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Tuesday, November 8, 2011

An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

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COLLEGIATETIMES

Check inside for your top picks on the best that Blacksburg has to offer

108th year, issue 112 News, page 2 Arts & Entertainment, page 5

Heading home at sunset

Opinions, page 3

Sports, page 6

Classifieds, page 4

Sudoku, page 4

Recalculating education Virginia Tech’s net price calculator is intended to help students estimate the true cost of university attendance BY KELSEY JO STARR | news staff writer

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rittney Moses recently realized college isn’t as expensive as she thought, with the help of a new tool Virginia Tech has to offer. The net price calculator, which is available on Tech’s website, helps students figure out accurate estimates of their cost of attendance at the university. Moses initially looked at similar estimates on college websites, adding money to those numbers for personal expenses. But to her surprise, the extra costs were significantly reduced when she used the calculator. “The daily costs aren’t what (the other websites) said they were,” Moses, a freshman human development major, said. “Everything’s either on my meal plan or included in my tuition.” Websites like College Board state that costs of attendance are much higher than they turn out to be, which can deter students from applying to some universities. The calculator is intended to help solve that problem. The calculator uses a base number for the average cost of attendance at Tech, not the university bill amount, said Barry Simmons, the Office of University Scholarships and Financial Aid director. As students enter more information, the number adjusts, providing them with a more personal estimate for the costs of attending Tech. The calculator takes into account financial aid, residency, student living plans, family financial history

and more to produce the estimate. The base number consists of tuition and fees, a room and board charge regardless of whether a student is on campus, and various allowances for travel and personal expenses. An extra expense for computer and software fees is factored in for first-year students. And finally, the net price is calculated by subtracting estimated financial aid awards. Before financial aid estimates are taken into account, the average cost of attendance for in-state students is about $22,000 per year, a number produced from the calculator. Tech implemented the calculator as part of the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008, which required colleges that participate in Title IV federal student aid programs to have their own calculators by Oct. 29, according to the Institute of Education Sciences website. Tech launched its calculator on Oct. 26, according to the Financial Aid office. However, Simmons said this is not the final solution to financial aid issues. “This is a consumer movement long in the making to make the issue of college choosing more transparent,” Simmons said. “Unfortunately because of the variability, between the way colleges do things and between the way people understand the college process, the whole effort is amiable but is rife with particular problems.” The net price, he said, is more than

the university bill students will pay, regardless of financial aid, because of extra costs for personal expenses. Extra costs can sometimes scare parents and students because of the sudden jump in cost, especially for incoming freshmen. “A lot of people, when they see the words ‘net price,’ jump to thinking, ‘That’s what my bill’s going to be,’ and that’s not the case,” Simmons said. “If we can get the right understanding of the terminology, that’s good. I’m all for being transparent. There are instances were institutions are not as forthcoming or transparent as they should be in letting students know what their financial aid is going to be.” Shelley Blumenthal, a guidance counselor at Blacksburg High School, said she likes that the calculator includes extra costs because it provides a more accurate estimate for the amount students will pay when attending Tech. “I like the fact that you can plug something in and get an early read on what possible costs are going to have to be taken into account,” he said. “I see it as being a very positive thing because one of the things that used to happen that students and parents would just see the sticker cost and didn’t look beyond to see the net cost after financial aid.” Blumenthal has already been encouraging students to use the calculator. He also plans to introduce it at various college nights and financial aid workshops throughout the year. To find the calculator, visit the Tech cost of attendance webpage at admiss.vt.edu/cost.php, and click the “Net Price Calculator” header on the right hand side.

Student X 18 years old In-state

A student returns to his car in the Perry Street parking garage as the sun sets. Students are adjusting to an earlier sunset in Blacksburg after the shift to standard time on Nov. 6.

standard tuition estimate:

photo by Daniel Lin

news reporter At its last meeting of the year, the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors approved a new nuclear engineering program, discussed university expansion and passed a resolution regarding Blacksburg water Monday, among other things. The program is significant because nuclear energy is seen as a possible green solution to problems the world is facing, including global warming and its carbon footprint, said Larry Hincker, university spokesman. If the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia approves the program, Tech will offer master's and doctorate degrees in nuclear engineering in spring 2013. The doctorate program will be the first of its kind in Virginia. “We believe that this will sail through because there is a lot of demand for this,” Hincker said. “This is partially a reflection of what is happening in the industry.” The Financial and Audit Committee gave its annual report on the student financial aid program at the university. According to the report, financial aid given has increased by about $50 million since FY 08-09. About $342.2 million was given in financial aid in 2008-09. In FY 10-11, that figure increased to $390 million. The university also saw an increase in aid from grants, scholarships and waivers by $40

million between the two fiscal periods. The BOV also discussed expanding the amount of students at Tech, a move that would bring in additional revenue for the university, but also stretch its capacity. “There has been this big question of should the university grow and should they bring more students in,” said Michelle McLeese, a graduate representative to the BOV and a doctorate student. McLeese said the graduate student community would like to expand and bring in more students. “We want more graduate peers, and we want to have a bigger community,” McLeese said. “We’re interested in manifesting graduate culture more throughout the university.” Matthew Banfield, a theater arts major and undergraduate representative to the BOV disagreed, saying overcrowding in classrooms is a problem. Banfield also said academic advising is a common issue among students. And it will be more difficult for students to find time to meet with advisors if the university expands. “It’s a two way street with the advisor’s responsibilities to the students and the students' responsibility to reach out to their advisors,” Banfield said. “There are a lot of good resources on campus already, but they just need some marketing attention to make the students realize that see BOV / page two

Family income of $50,000 to $ 59,000

tuition calculator estimate:

$17,364 $13,394

BOV approves new engineering degree CODY OWENS

Oldest child Family of 4

VICTORIA ZIGADLO / COLLEGIATE TIMES

Physician charged in Jackson death HARRIET RYAN &VICTORIA KIM mcclatchy newspapers A Los Angeles jury convicted Michael Jackson’s personal physician of involuntary manslaughter, concluding a trial that offered a glimpse of the last days of one of the world’s most famous men by deciding that his death was a criminal act. The verdict was delivered Monday in a windowless downtown courtroom a world away from the turreted Holmby Hills mansion where Dr. Conrad Murray had a $150,000-a-month position that included providing what the pop star called “milk” — the surgical anesthetic that ultimately claimed his life. With its verdict, the jury found that Murray acted with criminal negligence and that those actions were a substantial factor in Jackson’s 2009 death. The panel rejected the defense assertion that Jackson gave himself a fatal overdose of propofol and therefore bore complete responsibility for his own death. Immediately after the verdict, Murray was placed in handcuffs at the direction of the trial judge, to remain in custody pending his Nov. 29 sentencing. “This is a crime where the end result was the death of a human being. That factor demands rather dramatically that the public should be protected,” Superior Court Judge Michael Pastor said. The cardiologist, who had once told patients that working for

Jackson was “the opportunity of a lifetime,” faces a maximum penalty of four years in state prison. The stern approach Pastor took in sending Murray to jail rather than releasing him on bail suggested the minimum sentence of probation is unlikely. Authorities in Texas and Nevada are expected to revoke his medical licenses. The California Medical Board suspended his license earlier this year. After the verdict, Murray’s jury consultant, John G. McCabe, said the doctor’s biggest challenge had been the intense coverage of the singer’s death. Of the nearly 150 citizens in the jury pool, every one said they had heard of the case against Murray. He noted that propofol, unknown outside of anesthesiology circles the day Jackson died, quickly entered the common vocabulary as “that powerful, dangerous surgical anesthetic.” “Would the verdict have come out the way it did if there hadn’t been two years of pretrial publicity? We’ll never know,” he said. Los Angeles County District Attorney Steve Cooley denied that the case was brought only because it involved Jackson and said the office would prosecute any doctor. “To the extent that someone dies as a result of their being a so-called Dr. Feelgood, they will be held accountable,” Cooley said. Deputy District Attorney David Walgren, the lead prosecutor, echoed a theme of his own summation.

Jackson, he said, was “not a pop icon but a son and a brother, and that’s most important to keep in mind today.” The verdict came on the second day of deliberations and was read to a packed courtroom that included Jackson’s parents, some of his siblings and devoted fans. As a court clerk pronounced the word guilty, there was a gasp from the singer’s family. Across the aisle, Murray’s mother sat stoically while other supporters sobbed. During the six-week proceedings, prosecutors painted Murray as greedy and incompetent and accused him of abandoning his medical judgment in complying with Jackson’s request to be given the anesthetic propofol to put him to sleep. Murray, prosecutors said, acted not as a medical professional but as an employee, corrupting the “hallowed” doctor-patient relationship. Witnesses testified to many egregious medical missteps — giving propofol in an unmonitored setting, fumbling at basic resuscitation, keeping no records — failures that experts said directly led to Jackson’s overdose. As Jackson stopped breathing and suffered cardiac arrest under the influence of propofol, jurors were told, the doctor chatted on the phone and sent and received email and text messages. He delayed calling for help and lied to paramedics and emergency doctors, witnesses said. Central to the government’s case

were the doctor’s own words from a police interview two days after Jackson’s death. In the 2 1/2-hour tape, Murray admitted to giving the singer the propofol — caving after Jackson repeatedly begged for it, he said — as well as two other drugs earlier in the day. Admissions in the interview were enough evidence of the doctor’s guilt, medical experts testified. But the prosecution’s star witness also said levels of the drug found during an autopsy showed Murray probably gave 40 times as much propofol as he told police. The doctor’s defense said Jackson died by his own hand when the star, nervous about performing and addicted to a painkiller that rendered him completely unable to sleep, swallowed a sedative and injected himself with propofol. No defense witness, however, addressed head-on a point the prosecution’s medical experts repeatedly drove home: that even if Jackson gave himself the drugs, Murray was equally liable for leaving his patient in a situation where he could. Throughout the trial, fans who once staked out Jackson’s home lined the court hallways, huddling around laptops and mobile devices to watch the proceedings. During closing arguments, they cried, prayed and cheered along with the prosecutor’s closing and hissed at the defense attorney’s summation. Prosecutors were often greeted with thundering applause in the halls.


2 news september 23, 2009 november 8, 2011

page B editors: claire sanderson, michelle sutherland newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865 COLLEGIATETIMES

what you’re saying //comments from online readers...

BOV: Tech expansion is a possibility

On developer buying part of the OBMS property:

from page one

Bob >> This is already shaping up to be a disaster on the scale of First & Main proportions. With what I've seen over the past 5-10 years in Blacksburg, I would be extremely hesitant to bring a business of my own within Town limits or attempt to develop a piece of property here. Sadly, I know I'm not the only one who feels that way. I'd ask that Town Council doesn't shoot Town residents in the foot on this one, but I have little faith that they won't.

Anon >> Don’t want people protesting your development? Then don’t lie about what you are planning when asking for rezoning. It’s that easy!

the resources are there.” Although academic advising has been brought to the BOV’s attention in past sessions, changes in advising policy do not require its approval. While one degree program is on the path to incorporation, another has been discontinued. The BOV voted to cut the information security assurance program, which was created in 2010 for the National Capital Region.

The BOV decided to discontinue the program and support a similar one that is already offered at George Mason University. The BOV also discussed how local Blacksburg residents obtain water. It passed a resolution concer ning Montgomer y County's admission to the Blacksburg-ChristiansburgVPI Water Authority, which supplies water to the three localities. Hincker said residents in Blacksburg and Christiansburg receive their water from the Water Authority,

while those living in other areas of Montgomery County primarily rely on well water. Some raised concerns about the wells becoming contaminated by septic fields, as more areas in the county are developed. “When you start getting into dense developments, you want to have water coming from a centralized system rather than well water,” Hincker said. “It will allow them to have more managed, control g rowt h in t he county.”

Wearing the tradition Members of the class of 2012, 2013 and 2014 ring committees gather around a Blacksburg Transit bus wrapped in a ring-themed advertisement, which was unveiled yesterday.


opınıons 3

editors: scott masselli, sean simons opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865 COLLEGIATETIMES

november 8, 2011

The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

Your Views [letters to the editor]

Sutphin a good candidate

As

we all know, Blacksburg is a very unique place in the heart of southwest Virginia. Being home to a wonderful community of full-time, permanent residents and families, as well as more than 25,000 Virginia Tech students, the town faces unique issues and challenges that are inherent to the small town. Therefore, the town needs people who are not only leaders, but have firsthand knowledge of the issues facing the town

Voting important to election

T

and student communities. Michael Sutphin is a perfect fit for our Town Council and community, not only because he has the skills, but he also has the intimate knowledge. As someone who has experienced life from both the student citizen and resident perspectives, Michael has the ideas and the know how to ensure Blacksburg meets its challenges and can continue to be a great place to live, no matter who you are.

Justin Godard political science major

Public schools some of the best in the state. Elections on the ballot include Virginia State Senate and House of Delegates; Montgomery County Board of Supervisors, School Board, Sheriff, Treasurer, C o m m o n w e a l t h’s Attor n e y an d Commissioner of Revenue — as well as three at-large seats on the Blacksburg Town Council. Due to redistricting following the 2010 census, your polling place and supervisor districts may have changed. Most Tech students who live on campus now vote in a brand new precinct, E-3 at the Virginia Tech Airport, 1601 Tech Center Drive. This is a change from last time. Other students living off campus may be affected by the change too. If you aren’t absolutely sure where you are supposed to vote, go to the Virginia State Board of Elections website and click on “Where do I vote in Virginia?” Or, call the registrar’s office during the day at (540) 381-5741. Again, take ownership of your university and your town. Remember to vote today, Nov. 8.

oday, Virginia will hold state and local elections. It is essential for all students to turn out to vote, especially because Virginia Tech is a state university. In every session, the Virginia General Assembly makes decisions on tuition rates, funding for academic and athletic programs, and funding for university research. High student turnout will send a message to elected officials that our demographic is engaged in public issues and will hold them accountable for the decisions they make regarding our education, job opportunities and overall quality of life. Participation in county and town elections is equally important because the local government passes ordinances related to housing, public safety and transportation on campus and around the town. In addition, students who plan on raising a family in Montgomery County after graduation must vote to ensure the county supervisors John Bardo and school board keep Montgomery County envriromental policy & planning

Young Democrats defend debate

As

t he president of the Young Democrats at Virginia Tech and the person responsible for organizing the debate that was supposed to take place on Nov. 2 between Senator John Edwards and Dave Nutter, I would like to respond to the recent piece by the editorial board about that event. Although it is true that Nutter may have felt uncomfortable participating in the debate because the sponsoring organizations had more of a left-leaning bias, I would like to clarify that I invited numerous rightleaning organizations to cosponsor this event, including the College Republicans, Friends of Coal, the Pistol and Rifle Club and Right to Life, all of which declined to participate. If Nutter objected to the group of organizations that chose to co-sponsor the debate, that is not the

fault of those organizations, but of the many organizations that would have supported him that chose not to participate. Furthermore, several organizations that did choose to participate in the debate, such as the Political Science Club and the Debate Club, are not partisan or biased toward either candidate. While I completely understand the predicament that Nutter was in due to the fact that many of the participating organizations represented interests that he is opposed to, it was the most sincere wish of all of the organizations involved that both of the candidates could have participated in this debate with fair and equal support from the student organizations involved. I hope in the future we can work more closely with some of the right-leaning organizations on campus to better inform interested students and citizens in this area.

Amanda Anger president, Young Democrats

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MCT CAMPUS

EU problems threaten US E

very week, it appears as if the European Union is on the brink of collapse. A seemingly endless economic crisis threatens to bring down the very structure of an entity that is responsible for Europe’s tremendous prosperity and stability over the last few decades. The fundamental problem is that certain nations in the EU that are part of the “eurozone” — countries that use the euro as their currency — have over borrowed. Nations such as Greece have borrowed beyond their means and are now facing staggering debts nearly impossible to repay. Well, why should anyone in the United States care about Europe’s problems? As the 2007-08 global financial crisis showed, economic troubles know no borders. There are several reasons why we should care about our friends across the Atlantic. First, the crisis poses a serious threat to U.S. exports. Europe is the U.S.’s largest trading partner with more than 20 percent of all American exports going to the region. U.S. businesses are rightly concerned that should a broad recession occur, vital trading partners such as France and Germany may no longer be able to afford American products. The obvious result of this fall in demand is a drop off in production, which means even more job loss in the U.S. Next, as this crisis continues to rock Europe, the euro continues to lose some of its value in relation to the U.S. dollar. In this case, the value of the American dollar is further strengthened. That sounds like a good thing, right? Not entirely. This reduction in value makes U.S. exports more expensive in Europe and thus less competitive, impacting the individuals and businesses that rely on a more balanced euro-dollar relationship. If you don’t believe the theory, just look at what a devalued currency has done for

Chinese exports. Subsequently, Europe’s underlying problem is that of growth. Because Europe’s gross domestic product continues to lag, the U.S. loses out as well. With growth falling behind, the potential for future American investments and opportunities on the continent have become limited. The unstable nature of our own economic situation requires us to seek out as many of those opportunities as possible — and Europe counts. American investments in the region are also at risk. These include U.S. bank investments in particular. Although the U.S. may not be directly exposed to Europe’s most vulnerable countries, American banks do business with practically all of the large international banks, many of which have lent money to the troubled Mediterranean economies. Consequently, these large banks are themselves exposed to vulnerable European nations. American banks are not the only ones who may lose out. In manufacturing, U.S. automaker Ford Motor Company recently reported a third-quarter loss of $306 billion in Europe. Ultimately, a flagging European market drags everyone down with it. A spreading crisis will eventually refocus the spotlight on our own rising debt. It’s true that the U.S. fairs better than the EU, but should the crisis continue to expand, fears of another American financial crisis and our seeming inability to tackle our own economic dilemmas will surely increase. The last thing the American economy needs is for the entire world to scrutinize Congress’s every move in addressing the nation’s fiscal issues. Also, should the eurozone collapse, it would be politically disastrous for President Barack Obama’s 2012 prospects. If American workers get dragged down with their European counterparts, the president will find

it much more difficult to retain his job. Beyond economics, a disintegrated Europe would also affect international relations politically. The EU has been so successful because its respective members have proven that a more united, interconnected Europe is good for the global community economically and even politically. Developing nations such as China, Brazil and India depend on a strong Europe to successfully access the global market. Along with the U.S., it is Europe that continues to usher in a more liberalized world order. Furthermore, Europe’s integration has led it to pursue a powerful political agenda that has been good for human rights and international peace in general. At the end of the day, no one should want Europe to fail. The continent has been so tremendously successful precisely because it has been united. The EU, as one entity, represents the largest economy in the world. It also represents an essential pillar of western power. The eurozone may be in crisis, but this does not mean the consequences will be limited to European borders. If anything, should the EU come crashing down, the entire global economy may just go down with it. I believe the eurozone will emerge from its troubles much stronger, more prosperous and most importantly, more unified than ever before. Once the crisis subsides — and it will be a brutally slow and painstaking process — the market and fiscal pressures Europe is besieged with now, unfortunately, may travel across the Atlantic and emerge here at home.

AUSAN AL-ERYANI -regular columnist -junior -political science major

Motto vote irrelevant to future US goals T

he House voted 396-9 last week to reaffirm as the national motto the phrase “In God We Trust” and encouraged its pronouncement on public buildings and continued printing on the coin of the realm. The motto was made official in 1956 during the height of Cold War hysteria over godless communism and — in the words of Brig. Gen. Jack D. Ripper in “Dr. Strangelove” — “Communist infiltration, Communist indoctrination, Communist subversion and the international Communist conspiracy to sap and impurify all of our precious bodily fluids.” As risible a reason as this was for knocking out a few bricks in the wall separating state and church, it was at least understandable in the context of the times. But today, what is the point of having this motto? There are no communist threats, and belief in God or a universal spirit among Americans is still holding strong at about 90 percent, according to a 2011 Gallup Poll. The answer is in the wording of the resolution voted on: “Whereas if religion and morality are taken out of the marketplace of ideas, the very freedom on which the United States was founded cannot be secured.” What is troubling — and should trouble any enlightened citizen of a modern nation such as ours — is the implication that in this age of science and technology, computers and cyberspace, and liberal democracies securing rights and freedoms for oppressed peoples all over the globe, that anyone could still hold to the belief that religion has a monopoly on morality and that the foundation of trust is based on engraving four words on brick and

paper. If you think that God is watching over the United States, please ask yourself why he glanced away during 9/11 or why he chose to abandon the good folks of New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, and why he continues to allow earthquakes and cancers to strike down even blameless children. The problem of evil — why bad things happen to good people if an all-powerful and all-good God is in control of things — has haunted the faithful since it was first articulated millenniums ago, with nigh a solution on the horizon. It’s time to drop the God talk and face reality with a steely eyed visage of the modern understanding of the origin of freedom on which the United States was founded and continues to be secured. God has nothing to do with it. If you want freedom and security, you need the f ollowing: The rule of law; property rights; a secure and trustworthy banking and monetary system; economic stability; a reliable infrastructure and the freedom to move about the country; freedom of the press; freedom of association; education for the masses; protection of civil liberties; a clean and safe environment; a robust military for protection of our liberties from attacks by other states; a potent police force for protection of our freedoms from attacks by people within the state; a viable legislative system for establishing fair and just laws; and an effective judicial system for the equitable enforcement of those fair and just laws. With these in place the citizens of a nation feel free and secure.

Why? The answer is in the final word of the motto: Trust. Claremont Graduate University economist Paul Zak has studied trust among nations and found that the more of these components that are in place, the more citizens trust one another. Zak even computed the differences in living standards that trust can affect, demonstrating that a 15 percent increase in the proportion of people in a country who think others are trustworthy raises income per person by 1 percent per year for every year thereafter. For example, increasing levels of trust in the U.S. from its current 36 percent to 51 percent would raise the average income for every man, woman and child in the country by $400 per year. Trust pays. Trust has fiscal benefits that are derived through specific political and economic policies that have nothing whatsoever to do with religion or belief in God. Despite a strong faith in God, the percentage of Americans who believe that “religion can answer all or most of today’s problems” has plummeted from 82 percent to 58 percent, while those who believe that “religion is old-fashioned and out of date” leaped from 7 percent to 28 percent, according to a 2010 Gallup Poll. Thus it would seem that Americans are more aware today than half a century ago that it’s up to us to secure our freedom through enlightened secular policies with practical social applications rather than faith-based hope in empty mottoes reflecting an era gone by.

MICHAEL SHERMER -mcclatchy newspapers

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november 8, 2011

page 4

WORDSEARCH: Don’t Forget Your Make-up Boys Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

Today’s Birthday Horoscope: Think highly of yourself and be surprised by what shows up. Allow your rebellious, creative, nonconformist nature to step out. Perspective has everything to do with it. Support family and community, and it comes back multiplied.

Suduko

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Unscramble the letters to solve the category “Mushroom Kingdom” Have a set of words you want to see in puzzles section? Email your lists to ctadsproduction@gmail.com.

UNSCRAMBLER

a

1.

miora

2.

gliiu

3.

orsbwe

4.

dato

5.

bmoaog

o

6.

opoka

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By Julian Lim

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ACROSS 1 Some graphic works 8 It often involves x’s 15 Of words 16 One doing a lot of riding 17 “Don’t tell a soul!” 19 Phishing targets: Abbr. 20 Handbill 21 Nothing special 22 Wroclaw’ s region 24 Refillable candy 25 Equilibrium 29 34-Down degree 31 Spout nonsense

s a b

Check out tomorrow’s paper on page 5 for the answers!

crime blotter date reported 10/21/2011

WORD BANK Motley Crue Def Leppard White Snake Dokken Tesla Don Jovi Skid Row Cinderella Poison Wasp Stryper Extreme Great White Warrant White Lion Mr Big Winger LA Guns

time

offense

9:30 p.m.-7:56 a.m. Follow up: Theft of a motor vehicle/

c-

11/8/11 60 Instantly ... or how this puzzle’s other three longest answers came about? 63 Cape user 64 Ex claim 65 Suf fering terribly 66 “Listen to Your Heart” pop duo

38 Carl’ s sweetheart, in “Up” 39 Double-slash container 40 Deteriorate slowl y 41 Moonlight, sa y 44 Black and __: two-beer drink 45 Pugilism venues 46 “The Island of the Day Before” author 49 Event with a queen 53 Entre __ 55 Tanager homes 56 Impatient sounds

34 Like z: Abbr. 35 When two hands meet ? 36 Author Buchanan 37 Dates 42 With no end in sight 43 His co-pilot was a Wookie e 46 As a friend, in Marseille s 47 Trig functio n 48 “__ sight!” 50 Elbridge __ , governor famous for redistricting 51 Peruvian pronoun 52 How some stocks are sold 54 Woolly ru g 56 Far fro m titillatin g 57 Recorded on film 58 Key figure in epistemology 59 Eyelid nuisance 61 Japanese capital of yore 62 Quandary

7 __ in the conversation 8 Range along the Ring of Fire 9 Wolf’s activity 10 Lux. neighbor 11 Breyers alternative 12 It barely get s beyond the infield 13 Conserve, in a way 14 __ con pollo 18 Science educator Bill 22 Display of links 23 Really 25 Worry 26 “The Handmaid’s __”: Atwood novel 27 __ puttanesca: with a spicy tomato sauce 28 Avoid 30 Mezzo Marilyn 32 Capek play 33 Refinable rock

Friday’s Puzzle Solved

DOW N 1 Horned game 2 “Cheers” actor Roger 3 Paddy animals 4 Inside information 5 Here, in Haiti 6 Cajun entrée

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

1 3 2 1 6 5 4 0 6 5 6 4 6 5 5 1 4

V I O L A T I O N - A F F I D A V I T location

status

Fairfax Rd

Arrested

Prices Forks Rd

Active

destruction of property 11/04/2011

4:00 p.m.-8:30 a.m. Burglary/Larceny of medication and money

11/05/2011

1:19 a.m.

Underage possession of Alcohol x2

Kent St

Arrested

11/05/2011

2:18 a.m.

Public Intoxication

Cranwell

Arrested

11/4/11

13216540656465514

Regular Edition

W H

International Center 11/05/2011

11:13 p.m.

Underage possession of Alcohol x2

Slusher Wing

Arrested

11/06/2011

2:41 a.m.

Public Intoxication, Underage

Newman Hall

Arrested

possession of Alcohol

For Rent PHEASANT RUN CROSSING TOWNHOME For Rent 2012-2013. 4 bdrm. 2.5 baths. Refurbished. www.techtownhomes.com, techtownhomes@comcast.net

Advertise

Today’s Radio Schedule xed M i cs Dis

Art Day

Week ending Nov. 4, 2011

7-9 AM - Tyler and Will

WUVT “5 Minute” News at 5 PM 7-9 PM - Tha Soul Jonez

e Sp

12-2PM - Angela & Eddie

9 PM-12 AM - The Money Shot

rt ht A g i N ty cial Spe

in the

Classifieds. www.collegiatetimes.com

w Ne ic s Mu

2-3:30PM - KILL YR IDOLS- Chris Winfield 12-2 AM - John Sadler 3:30-5 PM - KV Wrenn

z

Jaz

lty

cia

9AM-12PM - Jared Auwarter

5-7 PM - The Music is Decadent & Depraved

2-4 AM - Chris Luceri 4-7 AM - Mixed Discs

xed M i cs Dis

Top tracks

( ) Last week’s ranking in top five

We Found Love • Rihanna

(1) 1

Sexy and I Know It • LMFAO

(2) 2

Someone Like You • Adele

(3) 3

Without You (feat. Usher) • David Guetta

( ) 4

Moves Like Jagger • Maroon 5

(5) 5


arts & entertainment 5

editors: chelsea gunter, patrick murphy featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

november 8, 2011

COLLEGIATETIMES

16 Blocks fashion show returns to Blacksburg

SPPS FILE 2011

Ali Zook models a Libra-inspired outfit designed by Tech student and FMDS member Mary-Elise Jennings.

FASHION MERCHANDISING AND DESIGN SOCIETY TO RAISE MONEY FOR WOMEN’S SHELTER TONIGHT KAILA TAYLOR features staff wroter Lights, camera, strut. Blacksburg may not be known as a fashion capitol, but one group is trying to change that. Tonight at 8 p.m., 16 Blocks magazine will be sponsoring the Fashion Merchandising and Design Society for its annual fall fashion show at Awful Arthur’s. The show will cost $5. All of the money FMDS raises at the show will go toward its philanthropy, Cornerstone, a shelter for women. Attendees will see designs created by Virginia Tech students, like those of Cassie Lintelman, a sophomore fashion design and merchandising management major. “There is no better feeling than seeing something you created being modeled down the runway,” Lintelman said. “To know that all of your hard work finally came together into a piece of wearable art is so gratifying.” However, this won’t be the first time Lintelman will have this experience, as this is the second year she’s been involved with the 16 Blocks show. But her duties have changed in the past year. “Instead of just being a designer, I SPPS FILE 2011 am also helping produce the show,”

Tim Austin models a shirt, pants and shoes donated by TOMS at last year’s FMDS 16 Blocks fashion show.

Lintelman said. “It is going to be an amazing experience for designers, vendors and attendees alike. A lot has gone into this show, and I’m certain just as much will come out.” Laura McCarthy, another student designer for the show, reiterated how time-consuming the preparation for the show has been. “All the designs took a period of several weeks each to create. I do things little by little and keep jumping around or else I get bored,” McCarthy, a senior fashion design and merchandising management major, said. “As far as excitement goes, anything with FMDS is going to be a party.” To get that party going, Awful Arthur’s will turn the restaurant into a fashion paradise, complete with a stage and runway for the models. In total, 18 models will be strutting down the runway, showing off nearly 50 pieces of clothing. A few of the models are in FMDS. However, even those who are not members are Tech students. Event coordinator Sarah Kohart, a senior fashion design and merchandising management major, looks forward to the show and hopes the crowd contains people other than students. “It’s a community event; everybody should come,” Kohart said.

A few local businesses, including Greenhouse, 310 Rosemont, Mad Dog and Fringe Benefit, donated a few garments and accessories that will be featured in the show — adding to the community atmosphere. Lintelman, one of the show’s coordinators, said talking to local businesses was just one step in the planning process. “This show has been an extremely long process to complete … from the vendors donating their clothes, to the staging committee working behind the scenes, and the models making it all happen,” Lintelman said. “It really could not have been done without the help and dedication of everyone involved, and I’m really excited to see it all finally come together.” After the show, Awful Arthur’s will host an event called Awful Karma, which is a dance party that takes place every Tuesday night. Attendees must pay $2 if they show up after the fashion show. With much riding on the show, McCarthy, a designer, echoes the excitement seen in all of the FMDS participants. “It gives everyone involved a chance to bring a fabulous show and fashion experience to Blacksburg,” McCarthy said. “It is a wonderful thing to see the designs that you have put so much blood, sweat and tears (into) walk down the runway with hundreds of eyes watching.”

Film ‘Tower Heist’ lacks in comedy but prevails through entertaining plot P

reviews can be misleading. Any decent editor can take hundreds of hours of footage and convey any message he or she wants by splicing together a two-minute promo. “Tower Heist” claimed to be a comedy in the previews, but the final product didn’t garner many laughs. Ben Stiller stars as manager of a ritzy apartm e n t complex, which is the home of a sleazy multimillionaire. When the rich guy gets arrested for fraud and stealing from all of the complex’s employees, Stiller, a band of disgruntled coworkers and a thief, played by Eddie Murphy, decide to rob the Wall Street tycoon. While the funny lines were sparse, Murphy did manage to make everyone laugh when he appeared on screen. Murphy is great when he is left to his own devices, adlibbing some hilarious lines. It’s been quite a long time since Murphy has acted in something that allowed him to be the fasttalking wise guy he plays so perfectly (see “Trading Places,” 1983). So, “Tower Heist” was not as funny as the previews wanted viewers to believe, but this does not mean it was a bad movie. I didn’t laugh a whole lot, but I was interested and entertained. “Tower Heist” has an “Ocean’s Eleven” (1960, 2001) feel to it. However, “Tower Heist” is not as clever as “Ocean’s Eleven.” The characters come up with a well thought out plan to execute a seemingly impossible robbery the first half of the movie, and during the second half of the movie, they attempt to put the plan into action. “Tower Heist’s” characters are not as skilled or suave as “Ocean’s Eleven’s” crooks, but they still resonate as likable people.

MOVIE REVIEW

So, ‘Tower Heist’ was not as funny as the previews wanted viewers to believe, but this does not mean it was a bad movie. I didn’t laugh a whole lot, but I was interested and entertained.

A couple of scenes were actually quite suspenseful, making viewers wonder if Stiller and company were going to walk away with the money, get arrested or maybe both. For the second week in a row I saw a movie preaching about the little guy — the working stiff — standing up to “the man.” (Last week’s review was on “In Time.”) What I found ironic about “Tower Heist” was that while this movie lambastes the 1 percent who control the money in the U.S., Stiller walked away from the movie with a $15 million paycheck. Murphy

earned $7.5 million for his role. I wonder how much money the rest of the cast and crew were paid for “Tower Heist.” Something tells me there wasn’t a whole lot left in the budget for makeup artists and lighting specialists. Not that Stiller and Murphy are a couple of corrupt misers, it’s just interesting to note. Should you see “Tower Heist”? Why not? It’s not the best or funniest movie of the year, but it’s a solid and entertaining flick. There are a few laughs and the plot moves fast, leaving little time for the audience to whip out their watches or cell phones to check the time. If you are looking for a surface-deep, crime comedy, “Tower Heist” is for you. Those who go in expecting comedic gold or a confusing and tricky heist movie like “Ocean’s Eleven” will most likely feel robbed.

COURTNEY BAKER -movie reviewer -senior -political science major

Leslie

Hager-Smith Re-elect Leslie, November 8th Broadband Expansion // Sustainable Development Regional Collaboration // Neighborhood Civility “We need an open access network to provide affordable high-speed broadband for all citizens. This will accomplish three goals: it will support clean, green businesses; preserve our beautiful surroundings; and build on Blacksburg’s strength as a computing and engineering hub.” - Leslie Hager- Smith

www.lesliehagersmith.com Paid for and authorized by Leslie Hager-Smith

MCT CAMPUS


6 sports

editors: matt jones, zach mariner sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

november 8, 2011

COLLEGIATETIMES

Hokies make rare appearance in AP top 10 T

he last time Virginia Tech was ranked in the AP top 10, they were just about to lose to Boise State on Labor Day in 2010. The last time the Hokies were in the top 10 of the BCS standings? Week 15 of 2007. Tech finished the regular season ranked No. 3, then lost to Kansas in the Orange Bowl on Jan. 3, 2008. If not for the ice water in Matt Ryan’s veins, the Hokies might have gotten a shot at a national title that season. But that’s another depressing story in itself. And, even though this year’s team might not be as impressive as the two Tyrod Taylor-led teams previously mentioned (both the “split time with Sean Glennon” version and the “about to be an NFL draft pick” version), they’ve still showed flashes of greatness at times this season. The offense, during impressive wins against Miami and Wake Forest, where first-year starting quarterback Logan Thomas showed an impressive amount of promise. The defense, in games against East Carolina, when they limited standout QB Dominique Davis to just 127 yards passing, and Duke, when they simply refused to break against a pesky Blue Devil attack when they were simply getting no help from their own playmakers on the offensive side of the ball. Unfortunately, it’s sad to say, with the exception of the season-opening blowout over Appalachian State, the Wake Forest game has been the team’s most complete effort all season. Their most complete effort all season saw them gain a whopping eight yards of offense in the first quarter. So what does all of this mean about this Tech team? Obviously, Thomas was going to go through growing pains in his first year as the starter, and that’s shown. To even compare him to Cam Newton coming into this season was unfair. David Wilson has been this team’s anchor all year, as he’s gone over 100 yards in all but one game, and currently ranks second in the nation in rushing yards. Without him, the Hokies

TREVOR WHITE/ SPPS

Virginia Tech free safety Antone Exum (1) celebrates after bringing down the Wake Forest ball carrier for no gain. The Hokies beat the Demon Deacons 38-17 on Oct. 15. just wouldn’t be the team they are, and I’d argue that they probably wouldn’t be 8-1. The defense, when healthy, has been dominant. Up until last week’s game against Georgia Tech, Clemson hadn’t had nearly as much trouble with any team they had played all year as they had on Oct. 1 in Blacksburg. Unfortunately, with the losses of Antoine Hopkins, Jeron GouveiaWinslow and Bruce Taylor for the year, and Alonzo Tweedy, Jayron Hosley and James Gayle struggling with nagging injuries, the defense has struggled somewhat recently and will have to improve

on that if they’re to stay in the top 10. And while the critics and naysayers will disagree with me, the Hokies deserve their top 10 ranking. Yes, in classic Tech fashion, they fell flat on their face in the national spotlight in the only game this year that’s really mattered. However, they’ve taken care of business in their other eight games. It hasn’t always been pretty, and it hasn’t always been fun to watch, but in a conference that’s continuously becoming more competitive, the Fighting Gobblers still reign king — for now.

One stat Hokie fans can hold over their conference rivals is as follows: In the seven years since they joined the ACC, four different teams have won the conference. Tech, Wake Forest, Florida State and Georgia Tech. The last three teams have each won it one time. The Hokies have won it four times. But I know for a fact that most of those same fans would trade all that consistency for one magical national title year. But, again, that’s another story entirely — one that I’m sure a few of my colleagues at the Collegiate Times would love to write.

The point is, as long as Tech keeps winning, there’s no reason they’re not a top 10 team in the country. But their entire year will probably be considered a disappointment if they don’t at least make it to the conference championship game. And that won’t happen if they don’t win the “Coastal Division championship game” on Thursday against Georgia Tech. Saying this game is huge would be one of the biggest understatements of the year. The same could be said for the team’s game against the Yellow Jackets every year. Since the conference expand-

ed to 12 teams before the 2005 season, only two different teams from the Coastal Division have been to the ACC championship game — I’m sure I don’t have to tell you who they are. And, unless Virginia wins out, that trend won’t be changing this season.

ZACH MARINER -sports editor -sophomore -communication major -@ZMarinerCT


Tuesday, November 8, 2011 Print Edition