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The Collegiate Times’ comprehensive guide to Virginia Tech Football

Friday, October 4th, 2013

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THE GENTLE

GIANT Derrick Hopkins is an imposing figure on the field, clogging up the middle of the defense. When he’s off the field, he’s an easy-going guy. ALEX KOMA sports editor

Most people use words like “nasty,” “mean” or “vicious” to describe defensive tackles. But Derrick Hopkins is none of those things. Yet, despite his diminutive personality both on and off the field, Hopkins has emerged as a key cog in Virginia Tech’s dominant defense.

“I’m a calm, cool, collected guy. I’m not really one to punch you out,” Hopkins said. “In the past, I’ve gotten a little rowdy, but now I’m kind of chill and calm.” But a certain venom does lurk beneath the tackle’s calm demeanor. Hopkins put on an absolute clinic against Georgia Tech, earning player of the game honors for his part in helping hold the Yellow Jackets to a paltry 129 rushing yards. “He played lights out,” said defensive line coach

CHEN JIANG / SPPS

Charley Wiles. “Derrick is playing really well right now and it couldn’t happen to a better guy.” Hopkins, or “Hop” as coaches and teammates affectionately call him, only recorded seven tackles on the day, but his overall effect in the game was monumental. Georgia Tech’s offense functions best when there’s the threat of the quarterback or a running back running “dive” plays right at the defensive tackles. And Hopkins completely eliminated that element of the

EXUM REJOINS TECH’S BEST UNIT BROOKS AKER sports reporter

The Virginia Tech secondary possesses a problem that would make any coach jealous: a wealth of talent and not enough room on the field. But the Hokies’ coaching staff is ready to manage the return of second team All-ACC cornerback Antone Exum. “It’s a good situation to have, I guess, where you’ve got (Exum) coming back,” said defensive coordinator Bud Foster. “You’re going to see (Exum and Facyson) play, now to the extent, whoever the hot guy is, you want to go with him. I want to make sure (Exum) feels comfortable. At the same time, he’s been a leader for us and if he’s not 100%, I hope he’d be man enough to tell me when it’s all said and done, that he can’t

You’re going to see both (Exum and Facyson) play.” Bud Foster Defensive Coordinator

PLAYER TWEETS OF THE WEEK

2012 LOSS REMAINS A PAINFUL MEMORY JACOB EMERT sports editor

FILE 2012 / SPPS Antone Exum (1) meets up with Tre Boston (10) after the Hokies’ 48-34 loss last season. Exum makes his return this week.

go full speed.” Exum returned to practice this week after being cleared by Dr. James Andrews for full participation. Exum felt pretty confident going into the test that he would be cleared this week, but there was just a shade of worry. “I wasn’t nervous but I knew how hard I had worked for this and I felt like I was really ready, so going into it I was very optimistic,” Exum said. “But it was in my head, like, ‘Man, what if I don’t know what’s best and he just comes in and is like, ‘No, five more

weeks.’’ I’d be crushed.’ I’m happy that I preformed well. They said I did excellent on the test so that made me even more confident.” With Exum returning the backfield, there had been talk of possibly moving him to safety to relieve Detrick Bonner, who struggled recently against Georgia Tech, from the starting free safety role. This would allow the Hokies to get the most playmakers in the secondary on the field at once. Exum started his career at Tech as a safety, but defen-

QUARTERBACK

sive backs coach Torrian Gray emphasized that Exum is a cornerback. “We’ve got two very good safeties and (Exum) is a corner, and that’s his position,” Gray said. Freshman Brandon Facyson is going to be the guy in the secondary that will lose the reps at corner with Exum returning. With Facyson sliding out of the nickel corner position, there will be some changes for the remaining

see EXUM / page 4

HEAD TO HEAD

see page 3

In his 30-plus years experience as a head football coach, Frank Beamer has mastered just about all aspects of the coaching profession. He knows how to win, he knows how to teach and he knows how to talk to the media. Often regarded as one of the best in the business when it comes to coach talk — using many words to say very little — Beamer never gets too high or too low when discussing his team. So when he unleashed strongly worded rhetoric in regards to last year’s game against North Carolina, saying Virginia Tech “got pounded down,” “got their tail pounded” and “it was a hammer job,” the message got across loud and clear. The Tar Heels welcomed the Hokies to Chapel Hill last fall, and then beat them down to the tune of 48 points and 778 allpurpose yards. The Heels embarrassed Bud Foster’s defense, running over them at will for 339 rushing yards. Giovanni Bernard, now with the Cincinnati Bengals,

BALANCED ATTACK Logan Thomas tends to follow playing against Georgia Tech with another strong game.

Curious about what players have to say on Twitter? see page 4

Check out which team your sports editors predict to come away with a victory. see page 2

see HOP / page 2

see UNC / page 3

ONLINE UNC offers a unique spread attack that balances the run and the pass. See how it’s been successful in the past and how the Hokies will try to stop it.

see page 3

was responsible for 262 of those yards, averaging over 11 per carry. “It is what it is, we got pounded. They ran for 300plus yards, plus they had a lot of penalties that brought long runs back too, so it is what it is,” said defensive tackle Derrick Hopkins. “Everybody saw the game. Bernard just ran the ball on us. It’s extra motivation, we’ve just got to keep doing what we’ve been doing and working hard and trying to play consistently and try to get better.” What bothered senior linebacker and defensive captain Jack Tyler when he watched the game film this week was that it wasn’t UNC overpowering the Hokies that led trouncing. The Tar Heels were so successful because of what the Hokies did — or didn’t do. “I mean it was embarrassing. That was the worst defensive game I’ve ever seen a Virginia Tech defense play,” Tyler said. “I mean every play there was someone not doing what they were supposed to. It wasn’t

Check online for videos featuring coaches Bud Foster and Scot Loeffler.


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October 4, 2013

HOP: LINEMAN HELPS GIVE HEART TO DEFENSIVE LINE

HEAD TO HEAD Collegiate Times sports editors face off with their weekly game predictions. Find out why they made their picks.

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

Derrick Hopkins has blossomed into an integral part of the dominant Hokies defense in 2013. from page one offense for the Jackets. “The second half, that whole first drive I felt like I was moving well,” Hopkins said. “The opportunities came to make tackles, so that’s what I did.” Hopkins’ ability to clog the line was most clearly on display during a crucial fourth down play early in the fourth quarter. With the Hokies up by only a touchdown, the Jackets elected to go for it with two yards to go. Running back David Sims ran right up the middle, but he quickly found nowhere to go and Georgia Tech turned the ball over. Defensive end James Gayle and linebacker Jack Tyler actually brought Sims to the ground, but it was Hopkins’ effort on the interior that made the stop possible. “(Defensive tackle Luther Maddy) and I just really clog the holes up and Jack and Gayle came and kind of got the tackle, but (Maddy) and I were big factors on plugging the holes and stopping it,” Hopkins said. “I was pretty proud of it, we had a third down stop before that, so I was kind of pumped up.”

I was pretty proud of it, we had a third down stop before that, so I was kind of pumped.” Derrick Hopkins Defensive Tackle Hopkins is referring to the previous play on the drive, where he wrapped up Sims for no gain to force the fourth down, another example of his physical dominance. “He’s got great quickness, lower body strength. He’s hard to get off his feet, he’s a player,” Wiles said. What makes Hopkins’ dominance relatively surprising is his lack of overwhelming size. Although he weighs in at 311 pounds, he only stands six feet tall. “I’m a little shorter than everybody else, I’m not 6’5” like some tackles, but I’ve got

good leverage,” Hopkins said. The redshirt senior made expert use of that leverage against the Jackets’ offensive line. Although Hopkins was regularly matched up with Georgia Tech’s 6’3” center, Jay Finch, he was still disruptive all night long. “When you get a 6’5” O-lineman, I’ve got to have good leverage to get my hands to the side,” Hopkins said. In addition to his strength, Hopkins has found success by learning how to control his emotions on the field. “It comes with experience, I just know what kind of attitude I have to go into the game with,” Hopkins said. “I might get a little antsy, but otherwise I’m just cool, calm.” However, that’s not to say there isn’t a place for emotion on the defensive side of the ball. In fact, he claims it’s just the opposite. “Emotions are a big part for the whole defense,” Hopkins said. “Good defenses have good emotions, everybody’s excited, everybody’s trying to get amped up because a quiet defense is a dead defense.” According to the tackle, the key is having “a good blend” of players that quietly lead by example and those who are more vocal. “We have some people that are really rowdy, some people who are calm, cool,” Hopkins said. “Antone (Exum), Gayle, Kyle (Fuller)’s starting to get a little rowdy. (Detrick) Bonner, Kyshoen (Jarrett), those guys. It’s really about half. (Maddy) and I, Jack (Tyler), we’re in the zone, but we’re not real loud like that.” A quiet demeanor isn’t the only thing that Hopkins and Maddy share. The defensive tackles have become like family thanks to their time on the line together. “I’ve learned a lot from Derrick, he teaches me, he gives me some corrections because we’re somewhat similar in the way we play,” Maddy said. “He brings all the heat, he encourages me to compete every week and we make each other better. He’s a great, great guy.” Hopkins insists that forming that kind of camaraderie on

the defensive line is essential for the unit to play together effectively. “You’ve got to have a relationship with the guy next to you, you have to have unity,” Hopkins said. But while the unit as a whole played well last Thursday, it was Hopkins that truly stood out. With a big performance in a nationally televised game, NFL scouts surely took notice of Hopkins, but he’s not thinking about the next level quite yet. “Not yet,” Hopkins said. “People are talking about it, but I’m trying to finish the year out strong, it’s my last year. My family and my chaplain are always talking about leaving a legacy, so I’m trying to leave a positive legacy when I leave.” In the meantime, he’s devoting his energy toward facing North Carolina this Saturday. The Tar Heels thrashed the Hokies 48-34 last year, and the memory still stings for Hopkins. “We got pounded,” Hopkins said. “(Former running back Giovani) Bernard just ran the ball on us. It’s extra motivation, we’ve just got to keep doing what we’ve been doing and working hard and trying to play consistently.” The Heels were indeed particularly effective on the ground — the team ran for a total of 339 yards, with 267 coming from Bernard alone. That’s a result Hopkins just isn’t used to. “That was the fi rst time somebody ran for more than 300 yards, for me at least,” Hopkins said. “It’s extra motivation a little bit, but we’re going to continue doing what we’ve been doing this year and improve on that to keep getting better.” Yet, true to form, Hopkins doesn’t let last year’s result affect him too much. Instead, he just approaches it the same way he always does: with a level head. “I could (take it personally), but I’m just trying to stay calm,” Hopkins said. “You could get mad and try to do too much and things like that, so I try to stay leveled off and go about it the right way.”

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

JACOB EMERT

ALEX KOMA SPORTS EDITOR

WW SPORTS EDITOR

It’s no secret that last season’s game against North Carolina didn’t go quite as the Hokies planned. Let’s be honest, it was the complete opposite of what they planned. The Tar Heels offense operated at will against the Hokies defense, which struggled for much of last year. Bud Foster’s crew couldn’t be a different place right now. They are suffocating every team they play and their counterparts on the other side of the ball are coming around. UNC has gotten off to a rough start in 2013 and this week their struggles will continue. Tech’s defense is too good and having already seen a couple spread offenses this year, they won’t have any trouble handling UNC’s fast-paced offense. The Hokies win streak will reach four, the longest since 2011, with a 20-10 win over the Tar Heels.

There’s no way around it — North Carolina embarrassed the Hokies last year. But the Tech team coming into this game is fundamentally different from the one that journeyed to Chapel Hill, N.C. last season. The defense is dominant, currently allowing the fourth fewest yards in the country, and the offense is slowly finding its footing. Similarly, this UNC team is very different is well. Running back Giovani Bernard is, mercifully, off to the NFL, and the Tar Heels’ defense is even worse than it was a year ago. Last year’s unit allowed the Hokies’ flailing offense to hang 34 points on them. Now that quarterback Logan Thomas has started to hit his stride, Tech should have no trouble scoring. Despite this potential for explosiveness, Tech still can’t afford to get into a shootout; it’s probably unwise to ask too much of Thomas if the team doesn’t have to. But the Hokies’ defense should be able to shut the Heels down en route to an easy win at home.

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@ @AlexKomaVT

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October 4, 2013

DON’T LET HIM GET

IN HIS ZONE

MIKE PLATANIA sports media manager

If Logan Thomas had it his way, he’d probably want to play Georgia Tech every week. The senior quarterback is now 3-0 against the Yellow Jackets, and in their three meetings he’s thrown six touchdowns and ran for three more, all while not turning the ball over once. Logan’s never been one to shy away from forcing a deep ball into coverage, or tossing up an "arm punt" when rushed, but when it comes time to play the Yellow Jackets, he’s shockingly consistent. In his three games against Georgia Tech, he completed 61.8 percent of his passes, and in the two games following Georgia Tech, he’s completing, again, 61.8 percent of his passes. All while tossing two touchdowns and running for another in each game. It’s a pretty intriguing stat for a quarterback who’s about as consistent as Blacksburg's weather. Every time the Techs face off, it’s always prominent and in prime time, and Thomas has been sensational. Last week against GT, he posted the second-highest completion percentage of his career at 76 percent after completing his first nine passes. “Things are good whenever he’s hot like that,” offensive coordinator Scot Loeffler said. “There were two passes in that stretch that were actually mistakes by him, and guys around him were able to make plays that were huge.” He put up his best stat line of the year despite nursing an abdominal strain that prevented him from fully participating in practice leading up to the game. “I’ve had that injury and it’s not fun, especially when you throw. It’s not an easy injury to overcome since you’re using all those muscles,” Loeffler

said. “He’s practiced a little bit more than he did last week which is a huge positive.” Earlier in the week, Frank Beamer said that Thomas fits toughness “to a T.” If Thomas has improved anything this season, it���s not getting rattled in close games. With help from his defense, Thomas and the Hokies have won their last three games by a single score, moving Thomas to 10-3 in one-score games in his career. Beating Georgia Tech, who some consider the Hokies’ biggest rival, not only helps the team in the conference, but has also shown to let Thomas get in a groove. “I never lost confidence in myself,” Thomas said after the game. “I had a good mentality coming in. I knew I had to be tough.” Thomas, who’s certainly guilty of being reckless with the ball, has always followed up beating Georgia Tech with another strong performance. With Thomas as the starter, the Hokies are 2-0 following playing Georgia Tech. It’s certainly worth mentioning that their most recent TREVOR WHITE / SPPS post-GT game was against Logan Thomas (3) runs away from Jeremiah Attiochu (54). Austin Peay, a team they “If we have to run the ball could probably beat if Logan Just as Thomas is coming off threw only with his left arm. his best game of the year, the 50 times a game because of But for argument’s sake, UNC defense and their sec- what they’re giving us, we’ll it was on a short week and ondary are coming off their do it. If we have to throw it Thomas carried the ball 15 worst. Last week against East 50 times a game, we’ll do that times and took a beating in Carolina, North Carolina too.” Last year, Thomas threw the season opener. coughed up 376 yards passing The Hokies are now return- and a 68 percent completion for a career-high 354 yards ing home from a victory percentage to Pirates quarter- against UNC. East Carolina and Georgia Tech dared on a Thursday night game back Shane Carden. in Atlanta to face North As for his supporting cast, Logan to beat them through Carolina, exactly like in 2011. the run game has been reel- the air, so he might have a In 2011 against UNC, ing, but Thomas showed last chance to torch the UNC Thomas accounted for all week that he can shoulder the defense again. It’s easy to hesitate before three touchdowns in the load all on his own. Thomas Hokies’ 24-21 win. After get- himself had more total yards saying Logan Thomas will have an efficient, turnoverting blindsided on the first than the entire offense. “You take what the defense free game. His streakiness can play of the game on a stripsack-fumble, Thomas settled gives you. At the start of the stretch across drives, quarters in and picked apart the Tar game, we knew were going to and games. get predominantly cover two, But if history is any indicaHeels’ defense. Now, the stage appears to and that’s what we want, so tor, Thomas looks set to conbe set for Thomas to light it we were able to take advan- tinue his hot streak against tage of that,” Loeffler said. UNC. up again.

WORKING AGAINST THE SPREAD CORNER NICKLEBACK

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JAMES O’HARA contributing sports reporter

The spread offense is the big buzzword in college football, but no other team runs the spread quite like head coach Larry Fedora and his North Carolina Tar Heels. In comparison to the passheavy attacks, like those at Marshall or East Carolina, or run-heavy systems, like the ones Cam Newton and Denard Robinson ran, the Tar Heels preach balance. The Tar Heels utilize a simple single-back spread concept, while running a nohuddle system to introduce variety and get defenses on their heels. Another twist to the Tar Heels’ system is that, despite running spread staples such as the “zone read” or “inverted veer,” they do not rely on a mobile quarterback. Instead, the quarterback is used as a decoy to keep the defense honest while they stretch the field to get their running backs out in space. When the offense is run with a talented back, like NFLdraft pick Giovani Bernard,

the system can be a smash hit, as Fedora proved in 2012. The Tar Heels averaged 40.6 points per game last season, while passing for 291 yards per game and rushing for 193 yards per game. The balance was the key. Most college offenses choose one aspect to excel at predominantly, allowing the defense to load up against it. But defenses crumbled when faced with an attack that both ran and passed the ball well, while also spreading the field and moving at a fast pace. “They’re very capable of attacking in a lot of different ways,” said defensive coordinator Bud Foster. As long as there are playmakers on offense, the defense needs to play its roles perfectly to succeed against the Tar Heels. Open field tackling is key for the defense — if the offensive player can make the first guy miss, they will have plenty of room to work with. Last season, the Hokies struggled in the open field and the Tar Heels took advantage. “I mean honestly, we didn’t

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UNC: STRUGGLING HEELS COULD OFFER TROUBLE

FILE 2012 / SPPS

Desmond Frye (26) misses a tackle on Sean Tapley (6) last season. from page one really what they were doing either. It was just guys weren’t focusing; guys weren’t running to the ball; guys were missing tackles; guys weren’t getting in their gap. It was just a disaster.” This year — with the Tech defense ranked fourth nationally — the success has come as a result of each player understanding their responsibility and buying in to Foster’s sys-

Guys were missing tackles; guys weren’t getting in their gap. It was just a disaster.” Jack Tyler Middle Linebacker

tem. “Everyone’s really doing their own assignment, everyone’s doing what they’re supposed to do on every play, and we’re seeing that’s why were being successful,” Tyler said. “Everyone’s really excited about that, but we know we’re still whatever, the third or fourth best defense and we want to be the best defense.” While the Hokies have been much improved from a year ago, the Tar Heels are struggling to find their footing in 2013. The Heels are 1-3 and two of their losses coming against teams the Hokies have already beat — Georgia Tech and East Carolina. The Hokies are watching

film to see what ECU did to be so successful against UNC — the Pirates put up 55 points in Chapel Hill last weekend — but they won’t confuse the Pirates’ success for a weak UNC opponent. “These guys are gonna be a tremendous challenge. I think they’re every bit explosive, if not more, than Alabama,” Foster said. “They’ve got a dynamic tailback, they might have the best tight end in America, they’ve got outstanding receivers. They’re very capable of attacking in a lot of different ways.” In the crazy world that is college football, it would be irresponsible to believe a team is going to struggle one week just because they did the last. West Virginia lost to Maryland 37-0 before beating No. 11 Oklahoma State by nine. Pittsburgh’s allowed 55 points to Duke before giving up just a field goal to Virginia a week ago. “I think North Carolina can have a miserable game against East Carolina and then — just like West Virginia came back the next week … it’s just unpredictable,” Beamer said. “I can’t tell you the reason, but you better be ready to play every Saturday. We learned that last year. When you think things are about right that’s when they’re ready to go wrong, so you just better get better to play each and every week.” Frank Beamer won’t allow the Hokies to be embarrassed by UNC again. He’s made that perfectly clear.

@ @JacobEmert

TIGHT END

UNC

execute, we weren’t doing our responsibilities,” said linebacker Jack Tyler. Foster emphasized tackling as well. “We didn’t tackle very well. I don’t think our guys were comfortable enough in their fits on the perimeter — because that’s where all the big plays came out of in the run game,” Foster said. This season, things have not gone as well for the Tar Heels, who have missed having a playmaker like Bernard at running back. Despite calling a nearly identical amount of running plays per game as in 2012, the Tar Heels have averaged 93 fewer yards per game in 2013. The problems in the running game have carried over to the team’s passing attack as well. While they are averaging about the same amount of passing yards per game as in 2012 (296), quarterback Bryn Renner has seen his completion percentage drop from 65.4 percent in 2012 to 59.9 percent this year. Renner has also seen his touchdown to interception ratio drop, from 4.00 in 2012,

WIDE RECEIVER

to 2.33 in 2013. All of this has added up to the Tar Heels averaging 25.3 points per game, 15 points less than they did in 2012. That does not mean that the Hokies are taking them lightly, though. The team remembers the difficulties they have had with spread concepts and no-huddle offenses in the past. “They’ve got talent along the offensive line, everywhere, great skill, they’re good. They put a lot of yards on us a year ago and it’s embarrassing,” said defensive line coach Charley Wiles. That being said, the Hokies feel more prepared for the Tar Heels this time around. “I hope going into it, playing the no-huddle teams that we’ve played will help us,” said Foster. Players agree that last year’s shellacking will also provide plenty of motivation. “It’s extra motivation, we’ve just got to keep doing what we’ve been doing and working hard and trying to play consistently and try to get better,” said defensive lineman Derrick Hopkins.

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October 4, 2013

PLAYER

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David Wang @Dwang09 I just missed the first hour and a half of the voice -_- DANG IT

Zack McCray @ThatBoy_Cray Watching Malibu’s most wanted right now and it’s brignign back the best of my childhood memories Antone Exum @IAmSwag1 1. THE DAYCARE IS NOW OPEN #COMEPLAY

EXUM: DEFENSIVE BACK RETURNS FROM INJURY guys in the secondary. “It’s obviously going to be a change with the chemistry and all of that,” Gray said. “I mean it’s just an adjustment period we have to go through but we’ll be fine.” The coaches, specifically head coach Frank Beamer, talked to Facyson about getting him involved on offense to a degree since his reps at cornerback are going to drop. “I talked to Facyson on Sunday about it,” Beamer said. “It was good. He’s eager and I think he wants to do whatever he can to help the football team.” But Hokie fans will have to temper their expectations for Facyson as a wide receiver. As impressive as he’s been at cornerback through

five weeks, he won’t see the same workload on the offensive side of the ball initially. “No, we were just playing around, messing around with him in a few combinations,” offensive coordinator Scot Loeffler said. “It’s nothing significant enough to even talk about.” The coaching staff believes that Exum and Facyson will split the reps about 50/50 each this week, but it depends on how Exum looks in practice leading up to the game. “I think the two questions are what kind of game shape (Exum) is in, and what do we think after Thursday’s practice and how well has Brandon picked up the offense we’ve put in for him,” Beamer said. As Exum integrates into the starting lineup through the next few weeks, fresh-

BRITTANY KEUP sports staff writer

Darius Walter Redman @TheCalc_33

from page one

JOURNELL STRUGGLES THROUGH ADVERSITY

man Kendall Fuller will be playing the nickel corner position. Through the first five weeks of the season he has been very good, but teams have tended to try to throw against Facyson a little bit more. But, as he’s already proven with two interceptions of his own, Fuller is a talented corner as well. The talented Hokies secondary will be tested again this week when UNC’s spread offense visits Blacksburg. “They like to throw it around, they’ve got a couple weapons and a good quarterback,” Exum said. “So it’s definitely a test, I came back right in time to get tested. I know they’ll come at me.”

@ @BrooksAker

Th is season the Virginia Tech football team has been quite unpredictable, especially redshirt senior kicker Cody Journell. While Journell’s consistency has traditionally been a strength for the team, he’s been very shaky this season. He’s missed three field goals and an extra point in his last two games against East Carolina and Georgia Tech. He did not dress for the Marshall game after being suspended for a violation of team rules. Coming into this season, he completed 36 of 44 kicks for his career, but this year he has missed five of his last nine attempts. “We just have to do our job, let Cody do his,” said quarterback Logan Thomas. “Obviously we’d love to have the points, but we have to have the mentality that we have to go score touchdowns.” About a year ago, Journell kicked a game-winning field goal against Georgia Tech in the team’s season opener. But with his recent faulty record, it was unclear as to whether or not Journell would come through this season in the ACC opener. During the game, Journell had two opportunities to come back strong, connecting on a 39-yard field goal with ten minutes left in the fourth quarter to give the Hokies a seven point lead. Although he got off to a strong start, Journell missed a short 25-yard field goal with five minutes left that could’ve put the game out of reach for the Yellow Jackets. “What you worry about is when it’s a bad miss. Cody said he thought he had it so I guess it was just left of the bar.

BEN WEIDLICH / SPPS

Cody Journell (89) attempts to kick a field goal against ECU. I thought it was good when I saw it,” said head coach Frank Beamer. Journell himself insists that the miss wasn’t as bad as people made it out to be. “It was just kind of one of those things where you are really close to the goal post, you know, and then you get on a hash mark at the same time, and I just really didn’t let my body take over and kick it,” Journell said. “Because you’re kicking further across the field. And it feels like you’re pushing it way right. I kind of just didn’t let my body take it the way I wanted to. I just need to trust my foot.” Despite his poor performance, Beamer still has faith in his fift h-year senior kicker. “The guy is a good kicker. Every kick is right down the middle, good height, he just didn’t quite follow through with that second one,” Beamer said. “The thing about Cody is he knows what went wrong. Some guys they’re missing and they can’t figure it out, but he know his rhythm, his kick and

I feel good about him.” Another issue off the field that has recently developed is the threats that Journell started receiving after the Georgia Tech game. Journell had to change his cell phone number and the team has reported the incidents to the police. “It’s just not something you think about or should think about at the college level, the pro level and the high school level,” Beamer said, “Guys are out there doing their best, playing as hard as they can play and there is no room for that. That wasn’t a good Hokie fan.” Yet, Journell insists that the threats haven’t deterred him, but have instead motivated him. “I think it motivates me more than anything,” Journell said. “I honestly feel more comfortable on the field than I do being out in public or whatever. It’s kind of like my release place.”

@ @CTSportsTalk


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Friday, October 4, 2013

COLLEGIATETIMES 110th year, issue 27 News, page 2

Lifestyles, page 3

Opinions, page 5

Planned Parenthood event reaches out to community BY CHELSEA GILES | lifestyles editor

Sports, page 7

Study Break, page 6

Gunshots fired near the Capitol; one suspect dead

OLIVIER DOULERY/MCT CAMPUS

Police chased down an unarmed female driver after she attempted to break through safety baracades on Pennsylvania Avenue.

GRAPHIC BY KEVIN DICKEL

Planned Parenthood is commonly linked to abortion issues, however, abortion only accounts for three percent of its services.

A weekend event hosted by Planned Parenthood welcomes all generations to learn about its mission and how to be involved. Planned Parenthood’s title often deters college students from thinking it’s a relevant organization to them — something that the organization is trying to fi x. With many misconceptions of what services the organization offers, there are new political actions that will surely affect its efforts to serve as a public health provider. Planned Parenthood is striving to engage the younger generation to take part in these new decisions. Due to recent state regulations that require health clinics like Planned Parenthood to endure costly renovations, there are state-wide concerns of this leading to the termination of clinics that cannot support these costs. To combat this, Planned Parenthood is seeking a waiver to

cover the costs of the Blacksburg facility. Olivia Babis, the Virginia Field Coordinator for Planned Parenthood Health Services, shows no hint of backing down. “Planned Parenthood has been in Virginia since the 1960’s, we have no intentions of going anywhere, and we want to be around to continue our services for our patients, and we plan on complying with these laws,” Babis said. Babis, however, is concerned that regulations focused on abortion are taking attention away from other services. “The regulations were ideologically motivated and were designed to shut down abortion providers, which would affect the other services we provide,” she said. “All of the other services we provide are

being put in jeopardy due to these ideological decisions.” Babis said she urges young people to be more informed and involved with these issues because the present generation seems to be complacent due to the comfort of certain rights being in place for them— rights that are now up in the air. “Many of our voters were around when Roe v. Wade was decided,” Babis said. “But younger women take advantage that they didn’t have to go through those struggles, and it’s something they expect to be there for them.” The organization’s local Blacksburg and Roanoke offices host events in an effort to inform the community not only of these political issues, but to raise awareness of Planned Parenthood’s mission and services. see EVENT/ page two

RICHARD SIMON, MICHAEL MEMOLI, LISA MASCARO, DAVID LAUTER mcclatchy newspapers

A shooting near the U.S. Capitol on Thursday was an “isolated incident” and officials have “no information that this is related to terrorism,” Capitol Police Chief Kim Dine told reporters. The incident appears to have begun when a car, driven by a woman who has not yet been identified, hit a security barricade on Pennsylvania Avenue near the White House, Dine said. The post is the outer perimeter of the multiple security barriers that protect the White House complex. The woman, who had a child in the car, then drove toward the Capitol with police in pursuit, Dine said. She hit a Capitol Police car near the base of Capitol Hill, injuring an officer, drove on an additional two blocks and then was shot by police as

she neared the Senate office buildings, according to law enforcement officials. The suspect’s condition was unclear, with some law enforcement officials saying she had been killed but others saying she was in custody. The child does not appear to have been injured. After the incident ended, police could be seen surrounding the vehicle on Constitution Avenue near the Capitol and the Supreme Court. The injured police officer was brought on a gurney to a helicopter at the foot of Capitol Hill and transported to a nearby hospital. “It sounded like fireworks, like a big fireworks display,” said Rep Gerald E. Connolly, D-Va., who heard the shots from the balcony off the House chamber while talking to another congressman about the government shutdown. “ see CAPITOL / page two

Homecoming candidate teams up with cancer patient MAURA MAZUROWSKI news staff writer

This fall’s Homecoming campaigns have introduced a variety of new themes— including the possibility of having two kings crowned at Saturday’s game instead of one. Chris Atkins, homecoming king candidate sponsored by the Farmhouse fraternity, is campaigning as a “King for a Cause.” He has an unexpected running mate— 7 year old Nathan Orban, who was diagnosed with Acute

NEWS Are two kings better than one? One Homcoming candidate thinks so see page 3

Learn how to stay protected from the flu in 6 easy steps see page 2

Lymphoblastic Leukemie at the age of 2. All proceeds of Chris and Nathan’s campaign will be donated to the Leukemia Lymphoma Society in Nathan’s name. “Farmhouse’s philanthropy raises money for the LLS, so the campaign is very near to our hearts already,” Atkins said. “I knew that I wanted to incorporate the LLS into the campaign because it is something that [the Farmhouse] has become so involved with over the years… I really wanted to find a way for our homecoming

campaign to give back to both them and the community.” From August 2008 to October 2011, Nathan underwent con-

I really wanted to find a way for our homecoming campaign to give back to both them and the commuity” Chris Atkins Homecoming Candidate

LIFESTYLES

TECH

sistent chemotherapy treatments, spending days in the hospital and enduring multiple blood transfusions. “I contacted the LLS and told them how I wanted to raise money and awareness through my campaign… I also asked if they knew of any Virginia Tech fans who would want to also help support our school,” Atkins said, explaining how he was led to Nathan. Nathan is an extremely dedicated Virginia Tech fan. He hopes to someday become a Hokie and to even play quar-

SPORTS How to handle awkward moments before they break the mood

quickly that it is difficult for Atkins’ and his brothers to keep track of all that they have made. “To make a donation to the LLS for a specific purpose, the donation must be a minimum of $10,000,” Atkins said, stating their fundraising goal. A wide range of family members, friends, students and other viewers of the website have already contributed greatly to the cause, bringing Atkins and Nathan one step closer to their goal. see CANCER / page three

ONLINE Last night, the No. 12 women’s soccer team defeated Clemson in overtime.

SEX

see page 3

terback for the football team. This Saturday will be his first Virginia Tech football game; something that Atkins said Nathan’s whole family is “very excited for.” There are multiple ways to help donate to both the campaign and the LLS. For every like on the Facebook page and view or share of the campaign video, a donation is made. T-shirts are also being sold for $10 each, or direct donations can be made on the campaign’s webpage. Donations are coming in so

What kind of weather can we expect for the first weekend of October? Check our website for the latest.

CollegiateTimes @collegiatetimes see page 7


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newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 4, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

Lets face it— it’s flu season. If you do not want to stay sick in your dorm room, miss classes, or get your roommate sick with the flu, check out some of the ways to stay safe this season.

Get vaccinated The flu has many different strands and changes every year, resulting in new vaccines every year. If you are wondering about how you can receive a vaccination while at Virginia Tech, don’t worry. Pharmacies at Walgreens, CVS and Kroger are currently giving vaccinations. If you don’t like needles, you can also get the vaccine in the form of a nasal spray, although it may be more costly than receiving an injection.

Get enough sleep Not only does adequate sleep help you recover from your sicknesses, but it helps keep your immune system functioning at its optimal level.

Wash your hands after you cough and before you eat Make sure to wash your hands after you cough or sneeze because you don’t want germs accumulating on your hands throughout the day. Your eyes, nose and mouth are three of the easiest places for germs to enter your body, so don’t help them get in. If you can’t easily get to a sink throughout your day, try to purchase some alcohol based hand-sanitizer.

If might have the flu, stay home All of your classmates will appreciate your decision when they don’t get the flu. It also may be a good idea for your roommate to study elsewhere the first day you have symptoms.

Don’t share drinks Sharing drinks with someone is one of the easiest ways to catch whatever bug that they have. Even if you are not currently sick, you can still have and spread the flu since symptoms can take awhile to show.

SEAN PILI / COLLEGIATE TIMES

Event: Generations work closely together to promote non-profits from page one

Planned Parenthood offers a variety of health services within it’s education department and medical office that pertain to each person regardless of age or sex, because it targets preventative and reproductive health overall. “We have an intersectional approach, no matter where you are in society, there’s health care no matter what,” said Alyssa Seidorf, a senior business management major and a Planned Parenthood civic engagement intern. “That’s what Planned Parenthood is, it’s access to health care no matter what your situation is.” In an effort to inform the local community, Planned Parenthood is hosting an event this Sunday tailored to be an all-community encompassing event. Pickin’ for Planned Parenthood is an outdoor event for all ages with live

music from “Einstein’s Monkey” and “Blue Mule” along with food served by Bruno’s Gastro Truck. The event is Oct. 6 from 3 to 7 p.m. at the historic Smithfield Plantation. Tickets for adults are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. Students with a school I.D. and children cost $10. Event organizer Sally Walker said Planned Parenthood events in the Blacksburg area have been evolving over the past 25 years, but this is the first one like this. Pickin’ is a new style of event for Planned Parenthood. Usually, the organization’s presentations are targeted to particular groups, but this one welcomes a cross-generational audience. Walker said it is essential to include all ages in health awareness not only to inform but to engage each generation so they are motivated to sustain future efforts of services like Planned Parenthood.

Seidorf said college students should care when they see the organization’s name for events, because even if it doesn’t apply to life now, at some point everyone will face reproductive health needs or concerns. Town council member, senior math instructor at Virginia Tech and faculty advisor for Womanspace, Susan Anderson said the collaboration between older and younger people is the only way to keep a pipeline of change and awareness alive in society. Anderson said Blacksburg has a lively network of nonprofit and service organizations, but their member age demographic is getting older, which inhibits any future growth. And with the Tech community as such an integral local influence, Anderson calls for students and young people to get involved. “Without young professionals joining in, we’re

going to get to a point where our organizations will cease to exist,” Anderson said. Seidorf said one way students can be most influential rests in how they vote in local and state elections. This is a driving force of her responsibility as a civic engagement intern to promote voters to be informed of what they are supporting when choosing one candidate over another. “It’s important to be involved and aware of what’s going on around you, because the people we elect are the people who make those decisions,” Babis said. With Planned Parenthood’s new tagline “care no matter what,” Anderson said attending the Pickin’ event on Sunday is a fun way to network with other supporters and seek ways to be more informed and involved. “We just think it raises awareness that we’re here, and we’re here to stay,” Walker said.

NEWS

Capitol: Police unsure of motive behind crash from page one

But one had the feeling it could be gunshots.” “We saw citizens fleeing this way and police going that way,” he said. The shooting, which came just two weeks after a shooter killed a dozen people at the nearby Washington Navy Yard, led Capitol Police to order the U.S. Capitol locked down for about half an hour. The House had just finishing voting for the day and lawmakers were clearing out. Lawmakers rushed back into the building and security hustled to secure the chambers. Police also cleared people

from Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House, pushing tourists into Lafayette Park. The White House ordered people to remain inside. People outside the Capitol could be seen running, as police cars with flashing red lights sped down Constitution Avenue. The House and Senate proceedings stopped, and Capitol police officers ran through the building directing staff to stay in their offices. An email sent to staff by Capitol Police about 2:30 p.m. EDT advised: “Gunshots have been reported on Capitol Hill requiring all occupants in all House Office Buildings to shelter in place.”

Give the gift of memories!


LIFESTYLES

lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 4, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

Cancer: Candidate raises awareness for a cause

3

TECH SEX

Don’t let awkward moments kill the mood

So,

COURTESY OF CHRIS ATKINS

Chris Atkins has decided to share his homcoming king crown if he wins with a 7 year old cancer patient.

from page one

“The purpose is not to get one person to donate a bunch of money,” Atkins said, “it is to get the whole community involved and to have as many people donate any amount that they can.” The week following the homecoming game, the Farmhouse will also be hosting a Mudrun 5K for

he she

the LLS, the final component of the campaign that will determine the official amount that has been fundraised. For Atkins and his brothers at Farmhouse, Nathan becoming king would just be an added bonus to their campaign. “We are very passionate about making Nathan our king, but we are even more passionate

about raising money for the LLS through the help of one of the greatest traditions at Virginia Tech- homecoming.” Nathan and his family will have to wait till Saturday, when the Homecoming King and Queen are crowned, to fi nd out if Virginia Tech will be having one or two kings this year.

SAID

we have well established that in my opinion (and in many of yours), sex is a beautiful thing. With that being said, some things can really affect the “beauty” of sex. Because sex, like any other activity, varies each time, place and way you do it, there are a slew of awkward moments that can sneak up on you. I’m not going to tell you how to avoid them, because you can’t. But we can figure out how to deal with them and why they occur. Vaginal fl atulence, varts, also known as queefi ng Guys: Did you just fart on me mid-sex? Girls: Oh no. (Squeezing legs together as hard as possible) I think we can all agree that this is ranked pretty high up there with the most awkward and uncomfortable situation you will ever be in. Neither party knows exactly where the noise came from, but they defi nitely don’t like it. A queef is an emission or expulsion of air from the vagina. During sex, air can get trapped in the vagina — so what goes in, must come out. It’s not a waste gas, so it doesn’t smell. As for how to deal with it? A simple ‘oops’ and a smile can go a long way. Guys— don’t make it a big deal, it is embarrassing enough already. Let it slide or laugh it off. Can’t get it up? Some guys might tell you that they have complete control over when and where they get an erection. Wrong. Even when aroused, some men do not have erections, and vice versa. While it can make for an uncomfortable attempt at sex, it does not mean that your partner is not into you if he can’t get aroused. The solution? Continue to do things that you both fi nd mutually pleasurable. Most men fi nd it embarrassing or stressful if their partner tries too hard to make them erect.

Someone gets hurt Sex is a physical activity, so there are chances of getting hurt. Th is category is probably the source of the funniest stories you will ever hear. Like the moment when you are trying a new position where the guy has to hold you up in some crazy position and you hit the floor. A (cough-cough) “friend” of mine once had an experience too funny not to share. My ex-boyfriend was about to jump on top of me. I did a poor job of anticipating what he was trying to do and abruptly sat up. The result? Him head-butting me in the face so hard that my nose started bleeding, and I began sobbing profusely. Yeah, that happened. Th is is a more extreme example, but injuries can happen during sex. If it is minor and just uncomfortable, laugh it off and keep up the good work. So, even though it seems like the end of the world, relax. Sex can be amazing, fun, passionate, life changing or just plain awkward. I fi nd comfort in knowing that other people experience the same mortifying moments every day. So, laugh off the awkward moments, treat the injuries, and enjoy making stories that you will remember forever. Once again, until next time.

meet the writer TECH SEX is a brand new, weekly column about sex on Virginia Tech’s campus, written by Abby Broughton. Broughton, a junior marketing major, will eventually be pursuing a Ph.D. in sex therapy, in the hopes to make a career out of sex therapy. If you have any questions or comments, email her at ambrough@vt.edu

The trendiest uses of #Twitter

She said: Twitter helps He said: Embrace the human element of Twitter connect with close friends No social media service is more falsely maligned and misused than Twitter. Those who do not use it complain that the 140 character limit is degrading the English language and that most tweets are pointless updates on what someone is eating for breakfast. Both of these statements couldn’t be further from the truth. Many more who do use Twitter, use it as an extension of Facebook, creating a private account from which they only follow and are followed by friends. This too, is incorrect. What makes Twitter so great is the public aspect - the interactions between people who share a common sentiment, who you never would have met otherwise. I started tweeting in April 2011 when I created a Twitter account to promote a D.C.based sports blog I had started with a friend. The blog inevitably died, but the Twitter account lived on and became itself a larger plat-

What makes Twitter so great is the public aspect— the interactions between people who share a common sentiment.”

form than the blog ever was. When people think of Twitter, what they should think of is what is colloquially referred to as “sports Twitter.” Sports Twitter has breaking news, analysis and opinion served 24 hours a day with a healthy dose of comedy on a variety of topics, not just limited to sports. Nowhere else can I interact with the best nine-year old baseball writer in the world (@MattsBats), the beard of a professional baseball player (@jwerthsbeard) and professional writers all at the same time. This is what gives Twitter the human element. It is people from all walks

of life jumbled together and sharing their common love of sports or other interests. I would guess that about 99 percent of the people I interact with daily on Twitter I would never have met in real life, but I still consider them good friends. When I was lucky enough to receive a full-time job offer after my internship this summer, I tweeted the good news after remembering to call my mom, of course. The reaction was instantaneous with 40 to 50 people, a number of whom I had never even met in person before, congratulating me and genuinely sharing the joy I had felt that day. You cannot find that anywhere else. So disparage Twitter all you want, but just know that you’re the one who is missing out. JAMES O’HARA - web editor - senior - computer science major

Let me give you a few of this week’s greatest hits from my personal Twitter. “That tiny little piece of passive voice in ‘American Pie’ always gets me. Flawless song otherwise.” “Thank you Netflix, for getting me. ‘Displaying Emotional 20th Century Period Pieces Based on Books’.” And let’s not forget the all important, “Bud Foster: a Kangaroo,” because that makes sense. See, there’s a reason why I have a private Twitter. I liken my Twitter experience to a less annoying, more rapidfire Facebook-status-posting spree. Whenever I have a novel idea, I smack it up on Twitter to inform my friends of my genius, in 140 characters or less, of course. Now, there are plenty of good reasons to have a professional Twitter, but just not for me. My friends hardly want to look at seven back-to-back tweets of pictures of my dogs, let alone future employers or random

she-said column stalkers. For me, Twitter is an outlet to let my quirky, perceptive juices flow. It’s also a place I can shamelessly retweet things about Hokie football, a Chaucer parody account and someone who calls himself Pimp Bill Clinton (I also frequently retweet the real Bill Clinton, but for different reasons). This is going to sound like an incredible tweeting faux pas, but sometimes I even deny followers. It’s not that I don’t think people would benefit from hearing my opinions on various subjects at all hours of the day, but more that my followers list is a highly-exclusive, cultivated group of people I

There are plenty of reasons to have a professional Twitter, but just not for me.”

wouldn’t mind hearing intricate details of my life. Or what song’s currently stuck in my head. There are even a precious few people I follow, but deny requests to follow me in return. If you find yourself on this particular list, be flattered. These are people I care about, but respect too much to let them think less of me for tweeting things like “Male Siri has a hot voice.” Not that I tweeted that or anything. So here’s a challenge for you, three people who are reading this column. Try to find me on Twitter — I dare you. Try to follow me. You’ll most likely be denied, and consequently Twitter-stalked in return. Don’t take offense though; really I’m just sparing you from tasteless midnight Flannery O’Connor jokes. DANIELLE BUYNAK - managing editor - senior - English major

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October 4, 2013

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Islamic clothing lines make debut at DC Fashion Week

watch:

Derek Netix Original Series emulates UK TV shows

PRIYA SINGH lifestyles staff writer

D.C. Fashion Week pushed the boundaries this year. Sunday marked the end of Washington, D.C.’s Fashion Week, which celebrated local designers, merchandisers and models that debuted the latest fashions for Spring/ Summer 2014. The seven-day festival included events like the PreFashion Show Block Party at H-Street Festival, a Kickoff Reception and Eco Fashion Show, and the Fashion Industry Networking Party. Our very own Virginia Tech Fashion Merchandising and Design Society (FMDS) had the opportunity to participate in D.C. Fashion Week as audience members of the Washington Haute and Modesty Fashion Show. Areej Fashions made its debut in the fashion community as one of the many organizations that represented Muslimah fashions, a quickly growing trend in the Islamic community. Muslima fashions typically involve dark, muted colors with flowy silhouettes and detailed embroidery. Th is fashion trend has its roots in Muslim culture, where women commonly cover their entire bodies excluding their hands, feet and face. While this was the fi rst show for many Muslimah designers in and around the capital, Areej Fashions has been hosting fashion shows nationally. But they made their official debut in D.C. as the hosts of the Washington

Haute and Modesty Fashion Show. The favorite designers of the night included MSQU2ARED Fashions and Nadha Designs, whose collection represented the revival of modest attire for women. One of my personal favorite outfits was a red applique lace dress from Nadha Designs similar to the one seen on the runway for Naheem Khan’s Spring/Summer 2014 collection during New York Fashion Week. Mali Rose, a couture clothing line for young, Muslim girls, featured intricate details made from natural fabrics, purposely for special occasions. The young models captured the bold concept of the collection with their charismatic catwalks, strutting down the runway and awing the audience. FMDS was honored to see children so confidently leaving their mark in the fashion industry. Many of the styles seen at the Haute and Modesty Show were revolutionary for the

traditional garbs of Muslim women. With several upcoming designers offering fashion-forward traditional wear, women can stay true to modesty without sacrificing their sense of style. While some of you might not be able to experience the latest collections live, Rent the Runway has just initiated their Storm the South tour, featuring big southern college campuses, including Virginia Tech. If you are not familiar with Rent the Runway, it is a website for women who temporarily bring pieces from the runway to their wardrobe at an affordable price. You won’t want to miss out on a great opportunity to incorporate the rich color and detailed prints seen at the D.C. and New York Fashion Weeks as a part of your own collection. These styles would be perfect to use when dressing up for special occasions. The event is October 8 from 11 p.m. to 5 p.m. in front of Squires.

LIFESTYLES

Netflix has continued the trend of American TV emulating its British counterpart with “Derek,� a comedy-drama that follows the life of a quirky nursing home caretaker. The “mocumentarystyle� comedy, released as a Netflix Original Series on Sept. 12, shadows an eccentric crew of characters who encounter everything from workplace romances to the tear-jerking loss of elderly patients. The show’s first few episodes get off to a relatively slow start. The deadpan style of humor, which relies mostly on the comedic aspects of Derek’s absurd interactions with other characters, may not be for everyone. But once you warm up to the character’s cringe-worthy awkwardness, similar to another British favorite, “The Inbetweeners,� the season progresses quite naturally. Derek’s tendency to go above the call of duty of care for the lonely residents makes it nearly impossible for viewers not to sympathize with him. Perhaps the most relat-

Wednesday, October 9 11:30 AM – 7:30 PM

able character, Hannah, played by Kerry Godliman, stands as a beacon of sanity amongst the otherwise hare-brained bunch. Derek’s schoolboy crush on Hannah is present from the very first episode. She remains a likeable and down to earth character throughout the story. Derek’s friends Dougie and Kev, played by Karl Pilkington and David Earl respectively, help round out the group with their sarcastic cynicism. While Derek’s humorous hobbies include collecting celebrity autographs and watching Youtube videos like “Hamster on a Piano,� Dougie and Kev prefer to go to the pub and hit on women. “Derek� is the creation of Ricky Gervais, who is most commonly known for his work on U.K. sitcom “The Office,� the basis for the popular American spinoff. The idea of American television borrowing from U.K. networking is not at all new and has been seen in shows like “Supernanny,� “Hell’s Kitchen,� “American Idol,� and another popular Netflix drama, “House of Cards.� However, while many British shows have been remade for American television, very few examples exist of America’s shows influencing the U.K. networks. The show’s writer, director, and lead actor, Gervais, who also starred in the 2009 film “The Invention of Lying,� was named one of Time’s 100 Most Influential People in 2010 and controversially hosted the Golden Globes from 2010 to 2012. While Gervais’ provocative humor at the Globes

caused celebrities like Robert Downey Jr. and Tom Hanks to refer to him as mean-spirited and sinister, Gervais claims the theme of his new show is of a very different sort. “It’s a show about kindness,� Gervais said in an interview with Salon. “It’s about kindness [being] more important than anything else, more important than intelligence, than success, than rewards, everything.� One aspect of the show critics aren’t talking too kindly of is Gervais’ portrayal of a main character that may or may not be mentally handicapped. While the title-character’s idiosyncrasies, which include fidgeting and social awkwardness, are apparent from the shows opening, it isn’t until the second episode that the concept is discussed. Although Derek is made fun of by strangers at a pub and accused of having Autism, his friends and coworkers stand by him through every difficult time. “If I say I don’t mean him to be disabled then that’s it. A fictional doctor can’t come along and prove me wrong,� Gervais said in an interview with Nicky Clark, a disability rights advocate. Despite mixed receptions of the show, “Derek� boasts a rating of four out of five stars and has been re-commissioned for a second season.

ABBEY WILLIAMS - lifestyles columnist - junior - English major

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OPINIONS

opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 4, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

5

The Collegiate Times is an independent studentrun newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Priscilla Alvarez Managing Editor: Danielle Buynak Art Director: Kevin Dickel Design Editors: Brad Klodowski, Andrea Ledesma Public Editor: Andrew Kulak Web Editor: James O’Hara Multimedia Editor: Nick Smirniotopoulos News Editors: Cameron Austin, Dean Seal News Reporters: Melissa Draudt, Leslie McCrea News Staff Writers: Kelly Cline, Josh Higgins, Matt Minor Lifestyles Editor: Chelsea Giles, Madeleine Gordon Opinions Editors: David Levitt, Shareth Reddy Sports Editors: Jacob Emert, Alex Koma Sports Media Manager: Mike Platania Assistant Photo Editor: Ben Weidlich Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: James Dean Seal Circulation Manager: Keith Bardsley MCT CAMPUS

Success of ‘millennials’ not guaranteed As

we progress from year to year, school to school, through the ranks of our public (or private) education all the way to a grand finish in college, we are constantly being advised and groomed for a successful career. The promised land is not so easily reached however, and increasingly our generation is struggling under the weight of various factors that are not always under our control. According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, “millennials”, people born after 1982, are entering the workforce significantly later than previous generations. Additionally, the average age when workers make a median-wage salary of $42,000 has risen from 26 years old in 1980 to 30 today. To what can we attribute our generation’s sticky situation? The recession economy

we have been in for the past five years certainly has had a hand in increased unemployment across the board. Whenever you talk to older people about the dismal job market, they probably wave off your doubts, as if to say, “This will pass.” We cannot single out the recession as the only cause of our generation’s woes — there have been boom and bust cycles in our economy since the beginning. Instead, as the article suggests, we must look to the structural changes in our society. These changes are primarily due to our emphasis on achieving higher levels of education than in the past. Combined with the increased cost of education, this emphasis is harmful to a majority of “millennials” who have been fed the idea of attending college their entire lives. So if they do not have

the resources to pay for it, tough luck. There have been too many horror stories of graduates buried under enormous debt from their student loans or graduates unable to find employment for us not to take notice. From what I have seen, some students remain hopelessly optimistic about their future, despite the empirical evidence to the contrary. In the past, a college degree certainly meant some sort of gainful employment, even without being at the top of your class. Today, many graduates are living with their parents still searching for a relevant job. This delayed entry into the real world puts us at a disadvantage in terms of how much later in our lives we will have to work, and the extent to which we will be able to change our society. Think about how much

time you will have to pursue a passion or become politically engaged if you are just trying to make ends meet. Without a solid plan for your post-graduate life, chances are you will be one of those struggling to find a job or pay off loans. Having a plan does not necessarily mean plotting out every move you make for the next seven years, but it should at least include some basic research on job prospects in various industries. I hate the idea that some people forgo choosing a major they are truly interested in for fear that it would hurt their “employability”, but we all need a certain level of pragmatism to make it out there. SHARATH REREDDY - opinions editor - junior - economics

Fantasy football should not detract from watching actual NFL games T here are several reasons people get excited for the NFL football season, some better than others. Primarily, people are pumped to see their favorite teams duke it out with the rest of the league. However, others see the beginning of the NFL season as the beginning of their fantasy football season. According to a 2012 article published by Forbes Magazine, fantasy football is a $4 billion industry with a growing user population of over 27 million. This revenue is generated by both paid leagues and internet advertisements derived from the individual leagues and various articles promoting it. As a veteran fantasy football user myself, I have noticed one major flaw in the system. Many NFL

viewers are becoming more focused on the individual players on their fantasy football team rather than the real life teams themselves. Some fans will go as far as to root against their favorite team for a specific player on the other team to score and add to their fantasy team’s value. Hey, if your favorite team loses to the San Francisco 49ers, at least Frank Gore got 153 yards and scored against them, right? That is 22 points in any standard league. Although fantasy football adds to the fun of watching professional football, it has made some fans lose sight of the thrill of watching an NFL game. The big plays do not seem to matter if they are statistically irrelevant or do not add points to your team’s totals. A major game-

changing fumble in a game will not satisfy several NFL fans if that defense/special teams is not on their fantasy team or the opposing fantasy team. That unbelievable, onehanded catch a receiver makes on the sideline makes the game worth watching for me, but it is sad to see some people see this spectacle as “only three points.” It is worse to watch fantasy football players get upset when a player on their fantasy roster gets injured. Many fantasy football players have no concern for the health of the player; the only fear they have is who they will replace this player with from free agency. Instead of watching for teams to win or lose, several fantasy football players want only their fantasy team’s players to do well. These

“gamers” get so wrapped up in the competition of fantasy football that the real clash between two NFL teams becomes just another footnote. It is a bit selfish to think that the players, who rarely think of their own statistics, enter the field of play to score points for a fan’s fantasy football team. I know that fantasy football is fun and quite entertaining, but there is more to professional football than numbers and statistics. The greatest part of an NFL matchup is watching the events of the game unfold. Fans should remember to distinguish between the “fantasy” and the real football. RYAN TURK - regular columnist - sophomore - business information technology

Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue.

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October 4, 2013

Today’s Birthday Horoscope: Today’s Birthday (10/04/13). Increasing your nest egg with common-sense frugality provides an overall theme for the year. Love takes priority, and fantasies seem more achievable. Blossoming creativity inspires a career rise. Pursue education; follow a trail to the source. Study with a master. Partnerships grown now last. Simplicity and adventure feed you.

Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham Quote of the Day

“Think of all the beauty still left around you and be happy.” - Anne Frank

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By Anna Gundlach

music downloads

10/4/13

ACROSS 1 Hitchhikes 7 Hiker’s snack mix 11 “Cocoon” director Howard 14 “Très sexy!” 15 Chevy hatchback 16 Tavern order 17 Baker’s sweetener 20 Columnist Landers 21 Swiss calculus pioneer 22 Odds and ends 23 “__ silly question, get . . .” 24 “Twittering Machine” artist Paul

for the week of October 1st through 4th

In the Stars (Galaxy Mix)- Icona Pop Hannah Hunt- Vampire Weekend Cool Song No. 2- MGMT Recover- CHVRCHES Feel It All Around- Washed Out

listen up

26 Cinnamon blend for a Thanksgiving recipe 33 “The Sheik of __”: 1920s song 34 “Poor me!” 35 Carpenter’s cutter 36 Places for compost 37 Little ones who, they say, are made up of the ends of this puzzle’s four longest entries

39 Israel’s Netanyahu, familiarly 40 Took a load off 41 Writing implements 42 Elegant dress material 43 “All finished!” 47 Make less difficult 48 Ages upon ages 49 Heart or liver 52 The devil 54 Tavern spigot 57 1966 Beach Boys hit

DOWN 1 Old Roman garment 2 Sound of traffic frustration 3 __ Bator, Mongolia 4 Fellow 5 Feature of a clear day 6 Dog also called a Persian Greyhound 7 Garden entrance 8 Too much of a good thing 9 Little wagon’s color 10 Have in one’s hands 11 Classico competitor 12 Norwegian royal name 13 Indoor ball brand 18 Shepard who hit golf balls on the moon 19 Lone Star State sch. 23 LAPD alerts 25 Grazing lands 26 Blue Ribbon beer 27 Dickens villain Heep 28 Underwater ray

29 Examine grammatically 30 Last Supper query 31 Mountain quarters 32 “Dallas” surname 37 Thousands, in a heist 38 Buy for the future, as gold 39 German road 41 Manners to be minded 42 Rock-throwing protesters 44 Marsh duck

45 Heavy metal band named for a rodent 46 “’Bout this large” 49 Boo-boo, to tots 50 Turn at the casin 51 __ of Mexico 53 Senate page, for one 54 Rocking Turner 55 Expert server, in tennis 56 Whodunit quarry 58 Rapa __: Easter Island 59 Japanese dramatic form

Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

10/3/13

WORDSEARCH: State Capitals Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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WORD BANK 1 Richmond 2 Austin 3 Atlanta 4 Denver 5 Boston 6 Trenton 7 Santa Fe 8 Nashville 9 Annapolis 10 Boise 11 Phoenix 12 Little Rock 13 Bismarck 14 Lansing 15 Albany

Aries (March 21-April 19) New assignments keep coming in. Take responsibility. Check for changes in plans. Resume negotiations. Tempers may be short. Avoid distractions. Rely on partners over the next two days. Stay and inish up. A dream provides necessary information. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Get practical work done. Try to convince others to try a new approach. A co-worker demands your time. Listen carefully. Postpone a spending spree. Keep your objective in mind, and get a lot done. Gemini (May 21-June 20) You are lucky in love. Heed an unsolicited suggestion. Keep talking until you reach a compromise. Prioritize passion and fun. Surprise party? Make necessary corrections. Your heart soars on Cupid’s wings. Don’t forget about gravity. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Family comes irst. Watch for surprises. Stash a treasure in a safe place. Reassess wornout beliefs. Look for a bold splash of color. Try on intriguing new ideas and philosophies.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Gather and evaluate information. Postpone a shopping trip. Increase your savings instead. You’re sharp as a tack, and see clues that were previously invisible. Don’t advertise your winnings. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) The next two days could be quite pro itable. A hidden danger lurks. Others ask tough questions. Choose your own path. You partner can help, and you may need it. Don’t be afraid to ask. Maintain elegance. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) The energy is high and lows with ease. A hero wins a battle, and a co-worker astonishes you. Get rid of whatever doesn’t work. Assert your wishes. Take action, and await the outcome. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You enter a philosophical phase. Stand irm by your decisions. There’s not enough money for everything. Review plans. A better time will come. Schedule carefully. The pressure increases, so keep calm and breathe.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Friends want you to come out and play. Don’t overextend. There’s a possible breakdown at home. Compare advice with your own intuition to avoid an awkward moment. If you ind a way to have it all, grab it. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Step into more responsibility. Delays and illusions or hidden dangers provide obstacles. This is a test. Work out your problems in private now. Air travel gets more complicated. Take caution. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Pay extra attention. It’s a good thing. Plug a inancial leak. Travel and romance both look good for a while. Reduce internal tension through meditation. Encourage self-reliance, and handle your own chores. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Review your budget. An unexpected development offers new opportunities. A pop quiz could surprise. Anticipate some controversy. Your reasoning gets challenged. Focus on your work.


SPORTS

sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 4, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

7

Volleyball returns from NC, Women’s soccer notches prepares for more ACC foes OT win over Clemson WILL GROOMS sports staff writer

Coming off of an impressive 12-2 start to the season, and looking to bounce back from a disappointing defeat at the hands of the Louisville Cardinals, the Virginia Tech volleyball team had high expectations when they arrived in Winston-Salem, N.C. for the first of two games last weekend against Wake Forest. After losing the first set to the Demon Deacons, the Hokies rallied to win the next three by a combined margin of 75-51 en route to their 13th win of the season and first of the weekend. Admittedly, jitters got the better of some of the more inexperienced members of the team in the first set loss. “It was really loud and I think we just needed to calm ourselves down,” said freshman outside hitter Lindsey Owens. “We were nervous in our first ACC match, at least I know I was.” The momentum gained in Friday’s victory did not carry over to Saturday’s contest at Duke. For the first time this season, the Hokies lost in three sets—tallying their third loss of the season. They committed 23 errors in three sets for an average of 7.67 errors per set—their

highest of the season. The Hokies had trouble putting the pieces together, hitting just .048 percent in the third and final set. “We weren’t sharp as a group for the whole match and Duke caused a lot of the mistakes we made,” said head coach Chris Riley. “They were just much better than us on that night.” The Tech volleyball team doesn’t have much time to

We weren’t sharp as a group for the whole match and Duke caused a lot of the mistakes we made.” Chris Riley Head Coach

lament the loss, however, as two big conference matchups approach this weekend in the form of Pittsburgh and Maryland. The girls on the team are very familiar with the threat Maryland poses and the hardfought match it’s sure to be. Pittsburgh, on the other hand, is a brand new conference opponent. In fact, the Hokies have only faced off with the Panthers three times this cen-

tury, two of which resulted in Tech victories. “We’re excited to play a new team and have a new challenge,” said senior middle blocker Victoria Hamsher. “We saw them a little bit when we played and split with them in the spring, but we still don’t know them very well.” Despite the unfamiliarity, Riley expects Pitt’s best shot this weekend. “They’re 2-0, and they’ve beaten some good teams,” he said. “They’re big, they’re physical and they attack well—we’re going to have to go in there and earn a victory.” The second matchup of the weekend presents a challenge that the Hokies are very familiar with. The Terrapins are winners of four of their last five matchups against Tech and enter this weekend with a 9-5 record. “Maryland has always been a good team that we’ve been right there with and gone back and forth with,” said Hamsher. “They have a couple of really good players that we’re going to need to target when we go up against them.”

@W_Grooms94

...

RACHEL FRANKS sports staff writer

Virginia Tech’s No. 12 women’s soccer team beat Clemson 1-0 in overtime Thursday night in their first home game in 18 days. “We are banged up a little bit from the road trip and it came to show tonight, but we showed a little bit of depth,” said head coach Chugger Adair. “We were able to win and use some different players at different positions. It was a good night for us.” Junior Katie Yensen led the team with the only goal of the night in the first minute of overtime. It was not her first game-winning goal of the season, but her first in overtime. The win brings the Hokies to 10-1-2 on the season and 5-1-1 in the ACC. The game started out slowly, as neither team had any good looks until 14 minutes in when Jasmine Reeves had a shot just slide by the outside of the right post. In the last five minutes of the half, Tech had a number of close shots. One occurred after Clemson’s goalkeeper, Kailen Sheridan, came out of the goal and sent the ball flying high into the air. The ball came down with Sheridan still out of the goal. Morgan Conklin was almost able to tap the ball into the open goal, but a Clemson defender was able to block the shot and keep the game scoreless. Throughout the half both teams played aggressively, as a total of 14 fouls were called in the first half alone. The Hokies came out of halftime hot, with two close

TREVOR WHITE / SPPS

Shannon Mayrose (4) wins a ball against a Clemson defender. looks in the first two minutes. After hot start, a number of fouls slowed Tech down, including a yellow card against Tech’s assistant coach after forward Murielle Tiernan got called for a foul when she was running down field on a breakaway. Tech controlled the ball most of the second half. They took nine shots to the Tigers’ one, but missed opportunity after opportunity. Neither team could score in regulation and the game went into overtime. Within the first minute of overtime, Yensen was able to poke the ball between a defender’s legs and into the goal off a pass from Taylor Antolino. Adair was pleased with how the team improved from the first half to the second. “I thought we had a poor first half, they were in to disrupt us a little bit and

make it difficult for us to play,” Adair said. “In the second half, we showed a little bit more composure on the ball. We were able to create more chances.” The Hokies came out with the win, but missed many open shots. Yensen said that finishing is something the team struggles with and is working on. “We need to focus on the final third and that extra touch because it was there, we had so many chances,” Yensen said. “I think if we can get those then we can put teams away not 1-0, but 3-0.” The team plays next when they take on No. 4 Notre Dame, the fi rst time the team will play the Irish as an ACC team. “We are going to get a full week of rest next week and start preparing for Notre Dame,” Adair said.

@CTSportsTalk


8

lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

October 4, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

LIFESTYLES

Student run gallery showcased in Friday Art Walk MEGAN VAZQEZ lifestyles staff writer

Though Blacksburg has a multitude of art galleries downtown, only one is soley managed by students. XYZ Art Gallery is the student-run gallery located on Main Street. It was founded by Studio Art students 20 years ago as a way to showcase their talent. “It’s kind of like a safe haven for studio artists to show their work in a public setting,� said Carson Bendel, president of XYZ Art Gallery. Students control every aspect of the gallery. Faculty advisors give some guidance, but students decide the shows, contact artists and organize events. “It’s a lot of fun because anything that anyone wants to do, we make it happen,� Bendel said. Students who wish to submit work do not need to be art majors, and they are also encouraged to participate in running the gallery. All artists, students or com-

munity members, are welcome to submit their work to the gallery for display at any time. The only requirements for a piece of work are for them to be finished and either matted or framed for display. XYZ displays a variety of art mediums from paintings, drawings, sculptures, ceramics to new media. Animations have been shown using projectors, and performance art has been showcased occasionally as well. In addition to displaying visual art, XYZ hosts musical performances, open mic nights, poetry readings and movie nights. The space is transformative, however, and is open to for other types of events as well. “We had a meditation last semester,� Bendel said. “We’re gonna start doing yoga in the gallery.� Intermediate yoga classes will be held at the gallery every Wednesday at 6 p.m. for anyone to participate. The current show in the gallery is Capital Vices Collection by Meggalif. It was the first show this semester and will be

on display during today’s First Friday Art Walk. “XYZ hadn’t been involved in this event a whole lot in the past,� Bendel said. “But it’s definitely something we’re looking forward to being involved in.� The first Friday of each month, art galleries in Blacksburg hold an opening for a new artist or exhibit. Laureen Blakemore, director of Events in Downtown Blacksburg, helped organize it into a larger event known as the First Friday Art Walk. The Art Walk starts at 5:00 p.m. and ends at 8:00 pm. “The idea was to make it more public, let people know what was going on, and to bring people down into the galleries and stores so they could find out about these great art galleries,� Blakemore said. Recently the Art Walk changed its format to a self-guided tour. The idea was modeled after a gallery in Ashville, N.C. that Blakemore visited as a part of the Downtown Revitalization Committee. Brochures for the tour include

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

Pita Vera and the XYZ gallery are two of the participating venues for this week’s art walk. information about each gallery participating, as well as a map of where each gallery can be found. “We came back and worked with the Blacksburg Partnership and modeled our brochure on that idea. People can pick that up at any time and know where the galleries are,� Blakemore said. Brochures are available in downtown stores, the Virginia Tech Visitor’s Center and participating galleries.

Not every participating location is a traditional gallery. Other venues include the Blacksburg Public Library, Bollo’s CafĂŠ & Bakery, Eucalyptus Massage Center, Mish Mish, Inc., Gillie’s Vegetarian Restaurant, Mill Mountain Coffee & Tea and Pita Vera. Groups of attendees range from families with young children to students to senior citizens. “It fosters being local and enjoying your downtown,â€?

Blakemore said. Gallery owners and managers want more people to see and experience the downtown art culture. “It’s definitely our goal to promote art in the community,� Bendel said. “I just want people to know that XYZ exists and that we’re doing really cool things.� On Oct. 10, XYZ will open their Sci-Fi and Fantasy show with a reception running from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.

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Monday, October 4, 2010 Print Edition