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An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

Thursday, March 24, 2011

www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 108th year, issue 34

News, page 2

Weekend, page 6

Opinions, page 3

Sports, page 5

Classifieds, page 4

Sudoku, page 4

Local ad agency to buy middle school site MICHELLE SUTHERLAND news reporter Blacksburg-based advertising agency Modea is on the move after agreeing to purchase a portion of the old Blacksburg Middle School property. Modea, founded five years ago by two Virginia Tech graduates, has agreed to purchase six acres once the town of Blacksburg has rezoned the area, said Ruth Richey, a public information officer for Montgomery County. Acquiring the property for $2.45 million, Modea plans to build a $10 million office building in the space. Modea officials said the company has outgrown its two offices, located near University Mall and in Kent Square. The new headquarters will be about 50,000 square feet, an upgrade from its current 7,000 square feet of space. The in-town move comes after the commonwealth provided hundreds of thousands of dollars in incentives. Modea co-founders David Catalano and Aaron Herrington considered sites in Illinois, North Carolina and Texas before deciding to stay in Blacksburg. The Virginia Economic Development Partnership, which “serves as a liaison between state agencies and partners,” worked with the parties to form a deal that would provide additional funding, said Christi Miller, a spokeswoman for the partnership. Modea will receive $200,000 through the Virginia Jobs Investment Grant, as well as other reimbursement funds for hiring new employees. These will alleviate the cost of expansion and encourage further growth, Miller said. According to Inc. Magazine, Modea is one of the top 5,000 fastest growing private companies in the United States, with growth of 1,335 percent over a three-year

Combined space of Kent Square and University City offices

7,000 ft2 Planned new office Part of Blacksburg Middle site to be purchased

50,000 ft 2

261,000 ft 2

WEI HANN / COLLEGIATE TIMES

DANIEL LIN / SPPS

Modea co-founder David Catalano, a Tech graduate, stands at his company’s current office in Kent Square. The company purchased a portion of the Blacksburg Middle School property for $2.45 million. the additional revenue; it was really just a good time to do it,” Catalano said. The founders said they are happy to stay in Blacksburg and look forward to its new downtown location. “Most of the businesses are up near the airport at an office park, (but) it was really important for us to have all of our people (in) downtown Blacksburg, where there are all the places to eat,” Catalano said. “We have a culture where everybody’s very friendly and friends with each other. We hang out with each other

period. Modea’s long-term growth plan is to hire 250 people in the next six to seven years, according to Meaghan Hinder, Modea office manager. The company looks forward to a new spacious headquarters downtown. The old middle school building has been sitting vacant for several years and many companies have been vying for the property. “I think that with the high school roof collapsing last year and the need for the school system to have

after work as well. Having it downtown in Blacksburg is really great for that.” Town officials look forward to the vitality the expanded headquarters will bring to the area. “I think it will be a great business to have there. It’s my understanding that many of them not only want to work downtown but also want to live downtown,” said Susan Anderson, vice mayor. “That’s good for Blacksburg, it’s good for our downtown merchants, it’s good for our downtown restaurants. “

DANIEL LIN/ SPPS

Modea will build a $10 million office on the newly acquired site.

Cowabunga dude— Surf Club makes waves at Tech club, and especially the longboarding competiton itself, is trying to tie surfing and longboarding together. “The type of style we are looking for in this competition is more like a surf style rather than the longboarding style downhill that you see,” said Alec Yuzhbabenko, a club member and freshman architecture major. The competition will be held in the Chicken Hill Lot near Lane Stadium from noon to 4 p.m. “The course is basically a lane down the hill and we are just letting the rider be creative with the riding line. We are judging on style, control, how they look on the board, what kinds of tricks they’re doing — it’s mostly slides and turns, because that is a lot of what surfing is about, going up the wave and doing sharp turns,” Dayton said. The event, which is expected to have more than 500 people in attendance, is “almost like a festival,” according to Trevor Collins, the club’s founder and president. The competition, which will have three separate events and a best trick award, is drawing competitors from all over the area and other schools as well. There will also be plenty of cool prizes for anyone who attends. Redbull, Volcom and local restaurants such as Sharkey’s, Awful Arthur’s and Cabo Fish Taco will be supporting the event. Dayton contacted many companies and explained what the club was all about and received plenty of support

u r f i ng in the S mountains? Not

STORY BY MIA PERRY PHOTOS BY MAZIAR FAHANDEZH

possible. Not possible until now, that is. Virginia Tech’s Surf Club is making waves this Saturday with its first ever “Surf the Streets” longboarding competiton. Since there are no actual waves here in Blacksburg, the club, which formed last semester, is holding a longboarding competition to help raise money. Longboarding, according to club member Michael Dayton, is the closest thing there is to surfing out on the water. “It’s just like a surfboard on wheels,” Dayton, a freshman business major, said. This is perhaps best illustrated by one of the groups’ favorite pastimes — tarp surfing. This unique activity involves longboarders coasting across a huge blue tarp at high speed, while at the same time someone else runs with an edge of the tarp, which catches air to create a giant “wave.” Watching as the surf clubbers “hang ten” on the concrete in front of D2, it’s a little surprising to see that it actually looks like they are being enveloped in a brilliant ocean wave. Tarp surfing also exemplifies how the

to make the event possible. Another member, freshman business major Caroline Pugh, has also played a big role in helping the club market the event. Members of the club — there are approximately 40 right now — want to stress that anyone is welcome to join or come try it out, even if they have never surfed. Aside from the longboarding competition, the group also does plenty of other things. “We are really focused on trips,” Collins said. “We go to surf trips to the Outer Banks, we took a big spring break trip out to Puerto Rico, and we also do stuff with ocean awareness.” To kick off its agenda, the club plans to go to Atlanta to visit the aquarium, among other things. “We also want to work on things like ocean cleanup,” said Tyler Augustine, a freshman business major. “We plan to look into working with the Surf Rider Foundation as well,” Yuzhbabenko said, “because they do a lot of beach cleanup and things that benefit the ocean.” It’s clear that the members want to help out the environment that plays such a big part in their lives. “Alec and I grew up at the beach,” Augustine said, who is from Virginia Beach. “I skated a lot growing up,” said Yuzhbabenko, “but then I got hurt so all I could do was surf.” The same thing is true for several of the other members as well, showing a close link between the two sports.

“We both also worked at surf shops, and some of us did surf instruction,” Augustine said. These guys eat, sleep, and breathe surf culture. “We are really social as well,” Collins said, “very social.” The group of surfers makes it clear that aside from surfing and boarding, hanging out and teaching people how to surf is part of its passion. The club is looking to make Saturday’s competition an annual event. “We have been doing stuff for two months non-stop,” Dayton said, explaining just how much t i m e and effort has gone into the event’s planning. Collins had to speak with risk management, a lawyer, an insurance firm, parking services, VT Rescue and VT Police, all to make sure things will run smoothly for Saturday. The event is free for students, and attendees can also purchase discounted after party tickets for three dollars for guys. Otherwise, the after party, which is at Cabo Fish Taco and will be featuring DJ Smiles and Jeedy (“Get ‘Em Hokies” anyone?), will be five dollars for guys at the door and free for ladies.

Official University April 16, 2011 Schedule 12:01a.m.

Ceremonial Candle Lighting April 16 Memorial

9:40 a.m. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 11 a.m. 3.2-Mile Run in Remembrance Alumni Mall

Reflection and Music War Memorial Chapel

Community Picnic Drillfield

11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

A Community of Learners: A Legacy of Achievement Newman Library, 2nd floor

Memorial Exhibit and Slide Show

7:30 p.m.

Candlelight Vigil Drillfield

11:59 p.m.

Ceremonial Candle Extinguished April 16 Memorial

1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Remembrance Through Art Performance Burruss Auditorium

Photography Exhibit

Holtzman Alumni Center

Video of April 17, 2007, Convocation Graduate Life Center at Donaldson Brown Auditorium

Squires Student Center, Old Dominion Ballroom

Open House Norris Hall, 2nd floor

Pastels of the 32 Hokies lost on April 16, 2007 Burke Johnston Student Center

Free play BreakZONE, Squires Student Center WEI HANN / COLLEGIATE TIMES


2 news

news editors: philipp kotlaba, liana bayne, gordon block newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

march 24, 2011

COLLEGIATETIMES

what you’re saying //comments from online readers...

world

On the direction of Virginia Tech’s basketball program:

Obama rallies El Salvador against cartels

I think Greenberg is a great guy, but he has reached is potential as a top D-1 coach. I dont know if its a lack a discipline or what, but it seems to be a recurring theme for the basketball team to not win the games they need and should win. (Seems all too similar to the football team and Beamer’s ability to coach in the big games as well)

Anonymous >> Everyone was hurt. Unless you’re going to make a claim about that being his fault, give him time. Good recruiting class is incoming.

Scotty B>> This athletic dept. has designed all of its programs to win a lot of games, but rarely win the BIG games and more importantly losing games they should have never lost (JMU in football and UVA twice in b-ball). Look around the state and see the young and vibrant coaches that are coming up the ranks and better yet see how successful they are. The football team wins 10 games a year and was an embarrassment in the Orange Bowl. This b-ball team has down what ever other b-ball team since the 90’s has done, disappoint fans. I still love them but they all can be very frustrating. My point; Weaver needs to go, we need change at the top.

crime blotter

SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador — Reflecting on America’s role in another war-torn country, El Salvador, President Barack Obama paid homage Tuesday evening at the tomb of a Catholic archbishop gunned down by U.S.-linked death squads more than three decades ago. Obama, who is facing questions from anxious lawmakers about U.S. military intervention in Libya, scrapped a visit to Mayan ruins on the schedule for Wednesday morning, and a spokesman said he would depart for Washington at 11 a.m., a few hours earlier than scheduled. On the last leg of a trip that also took him to Brazil and Chile, Obama pledged $200 million to Central America to battle a new menace: drug cartels. He hailed President Mauricio Funes, the first leftist leader in El Salvador’s modern history, for his moderate policies and efforts to “overcome old divisions” still visible in this tiny nation.

c-

Narcotics, public security and immigration were the main topics as Obama and Funes met in the ornate presidential palace, surrounded by tropical gardens. But so was the weight of history, and Cold War forces that turned this nation into a proxy battleground in which 75,000 people died during the 1980-1992 civil war. Moments before heading with Obama to a crypt beneath the Metropolitan Cathedral to honor slain Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo Romero, Funes thanked him for paying tribute to a prelate he called “the spiritual guide of this nation ... and the universal validity of his message.” Helicopters flew over the cathedral as Obama and Funes arrived. Obama, looking somber and occasionally shaking his head, listened as Funes spoke to him before a bronze reclined image of the slain archbishop. Obama lit a votive candle. At a funeral Mass six days later, a bomb exploded and shots rang out,

apparently from army gunmen on rooftops, sparking scenes of panic, terror and chaos among the throng of 250,000 faithful in attendance. The Vatican has taken up a cause for beatification and canonization into sainthood for Romero. Shortly after the arrival of Obama and first lady Michelle Obama on a day of brilliant blue skies, Funes noted that his country, like Chile and Brazil, had moved “in a very orderly and peaceful manner” toward democracy. El Salvador’s vulnerability to drug gangsters was underscored by a full-page newspaper ad by the Nationalist Republican Alliance, the right-wing opposition party that governed the nation for the past four presidential terms. It appealed for U.S. help “to avoid El Salvador from becoming the territory of drug traffickers as has sadly happened in nearby countries.” -tim johnson mcclatchy newspapers

1 3 2 1 6 5 4 0 6 5 6 4 6 5 5 1 4

V I O L A T I O N - A F F I D A V I T

date reported

time

offense

location

status

arrestees

3/14/2011

9:30 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.

Follow up to Larceny of money

Litton Reaves

Inactive

N/A

3/21/2011

8 a.m. - 10 a.m.

Follow up to Larceny of a Bicycle

Pritchard Hall

Inactive

N/A

3/21/2011

2 p.m. - 6:42 p.m.

Larceny of a Parking Sign/Vandalism

Burruss Hall

Inactive: Referred to Student Conduct

N/A

3/22/2011

4 p.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Vandalism to a light pole

Drillfield

Inactive

N/A

3/22/2011

12 a.m. - 8:15 a.m.

Counterfeit/Forgery of a Check

Food Science

Active

N/A

3/22/2011

unknown

Vandalism of a utility trailer

Military Building

Inactive

N/A

3/22/2011

9 p.m.

Possession of Drug Paraphernalia

Slusher Tower

Cleared by Arrest

#1 Again! Voted Best Apartment Community By Readers of the Collegiate Times!

Yes, you can live in a 3 bedroom Foxridge apartment home for only $314 a month* (per person). You also get 2 huge pools and a giant FREE fitness center. Park right outside your door with plenty of open parking for friends. No worries with 24 hour emergency maintenance. Ports throughout for Comcast high speed internet-discount pricing for Foxridge residents. The biggest value in Collegiate Living is Foxridge. Welcome Center open 7 days a week.

13216540656465514

Anonymous >>


opınıons 3

editors: scott masselli, gabi seltzer opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865 COLLEGIATETIMES

march 24, 2011

The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

Gmail should not replace webmail ecently the student body was informed that Virginia R Tech might abandon its webmail in exchange for e-mail offered by companies like Google, Yahoo and Microsoft. In the article, which appeared in the Collegiate Times, “Tech may outsource webmail service by fall 2011,” SGA President Bo Hart and systems engineer Ron Jarrell explained why moving to another vendor makes sense. Although it is not set in stone which vendor Tech would outsource its e-mail to, it appears as though Google’s Gmail is more popular with students. Because of this, and the fact that the company has come under scrutiny in recent months, most criticisms in this article will be pointed at Google. According to Hart and Jarrell, the change is being considered for three reasons: lack of space, cost and length of storage. Is there a single student who has run out of space for their e-mails? One can only imagine how many e-mails it would actually take to exceed webmail’s quota. In regard to cost, the number is almost insignificant. Jarrell said Tech spends about $150,000 per year for webmail. Tech spends more than that on some professors. Surely the same price can be paid for the management and maintenance of the e-mails of tens of thousands of students. Yes, the fact that old e-mails are deleted off the server after 90 days is a minor nuisance. But there are easy ways around this, such as forwarding the message to yourself at a later date, forwarding the message to a non-webmail address or saving the message to your computer. Most students will agree that Gmail is superior to Tech’s current webmail setup in these three areas. But there is one key area in which many of the vendors, especially Google, have a horrible track record: privacy. There may be a reason why the aforementioned Collegiate Times article failed to mention outside vendors’ stance on privacy — for if privacy was the No. 1 concern when making this decision, there is a good chance Tech would not consider allowing Google, Microsoft or Yahoo to manage its e-mails. Five months ago, then-Google CEO Eric Schmidt stated, “The Google policy on a lot of things is to get right up to the creepy line and not cross it.” Creepy is one way to put it, perhaps “privacy protection challenged” would be another. Putting Google in charge of students’ privacy is akin to having a fox guard the henhouse. The company poses such a threat to privacy that members from both major political parties are starting to take notice. Just this past weekend Rep. Joe Barton, Sen. Mike Lee and Sen. Herb Kohl called for investigations into the company’s shenanigans. Much of the latest controversy arises from the fact that Google collected private data from millions of users’ wireless networks. You know those cars that traversed the roadways and took pictures that make Google Maps look so cool? Well those cars were fitted with equipment that allowed them to collect personal information from your home wireless router. Information collected included Web pages users visited and pieces of e-mail, video, audio and document files.

The fact Google patrols the streets and collects private data should come as no surprise. The company, after all, joined with Microsoft and Yahoo in the enforcement of the “Great Firewall of China.” According to U.S. and British media, this means the companies helped the communist government block “politically sensitive content” to the country’s billion plus citizens — you know, sensitive subjects like the Tiananmen Square massacre, Taiwanese independence, criticism of government, democratic reform, human rights and religious beliefs outside of those sanctioned by the state. In numerous interviews, Schmidt has not shied away from the fact that the company is more than willing to share users’ information with the U.S. government. In light of Google’s readiness to hand over user information to authorities, CNBC asked Schmidt if people should trust Google with their information. His response? “If you have something that you don’t want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it in the first place. But if you really need that kind of privacy, the reality is that search engines, including Google, do retain this information for some time.” Reading the privacy policy for Microsoft, Yahoo and Google shows they may keep information for years. Google in particular saves everything you do — every e-mail ever sent via Gmail, every Google search, every Google Talk conversation, and so on — and ties it to your name or IP address. Someday the company will know you so well it may influence how you think; at least, that is what Schmidt recently told the Wall Street Journal: “But one idea is that more and more searches are done on your behalf without you needing to type. I actually think most people don’t want Google to answer their questions. They want Google to tell them what they should be doing next.” How is it possible that Tech is considering outsourcing e-mail to this company? The university obviously cares about student privacy; to the extent it will not even print your name in the graduation program unless you give it permission to do so. So why then is it even an option to put precious e-mails in the hands of a company that gets as close to the “creepy line” as possible? As it currently stands, students who are unhappy with webmail can simply forward e-mail to another address. But if the proposed changes go into effect, students who care about privacy will have no way to opt out of sharing their personal information with one of the largest corporations in the world (whether it be Google, Microsoft or Yahoo). The fact that 80 percent of students use webmail exclusively shows the current system is fine. Jarrell himself said it is only a small number that never use webmail at all, and there are only a few people who forward e-mails to off-campus addresses.

CHRIS DUNN -regular columnist -junior -political science major

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MAHEEN KHURSHID / COLLEGIATE TIMES

Social networking driving global awareness of news W

ith the recent events that have occurred internationally, both natural and political, it’s hard not to notice the impact social networking continues to have on our awareness of world news. While I have always been weary of the social implications of “social” networking, I am dumbfounded by the immediate response and access to information various e-outlets allow. For instance, Tumblr’s response to the political activism in Egypt was not just immediate, but also informative and revealing — not only were the opinions and articles from American news made available, the blogs and networks of those who were actually experiencing the events were right at users’ fingertips.Similarly, this is happening with events occurring here in the United States. From the government’s budget bill to the Wisconsin fight for collective bargaining rights, local issues are becoming national issues, seen and heard more than before — with even more comments and opinions being expressed and considered. Of course, Libya is currently the largest political issue, alongside Japan’s natural disaster and nuclear situation. In both situations we also have an unusually prominent amount of information being made available through social media websites. It really is pretty remarkable. The devastation Japan is currently experiencing is something we would typically see through the news, read in the papers and other traditional news sources. But now, we can read the experiences of those who are actually there. We can read the emotionally charged eyewitness accounts of those who have survived and are missing loved ones — without having to hear it from Anderson Cooper. The world’s people now directly share their experiences, with less and less of a news-media intermediary. As the anachronistic Middle East is steadily becoming a part of this dialogue, the world is finally becoming more connected on a personal level. I’m not making all of these broad generalizations without a reason. I recently read an article by Caterina Fake, the co-founder of Flickr, on social network-

ing and its consequences, and saw a connection between her opinion on the purpose of social networking and the way social networking is creating political change and international awareness. Fake talks about what she calls “FOMO,” or “fear of missing out.” She proposes that this is a side effect of social networking, and that it affects only one aspect of life — not surprisingly, social networking. But what about the current trend toward being informed through social networking, rather than just being social? Fake discusses the consequences of seeing what your friends are doing online — that’s where the “fear of missing out” comes from. Social media brings this feeling about the same way we are naturally afraid of missing out on things. By seeing events occur, we are inclined to want to be a part of them, which contributes to our fear of not being invited. The difference now, though, is that awareness is amplified, simultaneously amplifying the concern of missing out on something. With social media making us more aware of what our friends are doing and where they are going, we are more inclined to be envious of their free time and what they do with it, or the invitations they receive and we don’t. Continuing on the tangent of social media, Fake also hints that this sudden complete awareness of what is happening in all of our friends’ lives is not only a negative (unless you happen to think anxiety caused by FOMO is a good thing), but also a positive. Suddenly we have access to what our friends are doing, where they’re going and a day or two later we can see exactly what happened. It’s like you were there the whole time, even if you weren’t.Taking this seemingly simple construct — when I read Fake’s musings, the first thing I thought was “oh, this makes sense” — we can apply it to a much deeper and more important aspect of social networks and media that is continuously developing. What I mean is that FOMO is a potential driving force behind the developing use of social networking as a tool to bring news and information to those who would not have seen it oth-

erwise. It’s always been important to be informed, and with social interaction becoming focused primarily on online interaction, world news and information is beginning to merge with the same online networks. I know, online news has always been available as far as our generation is concerned. But this is different; this is awareness as well as involvement. Suddenly we are seeing news articles show up on our Facebook feed, between pictures from Friday night and someone’s status update. On other networking sites the same thing is happening, and it’s not so much that news is being shared, but how fast we’re seeing it. Within a few hours of learning of the earthquake that rocked Japan, stories were circulating on Tumblr and similar networks. Personal images and chillingly relatable pictures of people’s lives and homes appeared — not to mention the flood of similar content that followed the tsunami. So what’s the big deal? I can relate to people across the globe, sure. I can see what’s happening everywhere, sure. But the novel aspect of this is that news is becoming empathetic. It is becoming engaging, because we are so aware of everything. Suddenly it’s important to know, to make sure we’re aware of what’s going on in the world and in smaller, local communities.The driving force that is social networking doesn’t just create FOMO in a social context, but also in a worldly context — in terms of being aware and educated on what’s happening around the globe. Not only is it easier to relate to the news, it’s easier to empathize and even easier to come across. Perhaps the ever-expanding role of social networking will no longer be limited to our own social world, but instead continue to develop in its new dual role of informing the world of social change while simultaneously driving it.

SEAN SIMONS -regular columnist -junior -English major

Abortion opponents should consider practical implications re you anti-abortion or for abortion rights? Either you are against A women’s rights or unborn baby rights. The argument over abortion seems to be lacking pragmatic thinking. So, let’s take an honest look at abortion for once and see what would happen if Roe vs. Wade was overturned tomorrow. If Roe vs. Wade was overturned tomorrow, then the legality of abortion would be thrown to the states. Many people love the idea of states’ rights, but it’s a bad idea for individual states to determine the legality of abortion. My guess is nearly every state between the two coasts and Alaska would ban abortion. Unfortunately, that means poor women who can barely afford the operation now have to travel to a state in which abortion is legal. Low-income women who cannot afford travel expenses on top of medical costs will be forced to raise children they cannot support. Black market abortions without safety regulations may appear to replace the once legal abortion clinics. Unsafe abortion practices will put the lives of thousands of women in danger. The Catholic Church, like many religious denominations, believes life begins at the moment of conception

— a belief I agree with. Instead of trying to ban abortion for the entire country, which does not wholly share its view on the issue, why not encourage church members to abstain from getting abortions? A religion has the freedom to include or exclude people. If one religion does not condone abortion, then it should excommunicate members who have gotten abortions. To ban abortion is to force the moral viewpoint of one doctrine on thousands of people who disagree. If you do not want an abortion, or think abortion is wrong, then don’t get one. It’s called the “right to choose” because you can choose to not get an abortion just as easily as you can choose to get one. What about just allowing abortion in cases of rape or incest? Well, if a girl wants to get an abortion, she may falsely accuse someone of rape or incest to get the procedure done. Adding innocent men to the already exploding prison population, that costs taxpayers millions, does not seem like a good idea. What about the women? I imagine if Roe vs. Wade was overturned, then it would also be a criminal offense for women to get the procedure done, and it would probably become a crime

for doctors to perform an abortion. Doctors and women would be arrested. The court fees would further deepen the budget shortfalls of states across the country, while public defenders offices are already overflowing with cases. Abortion crimes would crowd the courts, strain public defenders offices and cost taxpayers millions. Cutting the funding from programs that provide abortions is a bad idea. Low-income women who do not want children will be forced to have kids they cannot afford to support. What happens then? The government will be forced to step in and provide Medicaid, welfare and other government support with taxpayer money. According to the book “Freakonomics,” legal abortion leads to lower crime rates. So, if abortion were to be banned and agencies like Planned Parenthood lost funding, the most likely effect would be higher crime rates and more people forced to depend on the government for healthcare and income.

JEFF HOMAN -regular columnist -sophomore -history major

Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor-in-Chief: Peter Velz Managing Editors: Zach Crizer, Katie Biondo, Josh Son Public Editor: Justin Graves Senior News Editor: Philipp Kotlaba Associate News Editors: Liana Bayne, Gordon Block News Reporters: Claire Sanderson, Jay Speidell, Michelle Sutherland, Sarah Watson News Staff Writers: Erin Chapman, Meighan Dober Features Editors: Lindsey Brookbank, Kim Walter Features Reporters: Chelsea Gunter, Majoni Harnal, Mia Perry Opinions Editors: Scott Masselli, Gabi Seltzer Sports Editors: Michael Bealey, Garrett Ripa Sports Reporters: Nick Cafferky, Matt Jones, Courtney Lofgren, Josh Parcell Sports Staff Writers: Alyssa Bedrosian, Alex Koma, Ashleigh Lanza, Zach Mariner Special Sections Editor: Bethany Buchanan Public Information Director: Dishu Maheshwari Training Director: Kelsey Heiter Copy Editors: Taylor Chakurda, Thandiwe Ogbonna, Spenser Snarr, Brittany Kelly Layout Designers: Danielle Buynak, Victoria Zigadlo, Wei Hann, Maya Shah Online Director: Jamie Chung Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: David Harries Distribution Assistant: Ryan Francis Student Publications Photo Staff Director of Photography: Sara Mitchell Business Manager: Luke Mason Lab Manager: Mark Umansky College Media Solutions Ad Director: Nik Bando Asst Ad Director: Brandon Collins Account Executives: Emily Africa, Matt Freedman, David George, Melanie Knoth, Hunter Loving Inside Sales Manager: Wade Stephenson Assistant Inside Sales Manager: Diane Revalski Assistant Account Executives: Maddie Abram, Katie Berkel, Kaelynn Kurtz, Erin Shuba Creative Director: Chloé Skibba Asst Production Manager: Casey Stoneman Creative Services Staff: Tim Austin, Jennifer DiMarco, Colleen Hill, Jenn Le, Erin Weisiger Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Student Media Phone Numbers Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. Subscription rates: $65 semester; $110 fall/spring. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2011. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


march 24, 2011

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One year later, Republicans seek to repeal health care legislation JAMES OLIPHANT mcclatchy newspapers WASHINGTON — Wednesday marked the anniversary of the health care law that its advocates said would change so much. In one very real sense, they were right. The political landscape one year later is radically altered, strewn with the fallen congressional careers of many of its supporters. The emotional debate over the bill arguably gave rise to the “tea party” movement. Republicans now control the House and aren’t far from seizing the Senate. Potential candidates for the 2012 GOP presidential nomination need only say one word, “Obamacare,” to get a rise from a crowd. And the president himself has struggled at times to ensure that his first term isn’t defined by the legislation.

Public attitudes toward the law, however, have not shifted much at all. The Affordable Care Act remains almost as equally loathed and celebrated as it was 12 months ago, despite the best efforts of Democrats to praise it and Republicans to bury it. Even worse for both sides, a majority of Americans remain confused about what the law actually accomplishes. This week, the trench warfare has heated up once again. Democrats point to the tangible gains the legislation has already delivered, from lifting caps on lifetime benefits to prohibiting discrimination based on pre-existing medical conditions to helping seniors pay for prescription drugs, while saying even more lies ahead as the law’s provisions go fully into effect in coming years. Republicans continue to pin the law

to the sluggish economic recovery, dismissing Democratic arguments that the law won’t blow up the deficit, and maintaining that it has already hurt small business and lowered the quality of health care nationwide. In the meantime, the law’s most controversial aspect, its requirement that all Americans have health insurance, is under assault in the courts. While public opinion has stayed relatively static on the act, there’s no doubt that the GOP still senses a political opportunity. For much of the last year, Democrats have sat on their heels on the issue; most incumbents ran as far away from the as possible during the congressional midterms. The ones that remain in Congress have witnessed Republicans vote to repeal the law in the House and muster a fair share of votes to do so in the Senate

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Events DOG WASH The Virginia Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine invites you to come pamper your dog at the annual VMRCVM Dog Wash fundraiser (hosted by the Class of 2014 and SCAVMA). The event will be on April 9th from 8am to 3pm at the veterinary college complex off of Duckpond Dr. Just park and follow the signs. Prices are $10 for a bath and $5 for ear cleaning and nail trim. Hope to see you there!

Lean@VirginiaTech is going to have its “Why Lean Administration’” workshop on March 29 and 30, 2011 in the Raleigh-Durham area to guide you to excel in managing and organizing your administrative tasks. The workshop will provide guidance on how to apply lean management in the field of administration and how to create an efficient and transparent process. This two-day event will also include a hands-on simulation game to enhance your lean administration experience. Cindy Swank, a widely recognized lean administration expert and former VP lean of a major insurance company, will share her insights with you. Details for this workshop can be found at http:// www.vtlean.org/ club/ workshops/ and if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at info@vtlean.org or (540) 443-6688. SKYDIVE! One-day first jumps from 13,500’ from 22-jumper twin engine airplane. Gift Certificates! www.skydiveorange.com 540.943.6587

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— and the GOP says it’s committed to using the appropriations process to gut the law. On the putative Republican presidential campaign trail, targeting the health care law remains a favorite sport. Repeal is an article of faith among teapartiers and budget hawks. Candidates such as Tim Pawlenty are seeking to use the law’s persistent unpopularity to boost their profiles, while Mitt Romney’s prospects remain fogged because of his support of a similar law while he governed Massachusetts. “If courts do not do so first, as president, I would support the immediate repeal of Obamacare and replace it with market-based health care reforms,” Pawlenty said in a statement Wednesday. But according to polls, advocating a full-blown repeal also carries politi-

cal risk. According to a new survey from the Kaiser Family Foundation, fewer than 40 percent of Americans favor repeal, regardless of whether the Republicans replace it with an alternative. That suggests that while agitating against the law plays well to the GOP base, it risks alienating centrist voters who may be taking more of a waitand-see approach to the act. Some in the Republican Party have recognized that certain provisions, such as ensuring that people — especially children — with pre-existing medical conditions can find health insurance, play well with the electorate and have suggested that a GOP plan would accomplish the same at less cost through the use of purchasing pools and other market-based reforms. GOP leaders are still working up a replacement in the House. “We don’t

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accept the status quo,” Rep. Tom Price of Georgia said on Wednesday. “There are a lot of things that need to be improved upon.” Price said he saw little risk in repeal, saying his constituents are more ardent about doing away with the law than ever. Republicans say they will continue to push the Democratic-controlled Senate on repeal efforts. Price said that with 23 Democrats in that chamber up for re-election next year — many of them from swing states — momentum may build next year for action, he said. “We may get a critical mass at some point and actually be able to move something,” he said, adding that he expected the Supreme Court to declare part of the law unconstitutional next year regardless.

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WORDFIND • Theme: 2011 VT Ring Dance March 25, 2011

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WORD BANK Ring Dance Banquet Music Masquerade Celebration Class Fireworks Tradition Pride Design Passion Cadets Juniors Alumni Green Silver Serve

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By Kelsey Blakley

ACROSS 1 Cape Co d feature 6 Valentine trim 10 Embezzle 14 Medicinal plants 15 Comet competitor 16 Plantation near Twelve Oaks 17 Li ke ESP? 18 __ avis 19 Pr ince William’s alma mater 20 Hea vy metal mimic? 23 Exotic guided tour 26 Subway co. in a 1959 song

3/24/11 27 Flop 28 Nic kname for a phar maceuticals czar? 31 Aim high 33 Commotion 34 Chapeau’ s perch 36 One bear ing down 37 Surfing-induced torpor? 40 Williams of ‘’Happ y Days’’ 43 Peevish, as a puss 44 One shooting the bull? 47 Shar p Italia n cheese 49 Sailor’ s poc ket bread?

52 11th-centur y date 53 Mantel piec e 55 Crankcase reser voir 56 He avenly food on the nightstand? 60 Bit of plankton 61 C-3PO worshiper 62 Where to see government programs 66 Nat or Card 67 Spar kling wine city 68 Elicit a :-) from 69 Dismally damp 70 “Lolita” star Su e 71 Pram occupant ’s wear

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editors: michael bealey, garrett ripa sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865 COLLEGIATETIMES

march 24, 2011

Hokies look to break winless ACC start against Eagles NICK CAFFERKY sports reporter After a rough start, the Virginia Tech baseball team is hoping its in-conference struggles will end this weekend with a three-game series at Boston College. The Hokies are 0-6 in the ACC this season, and Tech will be looking to get its first conference wins against the Eagles — who, at 2-4 in the conference, are fresh off of a series at Maryland where they took two out of three. The matchup also pits Tech head coach Pete Hughes against the team he led for eight seasons before taking the Hokies coaching job after the 2006 season. The Hokies are coming off of a 9-6 victory on Tuesday in a single game at Liberty. The game wasn’t without drama though, as it took a furious late comeback and 10 innings to give the Hokies the win. After falling behind 5-1 in the second inning, the Hokies were forced to play catch-up the entire game. Luckily for Tech, Chad Morgan and Johnny Morales took it upon themselves to be the heroes of the day. Down 6-2 in the eighth, Morgan got the stagnant Hokies offense moving with a three-run blast with two outs to shrink Liberty’s lead to just one. A single by Tony Balisteri scored another in the eighth, and just like that, the Hokies tied the game and forced it into the 10th inning. Finishing off the comeback, Morales doubled with two outs in the 10th and the bases loaded to bring in the final three runs of the game. While the comeback was impressive and gave the Hokies a much-needed win, the fact they had to battle from behind has been a problem all season

and it will be important to avoid in this weekend’s series. In the Hokies’ six ACC losses this season, they have actually outscored their opponents in the eighth and ninth innings by a combined score of 8-3. The problem has been in the seven innings prior to that — where ACC foes have outscored Tech 34-10. Considering four of Tech’s conference losses have been by two runs or fewer, the Hokies’ inability to start games strong is a prime reason for the rough start. In a somewhat unusual circumstance, the series will not actually be played in Chestnut Hill as originally planned, but rather on the campus of the University of Rhode Island in Kingston, R.I. This could be a good thing for Tech, because while the Hokies swept Boston College last season in the only series the two played, Tech is just 2-7 all-time when playing at Boston College. Starting for the Hokies in the series will likely be Joe Mantiply, Marc Zecchino and Joe Parsons, as the trio has started all six of the ACC games played thus far. It will be up to them to make sure Tech isn’t put into a hole early and to keep the Hokies in a position where their late-inning theatrics can be relevant. On offense, Michael Seaborn and Ronnie Shaban are the players to watch, as they are batting over .348 and lead the team in total bases in conference games. Freshman Chad Pinder could also be a significant factor in the series, as he is batting .458 with four RBIs in his last six games. The three games in Rhode Island, which start Friday, will be the end of a four-game road trip for Tech. The Hokies will play at home against Radford on March 29.

PAUL KURLAK / SPPS

Hokies hurler Marc Zecchino delivers a pitch in the first inning of Saturday’s loss to the University of North Carolina Tar Heels. Tech will rely on its starting pitchers to limit early inning runs as it tries to notch its first ACC win of the season against Boston College this weekend.

Success heads resume of Richmond coach Chris Mooney DICK JERARDI mcclatchy newpapers Chris Mooney grew up in the Parkwood section of Northeast Philadelphia, close by Franklin Mills Mall (which was being built when he was a teenager), Parkwood Shopping Center and Archbishop Ryan (where he went to high school). It is a neighborhood of row homes, nearly sideby-side front doors and hard-working people like Mooney’s father, who drove a Greyhound bus. In 1990, Mooney parlayed basketball ability and academic achievement, leaving the asphalt and concrete for the trees and open spaces of Princeton, where he played for Pete Carril and majored in English. In a week or so, Mooney, the University of Richmond head coach, is likely to have his pick of high-profile head-coaching jobs, possibly Georgia Tech or North Carolina State. He is this year’s Steve Donahue, another Philly guy who assembled a great senior class, got them to the NCAA Tournament’s Sweet 16 and moved up from Cornell to Boston College. Richmond is not likely to beat Kansas in Friday’s Southwest Regional semifinal in San Antonio’s Alamodome. But the point has been made. The Atlantic 10 champions have made a great run. And so has their coach. After finishing his playing career at Princeton, Mooney, 38, immediately went into coaching, first as head coach at Lansdale Catholic High (three years) and then at Beaver College (three years) before it became Arcadia. He left Beaver in 2000 to teach the Princeton way at Air Force as Joe Scott’s associate head coach. Air Force had its first winning sea-

son in a quarter-century in Scott’s last season there. When Scott went back to Princeton as head coach in 2004 (an experiment that did not work even a little bit) Mooney took over at Air Force, becoming the fourth-youngest head coach in Division I.

This is the most important event for a basketball fan every year. To be part of it is incredible, let alone to move on into the Sweet 16. It’s overwhelming. CHRIS MOONEY UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND HEAD BASKETBALL COACH

One 18-win season later, he was off to Richmond. The Spiders went 1317 his first season, 8-22 his second. Then, Kevin Anderson and Justin Harper, now seniors, signed on. “That was their 91st win yesterday,” Mooney said Sunday night while he was waiting to see if his team would play Kansas or Illinois. “That’s a school record, which is impressive. What’s more impressive is they joined the program after we won eight games. They did not get on a moving train.” Brilliant point guard Anderson, a 2,000-point scorer, and Harper, one of the most versatile big men in America, combine to average 34.5 points per game. Fifth-year senior Dan Geriot (Springfield Delco) is the third-leading scorer. It has been quite a run at Richmond, but like Cornell’s a year ago with all those seniors, it might be coming to an end. If Mooney is going to make a move, now is the time. Justin Baxter was recruited out of Pennsbury High to play for Mooney at Beaver. His freshman season was

Mooney’s last season. “We started four freshmen my freshman year,” Baxter said. “We had made a big-time transformation. They had been last the year before. We came in second in our division, made the playoffs at a school that’s really not known for its athletics or its basketball program at all.” Baxter is not surprised at Mooney’s success. “I knew he would get a shot at some point (at Division I),” Baxter said. “Did I think it was going to be after the first year I was there? I was hoping no.” Not because he didn’t want Mooney to do well. He just wanted to have him as his coach for a while longer. Baxter, an assistant coach at Neumann University and a physed teacher at St. Dominic’s in the Northeast, learned a lot of basketball from Frank Sciolla, his high school coach. He learned more from Mooney, one of Sciolla’s good friends. “I’m not sure if I play college basketball if it’s not in the offense that he runs,” Baxter said. Nobody who watched Mooney play at Princeton was surprised he has become a successful coach. He scored more than 1,000 points and also had more than 350 rebounds and 200 assists. He played the game the right way. And he is teaching what he knows, the Princeton way. When these Richmond seniors were freshmen, the Spiders went 1615. Then it was 20-16. Last season, it was 26-9, a loss to Temple in the A-10 championship game and a firstround NCAA Tournament loss. This season, it is 29-7, that A-10 title, a firstround NCAA upset of Vanderbilt, another win over Morehead State and the lowest surviving seed (12) in this tournament. “It’s a dream that you don’t really

think can happen,” Mooney said. “This is the most important event for a basketball fan every year. To be part of it is incredible, let alone to move on into the Sweet 16. It’s overwhelming.” It is, Mooney acknowledged, a “long way from Lansdale Catholic (and Beaver College).” And it has only been 11 years since he left Division III to be a Division I

assistant. “It’s really unbelievable just to be taking the court Friday night in the Sweet 16 in a dome,” Mooney said. Mooney, like most coaches, always imagined this. “The dream is strong,” he said. “There are a lot of us who coach who feel just great that we’re allowed to make our living in basketball. That’s

kind of a thrill in and of itself.” And so is coaching in the Sweet 16. When Richmond takes the floor Friday night, there will be just 12 teams left with a chance to win the 2011 national championship. Now, that probably is dreaming too strong for Mooney at Richmond, but just being there will be every bit the thrill that can’t be duplicated.


6 weekend march 24, 2011

editors: lindsey brookbank, kim walter featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865 COLLEGIATETIMES

‘Boogie for a Cure’ event to raise money for Relay for Life CHELSEA GUNTER features reporter Looks like the Virginia Tech Relay for Life executive board won’t be the only group hosting events to raise money this year. The Masters Urban and Regional Planning Relay team is pairing up with Boogieburg Soundsystem and 622 North to offer students a night to “Boogie for a Cure” on Saturday. The 622 North Restaurant and bar will be providing its facility for the event. All cover charge fees will be directly donated to MURP’s Relay funds. Students 21 and up will pay $3, while students between 18 and 21 will pay $5 and must arrive by 11 p.m. While helping a great cause, students can dance the night away on North Main Street from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Saturday. Boogie for a Cure coincidentally falls on the last day of Relay’s 10 for 10 campaign. “It’s a 10-day fundraising spree to try and raise $10,000 a day for 10 days to equal $100,000 dollars, and we’re the final event of that promotion,” said Dustin Akers, MURP’s co-captain. Boogieburg Soundsystem, which has played across the nation at parties in New York City, Miami, San Francisco and Baltimore, will provide the music for the event. Besides playing events at Awful Arthur’s, it has played alongside acts such as Ursula 100, SOJA and Girl Talk. “We do everything we can to jump on any opportunity to do charity events,”

said John Gaskins, Boogieburg cofounder. “If we can give back and help out those who need it just by throwing some dance parties, then of course we are going to get involved with great people like MURP.” Students should expect upbeat, bass-heavy, funky music. As the night progresses and students loosen up, the music will transition to electro, ghetto funk and disco. “What’s better than booty shaking on a Saturday night in the first week of spring, where loads of fun people will be at a fine establishment such as 622 North, all for the sake of benefitting Relay for Life?” Gaskins said. For more information and music mixes, check out boogieburg.com. Akers said he believes that students under 21 can still enjoy the dance party. “They normally don’t have the opportunity to go to bars and some of the DJ events like this, so it gives them a chance to go out with some of their friends who have already turned 21 to have fun,” Akers said. “They have a chance to escape from the apartment parties.” Those interested can check out the “Boogieburg Relay for Life Benefit Show: Boogie for a Cure” event page on Facebook. This will be the third fundraising event that the eight-member graduate student relay team has hosted. “We were just brainstorming ideas to bring in additional funds and we just happened to have the connections to make it happen,” Akers said.

Akers took advantage of the fact he knows the Boogieburg co-founders well and used to work as a bartender at 622 North. Besides this dance party, MURP has raised money through lollipop and T-shirt sales. The group is confident about reaching its goal of $1,000 after the “Boogie for a Cure” event. Originally, Swetha Kumar was the only team captain for MURP until Akers faced a tragedy. “My grandfather passed away Dec. 13 of this past year and that was my number one motivation of getting involved in Relay again,” Akers said. “I think remembering and celebrating my grandfather’s life is my favorite part of Relay.” Kumar offered Akers the co-captain position after he had invested interest in helping fight for a cure. Akers urges students to come out for 10th Relay Anniversary even if they cannot attend the “Boogie for a Cure” event. “We are the largest collegiate Relay in the nation, having raised over $1 million in the past two years,” Akers said. “Because of the anniversary, everything is going to be bigger and better with bands, free food, and coming together for a great cause. “Everyone has been affected by cancer, whether it is a family member, friend, or even yourself. It’s time to join this movement to fight for an end to cancer and for the beginning of more birthdays.”

‘Orange’ you glad you’re healthy? To end National Nutrition Month on a good note, the Student Dietetic Association is offering some tips on how to eat healthy. In accordance with this year’s National Nutrition Month theme, “Eat Right with Color”, the SDA has grouped some yummy foods into color categories with information on their nutritional benefits from the American Dietetic Association. Look for a new food color each day for some colorful food ideas.

Orange and deep yellow fruits and veggies contain nutrients that promote healthy vision and good immunity, as well as reduce the risk of most cancers. Choose from apricots, grapefruit, canteloupe, mango, papaya, peaches, pineapple, carrots, yellow peppers, yellow corn and sweet potatoes.

[Thursday, March 24] What: Farmer’s Market on the Plaza Where: GLC Plaza When: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Cost: Free What: CinemaTech Screening Series Where: The Lyric When: 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Cost: Free

Wondering what’s going on around the ’burg? Check out the events of the upcoming week. [Saturday, March 26]

What: The Ackley Kids Where: Gillie’s When: 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Cost: No cover What: Guest Artist Recital: Langley Winds Where: Squires Recital Salon When: 8 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Cost: Free

What: Class of 2012 Ring Banquet Where: Squires Commonwealth and Old Dominion Ballrooms When: 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Cost: Tickets on sale in Squires What: Live Music: Iris Dement Where: The Lyric When: 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Cost: $29.00 What: Third Eye & Boogieburg Present: Boombox Where: Awful Arthur’s When: 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. Cost: 18 +, $10 in advance, $15 day of show What: The Fustics with D. Charles Speer and The Pigeons Where: Gillie’s When: 9:30 p.m. to 12 a.m. Cost: 18 +, no cover

[Sunday, March 27]

What: Spring Concert: Indian Classical Music and Dance Where: GLC Auditorium When: 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Cost: Free

What: Student Recital: Saxaphone Quartet Where: Squires Recital Salon When: 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Cost: Free

What: Barney’s Version opens Where: The Lyric When: 7 p.m. to 12 a.m., showings at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Cost: $5

What: Student Recital: Luke Gusukuma, flute Where: Squires Recital Salon When: 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. Cost: Free

What: Jeff Willis Where: Gillie’s When: 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Cost: No cover

[Monday, March 28]

What: Class of 2012 Ring Dance Where: Commonwealth Ballroom When: 8 p.m. to 12 a.m. Cost: Event is free, but tickets are required

[Friday, March 25]

What: Dance Theatre of Harlem Ensemble: Lecture and Demonstration Where: Burruss Auditorium When: 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Cost: $5 students What: Gathering with women veterans Where: Women’s Center When: 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Cost: Free What: Dance Theatre of Harlem Ensemble: Interactive Performance Where: Burruss Auditorium When: 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Cost: $8 students What: Movie: Milk Where: GLC Auditorium When: 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Cost: Free

[Tuesday, March 29] What: An Evening with Esera Tualo Where: Old Dominion Ballroom When: 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Cost: Free What: Comedians Kirk Fox and Anthony Quinn Where: GLC Auditorium When: 7:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Cost: $1 students, $2 public


Thursday, March 24, 2011 Print Edition