, but I -junior choked worse than Lebron James in the playoffs. I’m not going to say I will regret that day for the -industrial & systems engineering major rest of my life, but I may very well have missed out on my soulmate. Exaggeration? You never know. For those men who already have that special lady in their lives, the pressure can be equally as crushing. Fail to impress, and you may not have another Valentine’s Day to mess up. You can always go with the traditionalist approach — flowers, candy and a dinner date for two at a nice restaurant downtown. There is nothing wrong with this, as it has surely left many women very happy. N o n traditionalists are spontaneous and take their loved ones on adventures. This is great if your girl isn’t afraid of trying something new. The way I see it, as CHELSEA GUNTER / COLLEGIATE TIMES


february 10, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

7

Greece reaches austerity agreement, reduces safety net ROY GUTMAN mcclatchy newspapers PERAMA, Greece — The shipyards are deserted in this town just west of Piraeus, Greece’s main port, and unemployment hovers at 60 percent. The country is at the edge of bankruptcy, and with more government spending cuts looming, newly impoverished Greeks are turning to charity for health care, medicines and food. The Greek branch of Doctors of the World, a French-founded relief group renowned for aiding war victims and impoverished immigrants, now has a clinic in Perama, where 80 or more people line up three days a week. To cope with demand, the group plans to operate the clinic seven days a week. Panagiotis Alexius has been coming in for free medicines and a dosage of oxygen since the clinic opened in February 2010. For 40 years he worked in the nearby shipyards, or abroad, spraying a toxic mix of chemicals and sand on ship hulls. Disabled by a rare lung disease in 2002, he received disability payments. But he’s now fallen through Greece’s safety net: He is officially assessed as 67 percent disabled, but the threshold for government support has been raised to 80 percent. Because of an unpaid tax bill from 10 years ago, Alexius is barred from receiving government-paid health services. “Greece is a total mess on these issues,” he told a visiting reporter. “I searched for help at the ministry, but it was difficult to figure out what is going on.” His six children, only two of whom are employed, help pay his electricity and food bills. As Greece’s political leaders struggle to reach an agreement with international lenders before a March 30 deadline, the toll is growing from an austerity program that promises only to get tougher. Greece has been living beyond its means for decades, and now the little man is paying the price. Professionals who do vital government jobs are in dire straits, with take-home salaries now cut to as low as $860 a month, or $10,300 a year. The private sector, too, is about to feel the squeeze. Earlier this week, political leaders agreed in principle to cut the minimum monthly wage in the private sector to $750 from $1,000. Optimism is in short supply, both among the country’s leading economics experts and at the volunteer doctors clinic in Perama. According to Dr. Nikitas Kanakis, the dentist who’s president of the Greek branch of Doctors of the World, the number of patients coming through the door of the group’s Perama clinic has quadrupled in the past two years. Eight in 10 patients now are Greeks, four times what it had been. “It’s a shocking time,” he told McClatchy Newspapers. “The state

doesn’t know who’s poor or who’s vulnerable. People used to be able to get money and find a doctor. Now everything is breaking down.” Many who seek help at the clinic have incomes of no more than $260 a month, and others have nothing at all, he said. The doctors group has been handing out 45-pound food parcels to families since December — 4,000 around the country, 1,000 in Perama alone. “I think we are the sole support for at least 300 families here,” he said. All medicines are donated. When a new cancer patient arrives, Kanakis issues a community appeal, and locals donate their leftover pills. “It’s a Greek thing,” he said of the practice, something not seen even in most war zones. Perama may be the hardest hit part of greater Athens, but the Greek capital also has Kifissia, a posh area full of high-end stores and eateries that appear to be thriving. In central Athens, in view of the Acropolis, people still dine out, though less than before, to judge from the many places that have cut back their hours. There’s many a sullen cab driver who would rather not be asked how he’s doing, but others hand out their cards and offer a guided tour on your next visit. Elegant cafes have a cosmopolitan wait staff, who speak other languages and know how to handle patrons’ astonishment at the prices — an espresso can cost $5 a pop. The city’s modern airport, 30 miles out of town, is connected by a fast metro to the city center, part of the state-of-the-art system built for the 2004 Olympics. Tourism has long been Greece’s heavy industry, and, assuming the country doesn’t explode over the latest cutbacks, anyone coming here this year can expect a warm welcome. For Delpina Koutsoumba, however, this is a winter of discontent. She’s 37, a trained archaeologist with a master’s degree who works for the

ministry of culture’s department of “aquatic antiquities,” issuing licenses and supervising construction of ports, hotels and other investments on Greece’s storied coastline. Her take-home pay last month was $860. “I’m an archaeologist, married with a child. Of course, I cannot live on this,” she said. Nominally, she earns $1,190, but late last year the government announced that it was lowering salaries retroactively — and docking everyone’s pay accordingly. “They told us: ‘You owe us money from last year.’ And they take whatever money they want,” she said. So for three months, it’s a starvation salary. Her apartment alone costs $730 monthly. When she supervises a site, the construction engineer at the site may earn 10 times her salary. But Koutsoumba says she cannot be bought: “In my department, there are archaeologists, who love their job. That’s why there is no corruption.” Her appallingly low income is barely augmented by the earnings of her husband, a philosophy teacher. “I don’t know what we will do this month,” she said. “Maybe I will ask for money from my father again or my grandmother, because she happens to live on her pension. Or my mother-in-law.” If that sounds bleak, the president of the Athens Chamber of Commerce can offer an outlook that makes the current situation sound cheery. According to Constantine Michalos,w not just Greece, but all of Europe is on the skids. “I don’t think there is a survival scenario for Europe in the medium to long term,” he said in an interview. Greece is the weak link “in a long chain of events” that began with the U.S. banking crisis, but “quite honestly, I don’t think there is an overall solution, a sustainable solution on a European level.”

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sports

february 10, 2012 COLLEGIATETIMES

editors: matt jones, zach mariner sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

Hokies looking for revenge against Golden Eagles Sitting close to the bottom of the ACC, the Hokies still have opportunities to make some moves BROOKS TIFFANY sports staff writer The Virginia Tech men’s basketball team will look to climb out of the bottom of the ACC bracket this Sunday, as the Boston College Golden Eagles come to town with the same mission. Both teams are struggling to make something out of the remainder of their seasons, as they have recently found success, with Tech downing Clemson and BC upsetting Florida State. The Eagles (8-16, 3-7 ACC) snapped a six-game losing streak with their win over FSU and will look to piece together their first winning streak since Jan. 14 of this year. That last win, before the Eagles went on their six-game skid, was against Tech, in which they edged out the Hokies 61-59. With its recent upset of FSU and hopes of sweeping Tech for the season, BC will bring a newfound confidence to the court on Sunday. The Hokies (13-10, 2-6 ACC) will need to deflate the Eagles early and set the tempo for the remainder of the game. Fresh off a recent home victory against Clemson, in which they put together an all-around

solid game, with the exception of the last five minutes, the Hokies should be able to carry this momentum forward by continuing the trends that brought them success. One such trend is the statistically quiet players on the team, such as Marquis Rankin and Dorian Finney-Smith, beginning to step up their game. Finney-Smith, a freshman who has struggled in ACC play this season, finally exploded against Clemson. He helped cage the Tigers by scoring 12 points, hitting two field goals from beyond the arc and bringing down eight rebounds. Rankin, who missed the first seven games of the season due to knee surgery, returned against Kansas State but has been quiet all season until recently. With starts against Duke and Clemson, the freshman point guard has shown a growth in confidence, contributing eight points in both games. With continued development from Finney-Smith and Rankin, big things could be in store for the Hokies as they continue to mature. Looking to the immediate future that is Boston College, Rankin and Finney-Smith will try to keep up with Jarell Eddie, who led scoring against

Clemson with 15 points, and Erick Green, who still holds his streak of scoring 10-plus points in every game this season. If the Hokies can put together an offense that is running on all cylinders Sunday, the Eagles could be in for a long night, as they have struggled defensively all year. BC’s struggling defense means Tech’s offense has a fantastic opportunity to shine, as the Eagles are ranked 322nd in rebounds per game and yield more than 67 points per game to opposing teams. The Hokies will look for Victor Davila to take advantage of the Eagles’ troubles on the boards by staying aggressive, being disciplined, and letting BC make mistakes that have them ranked so low in this category. In contrast to Tech’s offensive woes throughout the season, one area where the Hokies have generally had success is on defense. If Tech can shut down BC, much like Clemson, by getting physical and throwing off its shot percentage, it could turn out to be a nice night for the team. More specifically, the Hokies will need to get back on defense quickly in transition and harass players like Matt Humphrey, who scored 15 points against FSU, including two from down town. One of the Eagles’ key ingredients in their victory over FSU was their ability to move the ball, get open and shoot the three, making 10-22. If the Hokies can keep their legs moving and energy up, the Eagles’ stats should suffer as they have all season. With the memory of their heartbreaking loss to BC still haunting them, the Hokies will be looking to replace it with a much happier one. Both of these teams finally have something going for them and will look to build upon their recent successes. The only question is: Who will be sent back to the drawing board? FILE 2011 Tip-off is at 6 p.m. in Cassell The Hokies fell to the Golden Eagles last year on Senior Night 76-61, just days after beating No. 1 Duke. Coliseum.

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