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Wednesday, November 30, 2011 An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

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COLLEGIATETIMES 108th year, issue 120

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Food & Drink, page 7

ACC tickets sell out fast STUDENTS HOPING TO GO TO CHARLOTTE HAD DIFFICULTIES BUYING TICKETS SUNDAY JOSH HIGGINS news reporter Student tickets to the ACC Championship Game sold out within 47 minutes. The Virginia Tech Athletics ticket office opened sales for nearly 1,000 student tickets on Sunday at noon. However, the large number of students trying to buy tickets flooded the site, leaving some empty-handed. “My brother and I were on the HokieTickets site at 12 p.m. on Sunday when the site was supposed to open, so we could buy tickets for our group of 18,” Molly Reed said. “We’d all planned on going and figured if we got on the site right at noon, we should be able to secure enough tickets.” But Reed and her brother were wrong. The freshman engineering major was unable to purchase a student ticket, since the website crashed shortly after she logged on. Stephen Medley, the associate ticket manager for Tech athletics, said the large volume of students using the site is not unusual during firstcome, first-served ticket sales. The ticket office put a queue in place on the site that allowed only a certain number of students to purchase tickets at any given time. Once the queue filled, anyone who visited the site was directed to a countdown screen that refreshed every 60 seconds. Medley, who was monitoring the site during Sunday’s sale period, said he sat through about six to seven cycles before he was able to enter the site. He said he got one error message while monitoring, which said “unable to secure seats in this level” because lower-level seats had sold out. Shortly after, the ticketing provider reloaded the site to eliminate the lower-level seats. During the reload, no students were able to purchase tickets, and people on the site would have received a message saying the store was not available. Once the reload was complete, the message went away and students were allowed to continue purchasing tickets, Medley said. Lower-level seats were limited to two per person to give

as many students as possible a chance to purchase them, but without forcing students to purchase single tickets alone, Medley said. Upperlevel tickets did not have a per-person limit. Fans are turning to sites like StubHub.com to purchase tickets. However, prices are often higher than face value on these sites. As of last night, tickets for the game ranged from $75 to more than $6,000 on StubHub.com. Face value for lower-level tickets range from $70 to $175, and upper-level tickets range from $25 to $40. “We started searching on StubHub and TicketCity, but of course, tickets there were double the price, and it was hard to find a group of tickets big enough to accommodate all the people we had planning on going,” Reed said. “But regardless, I am just happy to have the tickets and will be heading to Charlotte this weekend to cheer on my Hokies.” Both Tech and Clemson were allocated 10,000 tickets in the Bank of America stadium that they could sell to their fans. Universities pay face value for these tickets. Tech designated about 1,000 of these tickets for students and 500 for the marching band. The remaining 8,500 tickets are sold to Hokie fans through other means, Medley said. Clemson sold tickets differently than Tech. Clemson’s ticket office opened a lottery on Monday from 12:05 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., according to Clemson’s athletics department website. Students had to register for the lottery, and winners were notified later that evening. Each student who won a ticket was allowed to purchase it for $40. Lottery winners can pick up their tickets with other people they would like to sit with at the game. Tech would like to be able to change their ticketing system to improve ticket sales for students. Medley said the ticket office would prefer to use an extended sale for student tickets, like it does for football and basketball season tickets. But he said when working within a short time frame, that method is impossible.

Awful Arthur’s closes its doors ERIN CHAPMAN news reporter Students returning from Thanksgiving break found a familiar bar in downtown Blacksburg gone for good. Awful Arthur’s closed its doors permanently on Saturday, Nov. 19. “It’s something the partners have discussed, and it ended up just being the right time to close,” said Michael Soriano, one of the restaurant’s four partners. Soriano began planning for the 12,000-square foot restaurant five years ago, but it became difficult to run successfully because of its large size. Soriano said he and his partners hoped the large restaurant and entertainment venue would fill a niche in Blacksburg. “I think that in general, the concept we had just didn’t work in Blacksburg,” he said. “Five years ago (when) we started planning in detail, there was nothing like that in Blacksburg.” Other Awful Arthur’s

locations in Roanoke and Salem are not as large as that of Blacksburg. In August, Blacksburg’s Awful Arthur’s leased the upstairs portion of the restaurant to the digital advertising firm Modea as an effort to make the restaurant smaller and more manageable. But the downturn in the economy and the pressure of operating a large restaurant for four years had already taken its toll. Soriano and his partners decided their efforts would be better spent focusing on their other businesses and the other Awful Arthur’s locations. The restaurant’s sudden closure has left local music promoters looking for other venues. Joey Paulekas, who manages marketing for the local event production and promotion companies Third Eye Presents and Boogieburg Soundsystem, is worried how this clos see AWFUL’S / page six

Opinions, page 5

Sports, page 3

Classifieds, page 6

Sudoku, page 6

FINDING THE RIGHT CHORD

A survey of more than 1,000 members of the Virginia Tech community found these to be the top four sources of music.

Panel discussion aims to help music industry and listeners reconcile competing interests as students use free services BY ZACH CRIZER | editor-in-chief Virginia Tech students’ favorite music is increasingly streaming into their ears instantly, and for free — a trend leaving many of their favorite artists with weakening streams of revenue. A survey conducted by the university’s Communication Network Services in coordination with the Future of Music Coalition shows Hokies are most likely to access music for no cost through YouTube, Pandora and free versions of services such as Spotify and Last.fm. Tech students’ music preferences will be further explored in a panel discussion tonight that will discuss “The Value of Music.” The event, hosted by CNS in a partnership with the FMC, will be held in Squires Student Center’s Old Dominion Ballroom tonight at 7:30. Kristin Thomson, who is a consultant for the music advocacy group FMC, said the discussion will seek to shed light on the changing landscape of the music business and how artists can reconcile their need for revenue with consumers’ preferences and use of emerging technologies. “We’ve always been interested in ensuring that artists are fairly compensated for their work in this environment with so many changes,” Thomson said. “We’re also really interested in how music fans can discover and enjoy new music. And there are all these emerging technologies to try and relate the two together.” Thomson, who will be moderating the panel, said college campuses are fascinating for FMC because students are using the latest technologies to acquire and listen to music. She said one of FMC’s main goals is

to educate musicians on the shifting dynamics of the business.

FREE SERVICES ‘GOOD ENOUGH’ The survey of Tech community members found a clear preference for free streaming services. A vast majority of the survey’s respondents said they use YouTube or Vevo either “a lot” or “sometimes” to listen to music. The popular video service, which is free, was the most common method of listening to music. Pandora and other free Internet radio sources, were the second most popular source for music. “We’ve also been testing, kicking the tires on a lot of these services, really trying to understand what the consumer experience is like,” Thomson said. “We spend a lot of time actually using the services to figure out why they’re cool or why they’re not cool so we can understand why consumers might adopt them.” FMC’s report on the Tech survey said YouTube and Pandora dominate college listening patterns because they provide “free access to relatively large catalogs of music.” According to the report, YouTube offers the world’s most diverse ondemand music catalog. It is attractive because it is free, legal and searchable. Pandora differs in its form of customization, but, according to the report, has seen tremendous growth in part because it “facilitates music discovery, leading listeners to other artists or songs that share the same traits that the listener already likes.” But the survey showed one indicator looms large in college students’ decisions: cost.

youtube

pandora

spotify

radio

see MUSIC / page four

Musician revenue from sale or play of single song

$.00025

$0.09

$.0013

$.15-.50

Tech increases financial aid available PRISCILLA ALVAREZ news staff writer The average college student today graduates with more than $25,000 dollars in debt, and tuition continues to increase. To help alleviate the burden on students, the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors increased financial aid available to students to $390 million, an increase from $342.2 million in 2008. The aid encompasses both subsidized and unsubsidized student loans, grants, scholarships and employment for students. “The financial aid I received wasn’t really beneficial at all, and hopefully this increase will help that,” said Erica Bassuq, a freshman university studies major. Tech increased the aid amount because of the suffering economy and its effect on financial aid requirements, said Barry Simmons, the director of scholarships and financial aid. “Over the past several years some of the requirements from the financial aid have been eased a bit so more people have been brought in to be eligible,” Simmons said. The total $390 million was split into three categories: $147 million went to loans, $174 million went to grants and scholarships, and $69 million went to student employment, according a yearly report by the Finance and Audit Committee on student financial aid published on Sept. 20. The new aid packages were voted on during the Board of Visitors’ most recent meeting in early November. “The purpose of the report was

to primarily focus on undergraduate financial aid, which is about $114 million of this amount,” said Tim Hodge, the assistant vice president of Budget and Financial Planning. About $22 million of the undergraduate financial aid came from the federal government, $13 million came from the Commonwealth of Virginia, $33 million came from private funds and endowment money through Tech, and $45 million came from outside sources, according to the Finance and Audit Committee report. “When we add this all up it paints a picture that there is a lot of money to support and make sure that access to an education is attainable. This is really something important that the university has been working on by speaking with federal and state officials,” Hodge said. In the past 10 years, Tech has increased institutional aid available for undergraduate students from $1.1 million to $13.3 million. But paying for college will still be difficult for students and families, because while aid increases, tuition costs grow as well. On average, tuition and fees will increase 7.9 percent for FY12, according to the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia’s 2010-11 report on tuition and fees at Virginia public schools. Tuition also increases because state universities like Tech are receiving less money each year from the state. Since October 2007, the university has lost $75 million in support from the

Splitting the bill At public universities in Virginia, the state pays a percentage of the cost of tuition, and individual students pay the difference. Tuition costs for students

2001-02

increase as state support decreases. These graphs compare the percentage of state support this year vs. 10 years ago.

2011-12

State Students VICTORIA ZIGADLO / COLLEGIATE TIMES

Virginia taxpayers, which eventually pushes up tuition. And because of the increasing cost of college, the aid money must be divided between more eligible students. “We’re always concerned for affordability and always advocat-

ing for more money for financial aid from the budget office,” Simmons said. “There are efforts underway to take affordability a little bit more seriously and develop programs for middle-income students here at the state level.”


september november 30, 2011 2009zach mariner editors: matt23, jones, sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865 COLLEGIATETIMES

sports 3 page B 3

november 30, 2011

End of NBA lockout makes for a frenzied December The NBA lockout has been lift- the amnesty clause will of course ed, and the cost of all the conten- still get paid, but their contracts tious negotiations is 16 games will not count against the cap. and a couple of players (Wilson The front-runner to lose his Chandler, Aaron Brooks and basketball dignity is Gilbert Kenyon Martin) who are stuck Arenas, who still has more than playing in China until March. $60 million owed on the six-year The official start to the offsea- $111 million contract he signed son is scheduled to be Dec. 9, in 2008. The man has started just when all hell will break loose, as 50 out of 328 games in the last managefour seam e n t sons and teams will has been scramble au g ht The front-runner to lose cpulling to disasa semble his basketball dignity is gun on and adjust a teamGilbert Arenas, who still mate in t h e i r respeclocker has more than $60 million the tive teams room since for the owed on the six-year $111 signing the upcoming million contract he signed ridiculous season. contract. The free in 2008.” Not every agency candidate frenzy will for the headline amnesty the chaos of the 16 days leading clause will be as wildly disapup to the Christmas Day openers, pointing as Arenas has been for as teams on the cusp will compete the teams that have supported for the likes of the few game- him, but he certainly represents changing free agents that will be those basic criteria for a player on the market. Marc Gasol, Tyson that a team could stand to lose. Chandler, David West, Jamal The shortened period for player Crawford and Nene will most movement will only be a part of likely be involved in the majority the added drama the extended of free agency rumors. lockout has created. Players will There will also be a fair share of rush to their team’s facilities to trades, as the NBA is known for put up some jumpers and work its over-the-top, league-changing off some of that lockout-induced trades (see Carmelo Anthony). fat they’ve gained over that last The trade rumors involving 149 days. three prime suspects — Dwight This should be an interesting Howard, Chris Paul and Deron season, with teams from the old Williams — will begin to domi- guard of the NBA (Spurs, Celtics nate the Twitter feeds of any- and Lakers) slowly falling from body who follows NBA writers. the top and being replaced by In addition to the usual player younger, more athletic teams transactions via trade and free (Oklahoma City Thunder and agency, the Collective Bargaining Chicago Bulls). However, there is Agreement added a small wrinkle still a lot of moving and shaking that may help some teams with to be done with the NBA between money to spend. now and Christmas, and it will An interesting clause that is only augment the anticipation included in the new CBA is the for what should be another great Amnesty Clause (think of the NBA season. “Get Out of Jail Free” card in Monopoly). Each team will get ZANDER BAYLIS one of these clauses and will be able to wipe one contract from its -sports staff writer current and future salary cap. The -sophomore players who will be slapped with -industrial & systems engineering major

MCT CAMPUS


4 news september 23, 2009 november 30, 2011

page B editors: claire sanderson, michelle sutherland newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865 COLLEGIATETIMES

Music: Tech encourages legal listening from page one

The report said usage of services other than YouTube and Pandora is markedly lower. A majority of respondents said they “rarely” or “never” used paid subscription services such as Rhapsody and Spotify premium. While many of these services offer enhanced features or remove interruptions from advertising, students aren’t necessarily willing to pay for the added convenience. “According to the survey responses,” the report said, “they are more interested in options that provide ‘good enough’ catalogs and ‘good enough’ interactivity, for free.”

THE FILE-SHARING PROBLEM These trends bring mixed feelings for musicians. “Most folks from the music industry would be pleased to see people choosing more legal or licensed services because there is some revenue that flows back to rights holders, including musicians.” Thomson said. Jeff Kidd, the spokesman for the university’s CNS department, is also interested in seeing more students choose legal methods of enjoying music. His department is responsible for making sure Tech’s bandwidth is not used to illegally distribute music, and legal use of music is one main goal of the cooperative effort between Tech and the FMC. “While there are clear educational benefits, providing Internet access to thousands of students also has its risks,” the report said. “Specific to our partnership is understanding how

(Tech) students are using their Internet access to listen to and acquire music.” Kidd was proactive in bringing the panel discussion to the university so students can immerse themselves in the debate over the value of the music they are listening to. “One reason we wanted to do this is to take a more proactive stance in terms of communicating to the community about some of the issues, concerns and benefits of the Internet music environment,” Kidd said. In accordance with the Higher Education Opportunity Act, the university receives complaints from record companies if music is illegally uploaded from the Internet service it provides. It contacts the students — often within an hour of receiving the complaint — who uploaded the material and asks them to address the issue. The school also attempts to inform students so they can avoid the situation all together. “The approach the university has taken, I think from the getgo, has been an educational one,” Kidd said. “I think the biggest ‘gotcha’ in file-sharing and the Internet is that the peer-to-peer clients, once installed, will share things whether you want them to or not.” He emphasized that complaints are not filed over illegal downloading, but instead directed at those who make the music available, an act that many peer-topeer clients — commonly known as torrents — perform without prompting. “They think the complaints we get are about downloading, but they’re not,” Kidd said. “The

complaints we get are about uploading. That coupled with the fact that these clients do it automatically is just a really hard thing to get around if you are going to have one of these on your computer.” In FY10-11, Tech handled 1,213 complaints of illegal file-sharing on its Internet connection. As of Nov. 15, Tech has handled 428 cases this semester. Thomson said the survey found these illegal options are decreasing in prevalence on Tech’s campus.

STREAMING REVENUE WITH MUSIC And while the FMC recognizes that an increase in legal music consumption is a step forward for the musicians it represents, Thomson said many of the services college students prefer are not lucrative markets for artists. “The price, the unit cost, has gone down a lot,” Thomson said. “What you used to make by selling a CD in a store is very different than the price you get for having something streamed on Pandora. “There is a debate in the music industry about what this means for us.” In its report, the FMC describes its “longstanding interest in and advocacy of the development of a legitimate music marketplace — one where musicians can sell their music for a fair price, and where music fans can discover and enjoy the music that they love.” Data from FMC shows that streaming services direct considerably less revenue back to the artists. And of course many YouTube clips are unofficial

recordings and generate no revenue at all. Kidd said the panel — which will reach out to an even wider community than the survey — would be useful in putting a finger on the pulse of how Tech students interact with music. Thomson will moderate a panel including two Tech students, two music industry executives and Phil Norman, one of Kidd’s colleagues at CNS. Norman said tonight’s panel discussion is a way of gaining more insight into how music producers and consumers can find common ground. “The point is to have the discussion,” Norman said. “There’s two sides to this story. We’re not there to force an ethical line down this issue. There’s a reason this culture is changing. There’s a reason the FMC is called the Future of Music Coalition. The business is changing.” The discussion is open to the public. After a short presentation of results from the survey, audience members will have the chance to offer input and interact with the panel members.

what you’re saying On the opinions column saying Americans hold obligation to the lower class:

Event details What: The Value of Music panel discussion When: Tonight at 7:30 Where: Squires Student Center’s Old Dominion Ballroom Cost: Free and open to the public

Hokie01: Yeah that's right - all economic plight is caused by some evil banker in a glass tower, who drinks cocktails made of ground up $100 bills while he stares down in disdain at the huddled masses. Or maybe....just maybe most poverty is the result of a lifetime of poor decisions (having children you can't afford, abusing alcohol/drugs, piling up credit card debt on the latest gadgets....take your pick, they all lead to a lifetime of misery). I know....the bankers probably tricked them into making those decisions....wow they are evil! Obama is 1%: Obama received more money from Goldman Sacks in 2008 than every politician running for every level of office COMBINED. And liberals wonder why banks are raking in the money while we all suffer Texas Mike: Josh, you need to get your history

lessons from a more balanced source. Reagan and Bush 1 both made "deals" with a Democrat-led Congress to lower spending. The Dems proceeded to increase spending. Obama can't even get his own party to get behind his lousy jobs act. It's a canard to throw around in stump speeches, and nothing more. No one voted for the only budget he's ever put forward, because it spent us into oblivion. The Dem congress has flaunted US law by not producing a federal budget for the past several years. They didn't want to go on record with their bloated spending plan before the 2010 elections, so they punted. "Continuing Resolutions" were put forward, and anyone who opposed them were branded as obstructionist. I drive by the "poor" subsidized housing complexes every day. The "poor" drive cars, have cell phones, kids have bikes, and most of them are overweight. Take a look at pictures of the poor during the Great Depression. Starving, clothes in tatters, living in shanty towns. Today's poor don't have it easy, but most seem to have enough left over after food, clothing, and shelter to pay for an iPhone.

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6:48-4:59 p.m.

Follow up to Harassing Phone Calls

ICTAS Building

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11/28/2011

9:49-10:00 p.m. Harassment

Hahn-Hurst Basketball Facility

Active

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editors: scott masselli, sean simons opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865 COLLEGIATETIMES

november 30, 2011

The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Zach Crizer Managing Editor: Lindsey Brookbank Design Editors: Danielle Buynak, Victoria Zigadlo Public Editor: Justin Graves Web Editor: Sarah Watson News Editors: Claire Sanderson, Michelle Sutherland News Reporters: Josh Higgins News Staff Writers: Erin Chapman, Meighan Dober, Abby Harris, Elizabeth Haydu, Cody Owens, Mallory NoePayne Features Editors: Chelsea Gunter, Patrick Murphy Features Reporters: Nick Smirniotopoulos Features Staff Writers: Courtney Baker, Torie Deible, Dane Harrington, Kevin McAleese, Andrew Reily Opinions Editors: Scott Masselli, Sean Simons Sports Editors: Matt Jones, Zach Mariner Sports Reporters: Michael Bealy, Nick Cafferky, Courtney Lofgren, Josh Parcell Sports Staff Writers: Eric Avassi, Zander Baylis, Alyssa Bedrosian, Cody Elliott, Taylor Hay, Alex Koma, Ashleigh Lanza, Brian Marcolini, Cody Owens Photo Editor: Daniel Lin Special Sections Editor: Liana Bayne, Nick Cafferky Public Information Director: Dishu Maheshwari Training Director: Kelsey Heiter Copy Chief: Spenser Snarr Copy Editors: Debra Houchins, Nora McGann Layout Designers: Nadia Groome, Kaitlyn Kicia, Bethany Melson, Matthew Ryburn Online Director: Jamie Chung Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: Philipp Kotlaba

MCT CAMPUS

Media insensitive Paterno deserves punishment toward Penn State If I

prepared for the worst as trayed it to be two days I put on my red jeans and prior. jacket. My family and I have Most students were enjoybeen planning on going to the ing the afternoon, and Nebraska vs. Penn State game there were various bake for more than a year. Growing sales and T-shirts being up, it was expected that my sold in support of efforts to sister and I would cheer on the prevent child abuse. In almost Big Red. Both my parents and every restaurant or bar my all of my aunts and uncles are family and I patronized, Penn University of Nebraska alum- State fans supported us being ni and loyal fans. Although I there, thanked us for comdid not choose to go there, it ing and wished us luck on will always be a part of my Saturday. life. Gameday seemed like a norHeading up to Penn State, mal, with huge tailgates filled the mood was somber, and with alumni and students. my family and I had no idea The mood in the stadium, what to expect. Joe Paterno however, was much different, had been fired on the past especially when the players Wednesday. entered. T h e They came in Board of arm-in-arm, Tr u s t e e s and eventualdecided to ly both sideact swiftly The media should have lines joined and made each other talked to more stu- in the center a clean sweep, firthe field dents who were not of ing key for a prayer. p e o p l e part of the riots, which The scene involved brought tears was the majority, to re- to Nebraska with the J e r r y veal a different senti- and Penn Sandusky State fans ment. child abuse alike. During allegations, the prayer, both in the the media administrawere cirtion and cling around football the group coaching like vultures staff. looking for This was prey. absolutely the right thing to Media attention during predo, and all Penn State stu- game activities is normal, but dents, alumni, staff and sup- in this case it seemed to lack porters should respect their class. decision. As the game came to a nailThe media, however, biting end, Nebraska prevailed, should have been more sym- but it did not seem like a win to pathetic to the situation most fans. It was a bittersweet and gotten both sides of the victory for me and my family. story from the students The horrible sexual abuse situabefore painting them in a bad tion overshadowed the win. light. Although this incident could As we neared campus, have happened anywhere, the College Avenue was lined media should not have tried to with local and national news taint the entire student body’s vans, which had been the tar- reputation. get of the riots that Wednesday Every student I talked to night. was embarrassed of Penn Around 2,000 students State and thought Joe Pa had gathered around the should have resigned or street and various locations been fired after not doing on campus to protest Joe Pa all he could have done being fired. Upset and irra- when he learned of the tional students even threw abuse. rocks and turned over a news The media should have van. talked to more students who News stations inter- were not part of the riots, viewed students, most stand- which was the majoring up for Joe Pa, making ity, to reveal a different the university as a whole sentiment. look unsympathetic and ignorant toward the MADELINE HENNINGS allegations. -regular columnist The mood on campus on Friday was very differ- -senior ent than the media por- -political science major

y ou decided to skip class and go live in a cave for a couple of days, you may have missed the debacle that is currently consuming all the media outlets and sports fans everywhere. Joe Paterno, the legendary Penn State coach who holds the record for the most wins in college football — who was previously viewed as a moral exemplar, a leader, a true gentleman, a man to be admired, respected and emulated — was fired. He was not fired for his inability to keep coaching, but because of his negligence, his compliance and tacit approval of one of the most heinous crimes an individual can commit — child molestation. It is disturbing that some apologists are arguing that he should still have his job, saying he fulfilled his legal obligations and is therefore exempt from any punishment or consequences. Under his reign, a former player and assistant coach, Jerry Sandusky, fondled and raped boys. Moreover, these detestable acts repeatedly took place in Penn State facilities. Also, it is not like this was a one-time ordeal. Sandusky is being charged with a minimum of 40 counts of sexual assault. A 40-count minimum. But did Paterno have any knowledge of this? Can he be held responsible? Yes, current wide receivers coach, Mike McQueary, informed Paterno in 2002 of a sodomy incident involving Sandusky. So when were the police informed?

Oh wait, they weren’t. Here is an account of one of the atrocious acts: McQueary walked in on Sandusky and a 10-year-old boy in the locker room showers. Sandusky was apparently defiling the boy. McQueary — keep in mind watching this disgusting and nauseating act take place — did nothing to stop it. Nothing. Nothing at all. He should be fired immediately. Who cares that he told Paterno the next day? Why the hell did he not do anything when he was there witnessing this horrendous event take place? But wait, it gets worse. The next day he told Paterno, who played the messenger and relayed the information to the athletic director, who in turn told the university president. What did the administration decide to do with this information? Absolutely nothing. Law enforcement was never informed and there was never an investigation. They just covered it up and pretended nothing ever happened. My question is: What was with the student outrage and rioting? Did those naive college students have the slightest idea how they were presenting themselves to a nation that was watching their every move? Look, I get it, he was a great coach and a living symbol of your university, but this is way beyond football. We aren’t talking about bowl games and tailgating festivities. We are talking about pedophilia.

We are talking about the loss of many children’s innocence. We are talking about a huge coverup where football seems to have usurped morality, where touchdowns and field goals hijacked people’s ability to recognize right from wrong. Instead of protesting Paterno’s exit, go out and protest for adjudication. All of the men that failed to relay the sex crimes to the police should be punished under the full extent of the law. And I don’t want to see that slap on the wrist nonsense just because he is Paterno. He is a human being, like all of us, and should be held accountable for his inaction. Unfortunately, the law cannot do much to this guy since he abided and followed Penn State policy, passing along the information to a superior. But what we can do, as a collective group, is recognize his egregious error in judgment. This is child rape and molestation — there is no acceptance, and children’s lives are forever ruined. Think about it this way: Bullying has three parties — the victim, the bully and the bystander. Do we hold the bystander accountable for their inaction? Yes, we do. They are just as bad as the bullies, and Paterno was a bystander.

TYLER ARTHUR -regular columnist -sophomore -business major

College: A place to develop opinions T

hose who go to college do so primarily to gain a better education and learn about themselves as they become adults. But it is also crucial for students to realize that college is a time and place to form their own opinions. The majority of all college students earning an undergraduate degree, and even some graduate students nowadays, are between the ages of 18 and 25. This age group is, unfortunately, still at a very vulnerable stage in life. Although people in this age group are considered adults and have the ability to survive on their own, they are still gullible and have not completely developed their own opinions. Until the age of 25, the human brain is typically not fully developed, according to neurologists. Therefore, until someone reaches this calculated age, they are more likely to make decisions blindly based on influence, rather than on facts and personal viewpoints. While we are growing up, a lot of our “personal” views on topics come from people who

have great impacts on our lives, such as parents, friends or teachers. Teenagers especially are easily targeted and influenced by things they watch on TV or what their peers say. However, this does not need to be the case. Neurologists also argue that although the brain is underdeveloped during people’s teenage years and early 20s, this does not imply that those in this age group are incapable of slowing down their thought processes to think about decisions and beliefs. College is the first time most of us are, for the most part, on our own. We are allowed to do whatever we want, whenever we want. We are basically given a four-year buffer period to make mistakes and learn from them without harsh or life-changing consequences. It is important, then, to strongly encourage everyone on campus to begin thinking for themselves. We need to find out what our passions are and, in a sense, begin seeing the world with our

own eyes. We should no longer be blinded by what others tell us. And we shouldn’t continue to be ignorant about current events globally and locally. It is unacceptable for us to simply agree with stated opinions just because we haven’t shaped our own. Everyone who has already been through college says these are some of the best years of our lives. Feeling passionate about a topic and spreading our opinions on campus makes this time even more worthwhile. Benjamin Franklin once said, “For having lived long, I have experienced many instances of being obliged, by better information or fuller consideration, to change opinions, even on important subjects, which I once thought right but found to be otherwise.”

LINA BARKAWI -regular columnist -junior -industrial systems engineering major

Student Publications Photo Staff Director of Photography: Paul Kurlak Lab Manager: Austen Meredith College Media Solutions Ad Director: Brandon Collins Asst Ad Director: Matt Freedman Account Executives: Johnson Bray, Kevin Jadali, Alyssa Brown, Brian Dickson, Janssen Claudio Inside Sales Manager: Mario Gazzola Assistant Inside Sales Manager: Adam Shata Office Manager: Kayley Greenday Assistant Account Executives: Alex Perry, Kacie Nolan, Jordan Peugh Creative Director: Casey Stoneman Asst Production Manager: Colleen Hill Creative Services Staff: Danielle Bushrow, Michael Craighead, Alyssa Morrison, Molly Vinson Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Student Media Phone Numbers Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. Subscription rates: $65 semester; $110 fall/spring. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2011. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


november 30, 2011

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WORDSEARCH: Colors Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

Regular Edition Today’s Birthday Horoscope: What would you like to be honored for this year? Your contributions are appreciated. You have extra charisma and use it to good advantage. You may need to log in extra hours, but you’re building something of value. Imagine the medal.

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Local eateries offer up holiday goodies Awful’s: Music scene As

the air becomes frosty and winter looms, the smell of baked holiday goods and the iridescent glow of Christmas lights atone for the misery cold weather can often bring. Food, a staple in any person’s survival needs, becomes even more prevalent beginning with Thanksgiving and ending with Christmas. Blacksburg — a place known for its small-town restaurants and local good eats — occupies several locations, all of which add new food to their menus for the holidays. Bollo’s, a well-known cafe and bakery right on the edge of Virginia Tech’s campus, offers a variety of seasonal options for its customers to choose from. Barbara Wright, who works for Bollo’s, takes joy in the change that transpires during the fall and winter. “We make pies for Thanksgiving and special holiday cookies for Christmas time,” Wright said.

Although Thanksgiving and all of its splendor has passed, Bollo’s customers can be reassured that more sweet delicacies await. Rum balls are offered and gingerbread is also available for individuals to decorate. Everyone can keep their belts unbuckled and should continue to wear the notorious “fat pants” to save more room for the mouthwatering treats this year. Decorated holiday cookies, butter cookies with jam in the middle and dipped in chocolate, as well as Mexican wedding cookies are just a few of the snacks Bollo’s produces for the season. With this cheery custom having been around since the restaurant’s opening in 1995, Wright said the seasonal treats have become hits among the community. “People get into the spirit of Christmas and Thanksgiving, especially about food and drink,” Wright said. “They remember their favorites from their families, and they like to try new things.”

Help Wanted ORGANIZER - Part-time organizer needed. Grand Jete is a Russian youth dance company that will tour the East Coast in March and April. Organizer will arrange community and church performances and logistics. Sponsored by Peacework. 4 hrs/ wk Nov-Jan, 8 hrs/ wk Feb-March. Contact Steve at 230-8581 or steve@peacework. org.

become the next tasty additions to the lot. Laureen Blakemore, the director of Downtown Blacksburg, said the Next Door Bake Shop and the Blacksburg Farmers Market also provide seasonal changes in food. Next Door Bake Shop often has special seasonal drink flavors, while the farmers market provides in-season produce, as well as holiday pies, cookies and breads. Blacksburg as a whole supplies its residents with tasty treats to remind them why they love the holidays so much. With the vast number of local locations on and off Tech’s campus to find food, students and residents can easily avoid larger chains to satisfy their needs for great holiday cooking.

EMMA GODDARD -features staff writer -sophomore -communication major

looks for new venue from page one

ing will affect the music scene in Blacksburg. “When this happens, someone usually steps up and takes the torch. This is the first time I can remember that there are really no other places open,” Paulekas said. He also said he disappointed and shocked to hear that Awful Arthur’s closed. “It caught me way off guard,” Paulekas said. “We have shows booked there up till February — very big shows that we now have to find spots for.” A band by the name of Big Gigantic was scheduled for Awful Arthur’s but has been moved to the Sun Music Hall in Floyd County. But Paulekas is unsure if this will become a per-

manent venue for their shows. “We went through a couple of options for the show, but this was the best. It really is a gorgeous musical hall, and we’re pretty excited about it,” he said. Currently, the Awful Arthur’s partners don’t have any plans to open the restaurant at another location, but Soriano said if and when that happens, a new restaurant would be not be as large or have the entertainment space the old one had. “In the future would Awful Arthur’s come back to Blacksburg? It’s a possibility, but don’t hold your breath for it right now,” Soriano said. “We loved being in Blacksburg, and we really want to think everyone for supporting us over the years. We hate to leave.”

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Customers can be sure they’ll be greeted by the fresh scent of sugary goodness every year with a slight twist each time. Wright said the type of food offered depends on the popularity among customers, and the special cookie and holiday recipes the bakers themselves can bring to the table. Locals will see a change in the drink menu this year also, with a new holiday tea that will be served at both Bollo’s and its sister store, Gillie’s, starting Dec. 4. There will also be an abundance of food and drink, as well as holiday gift items that will be sold. However, if cookies and pastries are not preferable, the Frosty Parrot also offers its own change in flavor to get into the holiday spirit. With its fairly recent opening, the frozen yogurt shop adds pumpkin and spiced apple pie flavors to add to the fall collection. In continuing with the Christmas theme, however, eggnog and chocolate peppermint

Week ending Nov. 18, 2011

7-9 AM - Hills ‘n’ Hollers

WUVT “5 Minute” News at 5 PM

9AM-12PM - Morning MisAnthropy

7-9 PM - The Local Zone

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9 PM-12 AM - The Big Waste of Time

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Sexy and I Know It • LMFAO

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It Will Rain • Bruno Mars

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We Found Love • Rihanna

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Good Feeling • Flo Rida

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The One That Got Away • Katy Perry

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november 30, 2011 page 7

november 30, 2011 editors: chelsea gunter, patrick murphy featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

food & drink

COLLEGIATETIMES

Brandy Old Fashioned

Melted Snowman Cookies EMMA GODDARD features staff writer

JIMMY HUDNALL

With the cool weather kicking in, it only means one thing: winter. Christmas is fast approaching, and what would be a better way to start off the holiday season than with Christmas cookies? This melted snowman cookie is sure to be a hit at a holiday party, with its appearance and delicious sugary taste. Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes

features staff writer Just in time for the inevitably frigid Blacksburg winter, this variation of the typical bourbon cocktail will warm you from the inside out. The Brandy Old Fashioned is most renowned in Wisconsin, where it serves as the unofficial state cocktail. First created in the 1880s, this timeless classic can serve as a sweet alternative to your usual “sipping drink”. The Angostura really distinguishes the flavors of the muddled cherry and orange, adding a taste of citrus that is noticeable, yet not overpowering. This brandy goes down slow, creating a pleasant warm sensation that lingers — in a good way. Brandy can be enjoyed by men and women alike. Surprise your friends by ordering one the next time you’re out and show you have distinguished taste.

Ingredients: 1 package Betty Crocker sugar cookie mix 10 large marshmallows Betty Crocker icing (white and orange) decorating icing tubes (black and green)

Directions: 1. Follow cookie mix directions on box to prepare dough. 2. Grab a golf-ball size chunk and squish it down until it’s about 1/4- to 1/2-inch thick. Bake according to box’s directions. 3. Once cookies are cool, load them up with cookie icing, spreading it around with the back of a spoon. Let some dribble over the edge for a “puddle” effect. 4. Spray a microwave-safe plate with cooking spray and place marshmallows on the plate. Set

Ingredients: 2-3 sugar packets 1-2 dashes Angostura Bitters cherry and orange slices 2 shots brandy lemon peel and cherry for garnish

Hardware: old-fashioned glass muddler strainer cocktail shaker

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Directions: 1. Empty the sugar packets and bitters into an old-fashioned glass. 2. Add the cherry and orange slice; muddle (mash) ingredients in bottom of glass. 3. Add the brandy. 4. Pour mixture into cocktail shaker and shake vigorously. 5. Fill the glass with ice and strain the mixture back in. 6. Garnish with a lemon peel and cherry.

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solutions: “Sushi Rolls”

DANIEL LIN / SPPS

1) california 2) rainbow 3) cucumber 4) tuna 5) salmon 6) tempura 7) avocado 8) philadelphia

EMMA GODDARD / COLLEGIATE TIMES

the microwave for 30 seconds, but watch the marshmallows as they cook. Stop the microwave as soon as the marshmallows start to get puffy. Do not let them double in size. 5. Spray your fingers with

cooking spray or grease them up with shortening, and carefully pull the marshmallows off, by the base, and set them on top of the frosted cookies. 6. Decorate cookies as you like with more frosting.


september 23, 2009

page B


Wednesday, November 30, 2011 Print Edition  

Wednesday, November 30, 2011 Print Edition of The Collegiate Times

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