Page 1

COLLEGIAN The MAGAZINE of Brisbane Boys’ College

May 2012

Y E L T R A H G N HAILI

CTO R Y I V O T S L A D S B UL E L N A I C O L L EG D L O C B B

Also inside:

STEP UP FOR PREPPIES

TRAIL BLAZING SCHOLARS

UNDERCOVER BOSS

CHANGING FOUND ATIONS

SHOWCASING ACADEMIC

OLD COLLEGIAN

OF THE AUSTR A LIAN

PATHWAYS

S COTT HUTCHINS ON

CURRICULUM


COLLEGIAN I S S U E 1 MAY 2012 UPFRONT

BBC NEWS

4

8

19

Revealing a new look and a new direction for Collegian magazine

Four graduates from 2011 talk about their results and the next step to realising their dreams

Jack Kibble is in the kitchen and sharing the sweet taste of success with others

Watt returns to BBC

World’s Greatest Shave

Olympic hopeful Mitchell Watt takes the time to encourage the next generation

Staff and students rally together to raise funds for the Royal Children's Hospital

Editor’s letter

Bright sparks

6

King of cakes

13 22

Headlines A few words from Headmaster Graeme McDonald

14 26 Tour de France

BBC students immerse themselves in the culture and joie de vivre of France

Photo courtesy Network Ten

ON THE COVER For story turn to page 62

Harvesting a brighter future Securing a quality education for Cambodian children

BBC ARTS

32

Highest honour Talented students take the stage with Opera Queensland and Opera Australia

Published by Brisbane Boys’ College CRICOS Code 00491J Kensington Terrace, Toowong, Queensland 4066 T 07 3309 3571 F 07 3371 2679 W www.bbc.qld.edu.au Editor Adele Graves Art Director Fiona Casey Contributors Chris Reid, Bren Arkinstall, Helen Jackson Photography Michael Marston, Bruce Peebles Cover BBC Old Collegian Chris Hartley ~ Queensland Bulls Wicketkeeper. Photograph by Chris Hyde/Getty Images

35 Summer of the Aliens

Old collegian James Dyke treads the boards in the Louis Nowra play


Music upon Twilight HIT TING THE R IGHT NOTES


BBC SPORT

REGULAR ITEMS

40

45 80 Insight

Flashback

Rugby legends and old collegians James Horwill and Will Genia kick start BBC’s Rugby season

The experts offer advice to navigate the way through the journey of parenthood

Take a closer look at some of the College’s sporting memorabilia

Wallaby greats

44

74 81 Snapshots

Last word

BBC Tennis team secures victory at the Brisbane International

Scenes from Leaders’ Induction and other events in the College calendar

Rev Graham Cole shares his thoughts on spirituality in the modern world

Grand Slam

CONNECT

58 70 72 Undercover boss Chairman Scott Hutchinson leads his company into its second centenary

The spirit of ANZAC

Old boys lunch in Toowoomba

BBC takes time to reflect and remember the fallen

Vintage Collegians gather at Picnic Point, Toowoomba


In season SN A PSHOTS OF THE SUMMER SP ORTS


4 | UPFRONT

EDITOR’S LETTER UNVEILING

A NEW DIRECTION

Welcome to the new look Collegian. The MAGAZINE of Brisbane Boys’ College

Whilst the magazine has undoubtedly evolved over time, this edition marks the first redesign in over a decade and we're thrilled to present a new format based on a very simple philosophy one magazine for one community. The features of the redesign include a traditionally styled masthead and a wider contemporary format, with subtle transitions in both typography and colour throughout. We've also included

Inner strength

section starters, making it easier for

BBC gymnast wins gold at national championships November 2011

the reader to navigate through the magazine. We’ve expanded our resources section, now entitled Insight, drawing on resident and external experts to provide you with fresh perspectives and resources on child development. In this edition we find out what’s in store for our 2011 scholars having

Whether you're a current family, an old collegian or an enrolled family at the first stages of your BBC journey, I hope you find the magazine to be a

May 2012

community. I would like to thank Graphic Designer Fiona Casey for skillfully bringing the vision for this new look

Watt who recently visited the College

magazine to life, Head of Marketing

and travel across the globe to France,

Chris Reid for his direction and Director

with students sharing their experiences

of Development Bren Arkinstall for his

from a cultural exchange in Europe. We

commitment to successfully merging

also feature a group of BBC Teachers

Sons of the College with Collegian. I hope you are as excited about the new format as we are.

guidance for local Cambodians training to become teachers at the First Steps

ADELE GRAVES

School in Siem Riep.

EDITOR

+

The MAGAZINE of Brisbane Boys’ College

of what it means to be part of the BBC

catch up with Olympic hopeful Mitchell

provide invaluable support and

COLLEGIAN

source of inspiration and celebration

now embarked on their next adventure,

who recently visited Cambodia to

2

Let us know what you think, email agraves@bbc.qld.edu.au

HAILING

H A RT L E Y

TO RY LLS TO VIC LEAD S BU CO LLEG IAN BBC OLD

Also inside:

STEP UP FOR PREPPIES

TRAIL BLAZING SCHOLARS

UNDERCOVER BOSS

CH ANGING FOUNDATIONS

SHOWCA SING ACADEMIC

OLD COLLEGIAN

OF AUSTR A LIAN

PATH WAYS

SCOTT HUTCHISON

CURRICULUM

BBC110 1902~2012


UPFRONT | 5

BBC NEWS | 9

BRIGHT SPARKS

8 | BBC NEWS

BBC’S 2011 SENIORS HAVE CARRIED ON

THE

THEME

OF

ACADEMIC

01

EXCELLENCE, WITH 21 PERCENT OF LAST YEAR’S COHORT ACHIEVING

MAX KOOPMAN

EITHER AN OP1 OR 2, INCLUDING 19

OP1, Bachelor of Engineering (Software Engineering) - University of Queensland

INDIVIDUAL OP1S AND 16 OP2S.

Awarded UQ Academic Vice-Chancellor Scholarship for 2012

WITHOUT DOUBT THEIR RESULTS

Whilst Google and Apple spring to mind when looking to the future for Max, at some

HAVE OPENED UP A WORLD OF

point, he hopes to be part of the culture of a small but revolutionary start-up company unique

OPPORTUNITIES BEYOND THE SCHOOL

to the software industry riding the boom. “We are currently in a massive boom in the

GATES WITH OUR SCHOLARS CHOOSING

26 | FEATURE

FEATURE | 27

HARVESTING A BRIGHTER FUTURE

software industry, which for now shows no signs of slowing down. What interests me most

TO ENTER VARIOUS FIELDS FROM

about software is its massive range of practical applications, especially when you consider that

MEDICINE AND SCIENCE, THROUGH TO

essentially anything electronic these days, be it a radio, computer or even a car, is driven by

ENGINEERING, THE ARTS AND MUSIC.

lines of code written by software engineers.” Max’s interest in the field was first sparked

WE RECENTLY CAUGHT UP WITH SOME

through his involvement with the BBC Robotics Club - an area in which he excelled, so much

OF OUR SCHOLARS WHO REVEAL THEIR

so, he was offered a scholarship with the UNSW - an offer he eventually turned down. “Accepting

SECRET TO SUCCESS ALONG WITH

that scholarship would have no doubt put me in a very good place in terms of following

THEIR DREAMS FOR THE FUTURE.

FOR MANY OF US our thoughts turn to

through with my robotics, but at the end of the

caffeine first thing in the morning – a welcome

day I decided the purely software side was my

fix for the daily grind in the western world.

passion.” When looking back on his senior year, Max

Yet travel across to Cambodia, one of Asia’s

admits it’s no walk in the park. “It’s a tough

poorest countries, and a very different picture

year, and personally I don’t think I would have

reveals itself as they wake in readiness for a

coped without something to break up the

14-hour-day in the rice fields, earning a mere

work. For me this was mainly rowing, which despite taking up a good chunk of my free time

$2 for their efforts. It’s an unfortunate but

– up to 10 sessions a week and a lot of early

common reality for far too many Cambodians,

mornings – gave me a release from the stress of

some as young as four, with a flawed education

schoolwork.”

system making it virtually impossible for the

“Going through at BBC there is a lot of

country’s poorest to break free of this cycle.

emphasis on goal setting both in the short and long term, so for any student I think a good

Yet whilst our lives are worlds apart, at BBC

OP is always there as a goal and motivator.

that morning cup of golden goodness now

To come out with an OP1 really feels like the

plays a central role in ensuring Cambodian

fulfillment of this goal, and seeing that number

children have access to quality education and

really felt like a confirmation that all of the hard work was worth it.”

inevitably a brighter future.

IMAGE COURTESY HARVEST CAMBODIA/ DOUG SHOBBROOK

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012

46 | INSIGHT

INSIGHT | 47

74 | SNAPSHOTS

SNAPSHOTS | 75

YEAR 9 HOUSE REPRESENTATIVES INDUCTION

BALANCING ACT

1 FEBRUARY ~ COLLEGE HALL

1.

2.

PROVIDING A BALANCED EDUCATION HAS ALWAYS BEEN CENTRAL

LEADERS' INDUCTION

TO THE ETHOS OF BBC. PREPARING BOYS FOR THE FUTURE BY DEVELOPING SKILLS SUCH AS FLEXIBILITY OF MIND, STRENGTH OF CHARACTER AND SOCIAL SKILLS IS EQUALLY AS IMPORTANT

6.

27 JANUARY ~ COLLEGE HALL

AS SECURING A GOOD ACADEMIC RESULT. IN THIS EDITION

Parents, friends and students assembled in

OF COLLEGIAN, OUR CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST JUDITH LOCKE

College Hall earlier this year for the induction of

EXPLORES THE NOTION OF SUCCESS IN A WORLD WHERE WE ARE

on the importance of integrity for a leader,

8.

BBC’s 2012 Senior Leaders. The service focused exploring this theme through the life of inventor

OFTEN MEASURED BY OUR ACHIEVEMENTS ALONE.

and avitator Bill Lear. 4.

As a clinical psychologist in private practice,

academic content and assessment; however, it

personally or as a part of a team or group? Have

I treat a lot of clients with stress and burnout

is not the only indicator. The personal qualities

they got a generally positive attitude that allows

issues. Would it surprise you to know I am

a student has developed give a much better

them to be in the moment, but plan a little for the

seeing these issues increasingly in school age or

sense of who they are and what they are likely

future, and not ruminate on the past?

university age clients?

to accomplish. More importantly, it is highly

The answers to these questions need to

likely that if they have only focused on achieving

be included when determining your child’s

There appears to be increasing pressure on children at school and a lot of it centres on

academic success, they have lost a lot of

accomplishments. Your own success is not only

working toward one goal – achieving a good OP

opportunities to develop other strengths and are

measured by your numbers (your salary, your

score. It’s a shame there is such an emphasis

more likely to be facing the risk of burnout or

weight etc.) and if you did worry about only one

on this particular aspect of a child’s schooling.

difficulty in living a balanced life.

While a good OP score typically means the child

There are many other good indicators of

toiled at the gym or the workplace.

achievement for your child. Have they got a good attitude to learning and are genuinely interested

Your child should end up with so much

runs out the moment they are accepted into the

in knowing more about the world and improving

more than an academic record when they leave

university they want to attend. It is probably the

their knowledge? Have they learnt cooperation

school. Scholarly success is not the only area of

most emphasised but least useful measure of a

and social skills? Have they developed their moral

accomplishment that is important to our sense

child.

compass and are they actively seeking to make

of self and our contribution to the world. We

What your child ends up with at school

the world a better place? Are they starting to

need to make sure we are actively encouraging

is not just a number. It is a range of qualities

shake off the egocentricity of youth and thinking

the development of all the potential positive

and character traits, which will stand them in

equally of the needs of their community as well

traits in our children so as to give them the best chance for a good and happy life.

good stead for living a happy, productive and

as their own desires? Have they got sporting and

balanced life. The OP score is one indicator of

other interests they don’t only pursue for glory,

their success in mastering a particular type of

but because they genuinely enjoy the activity,

9.

of your numbers, it is highly likely that the quality of the rest of your life would be reduced as you

has worked hard and developed study skills, the usefulness of a good OP score pretty much

5.

3.

1. Nikki and Jackson Evans 2. Terry, Hayden and Dominique Bertoli-Simmonds 3. Rev Graham Cole 4. Daniel and Helen Kyriacou 5. Michael and Nicholas Dow 6. Sharon and Cameron Wallace 7. [] 8. Arran, Marc and Catherine Raeburn 9. Eamon and Russell Uhr 10. Alexander, Stuart and Julia Russell

continued overleaf

7.

10.

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012

BRIGHT SPARKS

CONNECT | 55

SONS OF THE COLLEGE As an old boy, you'll now find all the stories you've come to know and love, including features, where are they now, event reports and upcoming functions in the Connect section. In this edition we've been lucky enough to have a number of recent graduates work on the magazine, bringing you stories of fellow old collegians. These boys have done a great job under the guidance of our own Chris Hartley who is also featured in the magazine, having recently led the Queensland Bulls to victory in the Sheffield Shield.

CONNECT OLD COLLEGI ANS

WHERE A RE THEY NOW

EV ENTS

Sons of the Edition 5 November 2011

College A magazine for BBC Old Collegians

56 Fraternity A few words about strong bonds from the President of the Old Collegians' Association

62 Hailing Hartley Read about the success of the dynamic Queensland Bulls wicketkeeper

65 Five Minutes 2011 Old Boy Xavier Small interviews BBC's fifth Rhodes Scholar Michael Huggins

67 Mixing it up Find out about the stellar career of Stuart Matchett in the music industry

69 Where are they now?

Undercover boss EMPLOY ER OF THE Y E A R

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


6 | UPFRONT

HEADLINES: SUCCESS STARTS EARLY

The recent State Government

Middle Schooling at BBC has

and confidence to function well in a

decision, that Year 7 would become

been an unqualified success and our

technological society by using the

part of secondary schooling (A Flying

regular reviews confirm that there

power of tablet technology. We also

Start for Queensland Children) aligns

has been a significant increase in the

provide an exciting range of leadership

perfectly with the structures and

level of engagement of our boys with

opportunities through our CLIMB

staffing already in place at BBC.

the academic programs offered to

(College Leadership in Middle School

Interestingly many of our parents

them. Because the Middle School has

Boys) program which encourages boys

have taken this change in government

established its own identity within the

to accept responsibility for leading their

policy as an opportunity to evaluate

overall secondary program, we have

peers.

the pathway for their son’s education.

been able to provide more personal

Our parents are increasingly focusing

attention to boys in Years 7 to 9 both

and the subsequent increased demand

on early learning as the foundation of

academically and pastorally. This

for places both in Year 7 and earlier

success and choosing to register their

special area of the school focuses on

years, the College has developed a

sons’ enrolment before Year 7.

providing an educational experience

new set of intake years from 2015; Year

which fosters self-esteem and allows

7, 4 and Prep.

While many schools are currently

Responding to the Flying Start policy

busily dealing with the ramifications of

boys to develop a real sense of

The government’s Flying Start

the government’s decision, at BBC in

belonging to the College. It is in this

program may well be the catalyst for

2012 we are celebrating our 10th year

part of the school that the building

enriching your son’s education in the

of Middle Schooling. The work that has

blocks are put in place for boys to

Junior School years preparing them for

occurred during this time has provided

cope with the rigorous academic

a successful journey into the Middle

a strong and valued bridge between

demands of senior schooling. Boys are

and Senior Schools at BBC.

primary and secondary education.

encouraged to develop an effective and efficient study program here and

GRAEME MCDONALD

outstanding teaching staff, pastoral

acquire a real understanding of the

HEADMASTER

care and successful transition

importance of research skills when

programs for students entering Year

tackling assignment tasks. We have

7, which has been the first year of our

a real focus in the Middle School on

Middle School for over a decade.

enabling boys to develop the capacity

BBC is already well equipped with


BBC NEWS | 7

BBC NEWS 8 Bright sparks Our scholars reveal their secret to success and dreams for the future

13 Watt returns to BBC Fostering the next generation of Olympic athletes

14 Tour de France BBC French students visit the cultural centre of Europe

24 The Great Outdoors On the adventure trail with the Outdoor Education program

A brighter future GR OW TH THR O U GH ED U C ATION

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


BRIGHT SPARKS

8 | BBC NEWS

BBC’S 2011 SENIORS HAVE CARRIED ON

THE

THEME

OF

ACADEMIC

EXCELLENCE, WITH 21 PERCENT OF LAST YEAR’S COHORT ACHIEVING EITHER AN OP1 OR 2, INCLUDING 19 INDIVIDUAL OP1S AND 16 OP2S. WITHOUT DOUBT THEIR RESULTS

HAVE OPENED UP A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES BEYOND THE SCHOOL GATES WITH OUR SCHOLARS CHOOSING TO ENTER VARIOUS FIELDS FROM MEDICINE AND SCIENCE, THROUGH TO ENGINEERING, THE ARTS AND MUSIC. WE RECENTLY CAUGHT UP WITH SOME OF OUR SCHOLARS WHO REVEALED THEIR SECRET TO SUCCESS ALONG WITH THEIR DREAMS FOR THE FUTURE.


BBC NEWS | 9

01

MAX KOOPMAN OP1, Bachelor of Engineering (Software Engineering) - University of Queensland Awarded UQ Academic Vice-Chancellor Scholarship for 2012 Whilst Google and Apple spring to mind when looking to the future for Max, at some point he hopes to be part of the culture of a small but revolutionary start-up company unique to the software industry riding the boom. “We are currently in a massive boom in the software industry, which for now shows no signs of slowing down. What interests me most about software is its massive range of practical applications, especially when you consider that essentially anything electronic these days, be it a radio, computer or even a car, is driven by lines of code written by software engineers.” Max’s interest in the field was first sparked through his involvement with the BBC Robotics Club - an area in which he excelled, so much so, he was offered a scholarship with the UNSW - an offer he eventually turned down. “Accepting that scholarship would have no doubt put me in a very good place in terms of following through with my robotics, but at the end of the day I decided the purely software side was my passion.” When looking back on his senior year, Max admits it’s no walk in the park. “It’s a tough year, and personally I don’t think I would have coped without something to break up the work. For me this was mainly rowing, which despite taking up a good chunk of my free time – up to 10 sessions a week and a lot of early mornings – gave me a release from the stress of school work.” “Going through at BBC there is a lot of emphasis on goal setting both in the short and long term, so for any student I think a good OP is always there as a goal and motivator. To come out with an OP1 really feels like the fulfillment of this goal, and seeing that number really felt like a confirmation that all of the hard work was worth it.”

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


10 | BBC NEWS

02

LACHLAN NEATE

OP1, Bachelor of Music (Musical Theatre) – Griffith Conservatorium of Music Having undertaken arts and social science subjects during his senior years, in addition to completing a Diploma of Singing, Lachlan is living proof that doing what you love will inevitably produce good results, which unexpectedly for Lachlan was an OP1. “When I first saw the result on the QSA website, my initial reaction was one of shock and disbelief. My projected OP had been a 6 or 7 and I was prepared for that result so was very pleasantly surprised.” Lachlan’s advice to anyone considering a similar mix of subjects – “You don’t need to do what’s perceived as the ‘smart’ or ‘hard’ subjects, you just have to do your best in the subjects you choose.” Lachlan’s hard work has certainty paid off, having been accepted into the newly created Music Theatre course at Griffith University’s Conservatorium of Music. Out of the hundreds of people who auditioned for the course only a handful were selected. “Music theatre was one of the first art forms I experienced as a young child. Since that time, my interest has grown and led me to become involved in amateur, and later,

03

HENRY CUNNINGHAM

professional theatre which continued to feed

OP1, Bachelor of Engineering/ Information

my passion for performing.”

Technology - University of Queensland

The course will see Lachlan study numerous performing arts strands including

“Year 12 is the hardest year that you’ll have

singing, acting, dance and movement.

to do, but you only have to do it once.” This

Having always imagined a career in music,

was Henry’s mantra for the year and one which

Lachlan has since formed his own band

saw him secure a strong result, which he admits

Cold Vengeance, who are currently working

was quite a surprise at first. “I was glad that

with leading muscian Dan Pratt to record

working hard throughout the year had paid off -

their first debut EP Captive Hearts. “We have

it was a great feeling to have done so well.”

been recording our EP for what feels like an

Having taken a keen interest in physics and

eternity now and are hoping to have that

graphics at school, engineering coupled with

finished and available for purchase in the

information technology seemed like the logical

near future.”

choice for Henry. “Engineering combines these interests at a professional level. I hope to work in a major engineering firm either civil or in mining.”


BBC NEWS | 11

04 TOM LAW

OP1, Bachelor of Arts/ Law University of Queensland Whilst this next chapter of his life represents

For former School Captain Tom Law,

Tom is now focusing his energies on

new and exciting challenges, Henry will always

his strong academic result was, in his eyes,

his degree (where he hopes to major in

value his school memories admitting there are

very much a shared success. When finding

French with a view to working in Foreign

many which will stay with him for life. “Adjusting

out the news, Tom described the moment

Affairs or Human Rights Law). Having

to life outside of school will be a task, but I

as one for the whole family. “Getting an

formed a strong connection with BBC

look forward to watching College activities

OP1 for me was not just about doing the

during his time as a boarder, Tom is also

from the other side of the field.” Having toured

best I can do, but about acknowledging

the youngest member to join the BBC Old

in the states at the end of his senior year

my parents for all the sacrifices they have

Collegians’ Association Board. “I hope to

with the First V Basketball team, he hopes

made for me over the past decade, in

provide a current view of BBC to the other

to continue his involvement with the sport.

particular sending me to board at BBC;

members of the OCA, so we can effectively

“I’ll definitely continue training and coaching

making many weekend trips up and down

help to further strengthen the spirit and

basketball this year and hope to make an open

the highway to watch me play sport or

sense of community that makes BBC

representative team. Otherwise, I’ll be sitting on

perform at a concert.”

unique.”

the supporters’ side of the court at each GPS game in 2012!”

It was these extra curricular activities that essentially helped Tom to achieve such strong results.

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


12 | BBC NEWS

FUTURE PATHWAYS

CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL OF OUR 2011 SCHOLARS

OP1 TIM CHALK

BHAVEK JAMNADAS

MAHASHA PERERA

Bachelor of Medicine/Surgery (BA/MBBS) - UQ

Bachelor of Actuarial Studies and Finance – Macquarie University

Bachelor of Medical Science/Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery • Awarded Sir Samuel Griffith Scholarship

OLIVER CHEN Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Medicine/Surgery (BA/MBBS) - University of NSW

PHILLIP LEE

JACK EDWARDS

NICHOLAS LEE

Bachelor of Engineering - UQ • Awarded UQ Academic Excellence Scholarship for 2012

Bachelor of Dental Science – UQ

WEI-LIN GRIFFITHS

Bachelor Medicine, Surgery and Science – UQ

Bachelor of Engineering - UQ

Bachelor of Medical Science (MBBS) - Griffith University

JASON WANG •

FELIX MAK Bachelor of Social Science (Honours in Actuarial Studies/Economics) - ANU

Bachelor of Engineering – UQ

OLIVER HARTIGAN

ANDREW RHEE

PATRICK OWEN Bachelor of Psychological Science - UQ • Awarded UQ Academic Excellence Scholarship for 2012

Awarded UQ Academic Merit Scholarship for 2012

PETER WATSON-BROWN Bachelor of Medicine, Surgery and Science – UQ • Awarded UQ Academic Excellence Scholarship for 2012

MINGYUE WU Studying in 2012 at Australian National University in Canberra

OP2 SADMAN ALMAN

TIMOTHY HAWTHORNE

JONATHAN O’SULLIVAN

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Laws - UQ

Bachelor of Engineering - UQ

Bachelor of Science - UQ

AIDEN CAREY

JACK HUSSEY

PETER PHILLPOTTS

Bachelor of Engineering/Biomedical Science

Bachelor of Engineering - UQ

Bachelor of Engineering (Mechatronics) / Bachelor of Science (Maths/Statistics) - UQ

JEFF CHANG

TIMOTHY JAMES

Bachelor of Engineering/Bachelor of Arts – University of Sydney

Bachelor of Engineering - UQ

JACK REES

KIERAN KING

Bachelor of Engineering/Business Management - UQ

JACK CLOUGH

Bachelor of Science - UQ

Bachelor of Laws/ Bachelor of Journalism - UQ

IAN EVANS

BARRY NEWELL

Bachelor of Architectural Design - UQ

Bachelor of Laws/Bachelor of Commerce – Bond University

JOSEPH HARRISON

ALEXANDER NICOLAIDIS

Bachelor of Science (Advanced) (Honours) Australian National University, Canberra

Bachelor of Engineering/Business Management - UQ

HARRISON WILSON Bachelor of Engineering - QUT


BBC NEWS | 13

WATT RETURNS TO BBC BBC OLD BOY AND OLYMPIC HOPEFUL MITCHELL WATT RETURNED TO HIS OLD STOMPING GROUND ON 9 MARCH TO HELP FOSTER THE SCHOOL’S NEXT GENERATION OF OLYMPIC ATHLETES. The 23-year-old national long jump champion was greeted by an enthusiastic group of BBC Junior School students as he delivered 68 brand-new pieces of sports gear on behalf of the Coles Sports for Schools program. "My passion for athletics started at school, so going back to BBC and seeing the excitement on the kids’ faces is wonderful,” Watt said. Having received strong support from the College community in collecting vouchers for the program, BBC has decided to pay it forward and will donate the sporting goods to a school in need. Watt commented on Twitter, “BBC decided to donate their Coles sporting equipment to a less fortunate school #respect” We wish Mitchell all the best for the Proudly supporting

coles SPORTS for SCHOOLS

London Olympics in August. IMAGE COURTESY NEWSPIX/ MARK CRANITCH

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


14 | BBC NEWS

TOUR DE FRANCE A GROUP OF BBC STUDENTS VENTURED TO THE CULTURAL CENTRE OF EUROPE.

Photograph by pchais/Shutterstock.com


BBC NEWS | 15

31

MARCH PARIS After flying to Paris via Dubai, the BBC French students caught the train from Paris Gare de Lyon and arrived in Beaune ready to start Immersion classes the following day.

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


16 | BBC NEWS

BACK ROW: SAMUEL BLOOM, CHARLES PIDGEON FRONT ROW: JOSEPH KIRWOOD, JEREMY BRIGGS, PETER GRANT, WILLIAM HALL

ARC DE TRIOMPHE

01–10 APRIL BEAUNE Spending 10 days in Beaune, boys were able to immerse themselves amongst locals, attending classes at the Dejeuner Ecole school and exploring the region’s beautiful countryside. Year 11 student Charles Pidgeon shares his experience. We woke up on the third day of the French language trip to drizzly weather that was very in keeping with Beaune (the charming village where we were staying). We attended school in the morning before joining with Madame Luxford and Madame Campagne after lunch to explore the local countryside of Burgundy. We drove through some very beautiful French countryside (it was incredibly green) before breaking out onto cleared grazing fields. Marking the landscape was a large hill and atop that sat a traditional French château with its own hilltop village. It was Châteauneuf (literally, the ‘New Castle’) that was owned by the same person who built La Rochepot. It was constructed in 1132 originally but was drastically remodelled in the 1400s. For

BEAUNE

JEREMY BRIGGS

less magnificent but not as spectacularly

Avenue des Champs Elysees, La Place de la

situated. After an awe-inspiring and

Concorde, the Obelisk, the Louvre Museum

interesting visit at Châteauneuf, we

and Chateau of Versailles. For BBC student

escaped the chill of the day by retreating

Jeremy Briggs, seeing these sights made the

to a small, cosy, French crêperie where we

long journey all worthwhile.

enjoyed hot chocolate and gaufres (waffles) with Nutella. What a great day!

11-13 APRIL

Having sat for more than 18 hours on a plane returning from France, one started to wonder was the trip really worth it. However, looking back, I can safely say that not only was the trip worth the travel time, but it actually exceeded my already lofty expectations and for me there was one day that really stood out – our final

DIJON > PARIS > VERSAILLES

day in Paris. The morning began with a quick

the Australian boys, the fact that fantastic medieval castles were dotted around the

For the second part of their journey,

until we physically entered the world’s most

countryside was very exciting. On the way

students visited some of the country’s

famous museum that the enormity of it started

to the castle we passed another fantastic

most iconic and loved sites including

to sink in. According to our tour guide it would

château (Château Commarin) which was no

the Eiffel Tower, Arc de Triomphe,

take six months to see the entire museum if you

breakfast and a metro trip to the Louvre. It wasn’t


BBC NEWS | 17 spent one minute at every exhibit. The interior of the Louvre was breathtaking and seeing some of the world’s most famous pieces of art up close was an incredible experience. Following lunch at the Louvre’s café, in which everyone unanimously decided that a good sandwich was made by good bread and thus, France had the best sandwiches in the world, we set off for the Arc de Triomphe and the Champs-Elysées. The Champs-Elysées was probably the best possible place that we could have spent our final hours in Paris. The Arc de Triomphe was breathtaking and strolling down the Champs-Elysées was an experience I’ll never forget. To finish the trip, we had an afternoon-tea consisting of the world’s best Macaroons and some delicious French hot-chocolate. The trip was truly a surreal and CHATEAU OF VERSAILLES

unforgettable experience.

LOUVRE MUSEUM Photograph by Andre Viegas / Shutterstock.com

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


18 | BBC NEWS

VIEWPOINT: LEADERSHIP

“Showing others the right thing to do.”

“You can’t be afraid to fail.”

“Requires patience, perseverance and practise”

“Using actions rather than words.”

EDWARD HOPE

TIM MOULDAY

CAMERON WALLACE

JAMES HORWILL

Year 5

Year 7

Year 12

BBC 2002

Sandpit Supervisor

House Representative

School Captain

Wallaby Captain

Leadership means helping others when they are sad or in pain, but it also means showing others the right thing to do like do not run on the concrete and don’t bully other students.

I believe leadership is in every

To me, leadership is an ongoing

For me leadership is all about

man, woman and child but it

learning process; a continuous

setting an example – using

is whether he or she wants to

development of an individual’s

actions rather than words. The

use this quality. One of the best

personality. Put simply, leadership

leaders who work most effectively

qualities is trust. In other words

does not come naturally to most

rarely say I, it’s about the team

your yes must be your yes and

people. I believe it is developed

whether it be on the field, at

your no must be your no. If you

through maturity and experience

school or within an organisation.

have committed to something

and like most things, requires

A good leader understands the

you cannot back out because

patience, perseverance and most

team, drawing out the best in

you don’t like it. For example

importantly, practise. I believe a

each of its members and can

if you were coming first in a

leader is someone who sets an

provide guidance in a time of

marathon you wouldn’t stop and

example that others will want to

challenge, when tough decisions

quit because it is hard; you would

follow. A leader is someone who

need to be made. It’s about doing

keep going. It's the same if you

shows respect to others and in

everything you can to get the

were coming last you would

turn, earns and receives that

best out of those around you.

want to back out, but you have

same respect. With experience,

committed to the marathon, so

being a leader becomes a natural

you should finish the race. As a

reaction. A leader in my opinion is

leader you can’t be afraid to fail.

a person who puts others before

As Albert Einstein once said, “Try

themselves; a person who provides

not to become a man of success

another with the opportunity to be

but rather a man of value.”

successful and achieve their goals.


BBC NEWS | 19

HAVING SHOWCASED HIS ABILITY TO THE NATION AND EVEN OUR PRIME MINISTER IN LAST YEAR’S JUNIOR MASTERCHEF COMPETITION, IT’S NO SECRET THAT YEAR 8 STUDENT JACK KIBBLE HAS AN INCREDIBLE TALENT WHEN IT COMES TO COOKING CAKES OR ANYTHING SWEET FOR THAT MATTER.

KING OF CAKES Having cooked for some of the world’s most renowned chefs, on face value it may appear that life has returned to normal with Jack back into the routine of school, cleaning his room, homework and sport. But that couldn’t be further from the truth, with Jack now busier than ever having started his own cake business, Just ask Jack – special cakes for special occasions. “I learnt so much from Junior Masterchef and really wanted to continue doing something with it, so I started my own cake business and have been

very busy. I’ve made cakes for birthdays, engagements and other special occasions,” said Jack. Late last year Jack also attended a fundraiser at the Mater Hospital as part of their Christmas Appeal, where he delivered a demonstration to children on how to decorate cup cakes. “It was really good to be part of something which helps sick kids feel good while they are in hospital,” he said. It was this event which compelled Jack to donate $300 of his own money to the Royal Children’s Hospital Appeal –

Working Wonders. “I had the privilege of meeting a young girl my age who had been battling Leukemia for some time, unfortunately she passed away early this year, but I hope with research more kids will succeed in their battle with illnesses like this.” Jack has also recently been named the ‘Cup Cakes for a Cure’ Ambassador – an initiative of The Kids’ Cancer Project. In July, Jack is set to deliver a number of cooking demonstrations and workshops at the Fun 4 Kids Festival in Warrnambool, Victoria. “I can’t

wait to get back into the kitchen and show other young children how to make some healthy food and of course the odd sweet treat too.” As always, Jack remains level headed when it comes to his success, “I have really surprised myself with just what I can do, not to mention the pleasure it gives other people to have one of my cakes. I don’t know what the future will bring, but I am just happy to be back at BBC with my friends doing all the things I love most.” IMAGE COURTESY NEWSPIX/ PAUL GUY

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


20 | BBC NEWS

THINK TWICE

A NUMBER OF SENIOR STUDENTS RECENTLY VISITED THE ROYAL BRISBANE HOSPITAL TO PARTICIPATE IN THE P.A.R.T.Y PROGRAM TO FIND OUT HOW A SPLIT-SECOND DECISION CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE.

In many countries around the world, the greatest incidence of trauma injury occurs in the 15-24 age bracket. In Australia alone, one

buttering and cutting bread one-handed and negotiating obstacles in a wheelchair. According to BBC Teacher Mr Matt

in four hospitalisations of people in this age

Atkinson whilst the information was

group happens because of alcohol. P.A.R.T.Y.

confronting, it drove home a very powerful

(Prevention of Alcohol and Risk Related

message.

Trauma in Youth), seeks to change attitudes and behaviours about risk taking.

“The scenarios presented to the boys really asked them to think twice before

The program, which was established

making hasty decisions. It’s a simple but

in Canada in 1986, is aimed at providing

potentially life saving message,” he said.

teenagers with information about trauma that will enable them to recognise potential injury-producing situations, make preventionorientated choices and adopt behaviours that minimise unnecessary risk. During the presentation students were engaged through the use of DVD’s and

EMPOWERING THEIR PEERS Armed with knowledge from the program, boys then presented this message to their peers in House meetings. “Being able to pass on their own feelings

interactive simulated clinical scenarios based

about the experience to their peers was

on the journey of a trauma patient. They

very powerful. The more young people who

experienced firsthand the difficulties faced

hear the P.A.R.T.Y message the better,” Mr

by trauma patients in daily tasks such as

Atkinson said.


BBC NEWS | 21

FOUNDATION OF SAFETY

PEOPLE POWER

THE TRAGIC DISAPPEARANCE

Bruce and Denise Morcombe have shown

BBC STAFF AND STUDENTS

OF DANIEL MORCOMBE IN

remarkable strength and bravery and as a result of extraordinary community support,

JOINED MILLIONS OF PEOPLE IN

2003 TOUCHED THE HEARTS OF

established the Daniel Morcombe Foundation,

OVER 5000 CITIES, ACROSS 135

THE PUBLIC, PARTICULARLY

tragedy never happens again.

PARENTS, ACROSS QUEENSLAND AND AUSTRALIA.

to empower children and ensure this type of On 24 April, the Morcombes visited BBC to educate Junior School students on ‘harm prevention’, which has become a central focus for the foundation. “We are committed to teaching personal

COUNTRIES, IN REDUCING OUR GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT FOR EARTH HOUR IN THE LAST WEEK OF MARCH.

safety to the young and vulnerable in our

A global grassroots movement, Earth Hour

community by providing these important skills,

encourages individuals, businesses and

free of charge and easily accessible to everyone

governments around the world to take

in Australia,” said the Morcombes.

positive actions for the environment and

IMAGE COURTESY NEWSPIX/ MEGAN SLADE

celebrate their commitment to the planet by switching off the lights for one designated hour. BBC decided to take this concept one step further with a week-long activity in recognition of the event. “Every morning during House Tutor Period we turned off the lights and air-conditioning in these classrooms,” BBC Sustainability Officer Dom Picaun said. “The initiative was not only designed to reduce our environmental impact, but to raise awareness among students about sustainability,” he said.

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


22 | BBC NEWS

WORLD’S GREATEST SHAVE SEVERAL STUDENTS AND STAFF AT BBC HAVE A NEW HAIRDO, HAVING EITHER COLOURED OR SHAVED THEIR HAIR AS PART OF THE THE WORLD’S GREATEST SHAVE, WHICH HAS BECOME AN ANNUAL FUNDRAISER AT THE COLLEGE. THEIR EFFORTS RAISED $1800, WHICH WAS PRESENTED TO THE ROYAL CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL ON 1 MAY. RIGHT: YEAR 11 STUDENT MATTHEW CHEEL RAISED $1000

TONKA OF A TIME JUNIOR SCHOOL STUDENTS HAVE TRADED IN THEIR SANDPIT TOYS, THANKS TO A GENEROUS DONATION FROM THE JUNIOR SCHOOL SUPPORT GROUP, WHO WERE KIND ENOUGH TO BUY MORE THAN $400 WORTH OF TONKA TRUCKS AND DIGGERS. THE DONATION HAS BEEN EXTREMELY WELL RECEIVED BY THE BOYS, WITH THE SANDPIT THE PLACE TO BE AT MORNING TEA AND LUNCH.

DOMINIC HAYES, ZACHARY DAVIDSON, HAMISH TRIM AND JACK WOODWARD PLAYING WITH THE TONKA TRUCKS


BBC NEWS | 23

PANCAKE DAY THE YEAR 9 INTERSCHOOL CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP (ISCF) GROUP HELD A FUNDRAISER ON SHROVE TUESDAY - AFFECTIONATELY KNOWN AS PANCAKE DAY. BOYS COOKED FOR A SWARM OF HUNGRY STUDENTS AT LUNCH, WITH ALL PROCEEDS GOING TO THE SMITH FAMILY TO HELP DISADVANTAGED TEENAGERS IN BRISBANE.

ALASDAIR STEWART AND LUC FERN WITH ALAN CHEEL SERVING UP PANCAKES ON SHROVE TUESDAY

SCHOOL SPIRIT BBC’s Senior Leaders, including School Captain Cameron Wallace, Vice Captain Jordy White and the iconic Highlander paid a special visit to the College’s youngest members to present them with a badge, based around this year’s theme ‘strive’. The Prep students were clearly in awe of their senior counterparts with an air of excitement filling the room when the seniors arrived.

AN EGGCELLENT ACT OF GENEROSITY JUNIOR SCHOOL BOYS HAVE BEEN WORKING HARD COLLECTING EASTER EGGS TO HELP BRING JOY TO CHILDREN LESS FORTUNATE THAN THEMSELVES.

On the last day of Term 1, boys presented Kerry and Julie from charity ACT for Kids, with a significant donation of Easter eggs. The Australian charity works to treat and prevent child abuse and focuses on providing children with the skills, care and confidence they need to heal and lead a normal life.

HARRISON GOURLAS GETS INTO THE SPIRIT OF GIVING

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


24 | BBC NEWS

T H E G R E AT

OUT DOORS

FROM GOLDEN BEACHES ON THE SUNSHINE COAST, TO THE PICTURESQUE NORTHERN RIVERS REGION IN NEW SOUTH WALES, JUNIOR SCHOOL STUDENTS VENTURED INTO THE GREAT OUTDOORS THIS TERM AS PART OF THE COLLEGE’S OUTDOOR EDUCATION PROGRAM.

Designed to help develop decisionmaking, communication and leadership skills, the boys experienced a range of activities from canoeing, horse riding and fishing through to bush walking and abseiling. Year 4: Alexandra Headland, Sunshine Coast, Queensland Year 5: Midginbil Hill, Uki, New South Wales Year 6: Tyalgum, New South Wales


BBC NEWS | 25

ARTISTIC TALENT ABORIGINAL ARTISTS INSPIRE STUDENTS

Years 4 and 5 boys recently participated in an Indigenous Art and Cultural Workshop with Arthur Conlon and Kerry Neill, where they enjoyed story telling, a didgeridoo performance, boomerang throwing and traditional dance. The boys also produced oil pastel drawings, with each class portraying a different Australian animal. Arthur shared his love for the outback and demonstrated a number of artistic techniques which have been adopted by the boys in their own works of art. ABOVE: ANGUS THOMSON AND CONNOR MCCAGH PARTICIPATE IN THE ART WORKSHOP AND AN ARTWORK BY ARTHUR CONLON

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


26 | FEATURE

HARVESTING A BRIGHTER FUTURE

IMAGE COURTESY HARVEST CAMBODIA/ DOUG SHOBBROOK


FEATURE | 27

FOR MANY OF US our thoughts turn to caffeine first thing in the morning – a welcome fix for the daily grind in the western world. Yet travel across to Cambodia, one of Asia’s poorest countries, and a very different picture reveals itself as they wake in readiness for a 14-hour-day in the rice fields, earning a mere $2 for their efforts. It’s an unfortunate but common reality for far too many Cambodians, some as young as four, with a flawed education system making it virtually impossible for the country’s poorest to break free of this cycle. Yet whilst our lives are worlds apart, at BBC that morning cup of golden goodness now plays a central role in ensuring Cambodian children have access to quality education and inevitably a brighter future. COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


28 | FEATURE

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

1. BBC teacher David Biggs working with a trainee 2. BBC staff with the First Steps trainees 3. Harvest Cambodia founder Doug Shobbrook participates in the training process 4. BBC teacher Tamara Sullivan provides a Tablet PC demonstration 5. BBC’s Derrick Smith conducts a training session at the First Steps School 6. Kara Way, Tamara Smith and David Biggs with First Steps trainee teachers

Once you understand the difficulties faced by the people of this country,

sees qualified Australian teachers travel to the First Steps School in the

it’s impossible to ignore. Having suffered under the Khmer Rouge, Pol

village of Kok Thnot in Siem Reap to provide invaluable support and

Pot’s ruling party from 1975 to 1979, Cambodia was literally stripped

training for local teachers.

of its knowledge and skills with doctors, nurses and teachers either

At the First Steps School, classes are taught by young Cambodians

executed or forced to work in labour camps. That may have been more

who have varying levels of experience, with the average age of teachers

than 30 years ago, but to this day Cambodia still struggles to provide

ranging from 16 to 33. In fact many of them seamlessly interchange

basic services and education to its people.

between the role of teacher and student in the one day. The training

Whilst the government education system appears to be free,

program is very much focused on creating sustainable change and

attendance rates are extremely low. Most families are unable to afford

sends a powerful message that Cambodian people have the expertise

transport to the city, not to mention ridiculous extra costs such as

to fulfill these important roles.

charging children to sit a test in order to proceed to the next grade alongside impossible tuition fees. With such obvious inequalities in education, BBC’s Deputy Director

The school is a vision of local man So Sok, founder of Stepping Stones Cambodia. Destined to live a life of poverty in the village rice fields, he learnt English by immersing himself amongst tourists

of Boarding Derek Smith, began fundraising by selling coffees to staff

visiting the Temple of Angkor Wat. It was in this village that Elizabeth

to support the work of Brisbane-based charity, Harvest Cambodia.

Shobbrook, who runs Harvest Cambodia along with her husband

Starting at just $3 a cup it didn’t take long for the word to spread

Doug, first met Sok in 2009. In perfect English Sok shared his dream of

and momentum to build with a number of staff expressing interest in

starting a school.

getting directly involved. BBC Teachers Tamara Sullivan, Kara Way and

In May last year the pair seriously started to consider Sok’s dream

David Biggs joined Derek in rallying support, raising enough money to

and through hard work, determination and unbelievable spirit, the First

participate in Harvest Cambodia’s Teacher Training program, which

Steps School was established with more than 300 children arriving on


FEATURE | 29

IMAGE COURTESY HARVEST CAMBODIA/ DOUG SHOBBROOK

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


30 | FEATURE

IMAGE COURTESY HARVEST CAMBODIA/ DOUG SHOBBROOK

the first day of enrolments. Some had walked bare foot for two hours

continue to fundraise by selling coffees and now support two

with others travelling the same distance by bicycle. Today the school

Cambodian teachers as part of Harvest Cambodia’s Teacher

has more than 800 students attending classes each day.

Sponsorship program. BBC Teacher David Biggs explains that just $40

The school provides lessons in organic farming, health and hygiene,

a month covers their expenses leaving them with $10 spare (by no

environmental care and animal farming techniques. Yet it’s the free

means a large amount of money, but enough to alleviate the pressure

English classes and access to technology that are seen to be the most

of having to work two jobs to make ends meet, affording them the

important assets in securing a brighter future for Cambodian children.

opportunity to focus on their own education).

With this in mind, BBC teachers also organised for the College to

“The whole experience has encouraged us all to become more

donate 10 Tablet PCs, fully equipped with software and a long lasting

involved in helping the First Steps School and the incredibly motivated

battery. The group presented the teachers with the tablets during their

teachers. We hope to return next January to see how they are travelling

stay – a very welcome addition, considering their previous computers

with the implementation of the strategies we taught them,” said David.

only lasted for 15 minutes on battery in a village with limited access to

Tamara also plans to visit the First Steps School in September to

power.

donate an additional 10 Tablet PCs.

For Tamara Sullivan, the appreciation shown by the teachers and

Considering Cambodia’s tragic past, the country appears to be full

their willingness to learn was incredibly inspiring. “I had set a simple

of hope and friendliness and the First Steps School is a living testament

task on the computers for the teachers to use word processing

to the warmth of these people. Their willingness to learn continues to

software to create a paragraph about their family. As soon as I arrived

inspire all educators who have been lucky enough to be part of this

the following day, a Cambodian teacher proudly presented a word-

amazing program, which ensures a whole village, adults and children

processed booklet he had created on the computer with accompanying

included, have access to a brighter future and the power to make

photos about his family. He had spent all night putting it together.”

positive changes in their lives.

Determined to provide ongoing support, this team of teachers


BBC ARTS | 31

BBC ARTS

32 Highest Honour BBC Music students perform in Opera Queensland and Opera Australia productions

35 Summer of the Aliens Old Collegian James Dyke delivers an acclaimed performance in his first professional role

38 Highland Gathering BBC's Pipers head to MacLean impressing with award winning performances

Music upon twilight BBC' S FIRST MUSIC EVENT IN 2012

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


32 | BBC ARTS

HIGHEST HONOUR IT’S NOT EVERY DAY THAT 12 STUDENTS FROM THE ONE SCHOOL ARE INVITED TO PERFORM IN MULTIPLE PRODUCTIONS FROM THE 2012 OPERA QUEENSLAND AND OPERA AUSTRALIA SEASONS.


BBC ARTS | 33

BELOW AND RIGHT: SCENES FROM THE MAGIC FLUTE AND A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM. PHOTO COURTESY OPERA AUSTRALIA/ JEFF BUSBY

Opera Queensland’s Head of Music/Tour Chorusmaster for Opera Australia, Narelle French, was blown away by the talent shown by a number of BBC students at The Magic Flute auditions – an Opera Australia production which is set to hit the stage in May. As a result, Narelle recently paid a visit to the College where a number of boys auditioned for the Brisbane season of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. From these auditions, eight boys were offered paid professional roles in A Midsummer Night’s Dream and a further three in The Magic Flute. Among the boys selected for The Magic Flute was Year 7 student Jude Korab, who was also selected as a soloist in Opera Queensland’s Macbeth in Concert, performing during the Easter holidays alongside BBC’s Director of Choral Studies Mr Brett Holland and part time Vocal Tutor Mr Shelden Mathieson. “These extraordinary opportunities are availed to very few performers young or old. To be offered paid professional roles with both the state and national company is amazing – there really is no higher honour for these boys,” Mr Holland said. Brett contends that the boys’ success can be greatly attributed to the opportunities on offer at the College. “We carefully select our music staff and all are strong professionals who stay on top of their field working not only as teachers and conductors but in a professional capacity within the industry,” he said. “In addition to our academic and cocurricular music programs, we also provide private lessons, which means boys can access first-class resources all in the one location.” Brett has a long-standing association with Opera Queensland, having performed in many of their productions and will also sing alongside BBC boys in The Magic Flute.

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


34 | BBC ARTS

“THESE EXTRAORDINARY OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILED TO

BRETT HOLLAND WITH THE 12 BOYS SELECTED TO PERFORM WITH OPERA QUEENSLAND AND OPERA AUSTRALIA

VERY FEW PERFORMERS YOUNG OR OLD. TO BE OFFERED PAID PROFESSIONAL ROLES WITH BOTH THE STATE AND NATIONAL COMPANY IS AMAZING…”

THE MAGIC FLUTE Welcome to a world where animals

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM Deep in the forest the fairies are stirring.

MACBETH IN CONCERT This is the classic tale of Macbeth. The

dance and children fly, where princes battle

A Midsummer Night’s Dream is coming to

story of a Scottish nobleman whose gallant

dragons and hope battles despair. To a

Brisbane. As Benjamin Britten’s spell-

code of honour is soon awash in the spilt

world where ideas matter, and music saves

bindingly beautiful score slips seductively

blood of his friends and family. Treachery

the day. It's a magical experience for the

out of the orchestra pit, discover a place

and deceit descend like a dark fog upon

whole family in Mozart’s The Magic Flute.

where Indian gods, British colonials

a once self-sacrificing man whose corrupt

and rustic clowns collide, collude and

fate drives him, his love and his nation into

sometimes fall in love.

violence and disaster.

BBC CAST LIST Jude Korab Lewis Scott

BBC CAST LIST

BBC CAST LIST

Thomas Yarrow

Stewart Lucas

Jude Korab

Michael Latino Will Scammell Thomas Church Lachlan Campbell Maxwell Pringle Kurt Neumann Sami Heinonen-Barnes William McFarlane


BBC ARTS | 35

SUMMER OF MUSIC THE ALIENS CAMP HAVING PLAYED NUMEROUS ROLES IN SCHOOL THEATRE PRODUCTIONS INCLUDING

More than 120 music students from six

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM AND AWAY, BBC OLD COLLEGIAN JAMES DYKE, WHO

ensembles including BBC Singers, Stage

GRADUATED JUST LAST YEAR, RECENTLY PERFORMED IN HIS FIRST PROFESSIONAL

Intermezzo Strings and Hudson Strings

ROLE IN THE BRISBANE ARTS THEATRE 'SUMMER OF THE ALIENS' BY AUSTRALIAN PLAYWRIGHT LOUIS NOWRA.

Band, Wind Ensemble, Concert Band, attended this year’s Intermediate Ensemble Music Camp at QCCC Brookfield. The camp provides an invaluable opportunity for ensembles to develop with students able to participate in a concentrated program where they can clearly focus on the music, outside of their normal school routines.

Set in the 1960s in a housing

commenting, “…it’s the young cast in this

commission area north of Melbourne, in the

production that carry a disproportionate

time of the Cold War and the Cuban Missile

amount of the drama with aplomb.”

crisis in America, the production tells the

“James Dyke – recently accepted into

tale of Lewis who is obsessed with aliens

Queensland University of Technology’s BFA

and yet utterly confused by humans.

course – is a local actor to keep an eye

Originally written as a radio play the

on, effortlessly comfortable in a role first

production includes numerous scene and

performed on stage by Vince Colosimo,”

time changes, a much greater challenge on

he said.

stage than for it’s original medium. James plays a brash young man named Brian, friend to Lewis who is constantly confronted by the realities of adulthood. The production was warmly received with Arts Hub writer Peter Taggart

ABOVE LEFT: JAMES DYKE PERFORMING IN BBC’S 2011 PRODUCTION OF AWAY

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


36 | BBC ARTS

MUSIC UPON TWILIGHT

DESPITE HAVING UNDER A TERM TO PREPARE, BBC MUSIC STUDENTS DELIVERED STUNNING PERFORMANCES AT THE TWILIGHT CONCERT, WHICH MARKED THE FIRST MUSIC EVENT FOR THE YEAR. The night included performances from BBC’s Senior Music Ensembles including the Camerata, Collegians, Big Band, Symphonic Band, College Strings, Symphony Orchestra and Pipe Band. The Collegians delivered a rendition of the timeless classic The Lion Sleeps Tonight, whilst the Symphony Orchestra wowed audiences with their music from Lord of the Dance. A new format also saw the concert double as an induction ceremony for the 2012 Junior, Middle and Senior School Music Leaders.


BBC ARTS | 37

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


38 | BBC ARTS

HIGHLAND GATHERING BBC PIPERS TRAVELLED TO THE SMALL TOWN OF MACLEAN IN NEW SOUTH WALES DURING APRIL TO COMPETE IN THE TOWN’S HIGHLAND GATHERING, TAKING HOME MULTIPLE TITLES AND AWARDS AT THE EVENT. Year 10 student James Senanayake was awarded first place in the Elementary Slow Air and March, Overall Champion Elementary Piper and the Piping Scholarship Award. Ryan Hickey also delivered outstanding performances to secure first place in the Elementary Bass Drum, Learner Drum Pad, second in the Elementary Tenor Drum as well as earning a Drumming Scholarship Award. Year 12 student Andrew McColl placed first in the Drum Major Competition whilst Angus Briggs and Bradley Bloom were awarded first and third place respectively in the Learner Chanter event. This was a fantastic achievement with BBC boys represented in 33 individual solo performances, competing against players from other bands, many being adult entrants. LEFT: YEAR 10 PIPER JAMES SENANAYAKE

STRONG PERFORMANCE

PRESTIGIOUS RECOGNITION

Playing against a strong set of competitors, Year 11 boy Lachlan McPhee delivered a solid performance to secure third place in the Queensland Highland Pipers Society Junior Air and Jig Competition. Held at Balmoral Bowls Club, Lachlan gained wonderful feedback from the judges on the evening.

Earlier this year, BBC Captain of Music Tim Whittle was presented with two awards at the Trinity College London Awards program held at the Brisbane Sebel and Citigate in King George Square. In his examinations Tim secured Top of State Music in Grade 8 and the Senior (Silver) Medal. Trinity College London, a leading international examinations board, provides international qualifications across a range of disciplines including music, creative and performing arts. They were one of the first boards to examine candidates in music in Australia and now provide opportunities for Australian musicians across the country. Trinity grades and awards are highly regarded and recognised by universities, allowing students to accumulate additional bonus points which can assist them in securing their tertiary course of choice.


BBC SPORT | 39

BBC SPORT 40 Wallaby greats BBC Old Boys James Horwill and Will Genia return to the College to kick start the rugby season

41 A sporting chance out west A unique opportunity for Australian children living in the Western Downs region

43 Talent pool BBC Swimmers secure outstanding results at recent state and national meets

Grand slam PR IM A R Y TENNIS CH A MPIONS

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


40 | BBC SPORT

WALLABY GREATS

WALLABY CAPTAIN AND VICE CAPTIN JAMES HORWIL (BBC 2002) AND WILL GENIA (BBC 2005) RECENTLY VISITED THE COLLEGE, DRAWING HUGE CROWDS TO THE SCHOOL’S SPORTS COMPLEX TO HELP KICK START TERM 2 TRAINING AND RUGBY CIC SEASON. BBC boys have been

XV this season, while Ben

program, run by resident

defence skills and increase

readying themselves for

handles the administrative

Strength and Conditioning

fitness levels,” he said.

the 2012 season, having

side of the program as Sports

Coach and BBC Old Boy Tim

commenced training in Term 4 last year, under the guidance of

Administrator (Rugby). According to Tom, they’ve

Mosey,” Mr Barker said. “During Term 1 we also

holidays at Twin Waters on the Sunshine Coast, providing boys

Tom Barker and Ben Spearritt

introduced a number of new

encouraged boys to attend a

who are directing the College’s

regimes to help prepare the

fortnightly session in wrestling

Rugby program this year.

boys for the challenges ahead.

and combative skills and these

“Every boy from Years 5

were extremely well attended.

Tom has taken on the role

The first rugby camp was also held during the Easter

of Coaching Director (Rugby)

to 12 has the opportunity

These high energy sessions

and will also coach the First

to participate in a weights

are designed to develop strong

with the opportunity to train prior to the season’s start in Term 3. ABOVE: JAMES HORWILL AND WILL GENIA WITH BBC RUGBY PLAYERS BRAEDEN HOOD AND TOM REID


BBC SPORT | 41

A SPORTING CHANCE OUT WEST

BBC HIT THE ROAD IN APRIL IN A BID TO BRING UNIQUE OPPORTUNITIES TO AUSTRALIAN CHILDREN LIVING IN THE WESTERN DOWNS REGION. ON WEDNESDAY 4 AND THURSDAY 5 APRIL MORE THAN 120 CHILDREN, FROM TOWNS AS FAR AS ST GEORGE, MITCHELL, CHINCHILLA, DALBY AND MILES, DESCENDED ON ROMA TO PARTICIPATE IN BBC’S EASTER MULTI-SPORTS CLINIC. Provided free of charge for boys and girls aged between 7 and 14 years, the clinic provided participants with an opportunity to experience and access expert coaching in tennis, rugby, cricket, netball, AFL and gymnastics. Held in conjunction with the Easter in the Country Festival, it was an opportune time for BBC to catch up with boarding families, old collegians and friends of the College with BBC hosting a social function on 4 April at The Club Hotel.

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


42 | BBC SPORT

IN SEASON

TERM 1 SAW THE COMPLETION OF VOLLEYBALL, SAILING, SWIMMING AND CRICKET. DESPITE RECORDING STRONG RESULTS, THE OVERALL LADDER DOES LITTLE TO TELL THE STORIES OF REMARKABLE PERSONAL BESTS, THOSE HOTLY CONTESTED VICTORIES AND THE UNRIVALED SPIRIT OF BBC COMPETITORS AND SPECTATORS ALIKE. HERE WE BRING YOU THIS SEASON’S HIGHLIGHTS IN SNAPSHOTS.

CRICKET AUSTRALIA CALL-UP

WAVE OF SUCCESS

INTERNATIONAL ARENA

Having been selected for the Australian Under 17 team in December last year, Year 12 student Harrison Jones was recently invited to attend the Australian Under 18 talent camp, conducted by Cricket Australia. According to BBC’s Director of Cricket David Marriott, Harrison is our first Australian representative since Chris Hartley played for the national Under 19 side.

Year 11 student Scott Pegg continues to experience success in the surf. In the Surf Life Saving State Titles Scott secured first in the Under 17 Surf Swim and second in the Surf Teams and Taplin Relay. His performances saw him secure a place in the Australian titles, which were unfortunately marred by the tragic loss of friend and fellow teammate Matt Barclay on day one of the competition. Under extremely difficult circumstances, competition commenced on day three at Kirra Beach which saw Scott compete as a semifinalist in the Under 17 Ironman race and as a finalist in the Under 17 Surf Swim and Belt Race.

At just 17 years of age, Year 12 student Harry Jones has been selected to stroke in the Under 19 Australian Junior Coxless Quad for the upcoming world championships in Bulgaria in August. Harry was selected for the team after securing third overall in the Sculling trials and winning the Seat Racing undefeated. Harry was joined by fellow Year 12 student Adam Edwards at the trials event and the pair recently attended Rowing Australia’s Junior Development Camp, held at the Australian Institute of Sport’s rowing facility in Canberra. Only 14 participants from across the country were invited to attend the camp.


BBC SPORT | 43

TALENT POOL BBC Swimmers have experienced outstanding results in both state and national meets. Ben Carlyon (Year 7) competed in the Queensland Primary Schools Swimming Championships, obtaining two gold, two silver and a bronze medal. In his Backstroke event, in which he placed first, Ben also broke the Queensland primary school record of 30.77s. He then went on to compete in the recent Queensland State Swimming Championships alongside Alexei Gantimuroff where they secured first place in the 12 Years 50m Backstroke and 50m Butterfly respectively, with Alexei closely following Ben in the backstroke event to secure second place. At the end of the day Alexei finished with three silver and a bronze medal. Year 8 student Joshua Crean swam in five races, claiming a bronze medal in the 50m Backstroke, while Year 9 student Baillie Paties helped secure a silver and a bronze medal for the 4x50 Freestyle and 4x50 Medley Relay teams respectively (Year 8 student Will Abraham was also part of the Medley team). BBC boys also experienced great success at the Swimming Australia National Age Championships with Year 9 student Elliott Mitchell

ON TRACK

REAPING THE REWARDS

Jeremy Briggs (Year 10) and Jack Johannsen (Year 11) represented Queensland at the 2012 Australian Junior Athletics Championships in Sydney during March. Jeremy delivered a strong performance to finish sixth in the Under 16 3000m national final. The boys joined old collegian Issac Wohlsen (BBC 2011) at the event, who competed in the Under 20 100m and 200m, securing fifth place in the 200m final. He was also a member of the Queensland Under 20 4x100m relay team, who won gold.

Hard work and determination sees cyclist and Year 12 student Owen Gillott continue to reap the rewards. Late last year he was awarded a gold, silver and two bronze medials in the Under 19 Queensland State Track Cycling Championships. He also earned his first national medal, as a member of the Queensland team, at the national championships in Adelaide in March where he was awarded bronze in the Maddison event. His efforts have taken him abroad with Owen competing in the recent Oceania Time Trial and Road Championships in Queenstown, New Zealand.

competing in five events in which he secured a personal best for each as well as finishing third in the 200m butterfly. Alexei Gantimuroff competed in the combined 12 – 13 age 100m Butterfly securing second place with a personal best of 1:05.98 seconds. Brothers James and Peter Mills also delivered strong.

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


44 | BBC SPORT

GRAND SLAM

AS TENNIS GREATS BATTLED IT OUT AT THE PAT RAFTER ARENA IN THE AUSTRALIAN OPEN SERIES, SOME OF OUR VERY OWN BBC BOYS WERE WELL ON THEIR WAY TO SECURING VICTORY, TAKING HOME THE TITLE OF BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL PRIMARY CHAMPIONS AT THE INAUGURAL EVENT. Held in conjunction with the Brisbane International at the Queensland Tennis Centre, the BBC team (Santokh Bains, Bryn Nuhrung, Max Williams and Oscar Wood) competed against nine other regions to take home the title undefeated. The team earned their place in the finals after BBC players Santokh Bains, Tim Bennett, Kaige Silcock, Max Williams and Oscar Wood beat 13 other teams in the

regionals in October last year. Boys were presented with the Inaugural State Team Trophy on Sunday 8 January with Oscar Wood and Bryn Nahrung also selected in the All Star team. In recognition of their achievements, boys were also given the opportunity to attend the Men’s Singles final of the Brisbane International where Andy Murray defeated Alexandr Dolgopolov.

BRISBANE BARRACUDAS

AFL

TRIATHLON GOLD

Year 10 students Elliot Acworth and Lachlan Lyndon won gold in the recent club Under 16 Water Polo State Championships as members of the Brisbane Barracudas. Lachlan was able to celebrate the victory alongside his father Robert, as the team’s coach, and was also awarded Most Valuable Player. As a result of his performance, Lachlan will join the Queensland Under 16 Water Polo team, who will be travelling to New Zealand in June for the Pan Pacs tournament.

Boarders Francis Woolla and Ujabi Matthew competed in the Under 16 Indigenous AFL carnival during the Easter Holidays. Francis has also been selected for the 40 player squad from which the National Flying Boomerangs team will draw from for their tour to South Africa next year.

BBC students Nic Fadden and Owen Gillott celebrated victory with fellow team members after winning the Junior Male division in the Mooloolaba Triathlon. For the second year running, Owen was the fastest rider for all divisions.


INSIGHT | 45

INSIGHT

R ESE A R CH

R ES OUR CES

PERSPECTIV E

46 Balancing act Clinical Psychologist Judith Locke looks at the big picture on success

49 The Australian Curriculum What it means for your child in Prep

51 3 ways for dealing with feedback BBC’s Matt O’Brien provides strategies for effectively dealing with feedback at school and at home

53 What they’re reading Our resident Teacher Librarians recommend books for children of all ages

Learn a love of reading

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


46 | INSIGHT

BALANCING ACT PROVIDING A BALANCED EDUCATION HAS ALWAYS BEEN CENTRAL TO THE ETHOS OF BBC. PREPARING BOYS FOR THE FUTURE BY DEVELOPING SKILLS SUCH AS FLEXIBILITY OF MIND, STRENGTH OF CHARACTER AND SOCIAL SKILLS IS EQUALLY AS IMPORTANT AS SECURING A GOOD ACADEMIC RESULT. IN THIS EDITION OF COLLEGIAN, OUR CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST JUDITH LOCKE EXPLORES THE NOTION OF SUCCESS IN A WORLD WHERE WE ARE OFTEN MEASURED BY OUR ACHIEVEMENTS ALONE.

As a clinical psychologist in private practice,

academic content and assessment; however, it

personally or as a part of a team or group? Have

I treat a lot of clients with stress and burnout

is not the only indicator. The personal qualities

they got a generally positive attitude that allows

issues. Would it surprise you to know I am

a student has developed give a much better

them to be in the moment, but plan a little for the

seeing these issues increasingly in school age or

sense of who they are and what they are likely

future, and not ruminate on the past?

university age clients?

to accomplish. More importantly, it is highly

The answers to these questions need to

There appears to be increasing pressure

likely that if they have only focused on achieving

be included when determining your child’s

on children at school and a lot of it centres on

academic success, they have lost a lot of

accomplishments. Your own success is not only

working toward one goal – achieving a good OP

opportunities to develop other strengths and are

measured by your numbers (your salary, your

score. It’s a shame there is such an emphasis

more likely to be facing the risk of burnout or

weight etc.) and if you did worry about only one

on this particular aspect of a child’s schooling.

difficulty in living a balanced life.

of your numbers, it is highly likely that the quality

While a good OP score typically means the child

There are many other good indicators of

has worked hard and developed study skills,

achievement for your child. Have they got a good

of the rest of your life would be reduced as you

the usefulness of a good OP score pretty much

attitude to learning and are genuinely interested

Your child should end up with so much

runs out the moment they are accepted into the

in knowing more about the world and improving

more than an academic record when they leave

university they want to attend. It is probably the

their knowledge? Have they learnt cooperation

school. Scholarly success is not the only area of

most emphasised but least useful measure of a

and social skills? Have they developed their moral

accomplishment that is important to our sense

child.

toiled at the gym or the workplace.

compass and are they actively seeking to make

of self and our contribution to the world. We

What your child ends up with at school

the world a better place? Are they starting to

need to make sure we are actively encouraging

is not just a number. It is a range of qualities

shake off the egocentricity of youth and thinking

the development of all the potential positive

and character traits, which will stand them in

equally of the needs of their community as well

traits in our children so as to give them the best

good stead for living a happy, productive and

as their own desires? Have they got sporting and

chance for a good and happy life.

balanced life. The OP score is one indicator of

other interests they don’t only pursue for glory,

their success in mastering a particular type of

but because they genuinely enjoy the activity,

continued overleaf


INSIGHT | 47

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


48 | INSIGHT

BALANCING ACT How can you encourage other positive traits in your child?

1

3

6

EXERCISE AND SOCIALISE

DOWNTIME

COMMUNICATE

Whilst

and

Children need downtime where they are

Have your child be part of a discussion

assignments should be set aside – it is

time

for

homework

learning how to amuse themselves – this

on whether their report card is a good

important to include other activities in

means they need to have time where no

reflection of themselves and shows their

the timetable – exercise, socialising with

activities are planned and you don’t keep

life to be balanced in academic, social,

family and friends.

them busy.

sporting and other interests.

2

4

7

TIME MANAGEMENT

ALL ROUNDER

ROLE MODEL

Make sure you give equal attention to their achievements in all areas including their

positive

social

and

emotional

achievements, not just their academic results.

Limit the time they spend on study to be a realistic amount of time to get homework and assignments finished. Ensure they judge their study as to its effectiveness in understanding the work or finishing assignments, and not just how long they sat at their desk.

5 READ BETWEEN THE LINES Don’t make the numbers on a report card the final summary of their year. Pay attention to the comments on their effort and attitudes, as well as their results.

Practice

a

balanced

life

yourself.

Model a life not only focused on your responsibilities at work or at home. Exercise, reading, seeing friends and downtime are as important for parents as they are for their children.


INSIGHT | 49

THE AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM:

WHAT IT MEANS FOR YOUR CHILD IN PREP BY JAN HEFFERNAN, BBC DEPUTY HEAD OF TEACHING AND LEARNING (JUNIOR SCHOOL) PREP IS MUCH LIKE BUILDING THE FOUNDATIONS OF A HOUSE; AS WITH A HOUSE, STUDENTS NEED A FIRM FOOTING ON WHICH TO BUILD THEIR SKILLS AND TALENTS. WITH THE INTRODUCTION OF THE AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM, WHICH NOW STIPULATES VERY SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES FOR CHILDREN IN THEIR FIRST YEAR OF SCHOOLING, PREP IS NOW MORE THAN EVER WHERE THE GROUNDWORK FOR FURTHER LEARNING IS LAID.

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


50 | INSIGHT

IN THE EARLY YEARS

PRIORITY IS GIVEN TO LITERACY AND NUMERACY, WITH BOTH REINFORCED AND STRENGTHENED THROUGH LEARNING IN OTHER CONTEXTS INCLUDING SCIENCE, HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY. AT BBC THESE KEY AREAS ARE ADDRESSED THROUGH THE DEVELOPMENT OF FINE MOTOR SKILLS IN READINESS FOR WRITING, PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS IN READINESS FOR READING AND HABITS OF MIND DESIGNED TO HELP STUDENTS DEVELOP STRATEGIES FOR BECOMING SELF-DIRECTED LEARNERS. SO HOW DOES THIS ALL EQUATE WHEN IT COMES TO WHAT’S HAPPENING IN THE CLASSROOM? JAN EXPLAINS BELOW.

BUILDING A SUCCESSFUL FOUNDATION FINE MOTOR SKILLS

PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS

HABITS OF MIND

WHAT ARE THEY?

WHAT IS IT?

WHAT ARE THEY?

The underlying skills for writing which

A crucial foundation skill for the

require the use of the small muscles of the

development of reading and spelling.

hands. One aspect of fine motor skills is

The set of skills underlying the

A collection of 16 thinking dispositions identified by Professor Arthur Costa. The dispositions are displayed by people

visual motor integration, which is critical for

acquisition of literacy i.e. what we need to

when confronted with problems where the

writing. Visual motor integration is the ability

learn to read and write. It includes the ability

solutions are not immediately apparent.

to take what you see and work out how to

to attend to, identify and manipulate sounds

draw it, such as copying the letter ‘a’.

in words.

WHAT’S HAPPENED IN THE CLASSROOM IN TERM 1

WHAT’S HAPPENED IN THE CLASSROOM IN TERM 1

WHAT’S HAPPENED IN THE CLASSROOM IN TERM 1

Grasping – using a crayon, pencil, brush,

The focus has been on developing the

glue stick

boys’ understanding of the words we use to

Managing your impulsivity

'talk about literacy'.

Striving for accuracy

Persisting

Manipulating – play dough, small blocks, paper, scissors

The boys have learnt the meaning and identification of:

Hand-eye coordination – writing, cutting, threading, moving a cursor

story

sentence

word

syllable

sound

The focus has been on:

Listening with understanding and empathy

They have been talking about what are sounds, words and letters. They have also been learning to identify syllables through a coordinated music/academic program where they clap/stamp/sing/say the syllables in words.

TRACKING THE DEVELOPMENT OF SKILLS At BBC we track the development of the skills required for writing, reading and spelling in each individual student. The screening of the Prep boys at the beginning of the year informs the teacher of the student’s progress along the continuum of these skills. Suggestions for development are done in consultation with our educational occupational therapist and speech pathologist. Development of these skills is incorporated into the specific class curriculum thereby ensuring a coordinated approach for each student.


INSIGHT | 51

WAYS FOR DEALING WITH FEEDBACK BBC’S DEAN OF STUDIES MATTHEW O’BRIEN EXAMINES THREE AREAS OF FEEDBACK COMMONLY ENCOUNTERED BY STUDENTS AND PARENTS, LOOKING AT STRATEGIES FOR EFFECTIVELY UTILISING THIS AT SCHOOL AND AT HOME. Feedback is something we all receive, nearly every day of our lives. Whether it is the reassuring push back of the brake pedal as we slow our car down at an intersection, the email you get from a colleague or boss telling what a good (or bad!) job we have

1

THE ASSIGNMENT OR TEST

AT HOME It’s important to remember that the feedback is not a reflection of you as a parent; it is simply there to help your son progress to the next level. Go through the feedback with your son, relating it back to the specifics of the task that was conducted. It is also important that parents

done, or the caring child or spouse telling There are two main types of assessment in

know their son’s strengths and weaknesses,

Every time we receive feedback, it either

schools. The first is formative assessment, used

so that when you are inevitably asked, “mum/

reassures us that we are doing a good job,

to assess student current knowledge and skill

dad can you read this?” you know the mistakes

motivates us to keep going, or change what

level e.g. diagnostic tests, draft assignments

made previously and areas to work on.

we are doing for improvement.

and practice tests or questions. The second

us “you know that would be better if you...”.

In schools, students and parents also

form of assessment is summative, which

AT SCHOOL

receive vast amounts of feedback in

normally occurs at the end of a segment of

Where it is necessary, encourage your

various ways. But what should we do with

learning, used for overall grading purposes

son to seek clarification or elaboration from

the feedback? How can we best use this

such as assignments, essays and exams. No

the teacher. A proactive way of doing this is

to shape our young and impressionable

matter what the assessment type, students

described in the great free resource ‘Study

children? We examine three types of

will normally receive feedback on their attempt,

Guides and Strategies’ available at http://

feedback and look at how parents can

in the form of a comment from the teacher,

tinyurl.com/f3dbck. The strategy is to create

facilitate and encourage the effective use of

a grade on a paper, a score on a test or a

a summary table or graphic organiser of the

this at home and at school.

standard marked on a criteria sheet.

feedback given. This has two main sections

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


52 | INSIGHT – issues or feedback that is understood by the student, and issues or feedback that is not understood by the student. By reshaping teacher feedback into a table like this, the student is assisted to identify the major and minor issues, and in the meeting with the teacher, can obtain understanding of the issues, recording any actions that need to be completed as follow up.

2

THE SCHOOL REPORT Students normally receive reports four times a year, interim reports that are written in the middle of each semester and semester reports that are written at the end of each semester. Interim reports often do not have grades, instead including comments indicating progress. Semester reports have grades and usually a comment indicating strategies

school, student and parents. In Term 2 and 3,

take these events personally, instead relying on

students should employ to improve. Most

parent teacher interviews follow the reporting

the expertise and professionalism of the staff

schools also report a Grade Point Average

period – it may be appropriate for this to be

involved with the activity.

(GPA), indicating the average academic

a two way conference (parent and teacher)

performance across all academic subjects

or three way conference (parent, teacher and

providing an aggregated snapshot of your son’s

student). Consider how you can use this time

performance at that time.

to additionally reinforce goals and expectations

comfort and protect our children and this

with your son.

should come first. However, once the dust has

AT HOME The school report contains a lot of information on every subject your son studies and it is strongly recommended that you spend quality time to discuss the details of this collaboratively with your son. Which subjects are his strengths and weaknesses? Why? How can improvements be made? Because reporting is approximately every 10 weeks,

AT HOME Part of our job as parents is to support,

settled, it is important to use the feedback they

3

THE SPORTING FIELD

have received to react positively, setting new goals and developing strategies to achieve them. It is OK to recognise disappointment, feeling frustrated or upset - it is also just as important to set new goals, outline the strategies for improving, seek further and more specific feedback and move forward.

Competitive and non-competitive curricular

this is the perfect time to assess, re-evaluate

activities often cause the most angst with

and make new SMART goals with your son

students, especially if they receive feedback

(Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic,

in the form of not making the desired team,

provides an ideal opportunity for a student to

Timely). A goal for each subject should be

division or level, or losing an important

develop independence and communication

written up somewhere publicly in the home,

match or race. As parents, it is easy to take

skills that will transfer into all aspects of their

where you are all reminded about them

this personally and it is common place for

life. Rather than picking up the phone or

regularly.

parents to sub-consciously internalise these

sending an email on their behalf, you should

'disappointments' causing a reaction based on

encourage your son to speak with coaches,

their past experiences or feelings. I personally

selectors or managers in order for them to

experienced this type of emotional response

obtain the specific feedback they need. In doing

during study or pastoral time at the start of

when watching my wife’s reaction when

so, they continue down the path of becoming

each semester. Completing this task both at

my daughter did not progress to the next

independent young men with the ability to solve

home and school reinforces the three-way

swimming lessons level with some of her class.

their own problems or issues, no matter what

partnership that is in operation between the

It is extremely important to remember not to

the context.

AT SCHOOL Most schools conduct goal-setting exercises

AT SCHOOL A disappointment in a co-curricular context


INSIGHT | 53

WHAT THEY’RE READING IN RECOGNITION OF THE NATIONAL YEAR OF READING, OUR RESIDENT TEACHER LIBRARIANS RECOMMEND BOOKS FOR CHILDREN OF ALL AGES.

I LOVE YOU BOOK

THE RECRUIT

THE HUNGER GAMES

by Libby Hathorn and illustrated

by Robert Muchamore

by Suzanne Collins

by Heath McKenzie

For: Children from 12 – 15 years

For: Young Adults

If I had to choose one single book in the Middle School Library which has appealed to any boy I have ever recommended it to, then it would have to be The Recruit, the first in the Cherub series by British author Robert Muchamore. When I set out to write this review, I said to myself, “No, I will not jump on the Cherub bandwagon” of worldwide popularity. But BBC Library borrowing figures say it all – The Recruit has been borrowed more often than any other book in the Library every year without fail since its publication in 2004. It is about undercover agents who are no older than 17. A terrorist would not allow strangers into his flat because they might be undercover police or intelligence agents, but children pose no apparent threat. The terrorist doesn’t know that one of the children is a Cherub agent and has bugged every room in the house, cloned the hard drive on the PC and copied all the numbers in his phone book. There are no master criminals or high-tech gadgets in the novels. Cherub agents live in the real world. They slip under adult radar and get information that sends criminals and terrorists to jail. For official purposes, these children do not exist. If your son would like something exciting, then you cannot go past The Recruit!

In case you’re one of the few who haven’t heard the news, The Hunger Games is the current ‘blockbuster’, both as a novel and now as a movie (think Mad Max meets Survivor!). The BBC Library has five paper copies and two eBooks on Overdrive, and still the waiting list is over 20! The Hunger Games is one of the increasingly popular genre of futuristic dystopian novels, where a repressed society is breaking down, usually because of ‘big bad government, big bad corporations, or big bad aliens’, as one writer put it. Here, what's left of the United States is now called Panem, a country with 12 postapocalyptic districts that hold an annual televised event, The Hunger Games. One boy and one girl from each district is entered, and the rules are simple: there can only be one winner. The 16-year-old Katniss Everdeen represents District 12 by taking her younger sister's place in the games and finds herself in a battle for survival.

For: Young children This is a wonderful book inspired by the authors visit to Papua New Guinea. It shares the joy of children as well as adults learning to read. Three mothers in Papua New Guinea shared their new ability to read by performing a “book drama” which this book is named after. The book is about how reading a book takes the reader to wonderful fantasy lands as well as the experience that a book gives through the simple task of turning the pages. This book is well written with beautiful illustrations. The Junior School Library has one copy of this book at this stage. The teacher/librarian will be introducing this book to some of the classes. DJ Williamson TEACHER LIBRARIAN

Jennifer King HEAD OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Elaine Mowat TEACHER LIBRARIAN

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


54 | INSIGHT

LEARN A LOVE OF READING

ONLINE RESOURCES

JUNIOR SCHOOL TEACHER LIBRARIAN ALAN RUSSEL RECOMMENDS THE FOLLOWING TIPS TAKEN FROM THE ASHTON SCHOLASTIC BOOK CLUB ON HOW PARENTS CAN HELP THEIR CHILDREN TO LOVE READING. HERE ARE SOME WAYS PARENTS CAN SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE SCHOOL.

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC FOR KIDS 1 Let your child see you reading - for enjoyment, for news, and for information in cookery books, directories, manuals etc. In this way children will see that reading is important to you for many reasons. 2 Read to your child often. Try to set aside a short period each day for this. Choose a quiet, special time - for instance, bedtime. Reading aloud together should continue, even when your child can read well.

kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids For: children aged 8 - 10 National Geographic for Kids provides endless information, which is presented in an engaging and interactive format. Children can travel to different places, explore new environments and learn about animals across the globe through imagery, video and quizzes. It’s a great resource for school assignments or for those simply looking for some new activities or games.

3 Take the time to talk about the books you read with your children. This helps establish the fact that books are things to talk about and that reading generates ideas, opinions and questions. 4 Build up your child’s personal collection of books. Give books as presents on special occassions. Take your child to book shops and browse together. 5 Visit your local library on a regular basis to choose books and encourage your child to get involved in the library’s activity programs. 6 Write your supermarket shopping list clearly and ask your child to help you read it in the shop. This can be fun, and it helps your child to build a sight vocabulary based on familiar things. 7 Consider a subscription to a children’s magazine. Magazines can be good reading for pleasure and information, and children enjoy receiving their own post. 8 Reading is what makes better readers. Do all you can to make reading a pleasurable and useful activity - and watch your child respond.

EEKOWORLD http://pbskids.org/eekoworld For: children aged 5-6 EekoWorld allows children to learn about the environment all while having fun! Most of the information is presented with voice over, so young children can learn too. Children can create their own EekoCreature and use it to explore various environments. The site also includes an Eeko Exchange where children can share their very own sustainability tips.


CONNECT | 55

CONNECT OLD COLLEGIANS

WHER E A R E THEY NOW

EV ENTS

56 Fraternity A few words about strong bonds from the President of the Old Collegians' Association

62 Hailing Hartley Read about the success of the dynamic Queensland Bulls wicketkeeper

65 Five Minutes 2011 Old Boy Xavier Small interviews BBC's fifth Rhodes Scholar Michael Huggins

67 Mixing it up Find out about the stellar career of Stuart Matchett in the music industry

69 Where are they now?

Undercover boss EMPLOY ER OF THE Y E A R IMAGE COURTESY NEWSPIX/ ALAN PRYKE

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


56 | CONNECT

FRATERNITY: STRONG BONDS

It’s my pleasure to help launch the first amalgamation of Collegian and Sons of the College. It is great to see old collegian stories highlighted in such a way that all the BBC community can enjoy! A year has passed so quickly since the OCA Presidency found me and like all jobs that call for a passionate approach it has taken far more effort and energy than I’d anticipated. That said it’s been a pleasure to work with Alex Persley and the Executive Committee. Our new Director of Development Bren Arkinstall dived straight into the deep end of the pool and has been a great help getting the OCA back on track. Andrew Macarthur continues to head up the BBC Foundation and he has been a great help with our quest for a full time Old Boy Alumni Officer. For the most part, old collegians see very little that goes on behind the scenes with their association and therein sits my raison d'etre. Quality communication is the lifeblood of any organisation and most of my effort has been to improve the way the OCA communicates with its members. It’s a great pleasure to announce that Old Boy Philip Winning has completed the new BBC Old Collegians website. We’re now looking for content to fill our slice of cyberspace with stories, anecdotes, photos and movies that you’d like to share with your mates from school. Our Facebook page is also going

strong and with almost 800 members, it reflects our initiative to engage younger old collegians as they leave school rather than 10 years later at a reunion when many contact details have been lost. Running BBC is a huge task today and many people work very hard to ensure that our proud heritage is there for all to see. One such person is Jackie McPherson, Chair of the College Council. Jackie delivered an inspirational recital of In Flanders Fields at the ANZAC Day service this year, recognising old collegians who died while serving their country. The new war memorial was also unveiled at this service and it is an amazing salute to our fallen collegians. Tom Law (2011 School Captain) has attended every executive meeting since joining the OCA after graduating from BBC. Tom has given us insights into the way students see the OCA and has made a valuable contribution in a short space of time. We intend to make it a tradition that a school leader from the Year 12 cohort is invited to sit on the executive and help us transit his colleagues to active membership of the OCA. Many of you will be unaware that the OCA has a constitution and that the association has had a number of different structures since its launch in 1920. The current executive recently undertook a strategic planning exercise, an Alex Persley initiative, from which

evolved a number of time-framed goals and objectives that are now outlined in our action plan. I’ve touched on the communication elements above and will continue to keep you updated as the plan further develops. We’re also looking for old boy email addresses to enable us to send regular updates. Please send your details to development@bbc.qld.edu.au so we can stay in touch. Old Boys' Day and the Annual Dinner on 11 August are two events not to be missed. We’re working on an exciting format for this year and will advise on the new website, by mail and email as appropriate. We look forward to seeing you there.

PETER DUN OCA PRESIDENT


CONNECT | 57

CONNECT

THIS YEAR THE COLLEGE CELEBRATES ITS 110TH ANNIVERSARY AND LOOKING BACK THROUGH OUR RICH HISTORY, IT’S CLEAR THAT BBC’S FOUNDATIONS ARE VERY MUCH BUILT ON GENEROSITY. The Toowong Campus that we currently occupy was purchased in 1929 for £5000 by the PMSA. The land was offered at a heavily discounted price and with a large portion of the land area being a gift from the owners - the Philp Sisters, who were making a donation to the College in memory of their late father Sir Robert Philp, a former Premier of Queensland. This land enabled the College to transfer from its Clayfield campus and facilitated the growth of the College into the landmark facility it is today. This gift was one of the first acts of generosity to change the education landscape at BBC. Since then, thanks to our generous College community, our campus has grown considerably in strength and stature and now BBC and the BBC Foundation are about to embark on a new era of development. In conjunction with Wilson's Architects, the College has recently completed a largescale consultation process with the various stakeholder groups to identify the priorities of our students, staff, parents, old boys and members of our extended community. The result is an exciting Master Plan for the College, which will form the blueprint for future facilities at BBC. The Oxley Sporting Fields Project is also progressing, with details for this new development just around the corner. Both the Master Plan and Oxley development will provide our boys with worldclass facilities. Just as the College Campus expanded immensely in 1931 to accommodate the evolution of BBC, it is hoped our future plans here at Toowong and Oxley, will ensure our boys continue on their chosen paths of success for the next 110 years.

BREN ARKINSTALL

OLD BOYS WEEKEND SATURDAY 11 AUGUST

Old Boys Day 1:30pm Tour of the College (meet at the vestibule off Kensington Terrace) 2pm

Old Boys BBQ on Miskin Oval

3pm

First XV Rugby Match versus Gregory Terrace, Miskin Oval

5pm

Post Game Drinks in Old Collegians Pavilion at BBC

Old Boys Day is sponsored by the OCA and is complimentary

Old Collegians Annual Dinner Mecure Hotel Brisbane 85/87 North Quay, Brisbane CBD 7pm for 7:30pm Tickets:

$60 includes canapés followed by a two course meal plus beer, wine and soft drink

Dress:

Cocktail/Formal

If you would like to book accommodation at the Mecure please quote reference BBC110812 to receive a 10% discount

T H E WAT PA C

BBC Golf Day Friday 9 November Indooroopilly Golf Club

For further details please contact the Development Office on (07) 3309 3513

DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


58 | CONNECT

As many women will attest, when going from black to natural blonde, orange is about as good as it gets – a reality Hutchinson Builders Chairman and BBC Old Boy Scott Hutchinson oddly discovered late last year. Scott’s strange appearances however were not the result of an identity crisis but rather his involvement in shooting an episode of Channel 10s Undercover Boss Australia. Disguised as new employee ‘John Russell’, Scott visited the Rockhampton Office and the College Street site in Sydney only to be fired after a lackluster performance on reception. Whilst he admits reception is much harder than it looks, Scott is certainty no stranger to hard work, guiding this private fourth generation business to remarkable heights and into their centenary which they celebrate this year.

UNDERCOVER BOSS


CONNECT | 59

FROM THE GROUND UP HAVING WEATHERED TWO WORLD WARS, the depression, numerous economic downturns, not to mention paradigm shifts in technology, transport and organisational management styles, there’s no shortage of milestones to celebrate. In fact, Hutchinson Builders appear to be in better shape than ever with more than 1200 employees, an expected $1.2 billion turnover this financial year and a debt free balance sheet sitting at around $200 million. Yet regardless of their tangible achievements, the company greatly attributes its success to their ‘no compromise’ attitude to the fundamental family values of integrity and respect that have been forged over the last 100 years.

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


60 | CONNECT

Billed as one of the state’s greatest home-

sector, Hutchinson’s has created an award

Brisbane’s inner city identity, George Kyprios

grown success stories, Hutchinson’s recently

winning Workforce Development Strategy. The

(Rock n’ Roll George). The intention was to

had the honour of being the first inductee into

program provides opportunities for apprentice

restore it and drive from Cairns to Hobart. But

the Queensland 400 Hall of Fame – an initiative

recruitment, training and support, post trade,

after discussions with the Queensland Museum

aimed at recognising and celebrating long term

short course and licence training as well as

it was suggested that George’s car should

members of this prestigious program. They

career development.

be kept in its original condition as an historic,

first appeared on the Q400 list in 1991 and

moment in time exhibit. “When heritage experts

are among an elite group of approximately 50

AT THE HEART OF HUTCHINSON’S OR

became involved, we realised that restoration

companies who have remained on the list ever

HUTCHIES, as affectionately referred to by

would destroy the intrinsic values that make

since.

staff, is their culture, which inherently shines

the car so special. Taking advice we decided

through in all they do. For a company that

conservation rather than restoration would be

Hutchinson’s was recently awarded Employer

has experienced such enormous success,

the best option for this classic car,” said Scott.

of the Year at the Australian Training Awards

their ability to engage with not only their staff

So they went to plan B – a replica which,

– the peak national awards for the vocational

but also stakeholders, makes them incredibly

with the help of the Holden Club, they located

education and training sector. The title came

human. More importantly, they’ve remembered

in near perfect condition at Jacob’s Well,

after winning both the regional and state award

to have fun along this 100 year journey, so

halfway between Brisbane and the Gold Coast.

last year. Recognising the need to develop

it’s without surprise that there’s a story or two

The replica was built at the same Newstead

skills in their workforce, particularly Queensland

behind the centenary celebrations.

factory as George’s famous car and despite

To add to the centenary celebrations

and Western Australia, where the company has expanded into mining and the resources

Last year, Hutchies purchased a dilapidated 1952 FX Holden, that had belonged to

being date-stamped four months older, it had clocked up only 38,000 miles.


CONNECT | 61

HUTCHINSON BUILDERS ARE PART OF THE WORLD’S FASTEST GROWING CONSTRUCTION MARKET, WITH THEIR PROJECTS RANGING FROM COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL HIGH-RISE, TO WORK IN THE GOVERNMENT, HEALTH, TOURISM AND INDUSTRIAL SECTORS TO NAME JUST A FEW.

To formally recognise the centenary they’ve

OPPOSITE: SCOTT HUTCHINSON WITH MANAGING DIRECTOR GREG QUINN. IMAGE COURTESY NEWSPIX/ PATRICK HAMILTON ABOVE: HUTCHINSON DEVELOPMENTS INCLUDING THE QUEENSLAND OPERATIONS EMERGENCY CENTRE, SALACIA WATERS PRECINCT AND CHATSWOOD APARTMENTS

clean up, loaning a number of bobcats and

the community residential and marina precinct

also released an illustrated history of Hutchies,

machinery. Incidentally, Jack along with Ben

Salacia Waters at Paradise Point Peninsula,

but Scott warns not to expect the usual

Young (a current team leader at Hutchinson

through to luxury apartments in Chatswood,

company history, “Like everything Hutchies

Builders) also coached the BBC First VIII to win

Sydney – the major commercial and retail hub

does, it is a little bit different,” he said.

the Head of the River in 2002.

of Sydney’s North Shore - due for completion

“Hutchies – the Super Builder is presented

in 2013.

in the genre of the super hero comic books that

FROM HUMBLE BEGININGS IN MANLY,

emerged in the 1950s. The publication is based

Hutchinson’s now has a network of offices

centenary, his vision is clear – to ensure

on the super heroes such as the Phantom,

throughout Australia reaching from Cairns to

Hutchinson’s remains a vibrant, contemporary

Superman and Catwoman, with a bit of Indiana

Hobart, the Bowen Basin to the Pilbara and

and innovative company that maintains a

Jones thrown in.”

Sydney to Perth with their headquarters located

healthy respect for traditional values and the

just round the corner from BBC in Toowong.

proud heritage that has been meticulously

OUTSIDE OF THE LIMELIGHT Scott is a father

They’re part of the world’s fastest growing

to four and husband to Mary, maintaining

construction market, with their projects ranging

strong ties with the College with one son

from commercial and residential high-rise, to

currently at the school and the family involved

work in the government, health, tourism and

in BBC’s Rowing program, particularly Scott’s

industrial sectors to name just a few. Some

Father Jack. When the floods hit last January

of their recent major works include the $46M

the pair were quick to rally with various rowing

Queensland Emergency Operations Centre, the

families, providing immediate support in the

largest of its type in the Southern Hemisphere,

As Scott leads the company into its second

crafted over 100 years.

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HAILING


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EARLIER THIS YEAR THE QUEENSLAND BULLS CLAIMED THE SHEFFIELD SHIELD FOR THE SEVENTH TIME, LED

HARTLEY PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRIS HYDE/ GETTY IMAGES

TO VICTORY BY OUR OWN CHRIS HARTLEY (BBC 1999). IN A HEART STOPPING FOUR-DAY MATCH, IN WHICH BOTH SIDES HELD THE UPPER HAND AT DIFFERENT TIMES, QUEENSLAND TRIUMPHED IN A DRAMATIC THREE-WICKET WIN OVER TASMANIA. COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


64 | CONNECT

There were two heroes for

“I was just saying to Steve play

game of cricket and the purists

Queensland in wicketkeeper

each ball, let them come to us. If

would love it – it doesn’t get better

batsmen Hartley and fast bowler

it's there to hit, swing hard,” he

than that.”

Steve Magoffin. After combining

said.

in the first innings for a vital

Hartley’s performance not

Yet despite his cool façade

only revealed his test match

partnership, where Hartley scored

Hartley was churning on the inside,

temperament, but saw him named

a spectacular century, the pair

with the game taking constant

man-of-the-match receiving

again battled the odds in the

twists and turns, “I really can’t

accolades from Tasmanian Captain

second innings overcoming injury,

describe the feeling. It was so

and Australian Test Cricketer Ricky

illness and a mountain of pressure

nervous and intense out in the

Ponting.

to prevail in a nail biting second

middle, then such jubilation. Every

innings run chase.

ball I was thinking ‘come on Tassie,

deck and only one man (Hartley)

just let up a little bit’. But they

looked comfortable the whole

never did.

game," Ponting said after the Bulls'

Determined to give it their all the pair managed to remain focused following a simple game plan –

“I don’t know if I’ve played in a

“It was not easy to bat on that

seventh Sheffield Shield triumph. "Hartley thoroughly deserved

he has done this week,” he said. “A situation like the other day probably suits his style right down to the ground; a real nuggetty and disciplined innings. We put him down once early but he really didn't offer any chances after that.” Accolades were also rolling in online and for the first time in his career Hartley trended on Twitter. Renowned Australian Businessman Clive Palmer commented, “Well done Chris Hartley. Man of the Match in the Sheffield Shield final

play straight and don’t look at the

better game of cricket than that.

scoreboard. “The more you look at

It was such a hot contest every

his man-of-the-match award. I

and trending on Twitter. He’ll have

the scoreboard, the further away

ball. Some people wrote during the

have not seen a lot of him but you

to join one day#”

the win seems,” said Hartley.

week how it was a really traditional

have to be very impressed by what

IF EVER A WIN DESERVED A LONG-LASTING CELEBRATION IT WAS THE MAJESTICALLY SEE-SAWING SHEFFIELD SHIELD FINAL IN WHICH QUEENSLAND AND TASMANIA SPENT FOUR DAYS WITH THEIR FINGERNAILS DEEPLY EMBEDDED IN EACH OTHER’S THROATS BEFORE TASMANIA, BLUE IN FACE BUT AS BRAVE AS A STORM TROOPER, FELL TO THE FLOOR. ROBERT CRADDOCK, THE COURIER MAIL


CONNECT | 65

FIVE MINUTES WITH A RHODES SCHOLAR FORMER BBC STUDENT AND 1989 SCHOOL CAPTAIN MICHAEL HUGGINS SHARES AN INSIGHT INTO A SUCCESSFUL LIFE AT BBC AND BEYOND, RELISHING THE OPPORTUNITY TO REFLECT ON HIS ‘GLORY’ DAYS AND THE IMPACT THE COLLEGE HAS HAD ON HIS LIFE.

BY XAVIER SMALL (BBC 2011)

What was the highlight of your time at

at school, but the shared BBC experience

a lot about people, how to work with them

BBC?

breaks down barriers immediately – and

and get the most from a team.

Beating Churchie in First XV Rugby and

it’s great to reminisce a little about school

First VIII Rowing! I also had the honour and

life during a normal stressful work day. I

Describe the tough times when you were

privilege to be inspired by the legendary

also think the breadth of education at BBC

studying to become a Rhodes Scholar.

Headmaster, Graham Thomson, and to be

is pretty unique. Sure, study is important,

How important is commitment and time

coached by him in the First XV.

but life after university is much more about

management?

interacting effectively with people, motivating

Without a doubt one of the big things I

Do you feel that as a businessman, being

them and unleashing their potential. BBC

learnt from rowing was time management. I

a BBC Old Boy and a part of the old boys

provides great opportunities to develop these

remember one rowing regatta that coincided

‘network’ has benefited you in any way?

skills: on the sporting field, in leadership

with a set of exams and I probably wasn’t

Definitely! It’s amazing how small the world

positions – all of which play a big role at

as prepared as I should have been. I tried to

is. I’ve come across many BBC Old Boys

BBC. When I look back I realise that playing

make it work by studying in the evening but

in my career, most of whom I didn’t know

in a rugby team and rowing in a crew, I learnt

would fall asleep at my desk exhausted from

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


66 | CONNECT

training. I would set my morning alarm even

from building something every day, but I

so many activities on offer at university,

earlier to study before training until I found

realised I wanted to do more.

you’d be a fool not to make the most

myself getting up at 2.00am to study (and

of it.

consequently collapsing in bed by 7.00pm).

What keeps you awake at night?

After that I realised I had to work throughout

My two-year-old son Charlie – he is fantastic

When planning your career, were there

the year (especially if big regattas were on),

but does seem to wake most nights and

any specific influences that persuaded

and get enough sleep so I could maintain

when he’s awake, he likes everyone to know

you to take the direction you have? Do

concentration when in classes or study.

about it!

you have any tips for students who are

I noticed that you won a silver medal in

What would be your top three study tips

take?

the junior coxless fours. How did you

for young men embarking on a tertiary

For me the key was selecting something I

balance your academic and sporting life?

education?

enjoyed and played to my strengths. Sounds

Rowing for Australia was definitely very

1.

TIME MANAGEMENT: The challenge

obvious but a few of my friends picked things

time intensive but once selected I actually

with university is that unlike school,

because it was seen as cool or it was what

took time off university to focus on it full

there’s no-one on your back. It’s all

their parents expected them to do and it

time. Then after the worlds in France I went

down to you, so self-motivation is key.

didn’t always work out for them. If you follow

backpacking around Europe. This was

This is easier if you choose something

your strengths you’ll do well, and it’s easier to

fantastic - taking a year off really helped

that interests you and plays to your

change direction from a position of success

me to gear up for university life. It wasn’t

strengths.

than when things haven’t worked out.

maybe unsure of a path they want to

common back then to take a gap year but I highly recommend it. It gave me time to

2.

on offer at university and so many things

think about what I really wanted to do and

ABOVE: MICHAEL HUGGINS WITH HIS WIFE KATE AND SON CHARLIE VISITING EXTENDED FAMILY IN ST GEORGE

to pursue that you need to keep a

what was important (in fact I came back

sense of prioritisation and focus. Setting

and started a different course). While rowing

goals upfront helps.

I worked as a construction worker in my father’s business – he said to one of his

SET YOUR GOALS: There is so much

3.

KEEP A BALANCE: I don’t have the

foremen, “work my son hard and toughen

longest of concentration spans so I

him up – you have my permission to get him

found breaking up the day really helped.

to do anything” – and they did. Some days I

Studying can be lonely and boring, so

would come home covered from head to toe

I would break up a day of study with

in concrete! I got a real sense of satisfaction

training, sport and socialising. There are

As Michael takes time out of a very busy schedule to reflect on his time at BBC, some very rewarding tips and words of advice have been shared. Whether you are a current day boy, boarder or even an old boy I’m sure you can relate.


CONNECT | 67

MIXING IT UP OLD COLLEGIAN STUART MATCHETT (1958-1967) HAS ENJOYED A LIFE THAT ANY POPULAR MUSIC ENTHUSIAST WOULD DREAM OF. SINCE LEAVING THE COLLEGE, HE HAS DONE EVERYTHING IMAGINABLE IN THE MUSIC INDUSTRY FROM TOURING THE UK DURING THE HEIGHT OF POP ROCK, TO DISC JOCKEYING FOR VARIOUS RADIO STATIONS IN BRISBANE AND SYDNEY. THIS WIDE-RANGING BACKGROUND IN THE AUSTRALIAN MUSIC INDUSTRY HAS LED STUART TO HIS CURRENT POSITION AS THE CONTENT DIRECTOR OF ABC DIGITAL RADIO.

BY NICK ADERMANN (BBC 2010)

In this position, Stuart (pictured below right) oversees the operations of the different frequencies that the ABC runs. This role is essential due to the shift from analogue to digital radio, and the large increase in audiences in recent years. In the modern age of digital media, these stations collectively receive larger audiences than the previous analogue station. But while some things in the music industry have changed, others, like Stuart’s love for music, have endured. So where did this love emanate? Matchett’s time at BBC was essential in the development of his interest in music. He remembers his time at BBC studying music as some of his fondest memories from high school. One recollection was from a 1967 Year 12 music class, with friends gathered around listening to The Beatles Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band album, which was his idea of a perfect class. It wasn’t all fun and games though, as his parents proved a tough obstacle in his desire to work in music. Rather than chase

an unlikely career in music, they pushed him towards a more stable career in science, which was Stuart’s other academic prowess during his time at BBC (and for four years at The University of Queensland). The progression from high school to his first job as a disc jockey was perhaps some of the more adventurous times in Stuart’s life. While he pondered a suitable career choice, he spent two years (1974-75) in the UK, listening to the wide range of records available and watching live acts such as Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd and Elton John during their prime. It was during this time in the UK when he got offered his first presenting job with 4ZZZ in Brisbane, and the rest is history. With his career in radio and time in the music industry, Stuart has inevitably encountered some big names. When talking about the most influential, he recalled his early days out of school, sharing a house in Brisbane with future drummer for The Go-Betweens, Lindy Morrison and current Australian of the Year, Geoffrey Rush. He

also proudly noted that he sold his own drum kit to Lindy, which would become her first ever kit. In more recent times after his disc jockeying stints, Stuart has settled into positions as project director for popular radio stations 2SM in Sydney and currently the ABC. Still having a fair control over the music that is played is essential in his job and although his days of presenting may be gone, his passion and love for what he does endure.

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


68 | CONNECT

MANLY TO MOOLOOLABA BBC OLD BOY JAKE LILLEY (BBC 2010) HAS BEEN LABELED ONE OF AUSTRALIA’S YOUNGEST UP AND COMING SAILORS AS HE STRIVES TOWARDS A LIFELONG DREAM OF REPRESENTING AUSTRALIA AT OLYMPIC LEVEL. In this year alone Jake has placed first in the Under 19 division and third overall at the Queensland State Championships (Laser Olympic), as well as first in the Under 21 division and second overall in the NSW and ACT State Championships (Laser Olympic). Jake is currently working towards the 2012 European Sailing Season and in a bid to raise his profile and gain support and funding, has announced his first fundraising event – the Laser Manly to Mooloolaba Challenge.

Jake will sail solo, non-stop over the 69 nautical mile journey in his small Laser dinghy to help raise funds for his international campaign but also for the Queensland Cancer Council. “Skin cancer took the life of my grandfather in late 2010 and I plan to donate 20 percent of all monies raised to this charity,” said Jake. “For the last three years I have trained tirelessly, day in, day out from the Royal Queensland Yatch Squadron in the hope of one day becoming an Olympic champion.

This year I hope to compete in three European events including the Skandia Sail for Gold Regatta, ISAF Sailing World Cup events and the European Championships, however gaining support through sponsorship is paramount in achieving these goals,” he said. For Jake, the challenge represents a great opportunity to increase his profile, gain invaluable support whilst raising money for charity and achieving an amazing feat. We wish him all the best in his adventure.


CONNECT | 69

WHERE ARE THEY NOW

DAVID HOOD (BBC 1961) Believing engineers must go beyond what is required by law, BBC Old Boy David Hood has been an advocate for greater sustainability within the industry for many years. Having taken on the role of National President for Engineering Australia in January this year, he hopes to make this one of the major themes during his presidency. A civil and environmental engineer, Hood, 68, runs his own consultancy business and is an adjunct professor at

ANDY ROY (BBC 1983) BBC boys and their fathers have been benefitting from two programs designed to bring stronger bonds through the teenage years, thanks to the work of Old Collegian Andy Roy who has partnered with Stephen Halsall to create Powerhouse Programs (PHP). With Andy a father to six children (four boys and two girls), all aged between six and 18, he knows all too well the challenges faced by parents in the teenage years and equally the importance of assisting children to become emotionally intelligent, socially aware and passionate about life. Earlier this year Andy presented a parent information evening – Supporting Teenagers – at the College covering topics such as the ‘Mystery of the Teenage Brain’

the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane. He has had a long association with Engineers Australia both as an office bearer and a staff member. It’s been an interesting and varied road for Hood to get to where he is today. Following his graduation from the University of Queensland in civil engineering in 1969, Hood joined the Air Force, where he planned, designed and constructed facilities on RAAF bases. In 1972 he worked in Indonesia on Australia’s gift of fighter aircraft to the Indonesian Air Force – this was Hood’s first

international experience. He later worked for the Department of Civil Aviation, now the Civil Aviation Authority on the development of Sydney Airport, followed by Parliament in Canberra where he took over and commissioned the new Parliament House. It was in this job when he had his environmental awakening, “One morning I thought – what are our buildings doing to the environment? The emphasis always seemed to be on cost. So at Parliament House we installed new energy initiatives and management systems which resulted in 40 percent savings in

total energy consumption in the first 18 months of operation,” he said. Since setting up his own consultancy Hood has never looked back. In 2007 he trained with Al Gore on the ‘Inconvenient Truth’ Climate Project and has delivered presentations to some 6000 people across Australia. Looking back on his career, he finds it has been a transformative journey, which has taken him from building military airfields –“how sustainable is that?” to being deeply involved in driving sustainability within his industry.

and ‘Effective Teen Parenting’. With his eldest sons at the College however, Andy is particularly passionate about the father and son relationship, with PHP running two courses, Building Bridges and Journey to Manhood, tailored specifically for these groups. PHP launched their first Journey to Manhood camp last year, exclusively for BBC families. The five-day bush experience acts as a modern day rite-of-passage, allowing participants to focus on what’s important in an environment free of modern day technologies. It’s designed to foster stronger ongoing bonds between not only father and son but the entire family with mothers also playing a crucial role in the experience. Andy will again run this program in September as well as the Building Bridges course in Term 4.

Andy is also a senior Common Ground Facilitator and Trainer with the Men’s Wellbeing Association. He’s supported various Pathways to Manhood camps throughout Australia as a Program Manager and Lead Facilitator and has been married to his wife Caitlin for 18

years, in which they’ve been selfemployed throughout this time. Amongst many exploits, in 1999 Andy and Caitlin also designed and implemented a 6,000 tree sustainable forestry plantation in the Noosa Hinterland with great success.

ABOVE: IMAGE COURTESY OF IRENE LOUBERGS PHOTOGRAPHY

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


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C A Z N A F O T I R I P S E TH

1.

BBC OLD COLLEGIANS JOINED WITH STUDENTS AND FRIENDS OF THE COLLEGE ON 24 APRIL TO HONOUR OUR FALLEN WHO PAID THE SUPREME SACRIFICE FOR THEIR COUNTRY IN A MOVING ANZAC DAY SERVICE.

The ceremony saw the unveiling of BBC's

1. Alex Foxton with his grandaughter Courtenay

new war memorial on the College Green, which

McCollough

pays tribute to Old Collegians who have fallen

2. Cadets from various units take part in the BBC

in World War I, II and Afghanistan.

service

During the service wreaths were laid by

3. Jackie McPherson with Prep student Ian Chung

veteran and Old Collegian Alex Foxton and his

4. OCA President Peter Dun

granddaughter Courtenay McCollough, as well

5. Ethan Feather and Will Cohn

as OCA President Peter Dun.

6. Zack Jones and Toby McDowell

The commemoration is an annual tradition at the College that honours the spirit of ANZAC, allowing students to reflect on the courage, mateship and sacrifice shown by those who have served their country.

7. Vintage Old Collegians


CONNECT | 71

2.

3.

4.

6.

5.

7.

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


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MILESTONES WEDDINGS Rhys Henkel (2003-2005) and Maria Roca on 21 January Martin Packer (1996-2000) and Emily Evans on 4 February

OLD BOYS LUNCH IN TOOWOOMBA 27 JANUARY ~ PICNIC POINT

Eamonn Cornish (1995-2002) and Jillian Hood on 10 March

On Tuesday 27 March, 30 BBC Vintage Collegians gathered

pictured below

at Picnic Point in Toowoomba for a memorable catch-up. A bus took a group of 10 from the Toowong campus, joining 20 old boys from the local area, sharing stories and many laughs over lunch. The day was organised by the Vintage Collegians and driven by local old boys Trevor Lloyd and Mac Patterson.

Thomas Washington (1997-2001) and Alexandria Grainger on 28 April

VALE Paul Belsky (1987-1991) passed in October 2011 Beaufort Palmer (1935-1939) passed in November 2011 Ted (E.J) Larkin (1939-1941) passed in November 2011 John Grimmett (1952) passed in December 2011 Donald Stephen Wilson (1937) passed in March 2012 Phillip Ottane (1967-1970) passed in January 2012 Anthony (Mark) Sargood (1960) passed in April 2012


CONNECT | 73

BBC’s Vintage Collegians is made up of those who graduated from the College more than 50 years ago. The group has a core membership who meets at the College every Tuesday to discuss and document the history of BBC and also assist our school Archivist Helen Jackson with various projects. The group are also planning trips to the Gold and Sunshine Coast later in the year. 1. FRANK WALTERS, MAC PATTERSON, JOHN STEWART 2. DOUG MAYNE, RAYHAM FRANCIS 3. WILLIAM THOMAS, OWEN STOCKWELL, DON MCDERMOTT

1.

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


74 | SNAPSHOTS

1.

2.

LEADERS' INDUCTION 27 JANUARY ~ COLLEGE HALL Parents, friends and students assembled in College Hall earlier this year for the induction of BBC’s 2012 Senior Leaders. The service focused on the importance of integrity for a leader, exploring this theme through the life of inventor and avitator Bill Lear. 4.

3.

5.

1. Nikki Poteri-Collie and Jackson Evans 2. Terry, Hayden and Dominique Bertoli-Simmonds 3. Rev Graham Cole 4. Daniel and Helen Kyriacou 5. Michael and Nicholas Dow 6. Sharon and Cameron Wallace 7. Callum Dunstan 8. Arran, Marc and Catherine Raeburn 9. Eamon and Russell Uhr 10. Alexander, Stuart and Julia Russell


SNAPSHOTS | 75

YEAR 9 HOUSE REPRESENTATIVES INDUCTION 1 FEBRUARY ~ COLLEGE HALL

6.

8.

9.

7.

10.

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


76 | SNAPSHOTS

1.

2.

WELCOME TO MIDDLE SCHOOL 20 MARCH ~ HILLSTONE, ST LUCIA The Middle School Parent Support Group 5.

hosted a relaxed evening for the Middle School community at Hillstone, St Lucia Golf Links. It was an opportunity for new and current parents to catch-up, with BBC’s Headmaster Graeme McDonald and Head of Middle School Tony Chittenden providing an update on the lastest developments and initiatives at the College.

6.

1. Joanne Robertson, Louise Hackett and Jacqui Valassakis 2. Shelley Pershouse, Tony Chittenden and Paula Lafferty 3. Graeme McDonald, Anne Sims and Helena Taylor 4. Don Graham and Charlie Starky 5. Jo Thompson and Kristine Berry 6. Brigette Tilley and Donna Strahan 7. Phillip McKee, Kate Barry, Rona and Craig Cooper


SNAPSHOTS | 77

3.

4.

7.

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


78 | SNAPSHOTS

BOARDERS' DINNER 15 APRIL ~ BISSET GALLERY BBC Boarding families celebrated the vibrant community that is Rudd House while in town for the start of Term 2. 1.

P&F WELCOME FUNCTION 24 FEBRUARY ~ BISSET GALLERY College families celebrated the start of a new year at the annual P&F Welcome Function 3.

5.

6.

5.

1. Andrew Macarthur, Anna and Fraser Galloway 2. Melody Rynne and Chris Byrne 3. Tim and Danielle Vincent, Sarah and Tony Anisimoff 4. Rosemary Smith and Fiona Roberts 5. Darren and Natasha Moore, Chris Findlater 6. Andrew Vincent and Ben Cohn 7. John Wilkinson, Tanza and Simon Fife


SNAPSHOTS | 79

BBC EVENTS FRIDAY

20

6:00pm Sydney Reunion Dinner

JULY

2.

SATURDAY

28 JULY

7:00pm Christmas in July College Hall

FRIDAY

10

10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Year Reunion

AUGUST

SATURDAY

4.

11 AUGUST FRIDAY

24 AUGUST FRIDAY

14

SEPTEMBER

Old Boys Day and Annual Dinner BBC and Mercure Hotel

7:30pm Grand Concert College Hall

11.00am Spring Fashion Parade Hillstone St Lucia 6:00pm Sounds of Scotland College Hall

WEDNESDAY

26

Vintage Collegians’ Lunch

SEPTEMBER FRIDAY 7.

9

BBC Golf Day Indooroopilly Golf Course

NOVEMBER

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


80 | FLASHBACK

TALES FROM A TROPHY TABLE COLLEGE CUPS AND ATHLETIC TROPHIES PHOTOGRAPHED IN 1932 ARE SIGNIFICANT IN BBC’S SPORTING HISTORY. IN 90 YEARS, THEY HAVE BECOME ENGRAVED RECORDS OF OLD COLLEGIANS, DONORS AND RECIPIENTS’ NAMES. In the centre, the Challenge Cup was presented by Mrs W Smyth as a perpetual

In the bottom right hand corner of the

trophy for the winner of the Senior Eights at

table is a china teapot decorated with

the BBC Regatta. In 1932, races were rowed

the College crest given to Mrs J Forsyth

in ‘Fours’. It was hoped that the Challenge

as a memento of the occasion when she

Cup would popularise our regatta and create

presented these prizes. The archives happily

an interest in ’Eights’.

received a similar version of this teapot given

To the left of the rowing trophy is the ‘Donald and Georgina Fletcher Cup’ donated

by Mr Ian Bennett (1957-1960). Although the Bennett family have had a

by Miss EB Watt. It was the first trophy

long association with BBC beginning with

awarded for Interhouse Athletics and won by

‘Dick’ Cottell in 1919, Ian is unsure of the

School House, the Boarding House in 1931.

English teapot’s origins within the family.

To the right is the ‘W Espie Dods

Fathers, sons and uncles have been BBC

Memorial Trophy’ for the Under 16

students during each decade from the

Champion athlete. This silver goblet recalls

1920s-1960s, with the most recent member,

both the name of a record breaking 220yd

Nicholas in 2000-2003.

GPS athlete and a Flying Officer killed in

On the table, are displayed individual

action during World War II. In 1932, the most

trophies and pennants each with their own

outstanding athlete of the day was RH Bently

tale that helps to tell the history of Brisbane

winner of this prestigious Under 16 Cup. The

Boys’ College. The archives hold the

Bently name has been synonymous with

memories, objects and photos that create

many BBC sporting victories.

the collective memory of a proud history.


LAST WORD | 81

SPIRITUALITY IN THE MODERN WORLD BY REV GRAHAM COLE, COLLEGE CHAPLAIN demanding and stretching

there are similar issues of change

to. There has been a tidal wave

BBC turned 110 years of age.

During February of this year,

adventure. Christ, therefore, calls

afoot in the classroom. Now that

of practical concern for others

There is no doubt that during

us to embrace change that is

students have their tablets, they

expressed through the multitude

these years of College life there

healthy.

are able to go to biblegateway.

of projects that are being focused

As I observe the ever-changing

com and access a myriad of

on by the service clubs and

between affirming traditional, time

world of BBC, I notice a number of

different biblical translations.

house groups at the College.

tested values in a world that is

developments that are impacting

Concern has been expressed

The list of projects is as long as

changing on so many fronts.

the spiritual core of the College.

that this could lead to students

your arm! Organisationally this

losing a working knowledge of the

is a wonderful problem to have!

Bible in its entirety. It has therefore

This recognition by the students

have been times of healthy tension

From a biblical perspective, it is abundantly clear that God is a

THE BIBLE AND TECHNOLOGY

God who is unchangeable and yet

It is only last year that we

been decided that students will

that they can make a difference

he constantly calls us to respond

celebrated the 400th anniversary

bring both their Bible and tablet to

in a hurting world is being more

to fresh opportunities with new

of the King James Bible which

class. It is exciting, however, that

wholeheartedly embraced than

ways of doing what we do. In

was a remarkable technological

the Bible is available in a format

ever before. It is heartening to see

Isaiah 43, God says through the

advance for its day. My how things

that young people are more likely

students coming alive as they take

prophet, “See I am doing a new

have changed! Recently I went to

to use.

the focus off themselves through

thing! Now it springs up. Do you

an Interschool Christian Fellowship

not perceive it!” It would be easy

leaders meeting before school.

for some to make the mistake

The 20 boys present were involved

of thinking that trusting in God

in a Bible study but there wasn’t

is predictable, boring and safe.

a Bible in sight. Smart phones

been involved in supporting a

unknowingly being taken on board

Nothing could be further from the

with Bible applications were

range of charities and ministries.

when he said over 200 years ago,

truth. When Jesus said, “I have

being used as boys focused on a

In recent times, however, a day

“Do all the good you can. By all

come that you may have life, life in

reading from the New Testament.

or two would not go by without

the means you can. In all the ways

all its fullness” he was highlighting

Change was occurring before my

students approaching me about

you can. In all the places you can.

the fact that a vital relationship

very eyes. Though mobile phones

wanting to explore an area of

At all the times you can. As long

with him would be an exciting,

are certainly not allowed in class,

need that they can contribute

as ever you can.”

A VISION FOR HELPING OTHERS BBC students have always

serving the needs of others and therefore respond to the call of God in their life. The advice of John Wesley is

COLLEGIAN MAY 2012


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Collegian Magazine - May 2012  

The magazine of Brisbane Boys' College

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