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Wednesday, October 5, 2011

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COLLEGIATETIMES 108th year, issue 96

News, page 2

Food & Drink, page 5

Apple reveals new iPhone JOSH HIGGINS news reporter After months of speculation from Apple fans and on technology blogs, the new iPhone was unveiled yesterday. Apple’s CEO Tim Cook — who replaced Steve Jobs as head of Apple last month — announced the iPhone 4S, a new and improved version of its iPhone 4 predecessor, at the Apple headquarters in Cupertino, Calif. But Amanda Pasquariello, a junior communication major, thought the phone would have more features. “I think it’s really disappointing that the iPhone doesn’t have as many new things as everyone else thought it would have,” she said. The phone, which will go on sale Oct. 12, will run on the new iOS 5 operating system. iOS 5, which adds a new notification center, new messaging, reminders and newsstand apps, will be compatible with the 3GS, 4 and 4S iPhones, iPad and iPad 2, and third and fourth generation iPod touches. But the phone touts more than just an updated operating system. The phone’s new innovative voice command software, known as Siri, will allow iPhone 4S users to press their

home button and use voice commands to call people, ask for the time and the weather, and perform other tasks. The phone also features an 8-megapixel camera that performs better in low-light conditions than the previous models. And the camera will be easily accessible for users, as iOS 5 will allow users to take photos from the phone’s lock screen. The phone will operate on a 3G network — a disappointment to some customers. “They didn’t change the design, and they made us wait too long — and there’s still no 4G,” said Mahesh Yalamanchili, a freshman biology major. The phone will be available in three options. Consumers can pay $199, $299 or $399 for the 16, 32 and 64 gigabyte phones, respectively. And it will now be available to Sprint customers, in addition to Verizon and AT&T customers, as it has been in the past. However, the phone wasn’t the only product getting attention at today’s event. Apple announced price reductions for their iPod Nano and Touch products. iPod Touch devices now start at $199, and Nanos start at $129.

Airport sees $9.4 million annually ERIN CHAPMAN news staff writer Regional Southwest Virginia airports contribute millions of dollars to the local economy every year, according to a new study. A recent executive report commissioned by the Virginia Department of Aviation examined airports in Virginia and the economic contributions they make. The Virginia TechMontgomery Executive Airport in Blacksburg generates $9.4 million in economic activity, and the New River Valley Airport in Pulaski generates $5.9 million. “I wasn’t quite sure what the economic impact was. When it was described within the executive summary I was surprised,” said Michael St. Jean, who manages the Virginia TechMontgomery Executive Airport.

The Virginia Tech-Montgomery Executive Airport, which works in conjunction with the university, the towns of Blacksburg and Christiansburg, and Montgomery County, employs 27 and has a payroll of almost $2 million. “The airport is a positive economic influence on the community, and it may be a reason that some businesses choose to locate here. It allows businesses to immediately commute to other places,” said Steve Ross, the deputy town of Blacksburg manager. The Virginia Tech-Montgomery Executive Airport sees business predominately from private executive jet use, while the New River Valley Airport's traffic comes from “ondemand freight activity." “We have a couple of larger indus-

Opinions, page 3

Sports, page 6

DRAWING

THE LINE

Classifieds, page 4

Sudoku, page 4

AS NCAA VIOLATIONS ROCK COLLEGE SPORTS, TWO MEN ARE MAKING SURE VIRGINIA TECH FOLLOWS ALL THE RULES

BY MATT JONES | sports editor

T

ake one step inside Tim Parker’s office on the third floor of the Jamerson Athletic Center, and you immediately notice one thing. “My boss is going to hate seeing all these papers all over my desk,” Parker said. Parker, Virginia Tech’s associate athletic director for compliance, settles in behind his desk and wakes up the screensaver on his computer in front of a wall covered in photos of Tech athletics. A guy who’s seen it all, Parker is responsible for the allocation of the compliance resources. While it sounds simple, Parker’s job is far from it. His colleague Bert Locklin, the director of athletics compliance, sits in a chair across from him, decked out in a suit. Locklin deals closely with initial eligibility for student athletes, while also touching on football recruiting. The papers on Parker’s desk, which range from the forms coaches fill out on official recruiting visits, to NCAA eligibility forms, to roster maintenance guidelines, are just part of the daily grind for Parker and Locklin. Compliance, an area Tech has excelled in since the arrival of Frank Beamer in 1987, touches on many different areas. The department’s job is not to hold a coach’s hand and make sure they are doing the right thing. Parker educates, coordinates policies to meet the regulations and then

creates systems to monitor the effectiveness of those policies. “A lot of times the compliance office is not doing anything wrong,” Parker said. “The compliance office is not set up to stop someone who is willfully and purposely circumventing the rules.” Parker is a key figure in the process of keeping Tech clean. In 2009, when two Tech football players — Kam Chancellor and Stephan Virgil — appeared in a video promotion for a club in downtown Blacksburg, it was Parker who ruled the video did not violate NCAA rules. “What we do is educate the people we need to educate, then we make clear what the control systems are, and we monitor after the fact,” Parker said. “It’s a threestep process, and eventually you will catch it.” see COMPLIANCE / page six

top compliance scandals

Miami

Southern California

Ohio State

In connection to booster Nevin Shapiro, the University of Miami learned of major allegations in the summer of 2011, outlining long-term infractions that include numerous NFL coaches and high-profile coaches. While no penalties have been officially handed-down from the NCAA, the Hurricanes have self-imposed multiple suspensions on players named in the report.

Prior to the 2006 NFL Draft, suspicions rose over whether former USC running back and then-Heisman Trophy winner Reggie Bush’s family had received gifts in violation of NCAA policies. The Trojans were banned from bowl games in 2010 and 2011, and will lose 30 scholarships over three years. Bush had to give his Heisman back.

In March 2011, former Buckeyes head coach Jim Tressel was fined and suspended by the university for two games for not informing the university and the NCAA that five of his players received improper benefits from a tattoo shop in downtown Columbus. Tressel left the university, and five players were suspended for five games to start the season. Ohio State also decided to vacate all victories from the 2010 season. Quarterback Terrelle Pryor bolted for the NFL.

see PLANE / page two

SAT critical reading scores lowest in past four decades PRISCILLA ALVAREZ news staff writer This year the SAT reading scores for the high school graduating class of 2011 reached the lowest point in nearly four decades, according to the College Board. The average score, for both pubicand private-school students, was 497, down three points from last year and 33 points from 1972. The College Board attributed this recent decrease in scores to the diversity of students taking the SAT — 44 percent were minorities, and 27 percent of those test takers did not speak English as their primary language. Also, there has been an increase of students taking the exam, who are not necessarily part of the college-going culture. Julia Lewis, a freshman university studies major, said the amount of time people spend reading may have caused the lower scores. “I believe we read less than previous generations. We’re so technologically advanced and reading off screens

that it causes a shorter attention span,” Lewis, said. According to the U.S Department of Education, the percentage of nonreaders among 17-year-olds increased from 9 percent in 1984, to 19 percent in 2004. Despite low SAT scores, Virginia Tech admissions will continue to hold its standard average SAT score of 1250, for math and critical reading combined. The SAT score is the last of the top three criteria that undergraduate admissions evaluates on a student’s application. Before reviewing exam scores, admissions reviews the strength of schedule and grade performance in students’ courses. “Virginia Tech continues to get strong students, so the national decline in scores is not a major concern,” said Amy Widner, admissions spokeswoman. One freshman finds this interesting. “It is ironic that college is more competitive, yet the SAT’s scores are worse,” said Megan Crouse, a university studies major. Some colleges are going a step fur-

ther by making the SAT optional for admission. According to the U.S. News & World Report, 24 of the top 100 liberal arts schools are SAT and ACT optional. The College of the Holy Cross, ranked 29th among national liberal arts colleges by U.S. News and World Report, made the SAT optional in 2006. The test did not correlate well with the system at Holy Cross. Instead, admissions began to focus more on what students did during their four years in high school, rather than what they did in four hours, according to a Holy Cross admissions spokesperson. Other top colleges with optional SAT and ACT scores are Wake Forest University, Drew University, Providence College and Smith College in Massachusetts. But these schools make up for the loss of standardization the SAT gives applications through other means. For example, Wake Forest requires its applicants to write multiple extensive essays. However, the majority of colleges continue to require the SAT for admission.

Average SAT Scores for College Bound Seniors 1990-2010 520

515

510 505

500 400 Math Critical Reading

0 90-91 96-97 98-99 99-2000 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10

NADIA GROOME / COLLEGIATE TIMES


2news september 23, 2009 october 5, 2011

page B news editors: claire sanderson, michelle sutherland newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865 COLLEGIATETIMES

Ring Premiere makes its mark

(Left) Fireworks were set off on the Drillfield at 8:00 p.m. last night as part of the Class of 2013 Ring Premiere. (Right) The Ring Design Committee distributed T-shirts to students in Squires Student Center. photos by mark umanksky.

what you’re saying //comments from online readers...

Plane: Airport attracts businesses from page one

Ronald McDouglass>> The fact that this policy has just recently been put into place is absolutely pathetic. I assumed that this was the case before I read the article. I would say more, but the word “pathetic” describes it enough. Random Sidenote: Frank Beamer, please man up and hire a good offensive coordinator and stop relying on athletic prodigies from the 757 to play QB. Without Bud Foster and Michael Vick, you would be playing Bingo right now in downtown Christiansburg.

Anonymous>> ]Congratulations to the students, staff and administrators who worked to get this policy passed. It is not helpful to gripe that it was not in place earlier. . . there would always be something to gripe about. Ronald, I did not see your name mentioned in the article as one of those working toward this policy.

crime blotter

date reported

time

9/29/2011 10/03/2011 10/03/2011

11:00-12:00 p.m. 4:30-2:30 p.m. 10:43 p.m.

offense

tries in the region that are using on-demand to move some of their freight, some of this is time sensitive or very critical that it needs to get to the factory. Time really equates to money,” said Keith Holt, the New River Valley Airport manager. Last year the New River Valley Airport moved 180,000 pounds of cargo. Holt said the role smaller airports play is vital to the Virginia aviation community. “While major airlines are great, often they don’t get you to the door of the community — that’s the role that smaller airports play," Holt said. We often say a regional airport is similar to an exit ramp

c-

off 81. That is the way that you get to the community." Mark Owczarski, university spokesman, pointed out the opportunities airports that are close to campus can provide. “We have businesses, companies and leaders landing right here in Blacksburg to meet with faculty and students to create new opportunities — it is a tremendous asset,” Owczarski said. The Virginia TechMont gomer y E xe c ut ive Airport has plans to extend its runway in the next three years to help better accommodate jet traffic. “Ten years ago we had 38 based aircrafts, now we have between 45 and 47," St. Jean

said. There has definitely been a steady growth of based aircraft." Airports across the state contributed a total of $28.8 billion to the state’s economy in 2010. The y a ls o prov ide 259,000 jobs, or 5.5 percent of total jobs in Virginia. “Certainly every state has airports,” Holt said. But I think that’s a real testament to Virginia to see what the economic impact of these airports is, what the utilization of these airports is, and how important these airports are to the overall economic growth of the state.”

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V I O L A T I O N - A F F I D A V I T location

Follow up to Larceny of a Bicycle Outside Pritchard Theft from a Motor Vehicle/ I Lot Parking Vandalism Possession of Marijuana/Possession Lee Hall of Drug Paraphernalia Possession of Drug Paraphernalia

status Inactive Inactive Student Conduct Student Conduct

arrestees

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On Making the Call:


opınıons 3

editors: scott masselli, sean simons opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865 COLLEGIATETIMES

october 5, 2011

The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

ON FACEBOOK

Timeline profile reflects life F acebook is making a big change in the upcoming weeks — it’s reevaluating its entire layout, and I got a preview of it. Stemming from the old layout, Facebook is changing to a timeline-style system, showing a person’s whole Facebook career, and even life. The small timeline key in the top-right corner has tabs for the past few years. There is even a tab for a person’s birth and others available for uploading pictures, video and other media to memorialize an event on the life timeline. This means past events that occurred before Facebook existed can be added to the timeline, with images and videos to further memorialize it as if the site existed since a person’s birth. In an interesting way, the new layout is a reinterpretation of every individual’s life history in terms of the social network culture’s norms and values. Users now don’t have to meticulously scroll through a person’s profile to find a past event, but can find it quickly and easily. In this sense, Facebook is changing its focus from the current to the past, but with higher value placed on recent events — bigger segments correspond with the timeline. In another sense, Facebook is focusing on archiving users’ lives through events on a changing timeline with statuses, comments, photos and other information. In this light, it is almost scary how much information is compiled about users and given to the site’s maintainers to do with what they please — but of course we “agree” to this. The new Facebook puts our lives on record, into a portfolio and on display as a single product (commodity?) for the world to examine and judge. However, this timeline does not resemble Twitter’s interpretation of the timeline — Facebook’s motive to “keep up” with Twitter should be replaced with a push for surpassing the competing social network site with new and innovative ideas. Consequently, the new Facebook looks much less like Twitter than the previous version — Twitter is still primarily focused on text-based media (“tweets”), and Facebook is now equally focused on text-based media (“statuses” and

comments), as well as digital image and video media (plus “events” and “likes”). Perhaps the new Facebook has a more complete social network site and more innovative interpretation of the social network culture. So that’s the new, and possibly good. But here’s the bad: Why should these profit-driven social networking designers and maintainers be trusted with users’ life information? Putting a person’s life on display for the world to judge — even if it’s a select world — can be very dangerous, especially when these social network architects have access to the more than 800 million active users’ information. This is especially dangerous when faced with two realities: First, the nature of the Internet, specifically how fast and easy information — especially personal information — is transported and delivered. Second, the realization that users don’t know what Facebook architects and maintainers will do with their information in the future. Not only are Facebook users more at risk to the profit-driven Internet’s exploitations, but they are also deeply invested into the individualistic — or selfish and self-centered —worldview mindset and attitude. This allows users to become even more self-centered and lazy. With the new Facebook, as well as subsequent revolutions and updates of social networks that will follow, users allow themselves to become self-perpetually more invested in themselves only. This makes us less likely to do things for — or become involved with — other people and society. The Facebook changes mark a major event in the social network cultural movement, and a minor step in the larger technological, social and individualist cultural movements. In my opinion, however, this marks a movement toward decadence concerning society at whole.

DIETER SELTZER - regular columnist - sophomore - philosophy major

Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Zach Crizer Managing Editor: Lindsey Brookbank Design Editors: Danielle Buynak, Victoria Zigadlo Public Editor: Justin Graves Web Editor: Sarah Watson News Editors: Claire Sanderson, Michelle Sutherland News Reporters: Josh Higgins News Staff Writers: Erin Chapman, Meighan Dober, Abby Harris, Elizabeth Haydu, Cody Owens, Mallory NoePayne Features Editors: Chelsea Gunter, Patrick Murphy Features Reporters: Nick Smirniotopoulos Features Staff Writers: Courtney Baker, Torie Deible, Dane Harrington, Kevin McAleese, Andrew Reily Opinions Editors: Scott Masselli, Sean Simons Sports Editors: Matt Jones, Zach Mariner Sports Reporters: Michael Bealy, Nick Cafferky, Courtney Lofgren, Josh Parcell Sports Staff Writers: Eric Avassi, Zander Baylis, Alyssa Bedrosian, Cody Elliott, Taylor Hay, Alex Koma, Ashleigh Lanza, Brian Marcolini, Cody Owens Photo Editor: Daniel Lin Special Sections Editor: Liana Bayne, Nick Cafferky Public Information Director: Dishu Maheshwari Training Director: Kelsey Heiter Copy Chief: Spenser Snarr Copy Editors: Debra Houchins, Nora McGann Layout Designers: Nadia Groome, Kaitlyn Kicia, Bethany Melson, Matthew Ryburn Online Director: Jamie Chung Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: Philipp Kotlaba Student Publications Photo Staff Director of Photography: Paul Kurlak Lab Manager: Austen Meredith College Media Solutions Ad Director: Brandon Collins Asst Ad Director: Matt Freedman Account Executives: Johnson Bray, Kevin Jadali, Alyssa Brown, Brian Dickson, Janssen Claudio Inside Sales Manager: Mario Gazzola Assistant Inside Sales Manager: Adam Shata Office Manager: Kayley Greenday Assistant Account Executives: Alex Perry, Kacie Nolan, Jordan Peugh Creative Director: Casey Stoneman Asst Production Manager: Colleen Hill Creative Services Staff: Danielle Bushrow, Michael Craighead, Alyssa Morrison, Molly Vinson Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times.

ON FACEBOOK

New theme for the better I ’m just going to come right out and say it — I like the recent Facebook changes. I’m not talking about the recent changes to the “newsfeed” feature and the addition of the ticker to the right side of your “newsfeed” (although I like those too), but about what Facebook is referring to as the “timeline” profile. Disclaimer: Currently, as Facebook has not released the official timeline, my profile is part of the Facebook developer’s access to these new changes. Facebook is still tinkering with the timeline, so what is described here may be different than what people actually see this weekend. If you Google “new Facebook”, anyone can get access to the developer’s version. These new changes give Facebook profile’s the appearance of timelines, beginning with users’ birth years and ending with their most recent posts at the top of the page. This new profile has many additions, including a “cover photo,” a new organization for all aspects of pages, and an overall timeline at the topright corner of the page that allows users to more easily access previous posts throughout their history on Facebook. What do I like about these new changes? Almost everything. I think my favorite change is the “timeline” feature that reorganizes profile information — wall posts, new friends, etc. — into a vertical timeline, with most recent posts at the top. I like this change so much because it just makes sense as a way of organizing any kind of information that has a time aspect. Before, the various information included as a part of the “wall” was awkwardly placed. Some of it was in chronological order, while other information was intermixed. Wall posts and statuses were majorly featured, while comments and new friends were awkwardly added in, and some posts were minimized. In this new look, all information is organized in the same manner, as posts on the timeline. There is a reason people so frequently organize information in chronological order — in a lot of cases, it just makes sense. Facebook is a good example of one of these cases. Some minor information is included as a group (i.e. comments, changes you made to your profile, etc.), but it is more visible than before. However, beware when you are viewing past months — for example I can view August 2010 by itself — because some information is minimized. All you have to do is click on the little dot on the timeline to view it and choose to have it featured on your timeline. I am also a huge fan of the overall timeline that appears to the right of a cover photo at the top of a profile. I really like the idea that I can view my

Facebook activity from years past. Facebook has become something of a public diary of our generation — with many of users’ major and minor life events posted as statuses and pictures. Just as those of us who kept diaries as children like to take walks down memory lane and read our childhood diaries, people can now view their Facebook posts from years past and reminisce about how much better (or worse) things have become. I vaguely remember how I felt when I was accepted to Tech, but my Facebook status from that day serves to remind me of how truly ecstatic I was at the time. I am also a fan of the cover photo feature. I like this new addition because it adds another unique aspect to an individual’s Facebook page. Visually, from profile to profile, most things on Facebook are the same. However, with this addition, there is a large visual feature of your profile that is (or at least can be) uniquely your own. And, like your profile picture, this can be a photo of pretty much anything you want. While I really like most of the new Facebook changes, there are a few things I’m not really a fan of. It was totally unnecessary for Facebook to include a user’s birth year as a part of the overall timeline. If you click on “Born,” all you see is your name and whatever information about your birthday you included as a part of your profile. I think it is pointless. There was no reason to include this aspect — Facebook did not exist in the 1990s (so long as what “The Social Network” has taught me is at least close to accurate), and therefore that is the only post on my timeline for years. It’s very awkward. A person’s birthday could have easily been included in the information box on their profile. As usual, there is a learning curve that comes along with getting used to the new changes that have been made. My profile is now very different than it has been for the past few years. But, honestly, spend about 15 minutes exploring your profile, and you’ll get used to it pretty quickly. So before you start whining, take a good look at the new changes you will be seeing this weekend. Yes, your Facebook profile is very different. Yes, different is not always good — but it isn’t so bad either.

GABI SELTZER - regular colomnist - senior - philosophy major

365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Student Media Phone Numbers Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. Subscription rates: $65 semester; $110 fall/spring. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2011. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


october 5, 2011

page 4

Cheaper Apple prices lessen knockoff values in China DAVID PIERSON

ing names such as BlockBerry and HiPhone 4. But Chinese bootleggers are now losing ground to the iPhones and other high-end gadgets they once copied. “People want the real thing,” said Guo Feilong, a vendor at a massive electronics market in northwest Beijing where hundreds of closet-size stalls sell genuine and pirated phones. “Prices have gone down so much, why would anyone need to buy a fake?” Falling prices for brand-name models are just one reason crude clones are becoming passe. Chinese consumers increasingly want devices that allow them to surf the Web, play games and download apps, a level of sophistication that’s tough for some low-rent producers to deliver. Some upwardly mobile city

mcclatchy newspapers BEIJING — Xiong Mingjian is often crushed into a corner during his tedious subway commutes, but passing the time has been easy since he bought a nifty new cellphone. The 27-year-old store clerk surfs the Internet and taps away at games on his Motorola Defy, one of an increasing number of popular high-end mobile phones that are helping China shed its label as a knockoff haven. For years, copycat cellphones have thrived in a country famed for counterfeiting many things, such as Gucci handbags, Hollywood DVDs and, most recently, Apple retail stores. It’s a market fed by shadowy factories turning out low-cost models bear-

Find

Help Wanted

International, a Beijing research firm. The average price has dropped below $300, putting them within reach of white-collar workers. “After playing with my friends’ smartphones, I had to get one of my own,” said Xiong, gripping a $275 touchscreen Motorola handset outside a Beijing subway station. “I would never buy a fake one because it wouldn’t be able to do the same things.” The trend bodes well for brands such as Apple, Finland’s Nokia and South Korea’s Samsung, which are battling Chinese makers to capture a greater share of the world’s largest cellphone market. “We’re looking at a billion (Chinese) cellphone users in the next couple of years,” said David Wolf, chief executive of Wolf Group Asia, a Beijing con-

sulting firm. “As important as North America and Europe has been for mobile devices, soon we’ll see the tail wagging the dog. Chinese consumers will eventually dictate what the rest of the world will use.” Indeed, major parts manufacturers are developing their own smartphones for the Chinese market that will be significantly cheaper than current offerings. Apple reportedly is working on a lower-cost, mass-market Chinese iPhone; the company did not respond to requests for comment. It all spells trouble for cellphone counterfeiters, whose hub is the southern industrial city of Shenzhen. Aided by China’s weak protection of intellectual property and an abundant supply of low-cost semiconductors, hundreds of factories sprouted in the past decade,

churning out knockoff handsets. These manufacturers found buyers not only in China but also in emerging markets in Africa and the Middle East. International pressure led to periodic crackdowns by Chinese authorities. Bad press about exploding batteries and high radiation in some flimsy phones scared off some customers as well. Declining profits spurred some counterfeiters to turn to making knockoff tablet computers instead. But others have decided to go legitimate by developing their own high-end cellphones. Wanxiang, a Shenzhen company that makes and sells shanzhai handsets such as the iPhome A8, is planning to release a trademarked 3G smartphone this year that sells for $230.

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dwellers wouldn’t dare risk losing face by carrying a knockoff phone. Factory orders for unlicensed phones, better known in China as shanzhai, or outlawed, phones, have been declining rapidly over the last few years, according to market researcher IHS iSuppli. Slightly more than 24 million shanzhai phones were ordered in China last year; that’s down about half from the peak in 2007 when the devices accounted for 20 percent of all shipments. Today, shanzhai handsets represent just 7 percent of new factory orders for phones and could be half that within a few years. Meanwhile, smartphone sales are soaring. More than 131 million are in use in China, up from 52 million in 2009, according to Analysys

Who will be on top next week?

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10/5/11

By Daniel A. Finan

ACROSS 1 Flying group 5 Comic Johnson 9 Hyphenated dessert name 14 Half dodeca15 Liner danger 16 Hater of David, in Dickens 17 Theater giant? 18 In __: confused 19 High humor? 20 Pan? 23 Relative of -lik e 24 Wine bar offerings 25 Moshe Dayan’s “oxygen of the soul”

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29 Guf f 30 Moo chew ? 33 With 44-Across, ten? 35 Change genetically 37 Former lover of Riker on “Star Trek: T.N.G.” 38 Pontif f’s wear 40 Foreshadowing 41 Service station vessel 44 See 33-Across 47 Org. whose members ar e concerned with lies 48 Birling roller

50 Radius, e.g. 51 San __: Sa n Francisco Bay city 53 Airline to Copenhagen 54 Kin? 60 Centipede maker 61 Spice 62 Yes-__ question 63 Veal piccat a ingredient 64 Part of Caesar’s boast 65 N.L. East squad 66 Country sound 67 Golden Fleece vessel 68 Sin in the film “Se7en”

Today’s Radio Schedule ed Mix scs Di Art Day

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DOW N 1 Very smart 2 San __ 3 Student’ s stressor 4 Emulate Cyrano 5 It may be reckless 6 Update mtge. terms 7 Band 8 Quaf f garnished with nutmeg 9 Technique of ancient samurai 10 Some native New Yorkers 11 Afro-sporting “Mod Squad” character 12 Vacation location 13 Cries of understanding 21 Hill worker 22 Buggy relative 25 Depth-of-field setting 26 Outfit again 27 __ Ga y 28 George Strait label 30 Actor ’s day job? 31 SEC school that retired Peyton Manning’ s number

7-9 AM - Hills ‘n’ Hollers

WUVT “5 Minute” News at 5 PM

9AM-12PM - Morning MisAnthropy

7-9 PM - The Local Zone

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12-2PM - Diesel & Cox

9 PM-12 AM - The Big Waste of Time

2-3:30PM - Chris Kitchen

12-2 AM - Red Panda

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3:30-5 PM - Trevor Richards

2-4 AM - GFunk & ATDub

5-7 PM - Ace Fever

4-7 AM - Mixed Discs

32 Pasta al __ 34 Santa’ s 21Down 36 O.K. Corral town 39 It’s usually upliftin g 42 D iced and served in a mushroom cream sauce 43 “Don’t look at me!” 45 Hall of fam e 46 Ally Financial Inc., formerly 49 City on the Rhone 51 Jerk 52 Stare master? 54 Ratatouille, for one 55 Doll’ s word 56 Did some selling out 57 Mashhad is its second-largest city 58 Airing 59 Intrusive 60 PC ke y

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

10/4/11

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october 5, 2011

editors: chelsea gunter, patrick murphy featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

food & drink

COLLEGIATETIMES

Frosty Parrot swoops in

5

Recipe: Buckeye Rice Krispies BY EMMA GODDARD | features staff writer

Giving in to that need for a chocolatey treat is inevitable. The blend of the smooth chocolate mixed with the crunch of peanut butter and Rice Krispies creates an incredible combination. So, don’t miss out on this tasty opportunity. Prep Time: 40 minutes Cook Time: 1 hour

Ingredients: 1 cup crunchy peanut butter ¼ cup margarine or butter, softened 1 cup powdered sugar 2 cups Rice Krispies 1 ½ cups semi-sweet chocolate morsels 54 mini-muffin paper cups

Directions: 1. In large bowl, mix peanut butter, margarine and sugar until thoroughly combined. 2. Add Rice Krispies cereal, mixing thoroughly. 3. Portion mixture, using rounded teaspoon. Shape into balls. Place each ball in paper cup and refrigerate. 4. Melt chocolate morsels in small saucepan over low heat, stirring constantly. Spoon one teaspoon melted chocolate over each ball. 5. Refrigerate until firm. Store in airtight container in refrigerator.

Drink

BY CHELSEA GUNTER| features editor

of the week

Hard rock purple haze CHRISTINA NESTOR / SPPS

NEW SELF-SERVE FROZEN YOGURT JOINT OPENS DOWNTOWN, ALLOWS FOR CUSTOMIZED ORDERS NICK SMIRNIOTOPOULOS features reporter The self-serve frozen yogurt craze that has spread throughout the country has officially made its way to Blacksburg. The Frosty Parrot, located at 125 N. Main St., made its grand opening last Tuesday night, offering 30 unique frozen yogurt flavors and more than 40 different toppings to compliment the icy treat. The self-serve model allows customers to make their own dessert creation with various frozen yogurt flavors and toppings, and pay by the ounce. The Frosty Parrot boasts a refreshing tropical theme, which is evidenced by the interior’s vibrant, bright colors. This is also reflected in the yogurt flavors’ names, including “Cookies & Cream Cove” and “Island Vanilla.” The Frosty Parrot is a local, independent business owned by Randy Dunton and Roger Henderson. The two became close friends while pioneering a girls basketball development program together. Following the program’s success, Dunton and Henderson decided they wanted to start a business together. When they came across the idea for frozen yogurt, they knew they had found their niche. “When I became aware of the self-serve frozen yogurt concept, we decided it was something that we wanted to bring to Blacksburg,” Dunton said. The pair looked into the possibility of franchising, but the rights to franchise in Blacksburg were already taken. Despite having minimal business experience, Dunton and Henderson decided to pursue the frozen yogurt concept on their own and started their own independent business. “There has been a learning curve for us,” Dunton said. “You don’t know what you don’t know until you get into it.” Since Dunton lives in Lynchburg, Va., he has focused on business development, while Henderson, who lives in Blacksburg, has headed the operations aspect of the business. Facing the demands of managing business operations, Henderson decided to leave his job at Blacksburg High School teaching math. “I really miss the kids and the classroom,” Henderson said. “Teaching is not easy, but it is easier. I am still getting used to (the) transition of having to be here all the time.” While he was disappointed to leave the classroom, Henderson was excited to move onto the next phase of his life and see the potential impact the Frosty Parrot could make. “I like doing stuff — I shift gears about every seven years,” Henderson said. “I like to build things and see what they might do. I am excited to

see what (the Frosty Parrot) might do.” Once they were set on the business idea, Henderson took the lead in finding the necessary supplies and equipment for the operations, as well as identifying and perfecting the product. The founders took the time to scope out various frozen yogurt places when they traveled on basketball trips. This was useful for determining successful approaches to the business and has helped provide structure for their current design. While Henderson had hoped the business would have been up and running before the start of the school year, the complications of renovating the retail space and identifying the right aspects for the product pushed the opening date two months back. Now that the shop is officially open, Dunton said they need to focus on raising awareness for the business and the unique product it offers. “Right now, people aren’t aware what the Frosty Parrot is,” Dunton

said. “We need to get people aware of who we are and what we provide.” While drawing people into the Frosty Parrot has been a key focus, the owners said their commitment to customer service will help create a positive atmosphere that will bring customers back. They both spoke of the encouragement they have gotten from their student employees who have helped provide customers with a friendly experience. “The young men and ladies on our staff are sharp, outstanding individuals,” Henderson said. “It is really refreshing to be around that every day.” While Dunton and Henderson are running a business, both owners are excited about the Frosty Parrot and its purposes, other than making money. “It is a business, but we are here to provide a service,” Dunton said. “We want it to be a place for people to meet and make friends and to enjoy a flavorful dessert creation.” Henderson echoed Dunton’s sentiments. “I have always wanted to do something like this,” Henderson said. “I just want to make your day better. I want this place to make your day better.”

Looking for a way to ease the sorrows of last week's game? Try spicing things up a bit with the Hard Rock Purple Haze. Ingredients: 1 1/2 ounces Malibu rum 1/2 ounce peach schnapps 1 ounce pineapple juice 1 ounce cranberry juice 7-Up soda or ginger ale

Directions: 1. Shake liquors and juices together with ice, and strain in a chilled martini glass. 2. Top drink with 7-Up or ginger ale. 3. Garnish with a pineapple wedge for added effect.

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6 sports

editors: matt jones, zach mariner sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865 COLLEGIATETIMES

october 5, 2011

Compliance: Tech steers clear of NCAA violations from page one

And that’s the key. At schools such as North Carolina, Ohio State, Southern California and Miami, the compliance staffs were overrun with violations. If the coaches have no interest in doing the right thing, it’s impossible for the compliance departments to do their jobs. “In a lot of the major cases you read about, you get people that were not even interested in doing the right thing,” Parker said. “They didn’t care whether it’s a booster, an agent or someone working on behalf of an agent — they didn’t care about doing the right thing. Compliance offices are not set up to stop that, hiring the right people then associating with the right types of boosters can help stop that.” The first e-mail is checked around 7:30 a.m. for both Parker and Locklin, and from there on, the day can take a multitude of directions. “It’s become different throughout the years with the updates in technology,” Locklin said. “I’ve got my cell phone, so my (e-mail) inbox is fluid. I sit there and work through my e-mails from home on my phone. But also with instant messengers, we deal with other institutions and other ACC schools.” The compliance staff, especially Locklin, has also embraced the social media craze in recent years. “We interact with some (schools) over instant messengers, texting and all the pieces of media you can think of. Twitter, Facebook — we deal with all MAZIAR FAHANDEZH / SPPS of those communication wise.” Parker, in his 15th year at Tech, has Tim Parker (left), associate athletic director for compliance, and Bert Locklin (right), director of athletics compliance, go through the NCAA manual. seen the changes in technology firsthand over the course of his career. Since his first job at the Metro Conference, and even after arriving in Blacksburg in 1997, the change is drastic. “It was so different when I first got here,” he said. “So much was still being done by hand — the NCAA had made very little progress as far as automating and making software programs available to us to do things electronically.” While many things have been changed, some things haven’t. “It’s almost exclusively electronic now, so it’s almost completely changed over the 14 years and two months ago since I’ve got here,” Parker said. “Not always for the better, but most of it’s better. “A lot of times you’ll look up and you’ve got a coach in your doorway, and the coach is looking for an answer. The immediacy about that hasn’t changed, that’s still the same.”

A lot on their plate It’s unlikely that many people on the Tech campus have more on their to-do lists than Parker and Locklin. Aside from the constant influx of emails, memos, phone calls and letters, Parker said there is a responsibility to deal with each issue on an individual basis. “The day-to-day picture is prioritizing things, and that’s one thing I think we’re really good at as a team,” Parker said. “We always have a long list of things that need to be done, but the order that you do it in is very important.” Even when every single coach is not getting top treatment, it’s part of Parker’s job to let them understand why. “We try to do that, we try to get back to everyone, or if we can’t and have to bump him or her down a little, it’s incumbent on us to explain why they’re not getting top treatment,” Parker said. While football is the top earner for the university and draws the most media scrutiny, there are different reasons why compliance deals with football closely. “I do think it may take a little more time to work with certain issues in football, just based on the fact that their rules are different,” Locklin said. “Just the amount of regulations that apply solely to football is huge,” Parker said. “Second thing is just the size of the squad. It’s so large, you’re talking about 120 student athletes — it’s about a fourth of our total student athlete population right there, in one team.” Aside from the fact that the department has to deal with 19 varsity sports (technically 20 with indoor and outdoor track), the NCAA rules and regulations manual is a whole other challenge. At 412 pages, the manual weighs heavily in the hands of Locklin as he flips through it. One difficult part of the job is having to explain the rules to the various constituencies. “Explaining to them the rulebook, and why certain things are in place that may restrict them from doing something or may allow them to do something,” Locklin said. “Having to defend that, and explain it.” That rulebook goes all the way to the football offices, where Beamer, the head coach, and his staff check constantly with Parker and the compliance staff. “If we’ve got a question, we go to them,” Beamer said. “I tell my staff, and Jim Weaver tells us. There’s never a reason for breaking a rule because if you’re in doubt, go ask them.”

Recruiting For schools that compete on a national stage like the Hokies do, strong recruiting is a must. While Tech doesn’t bring in the highest-rated classes, that doesn’t change anything for the compliance staff. Each visit, phone call or game

watched must be catalogued, and the compliance staff handles those forms. “It’s a requirement that when prospective student athletes come to campus on an official visit, the coaches provide us with an itinerary for the visit, so we know what they’re doing on the visit and where they’ll be on the visit,” Locklin said. Unofficial visits, specifically for football, are a little bit different. “Just for the fact that someone could walk through the door today and say, ‘Hey I’m here to visit campus,’” Locklin said. “Some unofficial visits, they’re unstructured. The requirement as far as detailed documentation is not as strict.” The Tech compliance website lists several forms that coaches use for the different contact methods, but none is more important than the national letter of intent. The compliance office generates the letter, and then gives it back to the football staff to send to the recruit. The compliance office then verifies that letter once it has been signed. “At that point, two things happen: We gain the ability to publicize that prospect, and then the following day, certain interactions can occur between our staff and that individual.”

Culture of compliance While many schools struggle to keep their big programs — football and basketball — under control, Tech is known for its straight-laced compliance philosophy. “Around here there shouldn’t be any reason for breaking a rule,” Beamer said. “They do a good job of educating, and if you don’t know, just go ask them. They’re always accessible.” That education starts in the various publications the compliance department publishes in. Everyone who buys tickets through Tech receives some sort of flier in their package detailing the rules of booster activity. “It’s thousands and thousands of people, and we’re constantly trying to get material in front of these folks to educate them about any regulations that may be relevant to them,” Parker said. “As far as keeping them from committing violations, all we can do is educate them about the rules, then hope that if a situation arises that may or may not violate a rule, they’ll contact us.” “I think it comes down to the compliance culture at Virginia Tech, from the top down,” Locklin said. “Our boosters are great, and I’ve noticed that throughout my years here. The communication between certain athletic boosters has been good.” That proactive mindset all comes back to the fact that Tech has a staff of coaches who put their team first. “We don’t have a lot of big egos here,” Parker said. “That’s what can get in the way and cause problems.” Even Jim Weaver, Tech’s director of athletics, is part of the movement to keep things running the right way. “We have a culture around here, a culture of compliance. I know it sounds silly, but our athletic director is a former compliance guy,” Parker said. “It’s always something that he’s stressed to the department, and it makes a difference. A lot of AD’s don’t make it a week in week out, month in month out thing; don’t stress how important it is. That’s a big advantage we have here.” That makes the compliance department’s job that much easier. “It’s really easy to work for Virginia Tech compliance because of the level of integrity from the top down,” Locklin said. “From Jim Weaver, to Frank Beamer, to Seth Greenberg, I think everyone’s trying to do the right thing, and everyone’s trying to follow the rules.”

Best part of the job While it isn’t always glamorous, as evidenced by the droves of paper on his desk, Parker and Locklin can take solace in the fact that players are reaching the field because of their work. Parker, sitting behind his desk, fumbles through it, looking for something. When he finally finds it, he reveals a thank you note from a Tech student athlete who had received help from the compliance staff on an academic eligibility issue. The staff filed a waiver on his behalf, and the student athlete was ultimately allowed to return to the playing field. “Things like this,” Parker said, holding up the note, “that makes it great. It reminds you that you’re here in the end to help student athletes. Hopefully it works out that way.” Locklin, a former swim and dive coach for the Hokies, has similar memories of times he has helped athletes reach their potential. “For me, a lot of times I’ll deal with initial eligibility, situations that are unique and require a little bit more work,” Locklin said. “Having that ability to succeed based on something that I was able to help them with; help them to be able to come to school here, it’s extremely rewarding. When I see football players on TV whom I worked closely with before they got here and upon their initial arrival, it’s extremely rewarding to watch them succeed.”


Wednesday, October 5, 2011 Print Edition