Page 1

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE

ROWING REGATTA

CELEBRATING 100 YEARS . 1916-2016

LAKE KAWANA . 5 MARCH 2016


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BBC REGATTA EVENTS PROGRAM TIME

DISTANCE

YEAR

EVENT

TIME

DISTANCE

YEAR

EVENT

1A

8.30AM

1000M

9

8TH QUAD

24X

10.40AM

500M

8

9TH QUAD

2B

8.35AM

1000M

9

3C

8.40AM

1000M

9

7TH QUAD

25Y

10.45AM

500M

8

8TH QUAD

6TH QUAD

26Z

10.50AM

500M

8

7TH QUAD

4D

8.45AM

1000M

5E

8.50AM

1000M

9

5TH QUAD

27A

10.55AM

500M

8

6TH QUAD

9

4TH QUAD

28B

11.00AM

500M

8

5TH QUAD

6F

8.55AM

7G

9.00AM

1000M

9

3RD QUAD

29C

11.05AM

500M

8

4TH QUAD

1000M

9

2ND QUAD

30D

11.10AM

500M

8

3RD QUAD

8H

9.05AM

1000M

9

1ST QUAD

31E

11.15AM

500M

8

2ND QUAD

32F

11.20AM

500M

8

1ST QUAD

9I

9.15AM

1500M

10

8TH QUAD

10J

9.20AM

1500M

10

7TH QUAD

33G

11.30AM

1500M

10

8TH QUAD

11K

9.25AM

1500M

10

6TH QUAD

34H

11.35AM

1500M

10

7TH QUAD

12L

9.30AM

1500M

10

5TH QUAD

35I

11.40AM

1500M

10

6TH QUAD

13M

9.35AM

1500M

10

4TH QUAD

36J

11.45AM

1500M

10

5TH QUAD

14N

9.40AM

1500M

10

3RD QUAD

37K

11.50AM

1500M

10

4TH QUAD

15O

9.45AM

1500M

10

2ND QUAD

38L

11.55AM

1500M

10

3RD QUAD

16P

9.50AM

1500M

10

1ST QUAD

39M

12.00PM

1500M

10

2ND QUAD

40N

12.05PM

1500M

10

1ST QUAD

17Q

10.00AM

2000M

11

3RD VIII

18R

10.05AM

2000M

11

2ND VIII

41O

12.15PM

2000M

11

3RD VIII

19S

10.10AM

2000M

11

1ST VIII

42P

12.20PM

2000M

11

2ND VIII

20T

10.15AM

2000M

OPEN YEAR 11

4TH VIII

43Q

12.25PM

2000M

11

1ST VIII

21U

10.20AM

2000M

OPEN

3RD VIII

44R

12.30PM

2000M

OPEN YEAR 11

4TH VIII

22V

10.25AM

2000M

OPEN

2ND VIII

45S

12.35PM

2000M

OPEN

3RD VIII

23W

10.30AM

2000M

OPEN

1ST VIII

46T

12.40PM

2000M

OPEN

2ND VIII

47U

12.45PM

2000M

OPEN

1ST VIII

Pennants will be presented for first place in the first round at the conclusion of the regatta at 12.45PM.

LANE DRAW

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

FIRST ROUND

NC

GT

ACGS

BBC

BSHS

BGS

TSS

SECOND ROUND

BSHS

NC

GT

ACGS

BGS

BBC

TSS

GPS REGATTA SCHEDULE 2016 DATE

SENIOR HOST SCHOOL

VENUE

30 JANUARY

NUDGEE COLLEGE

LAKE WYARALONG

6 FEBRUARY

BRISBANE GRAMMAR SCHOOL

LAKE WYARALONG

13 FEBRUARY

ANGLICAN CHURCH GRAMMAR SCHOOL

LAKE WYARALONG

20 FEBRUARY

BRISBANE STATE HIGH SCHOOL

LAKE KAWANA

27 FEBRUARY

THE SOUTHPORT SCHOOL

LAKE KAWANA

5 MARCH

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE

LAKE KAWANA

12 MARCH

HEAD OF THE RIVER

LAKE KAWANA

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  3


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The production of this program is the culmination of significant work from the Brisbane Boys’ College Rowing Support Group. We hope the program will act as a souvenir of the wonderful times oarsmen from all schools have enjoyed while rowing. BBC continues to enjoy strong support from our sponsors, which is evident by the advertising content in this program. Your continued support is helping many young people to row in top quality equipment and for this we thank you most sincerely. Volunteers continue to donate their skills and time to BBC Rowing. To these supporters a huge thanks.

CONTENTS

To all the coaches, your contribution has been truly outstanding

Welcome6

dedicate to our rowing program.

Celebrating 100 Years

To Rowing Queensland Inc, we acknowledge the professional

and we are extremely grateful for the skills and time you

8

manner in which your staff continues to assist the sport of rowing. A very special mention must be made to the

Young Rower has 100 Years Behind Him

18

Queensland Boat Race Officials for their ongoing support.

Captain’s Welcome

23

been possible.

Athlete Profiles

24

BBC Rocks the Boat at Grafton 

28

1000 Metre Mark

29

Spotlight on BBC Old Boys

30

Without your help and advice, today’s regatta would not have

BBC ROWING LEADERSHIP ROLES

ROWING SUPPORT GROUP

Director of Rowing

President

Andrew Cruickshank

Paul Gardner

Head Coach

Vice President - Seniors

Richard Paterson

Let the Adventure Begin

33

Lessons in Leadership

38

Matthew Yates

Academic Pathways

39

Jason Kubale

College Rowers

48

Year 10 Year 9 Year 8 Chris Beech and Richard Bell

CAPTAIN OF BOATS Published by Brisbane Boys’ College Program team: Adele Graves, Tracey Maree, Andrew Cruickshank, Richard Paterson Photographs: Michael Marston, Tracey Maree © Copyright Brisbane Boys’ College The contents of this program are copyright. Reprints of articles must have the permission of the original author and acknowledgement of the source, being Brisbane Boys’ College.

4

Morgan Apel

VICE CAPTAINS OF BOATS Cal Hope Julian Braybrook

BOATMAN Stephen McAlpine

Cath Costello Vice President - Juniors Adam Bloom Secretary Narelle Cooley Treasurer Sandy Horwood Regatta Coordinator Gerd Wimberger Communications Coordinator Andrew Dillon Functions Coordinator Julie McStay


No member of a crew is praised for the rugged individuality of his rowing.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  5


WELCOME

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE ROWING REGATTA

6


HEADMASTER I would like to take this opportunity to thank all members of the Brisbane Boys’ College Rowing community who have worked tirelessly once again this year to support our boys in enjoying the wonderful sport of rowing. This year we celebrate 100 years of rowing at BBC; a

I would be remiss if I did not give a special vote of thanks to

particularly special milestone in the life of the College. I would

the many coaches who assist in guiding all the young men in

like to acknowledge the work of all those involved in the

our competing crews. These men and women have provided

centenary celebrations. We are pleased to share with you,

support and inspiration to our oarsmen over many weeks.

within this program, stories which not only reflect this rich history but also provide an insight into College life today and most importantly those at the heart of our rowing program and indeed the school, our boys.

I extend a special vote of thanks to the BBC Rowing Support Group. The efforts of these men and women in organising social functions and coordinating the many activities that are required to ensure that the season runs very smoothly have

The College is very much aware of the huge time commitment

been quite outstanding. The sacrifices that you have made,

and incredible dedication required from our boys to achieve at

ladies and gentlemen, are deeply appreciated by the College

the highest possible level in the sport of rowing. We are thrilled

and our students, and without your willingness to go the

with the fine oarsmanship our young men are showing and

extra mile the boys would not enjoy such an engaging rowing

we congratulate them all on their commitment to excellence.

season.

I am sure that during the course of the season we will see some extremely exciting races, but the wonderful thing for me to watch is the fine spirit of camaraderie that exists within our rowing club, and this is typified with the support of the older boys for the younger boys.

In closing I would like to extend my very best wishes to all the rowers, coaches and supporters from all the competing GPS schools who are having, I trust, a wonderfully successful rowing season. Graeme McDonald HEADMASTER

Welcome to the penultimate regatta of the year. I hope you enjoy this Centenary edition of our regatta program, a celebration of BBC’s long history with this great sport of rowing. An enormous amount of preparation is required to make the BBC Regatta a success. The effort continues on regatta day with many volunteers working to deliver this fantastic event. I’d like to thank all of the people that come together each week

I believe that rowing is a unique team sport. It requires above

to assist with GPS Rowing - the GPS Association and school

all else, some of the most difficult qualities to teach or instil in

Directors of Rowing who coordinate the event logistics; Rowing

a person, and some of the best personal qualities to carry into

Queensland who coordinate the Boat Race Officials, Marshalls

one’s life - the capacity for hard, unrelenting, exhausting work

and give our boys an opportunity to partake in fair racing; the

and the disciplines and virtues that result, including dedication,

Boat Race Officials who, for no reward other than seeing young

sacrifice, courage and selflessness - nothing instils these values

men delight in the sport they love, give up their weekends to

better than rowing. In its essence rowing is, more than any

provide a great experience for our boys; the Sunshine Coast

other team sport, based predominantly upon the disciplines

Council who allow us to use their fine facility for racing; the

and values of hard work. It prepares boys to be great partners

Surf Life Savers and Paramedics; the countless parents in

both in business and in life. The boys will not need luck today,

each Rowing Support Group (RSG) who enable us to put on

they will get out what they have put in.

such a good show each weekend, keeping the young men fed, watered and in shade; in particular I’d like to thank the BBC RSG for the hard work they have put in to provide such a high quality event for all the supporters here today; and last but not least to the boys of each school who are racing today, some for their last time this season.

Again, welcome to the BBC Regatta and our Centenary celebrations. Thank you for your support and attendance and I hope for good weather, fair racing and above all that boys from every school produce their best performance out on the water today. Andrew Cruickshank

DIRECTOR OF ROWING

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  7


CELEBRATING 100 YEARS

1919

Rowing has become synonymous with BBC, its history filled with iconic moments and milestones. As our boys ready their minds for the ultimate race, we reflect on those who have gone before them and anticipate the future which lies ahead as boys continue to build the BBC Rowing story.

1925

Standing: Bill L Boyd (bow), John G Cameron (3), Middle: Ogilvy JS Macdonald (stroke), Dr V McDowall (coach), A Edward Junner (2) Front: Archie P Douglas (cox)

Winners of the All Schools Rowing Championship

A New Boatshed at Breakfast Creek

1916

Standing: Mr JT Styles, Esq (coach), EK Murphy (3), RS Brown (2), Dr V McDowall (coach) Middle: SO Cowlishaw (stroke), GS Sturtridge (bow) Front: AR Kennedy (cox)

Winners of the Head of the River Sydney R Forrest (stroke), George C Broom (3), Ogilvy JS Macdonald (2), Jack VM Ogilvie (bow), Donald F Harris (cox), Mr Douglas (coach), John G Cameron (captain)

1924

BBC’s First Crew

1917

THE EARLY DAYS (FROM 1916) Brisbane Boys’ College started life as Clayfield College on the north side of Brisbane. Consequently when rowing commenced in 1916, a location for a rowing shed was sought close to the suburb of Clayfield.

8

Some of the earliest Brisbane rowing sheds were built on Breakfast Creek including one of the more successful, the eponymously named Breakfast Creek Rowing Club. A rowing club of 35 boys was formed in 1916 and operated out of a lean-to at the end of Argyle Street on the northern bank of the creek. In 1925 a new shed was constructed for £375. The first boat purchased was a white cedar practise four from Melbourne named ‘Sydney’ after the first stroke Sydney Forrest, and also the HMAS Sydney which sank the SMS Emden in World War I.


1933 1937

JC Fraser (stroke), BH Taylor (3), BM Palmer (2), RT Wright (bow), JW Cramb (cox)

Boatshed Opens at Toowong

Winners of the Head of the River

S Hawgood (stroke), GL Wilson (3), W Arrowsmith (2), W Georgeson (bow), R Harris (cox)

Winners of the Head of the River

1934

Sports Budget

1927

Regattas were conducted over ¾ mile on the Hamilton reach until 1919 and then between South Brisbane and North Quay until 1930. In 1931, all regattas and the O’Connor Cup, later named the Head of the River, were conducted on the Milton reach. In 1931 boys from Clayfield College were moved to a new campus at Toowong and for the first two years used shared facilities with the Toowong Rowing Club. This close relationship with Toowong extends to this day. The new BBC Boatshed, near the Regatta Hotel, was opened on 14 April

1934 which relieved the restrictions on space, equipment and membership. This was extended to accommodate eights when they were introduced into Queensland schoolboy rowing in 1955. Schools first started competing for the O’Connor Cup in 1922, with the first race broadcast by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) in 1945. The first official Head of the River, however, wasn’t held until 1946, with BBC securing victory and taking home the very first title. The Head of the River became known as a significant social event with

people lining both sides of the riverbank and cars following the crews down Coronation Drive as they battled it out for the prestigious title. By the mid-fifties the event was attracting more than 12,000 onlookers and keen spectators watched in anticipation for the smoke from the starter’s shotgun to signify the start of the race. During this period of time, when the Head of the River was raced on the Milton reach, BBC experienced more success than any other school and this was largely due to the guidance and passion of one man.

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  9


CELEBRATING 100 YEARS

1944

1938

JC Fraser (stroke), TN Chenoweth (3), NC Foulkes (2), RT Wright (bow), JJ Wilson (cox)

Winners of the Head of the River

Back: HJ Hall (2), AH Donaldson (2), DH McClymont (2), KJ Donnollan (2) Middle: ER Sneyd (1), DB Nimmo (1), Mr TW Erskine, DT Loosemore (1), BA Junner (1) Front: ER Whelan (1), MR Lockhart (2)

First and Second Crews. Won all races including Head of the River

1938

ER Whelan (cox), DB Nimmo (stroke), BA Junner (3), HJ Hall (2), BN Richards (bow)

Winners of the Head of the River

1945 JC Patrick (bow), DM Newman (2), CD Erickson (stroke), HA Dunn (3) Absent: AAE Falk (cox)

Winners of the Head of the River

1942

THE OLD FOX (1944-1971) Dave Magoffin, ‘The Old Fox’, coached rowing at BBC for nearly three decades from 1944 to 1971, securing 15 Head of the River wins during this time.

10

He also coached intermittently for periods at Mosman in Sydney and Toowong Rowing Club. His winning crews were rarely seen as favourites, but Magoffin was not interested in winning lead up regattas and coached to win only one race – the Head of the River. Magoffin was a draughtsman, a humble man not driven by ego. He lived a simple life with his mother, walking down nearby Sylvan Road to the shed to coach his crew. His unassuming life belied an approach to coaching that was well ahead of his


1946 1949

Back: JR Cameron (stroke), BH Newell (2), GL Boyd (bow), NF Holland (3) Middle: Mr TW Erskine Front: VW Trevethan (cox)

Winners of the Head of the River

AC Moore (stroke), HJ Smith (3), JA Byth (2), JR Slater (bow), JG Fisher (cox)

Won all races including Head of the River

Standing: BH Newell (3, Captain), AC Wood (bow), KJ Mann (2) Middle: Mr ER Whelan (coach), ND Wilson (stroke), Mr R Bevan (rowing master) Front: J Cameron (cox)

The winning crew from right: DW McLeod (cox), AC Moore (stroke), AJ Moore (3), DG Simpson (2), JR Slater (bow)

Winners of the Head of the River

1947

time. Ironically, he had a severe speech impediment and yet he was a wonderful communicator. His success was based upon the combination of a diligent work ethic and technique. What set him apart was his selections, psychology and planning. Each seat in the boat required certain attributes and he took great care to match the oarsman to those qualities and articulate what was expected. His descriptors of technique verged on the poetic and his intimate knowledge of the Brisbane River with its tides and eddies suggested he

Winners of the Head of the River - First DO Magoffin Boat

1950

actually felt the rhythm of the water. While his critiques of oarsmen were forthright they were delivered with sensitivity and purpose and mostly elicited the required actions. It has been the honour of a generation of BBC Old Boys to be able to say, “I was coached by Dave Magoffin.” Implicit in that statement is a fraternity of common values, friendship, humility and pride. It remains a brotherhood of men spanning nearly 30 years.

In 1971 beset with ill health Magoffin retired and moved to the Blue Mountains in New South Wales where he subsequently passed in 1973. The fact that he was interred in an unmarked grave was only discovered in 2000 and this was rectified by grateful BBC Old Boys, who with contributions from Mosman and Toowong Rowing Clubs, raised $5000 to fund a suitable memorial. ‘The Old Fox’ was finally, fittingly put to rest.

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  11


CELEBRATING 100 YEARS

1951

1955

W Thomson (bow), G Byth, L Stubbings (stroke), B Junner (coach), D McLeod (cox), J Cameron

1951

Back: KG McLaughlin, RF Bodman, IM Cook, PB Clarke Middle: NS Clough, JR Kerrison, Mr CM Goldburg, C Southwell, K Edwards Front: A Anderson Absent: RC Warren

The First Year of Rowing Eights

Winners of the Head of the River - The O’Connor Cup

John Adam (stroke), John Wilson (7), Russell Philip (6), Ian Mayes (5), Bill Thompson (4), Darryl Blunck (3), Ian Sinnamon (2), John Drewe (bow), Ian McDougall (cox)

Winners of the Head of the River

1956 LK Stubbings, JW Cameron, JJ Shannon, DM Cameron, RW Bray, Mr JR Cameron (coach), Mr CM Goldburg

Winners of the Head of the River

1952

SNAPSHOT IN TIME The Wright name has become synonymous with BBC Rowing, with the late Ron Wright part of the Head of the River winning crew in 1937 and 1938. As Vice Captain of Boats, rowing in bow seat for BBC, Ron recalls all the boaters floating along the river, after the crew had secured their victory – a moment he describes as exhilarating and exciting. Anyone

12

who has sat on the banks at such an event will attest to the raw emotion that it produces and this was captured beautifully in the 1937 Portal: “Head of the River! What a thrill lies behind those words! What do they bring to your mind? Perchance a broad sweep of river, a flicker of sunlight and the fluttering of ribbons. Or maybe the murmur of a great

crowd, which swells into a fullthroated roar as “They’re off.” And then the pulsing four-oars, sweeping on with a seemingly effortless rhythm that belies the straining muscles of the rowers. What a great day it is for them.” And a great day it was, “We had done it! Wild was our jubilation and resonant our war-cry! The College


1963 1957

Back: IA McDougall, DR Blunck, EW Thomson, IJ Sinnamon, JT Drewe Front: JK Wilson, JC Adam, Mr CM Goldurg, Mr DO Magoffin, IK Mayes, RK Philip

Record Winning Coach - Mr David Magoffin

Winners of the Head of the River

Back: BR Perkins, PA White, PM Cribb, DK Hall, DMH Job Front: DA Hood, JR Lyndon, Mr IMB Cribb, Mr DO Magoffin, CA Bartlett, BH Carlyle Back: S Tupou, JH Willers, CA Clarke Middle: DE Svendsen, PF Meyer, Mr DO Magoffin, Mr GT Roscoe, EF Smith, DI Brown Front: PJ Haggarty Absent: DE Gold

Winners of the Head of the River

1961

Winners of the Head of the River

1965

had made rowing history, being the first metropolitan school to win a “Double Double.” We are happy to be able to record that our victories inspired Mr. Foxcroft’s muse with such effect that he burst into sweet moan and mellow music, and composed a College Boating Song.”

cartoonist Ian Gall (BBC 1916-1921) developing a comic for the paper at the time. Ron was rightly depicted as the young man with the wild hair in bow position – unbeknown to most, the crew had made a pact not to cut their hair until they had secured a Head of the River win.

The victory went on to make The Courier Mail, with old collegian and

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  13


CELEBRATING 100 YEARS

1972

1966

P Meyer (stroke), D Brown (7), P Loder (6), C Clark (5), R Townsend (4), D Matley (3), W Jenkins (2), G Lingham (1), S Odgers (cox), D Magoffin (coach)

Back: HG Foxton, DR Fraser, JB Skerman, CJ Worcester, WB Crichton Front: IG Terry (cox), RFN Bell, Mr DJ Murphy, MS Foote (stroke), RM Banks

Winners of the Head of the River

Winners of the Head of the River

1966

The College was featured in the local paper - “Brisbane Boys’ College were untroubled to win the 47th GPS Head of the River rowed on the Milton Reach yesterday. Starting in the very favored No. 1 position they defeated Brisbane Grammar School by 1/2 length, with Brisbane State High School a further 1 1/4 lengths away third.” D Moore (stroke), R Nixon (7), C Morley (6), A Hart (5), J Svendson (4), D Jamieson (3), J Woodward (2), J Brown (bow), S Odgers (cox)

Winners of the Head of the River Back: R Gould, N Seawright, K Gobius, P Winkley, R McLeod Front: C Beech, P Einersen, Mr D Murphy (coach), M Geldard, A Henderson

1968

Winners of the Head of the River

1974

THE HEAD OF THE RIVER MOVES FROM THE BRISBANE RIVER Brisbane River floods have brought their share of heartache to rowing communities across the city, BBC included.

14

In 1974 floods washed away the school’s shed and the decision was made to rebuild on a different site. Along with the Toowong Club, BBC relocated upstream to the much quieter St Lucia reach next to the University of Queensland. A new shed named ‘The Dave Magoffin’ was opened in 1976. Simultaneously a decision was also made to move races from the river to a nontidal stretch of water providing fairer competition conditions. Space limitations


1992

1983

Back: R McDougall, A Lyndon, J Bell, S Wilson, C Smith, I McKenzie Front: M McNaught, Mr I Luxford, R Bishop, L Brown

M Salter (bow), T Patterson (2), C Baildon (3), G Wood (4), R Graham (5), D Collins (6), L Meehan (7), D Addis (stroke), C Grummitt (cox)

Australian Representative - Richard Graham

Winners of the Head of the River

Back: Mr I Luxford (coach), R Martin, S Richardson, J Graham, J Pettigrew, Mr GM Cujes Front: A McGregor-Stephen, C Pearson, M Lawson, R McPhee, A Banks

Australian Representative - Randall Martin

Winners of the Head of the River

1990

for spectators was also becoming an increased safety issue. After the floods in 1974 the Head of the River was held for the first time away from the Brisbane River at Lake Kurwongbah and it was won by BBC. In the following decades it moved to Hinze Dam, Lake Wivenhoe and later Kawana – the race course still used today. In fact, BBC hosted the first rowing regatta on the Wivenhoe Rowing course.

The naming of boats provides a roll call of significant contributors to the rowing club over the years. This extends from donors, coaches, parents and principals through to oarsmen, serving to remind everyone of the established traditions and the work and sacrifice required to build success in rowing. In 1993, after winning the Head of the River, the BBC First VIII was the first Australian schoolboy crew to travel to England and win the Princess Elizabeth

Cup at the Henley Royal Regatta. This was a significant achievement given the prestige and competitive nature of the race. The rowing club success rises and falls on the enthusiasm and abilities of those tasked with its management and the support they are given. It is encouraging to note that in 2016, the centenary year of BBC Rowing, there has been a record enrolment of 90 boys learning to row for the first time in Year 8. Rowing remains an integral part of BBC life today.

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  15


CELEBRATING 100 YEARS

1993

J Morrow, L Brown (stroke), H Karrasch, G Brown, S Wilson, N Simmonds, N Hollingworth, T Bentley, T Jensen

Winners of the Head of the River Australian Representative - Hamish Karrasch

J Morrow, L Brown (stroke), H Karrasch, G Brown, S Wilson, N Simmonds, N Hollingworth, M Kesby, T Jensen

Henley Champions

1993

Back: Mr J Hutchinson (coach), JF O’Neill, CM Fiedler, TO Dighton, MA Macdonald, RJ Uebergang, Mr B Young (coach) Front: PW Dood, AD Dunlop, JA Wheeler (Captain of Boats), AC Douglas

Winners of the Head of the River

2002

COLLEGE BOATING SONG Words and Music by A.B. Foxcroft

16

Flash your hands away lads, Steady up the slides, Lift your shoulders at the catch And watch the way she glides. Feel the leaping boat lads, Tremble to the drive; Watch the rating of the StrokeYou’re certain to arrive.


2014 2007

Nikolai Duncan (bow), Doug Brown, Andrew Bassett, Eamon Cowling, Ian Dunlop, Sam Koskinen, Scott Laidler, Sam Allen (stroke), Eerin Haselgrove (cox). Mr Christian Oneto and Mr Griff Moore (coaches)

Australian Representative - Scott Laidler

A.W. Rudd Restoration Project Begins - Chris Beech with Peter Svendsen who rowed in the boat in 1963

Tom Summers, Harry Jones, Max Koopman, Jack Strahley, Adam Edwards, Xavier Small, Daniel Mahler, Sam Jacks, Jonathan Katahanas. Mr Islay Lee and Mr Will Keates (coaches)

Open First VIII places second at the Head of the River

Australian Representative - Harry Jones

2011

Chorus Dip, sway, Hands fast away, Lift her and drive her and send her through, Backs straight, None must be late, That is the way of a College crew.

2014

Whether you win or lose the race, Remember that others will take your place, So, Pull! boys, carry it through, That is the way of a College crew. A word for crews of old, lads, Gallant fighting fours,

Though oft they missed the laurel crown, The lesson learnt is yours; To make your best endeavour, To stand the final test, To row the race for honour of The School that you love best.

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  17


YOUNG ROWER HAS 100 YEARS BEHIND HIM If history has an end result, 13 year old Brisbane Boys’ College oarsman William Maclean will have everything going for him, to not only represent the College at the highest level but to also represent Australia in the sport of rowing. BY SIMON NEWCOMB

18


BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  19


For a young man William has shown an enormous desire to

BBC commenced rowing as Clayfield College in September 1916

succeed.

with a membership of 35 rowers at a shed situated opposite the

“Right from the time I was able to walk, I have wanted to row

famous Breakfast Creek Hotel.

and when my parents decided to send me to the College I have

For its time, the shed was very modern boasting one shower and

dreamt the dream to be successful,” William reflected.

a set of lockers.

The Maclean family have been involved with rowing for 100 years

Initially rowers had to use borrowed boats but when it was

with William’s father Ian rowing for BBC in 1991, his grandfather

announced the College was going to buy a new boat, great

Quentin representing the College in 1962 and his great

excitement arose with a large crowd of parents and rowers

grandfather Ian who represented his school in 1916.

welcoming the new boat when it arrived from Sydney at a cost

Having my family involved in a sport for 100 years gave me an added incentive to take up rowing at Brisbane Boys’ College especially this year as the Club celebrates 100 years of rowing history.” 20

of £38. It was a clinker built craft made of white cedar with fixed seats and was named ‘Sydney’ in honour of the Australian battleship that destroyed the German raider ‘Emden’ and the name of the first College stroke of a crew - Sydney Forrest. Maclean has already set his life goals to become a top oarsman but also to win an Oscar for Australia as an actor.


“I love acting and am already involved with theatresports at

Many independent schools have been competing between

school, but with the support of my family, I also want to become

themselves since 1890 in various competitions at first known

a great rower,” William said.

as Men’s Grammar Schools in four oared boats with coxswains

“I took up rowing because my father said I would be good at it. I know I am tall for my age and have strong legs and have learnt through my other sporting love rugby, that to win you have to just keep going,” William said. “I have taken my father’s advice and currently have been selected in the Year 8 Third Quad, but have already made a decision to try for the Second crew. “Our final regatta will be held soon while the Head of the River for

that consisted of the following schools: Ipswich, Brisbane, Maryborough and Rockhampton Grammar Schools, The Southport High School and Central Technical College. From 1918, the Greater Public Schools Association ran the events commencing in four oared boats with coxswain until 1954. In 1955, the association changed the top race to eight oared boats with coxswain.

our Senior boys will be held at Kawana on Saturday 12 March

Since 1918, Brisbane Boys’ College has won the Head of the

and I am hoping that BBC will win in their centenary year.”

River event 24 times.

The GPS Head of the River is contested between seven of the nine GPS schools in Brisbane.

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  21


THE A.W. RUDD Restoration Project The A.W. Rudd is one of the most iconic boats in BBC Rowing’s history. This magnificently crafted vessel was launched in 1958 and was retired from the water in 1973. The Old Collegians’ Association has been carefully restoring this classic four, which they hope to unveil this year to celebrate the BBC Rowing centenary. 22

This racing shell has been rowed by a large number of courageous and successful BBC oarsmen and crews. It is a symbol of the pride and hard work displayed by all BBC rowers throughout the last century. Norman R Wight & Sons, boat builders since 1909, a proud BBC family, have been the drivers behind this restoration, transforming it from a weathered shell to its original showroom condition. The late Ron Wright was Captain of Boats and part of BBC’s Head of the River winning crew in 1937 and 1938. His work on this project is undoubtedly a fitting tribute to his dedication and passion for rowing. The restoration demonstrates the pre-eminence of Rowing at BBC for the past 100 years and will continue to remind students, old boys, staff and visitors of the significance of the tradition of rowing at the College. The Old Collegians’ Association would like to thank all those who generously supported this important restoration project.


Captain of Boats We are all familiar with our own ‘comfort zone’. However, unlike most other sports, rowers are constantly required to operate at levels that are above and beyond our known comfort zones. This season BBC rowers have adopted a new frame of mind that involves repeatedly removing ourselves from our comfort zones in order to explore who we are and what we’re truly made of. Teamwork is our other focus. We’ve explored the essence of sacrificing ourselves for a friend. No sane person would run into a burning building...but, you might do so in support of a friend who needs you to. That instinctive desire to ‘step up’ for another is also at the heart of our sport. I want my crew mates to enjoy success even more than I want it for myself. I trust that they feel the same. Daniel James Brown wrote in his famous novel, The Boys in the Boat, “Rowing is, in a number of ways, a sport of fundamental paradoxes.” The technique involved with moving a boat with maximum efficiency is arguably one of the most challenging paradoxes involved with rowing. An athlete must apply enormous amounts of force to the oar handle through the drive phase of the stroke before extracting the oar’s blade from the water, with extreme precision. They then return to the catch position to place the blade back into the water, again with extreme precision. On race day, this process is repeated hundreds of times at high speeds over a distance of 2000m whilst the athlete is experiencing intense physical and mental pressure; all of which is completely voluntary. This is leaving the ‘comfort zone’. This is how we discover who we really are. With only seven days until BBC sees its 100th GPS Head of the River, we seek to polish our technical gains of the season and prepare to take ourselves as far out of our comfort zones as possible one last time. As the Captain of Boats in BBC’s centenary year of rowing, I would like to wish all competing crews the best of luck and urge you all to take the time to ponder the question, ‘How far am I willing to push myself?’ Morgan Apel

CAPTAIN OF BOATS

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  23


INTERVIEW

ATHLETE

PROFILES

Meet Julian Braybrook, Bradley Bloom and Ben Fenwicke

24


JULIANBRAYBROOK

YEAR 12 . SECOND VIII (CO-VICE CAPTAIN) Despite the physicality it demands from its athletes, according

“This idea of choice between extending your comfort zone or

to Second VIII rower Julian Braybrook, mastering the mind is the

remaining bound by the realms of what is easy, is one that can be

ultimate key to success when it comes to rowing.

applied to almost every aspect of our lives.”

It’s not about just winning, but striving for it; accepting at the start of the challenge that even though you might not get there it’s better to have given it your all, than to have not tried at all. Rowing is hard, but that’s what makes it rewarding.”

Julian first started rowing in Year 10 with the Head of the River winning Year 10 First Quad. “Up until this time I had played cricket and thought rowing would just be good fitness. I did alright and really enjoyed it so I kept going,” he said. As the end of the season approaches Julian and his crew continue to maintain a rigorous training schedule. “Depending on whether it’s a heavy or light week, we row on Monday morning, have an ergo session on Monday afternoon,

It’s a sentiment which he continues to value and one that was

Tuesday morning we complete stretches or a land session and

echoed in his end of year dinner speech last year.

in the afternoon we’re in the gym for our weights session. On

“At the end of the day, when you strip back every calculated technicality, every number, every figure involved with rowing you are left with one simple conclusion: rowing is a sport in which the crew that gives up last wins. The question then must be asked,

Wednesday we row in both the morning and afternoon, Thursday morning is either ergos on a heavy week or the gym if we’re completing a light week of training and on Friday we get one last row in before race day.”

how do some crews postpone this ‘giving up’ when others around

“The fitness is second to none but enduring the training together

them are caving into the temptation,” said Julian.

as a crew makes all the difference. They are all your mates

“Each person has inside their head an area of bland mediocrity, an area which holds them to an average, acceptable performance; an area that tells them that pretty good is good enough: a comfort zone. The crews that strive to exist outside their comfort zones

and you all have to try for each other. With eight other blokes depending on you, there’s a sense amongst all of us that we don’t want to let each other down. It’s all about keeping each other accountable.

are the ones that will give up last, and the ones that will win the

“As always with rowing, through the struggles and tough times one

races,” he said.

learns about the value of hard work and explores the boundaries

“Existing outside your comfort zone is all about choices. Every

of how far you can push yourself.

rower here tonight, is familiar with these choices. When you’re

“The mental fortitude rowing teaches is a critical strength of the

1000m into the race, your body is burning and your muscles are

sport as a whole and one that I am sure all of the boys have come

screaming at you, the choice is between taking a light stroke

to realise for it can be readily applied to all aspects of a young

‘going easy for a few’, or pushing yourself through the pain.

man’s life.”

The choice is between slacking off mentally; not placing in time, missing one or two catches or holding your focus through the distraction of your discomfort.” BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  25


BRADLEY BLOOM

COX YEAR 11 FIRST VIII Like any young rower, the allure of a Head of the River win remains a powerful motivator for Year 9 student Bradley Bloom, who first started rowing in 2014. But it’s the opportunity to start the day on the water which keeps Bradley coming back for more each season. “As odd as it sounds, I love the idea of getting up early when the sun is just coming up and the water is flat… well usually,” laughs Bradley. “The idea that you can wake up every morning and train is something that I really look forward to.” Bradley became accustomed to the early morning starts well before taking up the sport thanks to his older brother Sam, who in his senior year rowed with the First VIII and continues to assist with the BBC program in a coaching capacity. “I would often go down to the shed in the morning when Sam was rowing. He has had a big influence on me and actually coached me in my first year when I rowed with the Year 8 First Quad,” said Bradley. “I feel incredibly lucky to be able to start my day in this way and to be able to experience rowing whilst at school.” For Bradley, rowing, more so than any other sport, epitomises what it means to truly come together as a team, or as ‘One Shed’. 26

There are a lot of team sports, but you really have to come together as one when you row. Whilst each person has their own responsibility in the boat, you have to be in sync.You all have to commit. But when you do your job right and together it’s the best experience ever.” As cox of the Under 16 First VIII, it’s Bradley’s job to motivate his crew. “Motivation and communication are key – and mainly the communication. When the communication is clear it allows the rowers to focus purely on their performance. It means they don’t have to think about things that don’t matter and instead just the race ahead. “As cox I try and take the time to really learn about each individual rower, what they’re good at and their weaknesses. I can then use these insights to enhance the overall performance of the boat. “And every rower is different. Some rowers need lots of vocal motivation to get their

heads in the game. Others might prefer to sit by themselves and visualise winning the race. My crew is half and half. Some are quiet whilst others are bursting with energy before a race.” In addition to learning how to motivate others, rowing has taught Bradley how to be organised. “Organisation is a big thing. When you row everything is ‘on the ball’ and you have to be prepared for every aspect. It’s the same with school work – you’ve got to try and be as organised as possible. “Rowing has also taught me to learn from my mistakes. If one race doesn’t go well, that’s ok, as long as you’re able to work out what went wrong and how you can work to improve it. “Whilst we haven’t crossed the line first this season, we’ve seen some real improvements. There have been a few movements in the boat, but that’s all part of the process of making sure we try and find the best combination so we’re prepared, as a crew, for the ultimate race day. “Winning aside, I’m also looking forward to being amongst the spirit on the day. The crowds in the past have been pretty big and given that it’s our centenary year hopefully this year can be the big one.”


BEN FENWICKE

STROKE YEAR 9 5TH QUAD . COX YEAR 12 SECOND VIII

You need only spend a minute or two with

“A lot of people ask me why I do rowing.

Ben, to realise his passion and genuine

They all think it’s so hard, it’s so tough

enthusiasm for the sport of rowing. As he

– and to a degree it is, you really have

starts to speak of his crew and what it’s like

to master your technique and with that

on the water, it’s almost as if he were sitting

comes pain and blisters. You have to be

in the boat itself. “I love how the boat and

willing to persevere. But it’s all these factors

crew have to work together swiftly and how

combined that I love.”

it is all connected,” said Ben.

For Ben, the whole season essentially goes

“I remember my first good stroke, when all

into four minutes or the race of all races –

the oars were placed correctly. You had to

the Head of the River.

stop and think ‘Wow, that’s pretty cool.’ I love the feeling of the bubbles rushing under the boat, the coxswain urging you on. It’s a very demanding sport but with it comes a great sense of achievement.” His enthusiasm is mirrored by his level of involvement with the sport, rowing with the Year 9 Fifth Quad and now coxing the Open Second VIII. A commitment which sees him train every day of the week, except Sunday, and often both in the morning and afternoon. “A lot of people misunderstand the role of the cox, and I did too initially. It’s a really important role and it’s all about motivation, timing and technique,” says Ben. Having grown up in Texas, Queensland, Ben fittingly likens the experience to good

“There’s a fine line between a great sense of accomplishment and disappointment. Whether you’re coming first or last it’s about pushing as hard as you physically can,” Ben explains. “What I’m most looking forward to about the race is finishing it knowing how much

Rowing is a great representation on how to live life; how to look to where you can improve and then to map out a pathway to make that improvement. If anything rowing has taught me how to work as a team. If you’ve ever watched rowing you’d know how in sync the whole boat has to be.” As he thinks to the future and how rowing

effort we’ve put into this, knowing we

may play its part Ben likens BBC’s ‘One

couldn’t have been any more prepared. And of course that College pride and spirit

Shed’ mantra to a workplace setting.

which comes with competing in this

“I guess you could say it’s like 50

iconic race.”

people, one building. When you row and

Technique and athletic development aside, rowing has ultimately taught Ben what it takes to be a good leader.

particularly as a cox, you have to know how to communicate with other people, understand what they are struggling with, their strengths and how to motivate them as a team. I imagine this will no doubt be relevant when I’m working.”

horsemanship. “If I were to use an

Ben has been involved in numerous sports

analogy, the rowers are like stallions

over the years, but it’s rowing which takes

and just like guiding a horse, you have

the cake.

to know what the stallion or in this case the rowers are going through – and rowing is tough going.”

“Cross country, swimming, cricket, track and field, soccer, sailing, softball – I’ve tried them all. But rowing is just one of

“The key is to be passionate and to

those sports you have to try to understand

understand where everyone in the boat

the sensation that you get from it. It’s

is at. For example, let’s say ‘Elliott’ is

something you just can’t get from other

struggling – that’s when I’d come in

sports. It’s so much work, but brings so

and shout out, ‘Elliott, use your

much reward.”

body, remember the second race we won by two boat lengths, let’s make that three today’.

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  27


BBC ROCKS THE BOAT AT GRAFTON The Clarence River came alive with boats, competitors and officials in December last year for Grafton’s annual regatta. The event attracted a record number of competitors

Men's VIII ahead of all other competing Queensland

including a large number of schools, and makes for

schools, the King’s School (NSW) and Christ

a good competition leading into the GPS Rowing

Church Grammar School (WA). The University of

season.

Queensland Under 23 VIII won the event by only a

BBC placed third in the overall point score with only

length and up to five years’ age difference.

five crews at the event, following strong wins in the

A special rowing camp in Bundaberg followed the

Under 17 VIII and Under 15 Quad events.

Grafton Regatta for the BBC First and Second VIIIs.

It was another successful day on the water on the

The results from this preseason event represented

Sunday, with BBC bringing home medals for all

a strong start to the GPS Rowing season in what

ages, culminating in the Open Men’s Championship

is BBC Rowing’s centenary year – celebrating 100

eights, the main event of the day.

years of one of the oldest sports in the world.

In what was a magical morning of rowing in the fog, the BBC First VIII placed second in the Open

28

PHOTO COURTESY OF EMMA MCCARTHY


1000 Metre Mark BY MARK DWYER, HEAD OF CO-CURRICULUM

I have always seen rowing as a form of human art. Of course, it is heavily scientific, expertise generated from mathematics, physics and the interplay between the constants and variables; biomechanics. Still, for me, the confluence of physicality and character, sensibility and movement sensuousness, speed and control, reach and definition, can all implode if the pure complexity of the art is misunderstood by the players that make the essence of rowing, the crew. The explicit fundamentals of the movement can be

questions of themselves in the first 500 metres

taught by competent coaches. Explaining how a

of a race. The ecstatic dynamism of the first 90

boat needs to be moved is not too taxing. Outlining

seconds usurps the time to ponder and reduces

how component parts need to gel in order to

the sense of placing self in the moment. The

create the whole picture is a little more difficult,

second 500 metres brings relativity to the fore – an

but not beyond the competent coach and not out

acute awareness of relative speed, relative place

of reach of the dedicated oarsman or coxswain.

and, perhaps, relative quality. By the time the 1000

All these things can be embedded into a rowing

metre mark beckons their presence, decisions

program, as is rightly the case, and, yet, something

need to be made.

will be missing.

All rowers will probably ask the same question

I think there are times, as adults, when we all revert

around the 1000 metre mark. Not all will spy

to type. We revert to one of our central characters

the right answer. Some acquiesce to the “no”

when specific circumstances present. At times,

voice while the grittier character will rise to the

often the genuinely challenging times, the times of

challenge, answer “yes” and commit to achieving

loss, unforeseen and unwelcome change, pressure

the extraordinary. And there, in the boy, is the

or stress, I see myself reverting to the ‘1000 metre

emerging man.

mark’ type. I don’t think crews ask too many

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  29


INTERVIEW

SPOTLIGHT ON BBC OLD BOYS JIRIC HASELGROVE

“It has created lifelong friendships, introduced me to some of my

Despite his parents trying to convince him otherwise, old boy Jirik

athletes I have ever had the pleasure to coach and day in day out

Haselgrove (BBC 2005) has always been drawn to rowing. At the age of just nine, he began coxing with the Toowong Rowing Club, an experience which only affirmed his love for the sport. Jirik came to BBC in 2001, having been awarded an Academic Scholarship - an application which Jirik says was a direct result of him wanting to join the College’s rowing program. By the time Jirik was 15 he was approached to coach at St Aidan’s with a focus on improving technical knowledge for coxing amongst their crews and in 2004 as a Year 11 student, was the youngest coxswain to be selected for an interstate team, which saw him race with the 2004 Queensland Men’s Youth VIII - the last men’s eight to win the interstate regatta for Queensland. In the same year, Jirik joined the University of Queensland Boat Club (UQBC) as the Junior Men’s Coxswain, moving into the high performance Men’s Coxswain position the following year; his senior year at the College. During this time Jirik also coxed BBC’s First VIII, a role which was taken on by his brother in 2006 and 2007.

greatest mentors, gifted me with some of the most incredible continues to create some of the most lasting memories I will ever have. It is, without a doubt, the ultimate team sport,” he said.

LACHLAN BROWN In Term 4 last year, as part of the 100th Anniversary Row to Breakfast Creek, BBC Old Boy Lachlan Brown (BBC 1993) returned to impart the lessons he and his crew learnt from rowing with our current students. “BBC was great for me and it taught me a lot. It turns out however, that the most valuable lessons I ever learnt were those that I learnt through rowing,” said Lachlan. Here we feature some of the insights he shared with the boys. WE LEARNT ABOUT INTEGRITY AND LEADERSHIP by

ensuring that we would always encourage and congratulate the younger oarsman before and after races. We would always be there to help them with the loading and unloading of boats and oars, on and off the trailer, or in and out of stretchers. We would

Size eventually got the better of Jirik and saw him retire from

always acknowledge their presence as we crossed paths around

coxing and turn to coaching and officiating. At 18, Jirik returned to

the College, whether it was in between periods or at lunch.

St Aidian’s to coach the school’s First VIII and eventually returned

A friendly “g’day” or a simple eyebrow raise means a lot to a

to a high performance environment some years later, where he ran

junior oarsman. These are the moments that inspire the younger

the Junior Women’s program for the UQBC, and led the crews to

oarsman to do their best during their next training session and to

eight state and five national championship gold medals.

put in that 100% during a race.

Today, Jirik is the Women’s Sweep Coach and Coach Coordinator

WE LEARNT ABOUT COMMITMENT AND DEDICATION

for the Australian Under 21 Rowing Team. He also debuted as

by ensuring that we would always turn up for training, on time,

a commentator at the national championships this year, having

every time. I learnt that it was not just about me, it was about my

commentated at state championships and school regattas for six

contribution to the crew, and that it was always about the crew as

years – an experience he likens to his coxing.

a whole.

When speaking with Jirik, his passion for rowing has influenced all

I LEARNT ABOUT HONESTY AND TRUST when I saw the

areas of his life. “Beyond my involvement in rowing, it’s BBC old boys, in the form of masters rowers at Toowong, that instilled a passion for the sport in me at a very young age. That passion basically shaped my life choices and direction throughout my school life and, ultimately, into adult life. The leadership, discipline and passion that rowing has instilled in me has become the basis of all of my professional success and I will ultimately remain involved in this sport for the rest of my life,” said Jirik. 30

fatigue or sheer exhaustion in the faces of my crew mates when finishing a tough race. These were the times when we had just endured a hard week of training and Churchie or Terrace had pushed us for the full 2000m, but as a crew we refused to give in and finished ahead by only a canvas. We were always honest with each other and we could always trust each other to give 100% during training and during the races. I LEARNT ABOUT RESPECT through seeing my parents

sacrifice their sleep-ins to get me down to the sheds in the early


hours of the morning, and through seeing them sacrifice their weekends to attend regattas. I learnt about respect through seeing my coach being there for each and every training session and for being there to talk with when I thought I couldn’t keep going. Lachlan left the boys with this message, “So having said all of that, it was only some 20 years ago that I was sitting exactly where you guys are now, wondering what

THE ICONIC HENLEY CREW Lachlan rowed at the College from 1990-93, and was part of the First VIII Head of the River winning crew in 1993, who finished the season undefeated, Australian champions at the Henley Royal Regatta and Princess Elizabeth Challenge Cup Victors. The story is iconic and Lachlan was able to take the boys back in time as

the rowing season will hold for us. The most important

he reflected on the event.

message I can give to all of you is to; believe that the

“After our Head of the River victory in 1993, we continued to row

hard work will pay off, believe that if you do more you will get more, and above all else believe in yourselves.”

“I believe in you all and I believe in BBC Rowing. Remember, a goal is only as worthy as the effort required to achieve it.”

for the next four months. The last month was spent over in the UK where we competed in a number of lead up regattas before finally competing at Henley,” explains Lachlan. “In one of these lead up Regattas we rowed against Eton College. They defeated us convincingly by some four lengths. Eton were the best rowing school in the UK, if not in the world. The Eton crew were a year older than us, they had the best boat, the best oars, the best kit, and they were a very impressive outfit. “We on the other hand were the under dogs from Australia, with a very second hand borrowed boat. So as you can imagine, Eton

+

BBC Old Boy Haimish Karrasch was also part of the iconic 1993 Henley winning crew and following on from this victory, went on to represent Australia in rowing at the 1996 and 2000 Olympic Games in the lightweight coxless four event and lightweight double-scull event respectively. In 2003 Haimish went on to row with the Australian Institute of Sport’s lightweight four, a crew which took home the title at the Australian championship at Lake Barrington.

were also very intimidating to us. “There were a lot of people who doubted us and nobody really expected us to succeed at Henley. However what people didn’t realise is how determined we were and how much we believed in ourselves. We ignored all of the negativity and any doubt in the months prior. We continued to get out of bed through April, May, June and July when it was absolutely freezing. We trained at 100 percent when there were no other crews to pace ourselves against. “We continued to train eight times per week if not more. Stroke by stroke, race by race, we progressed through all of the sudden death heats at Henley, and after a week of racing each and every day, we lined up against Eton College again. We knew we had put in the required effort, but above all else we believed in ourselves, we believed we could beat Eton, we trusted our coach and followed his advice. “So on that day, 4 July 1993, Brisbane Boys’ College rose to the challenge and despite being a year younger, they beat one of the best rowing schools in the world.” Winning Henley Crew: J Morrow, L Brown (stroke), H Karrasch, G Brown, S Wilson, N Simmonds, N Hollingworth, M Kesby, T Jensen

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  31


SPOTLIGHT ON BBC OLD BOYS RISING STARS Scott Laidler (2007) continues to be one of BBC’s highest achieving old collegians in the elite rowing scene. Scott has rowed in the Australian Mens Eight for the last three seasons and is currently fighting for a place in the boat for the Rio 2016 Olympics. We wish him all the best and look forward to following Scott as he continues his rowing journey.

PERSISTENCE AND PERSEVERANCE

ON THE OTHER SIDE

The last 12 months may have been polarised by highs and lows for

He may have only moved 20 meters up the road, but

Old Boy Tom Franey (2014), but in the true spirit of rowing, persistence

rowing on the ‘other side of school’ has taken BBC

and perseverance continue to pave the way.

Old Boy Tom Davidson (2014) across the country and

“In 2015 I joined the Toowong Rowing Club’s Junior rowing program,

the world.

where I was fortunate enough to compete at the Queensland Club

“After finishing at BBC in 2014, I started rowing at

State Championships, New South Wales State Championships,

Toowong Rowing Club. Rowing out of school has

Nationals and the Australian Team Selection Regatta,” said Tom.

been such a different experience and we had a great

“I had a great season with all the boys and we managed to secure some reasonable results from that campaign,” he said. “We also travelled down to Penrith in April that year to trial for the Under 19 Australian Rowing team in the Junior Mens Four after many months of intense training, we were fortunate to gain selection into the Australian Rowing Team as the Junior Mens Four. “This saw us travel over to Rio to compete at the Junior Rowing World Championships, where I learnt a lot of valuable lessons that I hope to take forward as I prepare for the seasons ahead. “Unfortunately after returning from the world championships I was diagnosed with Glandular Fever which put me on the sideline and as a result I have missed the majority of training and consequently competition for the 2016 season. “But I’ve used this time to critique technical skills, improve my base fitness and as an opportunity to do some cross training on the bike.”

first season, with success in both the Queensland and New South Wales State Titles as well as the Australian National Championships in a range of boat classes,” explains Tom. “To top of a great season we were selected for the Junior Australian Rowing Team in the Junior Mens Four and competed in the Junior World Championships in Rio de Janeiro. It was an amazing experience and we quickly discovered what a big step it is to race internationally,” he said. “Since then I have been rowing in the Queensland youth eight. We recently competed in the New South Wales State Championships and had a great race and we’re hoping to build on that and take out the elusive win at nationals this year.” In addition to his rowing commitments Tom is also studying Business at the Queensland University of

And with that in mind, Tom’s focus now turns to the 2017 season.

Technology.

“My aim for next year’s season is to gain selection in the Australian

“It’s going well and it presents a very different set of

Under 23 lightweight sweep squad, who will compete at the world

challenges to those at school, but I am loving the

championships. I also hope to continue to chip away at my university

freedom and try and take as many road trips when I

degree in Exercise and Sports Science.”

can fit them in around training.”

32


Let the adventure begin Starting high school represents a monumental milestone in a child’s life; it marks the start of a period of great growth and increased independence. For Year 7 students at Brisbane Boys’ College it presents an opportunity to retreat to the great outdoors. For two years now, the College has run a unique Orient and

“On the first day, boys’ orienteering skills were put to the test as

Connect Retreat program for those starting Year 7, designed to

they navigated the campus using a map and a range of clues. This

help boys build resilience, alleviate any anxieties associated with

activity was all about getting them to interact and cooperate with

the transition and importantly to foster genuine connection. Five weeks into the first term, a noticeable sense of camaraderie and energy can be seen in the schoolyard. According to BBC’s Outdoor Education Coordinator Virginia Mitchell, the program - run over four days in the first week of school - has received an overwhelmingly positive response from parents, teachers and boys alike. “The whole experience is built around connection. Whether boys are completely new to the College or are transitioning from our Junior School in Year 6, we want them to know that they are not only joining a community, but belong within it,” said Virginia. This year the initiative commenced with a one-day Orient program

their peers, whilst engaging with the history of the College. It was a very symbolic way to say, ‘You’re now a part of this history’. “They were also given a personalised hat and an individual bag tag, which were made by one of our staff from the Manual Arts department.” Boys and staff then travelled to Camp Somerset on the Wednesday to complete the Retreat component of the program. “We want boys to feel accepted and valued for who they are from the very first day, which is why the experience runs in the first week of school. It’s a crazy time to do it from a logistical perspective, not to mention the heightened sense of nervousness experienced by boys and parents alike during this period. But for

held at the school, followed by a three-day Retreat where boys

us, ensuring a strong start to the year takes precedence,” explains

participated in a range of activities designed to help them learn

Virginia.

about themselves and others.

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  33


“Instead of boys turning up in a new uniform, not knowing their

Parents also play a significant role in the experience which

peers and having to navigate a foreign environment, we want

according to BBC’s Acting Head of Middle School, Sean Riordan,

them to have an experience where they are challenged but also

is essential.

supported.

“Parent partnerships are crucial in the middle phase of learning.

“And when it comes to breaking down barriers and strengthening

At BBC we understand the importance of parents and teachers

relationships there is no better place than the natural environment

working in partnership to achieve successful outcomes for

itself. In a structured, timetabled world boys don’t always have

all of our boys. It’s important that boys are able to move from

the opportunity to have those incidental conversations that often

dependence to independence and are supported during

take place on camp. The type of conversations that help to

this phase. Middle schooling is very much focused around

establish friendship and trust. We’re incredibly lucky to have such

relationships, connections and partnerships,” said Sean.

passionate staff who not only make the program possible but who truly endorse it. “The initiative acts as an important rite of passage, with the activities symbolic to their growing independence. Boys took part in a high ropes course, rafting and also took lessons in learning to polish their shoes, iron their shirts and to wear their uniform with pride.”

34

“Parents were able to attend a session on Monday, where they were invited to write a letter to their son and place it in his locker ready for his return from camp,” said Sean. “Watching boys read through their notes and to share this experience with their parents was really quite amazing. We are also going to archive the letters for boys to revisit when they reach Year 12.


“Looking three weeks on, you can see boys really immersing themselves in the BBC culture and because our principal teachers and housemasters joined us on the retreat, strong relationships have already been formed, which means we are down to the business of learning already.” For mum Rowan, new to the school, the experience helped make the transition just that little bit easier for the whole family. “Our son can get quite homesick and despite feeling a little anxious on the day of the camp, he returned with some great stories and clearly enjoyed the experience. He’s even polished his shoes and ironed his shirt a few times – although I’m not sure how long this will last,” laughs Rowan. “As a mum there is always that sense of being torn between wanting your son to be independent and strong and at the same time protected, because of course you want to nurture them – I mean they are only 12. So we were very excited to see him return and what an entrance. Seeing the boys walking through the guard of honour, past all those seniors to the sounds of the bagpipes and war cries was real goosebumps material. Despite looking a little weary and slightly overwhelmed you could see a real sense of excitement in their faces,” she said. “The whole experience has definitely helped our son to settle in. Rather than just going in on the first day, not knowing many people, it enabled him to realise that he’s not alone and that there are many boys in the same boat. “The presentation from staff at the end of the camp was great. They were extremely personable and it’s clear that they understand our boys. It was nice to hear their natural and humorous description of the Somerset experience.” In her address to parents, Virginia highlighted the power of relationships as the foundation for learning and growth. “It is our role at BBC and specifically through Outdoor Education to inspire your son, encourage him to dream, take control of his life and create his own bright future. Challenge is not comfortable, your son will not have loved every moment or every meal. He will however have tried, he will have persevered, he may have had

To watch a video of the experience, visit BBC’s Vimeo Channel vimeo.com/154269945

to ask a mate for help, he may have even failed. It is through this process he will have learnt. About himself, about the support around him and what it is to try. “We have high expectations of our boys, but we believe your son is brave and we believe in the power of human connection and the joy it brings.”

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  35


When we decided a subtropical island would be our next holiday destination to relax and soak up the sun, I went back to my childhood memories of packing up the car and the excitement of our boat ride to our island paradise. I still remember the smell of the sea and the glistening waters as we would take our 45 minute vehicle ferry ride to the quaint little island tucked away in the corner of South-East Queensland. As it turned out, North Stradbroke Island is still one of Queensland’s best kept secrets, and I know why. Straddie is but a hop, skip and a jump away from Brisbane, and to my amazement still as pristine and beautiful as I always remembered. Why has it taken me so long to come back to this little piece of paradise! You can’t visit Straddie without dipping your toes in one of Point Lookout’s magnificent beaches. White sandy beaches and crystal clear waters hug the shoreline of the Point, making it popular with surfers, swimmers and fishermen.

While cruising around the island we came across a few shopping havens from quaint gift and clothing stores to the local convenience store, bakery, butcher and fruit shops. Point Lookout is known as the hub of the island and it buzzes with outdoor cafes, restaurants and take-away eateries. Stradbroke Island Holidays made it so easy and are offering some great deals from now until the end of August with 3 night packages including a vehicle ferry transfer with Stradbroke Ferries. There are a number of amazing accommodation properties; we chose a holiday house so we could take our dog, but there are resorts and even quaint waterfront cabins at Amity. The relaxed island pace ensures for a peaceful holiday surrounded by the beauty of the bush and the life of the ocean, in essence the best of both worlds. It’s an island waiting to be discovered full of natural attractions and hidden treasures. We headed home feeling rejuvenated and like one of the locals – can’t wait to get back to Straddie again!

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Lessons in leadership When it comes to providing lessons in leadership, it turns out learning to row is learning to lead. And you needn’t look further than this year’s Leaders’ Assembly to find evidence of this, with a number of rowers formally inducted into leadership roles at a dedicated assembly in January.

Congratulations to BBC Rowers Morgan

“As a leadership body we’re not expecting

Apel, Julian Braybrook, Tom Burke, Scott

changes to happen overnight, but let us

Foxton, Jack Kibble, Michael Makeham

remember, ‘The journey of a thousand

and Tom Reid who were named Prefects;

miles begins with one step’. And I intend

Elliott Williams as Knox House Captain and

on taking that first step with you today. I

Sam Lassman, Matthew Pettigrew and

want everyone here to make a pledge that

Sam Wiltshire who were selected as Spirit

you, me and all of us commit to Team BBC.

Committee members.

Because teamwork will make the dream

School Captain Dom Walton, delivered a special address at the assembly, unveiling this year’s theme and sharing his insights on what it means to lead and the importance of working together as a team. He commenced by providing his peers with one condition for the ‘expedition’ ahead. “Never travel too far ahead of the pack, you will lose sight and change direction. Never travel too far behind the pack, you will slow the rest down and progression will not be made. Brothers, just travel alongside me, them and us and our journey will certainly be one to remember,” said Dom.

come true. Let us not be remembered as the team who falters, rather, as the team that share the vision, the dream and the desire to forge forward.” In introducing the theme ‘Forge’ Dom encouraged his fellow peers and staff to apply it in numerous ways: to forge ahead and make good progress; to forge as one and work together as a College community; and finally to forge memories and to appreciate every moment. He left the audience with this quote, “So let’s ‘Start by doing what’s necessary; then do what’s possible; and suddenly you will be doing the impossible.” MAIN PHOTO COURTESY OF ZACK WILLIAMS WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ZACKWILLIAMSPHOTOGRAPHY

38


ACADEMIC PATHWAYS Success has many different faces at Brisbane Boys’ College. At BBC, we challenge boys not only to think about what they will do to succeed but to discover the role they can play in the world. We are incredibly proud of all of our boys and know they will go forth with the confidence and capability to change the world. Here we share a number of stories on our recent graduates and the various endeavours they are preparing to follow.


ACADEMIC PATHWAYS - CAMPBELL STARKY

NEW

WORLD

Living by the mantra ‘Do what you love and the rest will follow’ can be, at times, easier said than done. For Brisbane Boys’ College graduate Campbell Starky however, this mantra is guiding the way.

40


As he prepares to move to Canberra to attend the Australian National University (ANU), where he’ll study a Bachelor of Law and Bachelor of International Security Studies, Campbell reflects on how it all came to be. “If you had asked me three years ago if I’d be undertaking International Security Studies I would have said ‘no way’. I’ve always had a strong interest in Law – my sister is currently studying Law and we often talk about what she’s working on - but Engineering was what I initially had in mind,” said Campbell. “International security is different to anything I’ve ever done before and I guess is a slightly unusual choice, but it sounds really interesting and in my first semester I’ll be studying units such as Arabic which will be quite different,” he said. “The course will explore areas such as cybercrime, environmental degradation and food security – all of which currently, and will no doubt continue to, impact on the world we live in. I don’t know exactly what to expect but I’m looking forward to it nonetheless.” Apart from embarking on a new learning adventure, Campbell is looking forward to discovering a new type of independence. “A little while ago I decided that I wanted to move and explore some place new,  I’ve always lived in Brisbane so I’m looking forward to the change. “When I visited ANU it seemed to have a community minded type of vibe, the campus is beautiful – which I realise doesn’t sound like a solid reason to base my decision on - but something just felt right. “I’m lucky to have a few mates who will also be heading down to Canberra for university, which will make the transition a little easier.”

“BBC is a hive of really great people and I’m going to miss them all.” No doubt however, the memories made and friendships forged whilst at the College will remain with Campbell for life – a sentiment he spoke to when he delivered his Valedictorian Speech last year, reflecting on his first day at school, his love-hate relationship with the BBC uniform and his time with friends. “Now I told you that I was going to tell you a few stories, I lied. I really only told you one story tonight – I told you about how a clueless boy came to a strange and scary new place called Brisbane Boys’ College. I told you that after no time at all, Brisbane Boys’ College had become his second home and his second family. I told you there was plenty of laughter and he made some amazing memories with this second family, and I told you that they shaped him and helped him to grow. Really what I’m trying to say is thank you. Thank you for the memories, thank you for being amazing friends and for making me the person I am today.” When asking Campbell what he is enjoying most about the here and the now, he’s quick to respond. “Just hanging out with my mates and for the first time in my life having nothing else to do but enjoy each other’s company. “A group of us recently returned from Cambodia, where we visited the First Steps School. I visited this village last year to help build infrastructure for the local community as part of BBC’s Coffee for Cambodia initiative, which supports Harvest Cambodia. “It was really nice to return to the village and to take the time to travel with my mates.”

But it is definitely his mates and those he has come to know at BBC whom he’ll miss most.

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  41


ACADEMIC PATHWAYS - ANDREW SU

THINKING

FORWARD

It was his practical experience with researchers at QUT’s Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, as part of BBC’s Student Scientist Partnership Program, that sparked Andrew Su’s interest in medicine.

42


During his last year of school,  Andrew was fortunate to work alongside leading researchers as part of the program, looking at the human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) which has been linked to cancer and can be detected in saliva, with a view to unearthing more effective ways to detect the cancer in its early stages. Having been awarded a UQ Scholarship for Excellence and his first preference in the first round of QTAC offers, Andrew is set to commence a Doctor of Medicine in March at the University of Queensland. He’ll spend the first four years completing a Bachelor of Science, majoring in Biomedicine, with a view to selecting a specialist area for the remainder of his degree. On top of this, he hopes to undertake a number of medical internships abroad as part of his scholarship and to contribute to medical research along the way. “I’ve been invited to take part in UQ’s Advanced Study Program in science which gives you greater access to research, but in terms of the end goal I definitely want to become a doctor; I like the practical nature of this field and how it enables you to directly interact with people,” said Andrew. For those who know Andrew, his career direction may come as somewhat of a surprise following his success in robotics, having been part of BBC’s Team Pi who were crowned world champions in the Robocup Junior Open Soccer Superteam Competition in China last year.

I would, however, like to contribute to research which combines medicine and robotics, initiatives like 3D printing which enables researchers to create organ scaffolds in which cells can grow on,” he said.

“I’m also keen to potentially explore the field of neuroscience, which again ties in somewhat with the world of robotics in terms of investigating connections and electrical systems. When asking Andrew about the most valuable piece of advice he received whilst at school, it’s not so much a statement or conversation in which he chooses to draw upon, but more so a feeling of being able to learn in a supportive environment. “The environment at BBC was just really nice, being able to easily talk to all teachers and to have the support of people like Mr Noy was what made the difference, and for that I am truly grateful.”

“Robotics can be, at times, a little isolating as it requires you to spend a lot of time on the computer and I’d like to be more hands-on with what I do. Robotics will always remain a hobby though.

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  43


ACADEMIC PATHWAYS - NATE DENNIS

KICKING

GOALS It seems that Nate Dennis is kicking goals in all areas of life since graduating from Brisbane Boys’ College at the end of 2015.

44


The 18 year old Buderim local is enjoying his new found independence before commencing at the University of Queensland in March where he will study a Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) and a Bachelor of Biotechnology (Honours). “I’m really enjoying the freedom to do whatever I want. I’m still training four times a week for AFL, but apart from that I’m just going to the beach and catching up with friends before I need to get a job and start uni,” said Nate.

I was thinking about studying physio the whole way through high school, until halfway through Year 12. I played a fair bit of sport (AFL and Basketball) and ended up talking to a number of physios about the career choice, but they talked me out of it,” he laughed.

Some of those catch-ups have been with fellow BBC boarders who reside on the Sunshine Coast; something that Nate is missing already. “I miss boarding – seeing your mates all day every day. That is what I will miss most about BBC.” But it’s the excitement of university learning and the prospect of a share house in Brisbane that are proving to be big drawcards for the OP1 recipient. “I’m pretty excited for uni life – the freedom not just socially but also how I’ll learn, particularly the lecture podcasts.” “Boarding really prepared me for the idea of a share house while I study. I’m used to having so many people around, so that’s what I’m looking forward to again,” said Nate. The school basketball player didn’t always have an engineering and science career in his sights, with a last minute change of heart halfway through his senior year.

“So after doing a bit of research into the courses available and based on my interests, I decided on science and engineering.” Nate wasn’t new to the areas of maths and science, having completed the Student Scientist Partnership Program, which sees students team with leading researchers, and achieving very high marks in his mathematics subjects. “I liked maths at school; I’ve always done well. I had Mr Blood as a teacher and he really helped foster my interest. We also did a biotech unit in biology class which sparked my interest too.” And when Nate isn’t at a university lecture, he will be training with the Brisbane Lions AFL Academy or Aspley AFL Club, chasing his sporting career dream whilst gaining that all important education. “I was pretty stoked when I received my first choice in the first round of offers and I’m really interested in the engineering side of the degree; I think there are some great career opportunities and prospects out there inthat field, particularly if AFL doesn’t work out for me.”

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  45


To find out what’s happening at BBC and across our community, follow us on Facebook or Twitter. facebook.com/BrisBoysCollege @BrisBoysCollege Here’s what’s been shared recently.

PATRICK THYGESEN (LEFT) WITH FELLOW BBC ATHLETES

CONGRATS PAT

Social Shares

A big congratulations to Year 9 student, Patrick Thygesen who attended the Future State Greats Presentation where he was presented as Metropolitan West’s Future State Greats Elite Athlete.

ROWING WEEKEND UPDATE The Open First VIII travelled to Sydney for the NSW State Championships, with a great first heat to qualify for the A final. BBC crossed the line before some of the great rowing schools including The King’s School, Wesley College, The Scots College, Carey Grammar, Newington College, Geelong College, Xavier College, Sydney Grammar, St Ignatius Riverview and Sydney Boys High School. Our Opens placed eighth in the A final, proving themselves strong against a high quality field. Well done! Our rowers had their final event at Lake Wyaralong before heading back up to Lake Kawana. The boys did well with two double wins for the Year 9 Fifth and Sixth crews in a very competitive environment, positioning themselves well. The Year 10 stepped up in very tricky conditions with a number of top three finishes. The Year 8 crews all fought well and created some positive momentum. The focus has been on individual responsibility to the collective group and focusing on performing the process to the best of their ability.

BOARDERS’ TRUCKERS NIGHT The Boarding House turned into a truck stop for the first themed dinner for the year - Truckers Night. The boys dressed for the part (as did staff) where they enjoyed a traditional trucker’s menu: an entrée of party pies and nuggets, followed by steak, ribs, peas and potato for main course, before spoiling them even more for dessert with the ever popular Cold Rock ice cream option. Special mention to our Headmaster, Mr Graeme McDonald, Mr Chris Duffy, Mr Sean Riordan and Mr Trevor Evans for joining the boarding community for dinner. A big thank you to the Catering Department for putting on a very special dinner. The night ended with our singing cowboy, BBC Boarder, Tom Drury from Miles. We can’t wait for the next themed dinner!

46


@BrisBoysCollege PARENT INSIGHT New Middle School parents were recently invited to attend a number of insight sessions designed to equip them with helpful tools and information for supporting their son in this next phase of his learning journey. Here we share with you some insights provided by staff on the day.

FOUNDER’S DAY

YOU’VE GOT A FRIEND IN ME

We honoured our heritage, marking 114 years since Mr Arthur ‘Barney’

While our Middle and Senior School students have been

Rudd opened our great College. Rudd believed education was the key

preparing for their interhouse swimming carnival, our

to human progress. He saw no barriers only opportunities. Tradition

Year 6 students have been buddies for our youngest

and these ideals have been handed down through the generations,

learners in the Junior School.

and today BBC is one of the most progressive and sought after boys’ schools in Brisbane.

BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE REGATTA 2016  47


BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE ROWERS OPEN FIRST VIII

SECOND VIII

THIRD VIII

FOURTH VIII

STROKE

Alistair Waters

Julian Braybrook

Matthew Pettigrew

Samuel Lassman

7

Jack Kibble

Tom Reid

Paraka Nii

Patrick Daly

6

Cal Hope

Scott Foxton

Lachlan Dennis

William Hulme

5

Morgan Apel

Xavier Vela Tupuhi

Le'sa Tai'mua-Swain

Joseph Avauli

4

Danté Harp

Tom Burke

Sean Farrell

Kenneth Wyllie

3

Luke Palmer

Lachlan Acworth

Angus King

Daniel Gilliland

2

Ben Beatty

Michael Makeham

Prynce-Romeo Taugaele

Jarod Heylen

BOW

Lachlan Phillips

Elliott Williams

Sam Wiltshire

Matthew Davis

COACH

Richard Paterson

Emma McCarthy

Kaitlyn Lawrence

Kaitlyn Lawrence and Cam Wallace

FIRST VIII

SECOND VIII

THIRD VIII

STROKE

Sam Tait

Matthew Tong-Law

Lachlan Swinbourne

7

Matthew Malins

Ben Hobart

Alex Crutchley

6

Michael Griffiths

Alexander Murdoch

Trevor Hosea

5

Joe Gilmour

Thomas Buchan

Callum Hinwood

4

Liam Jackson

Angus Cole

Deevon Toleafoa-Felagai

3

Thomas Kibble

Aled Temperly

Luc Heylen

2

Lewis Barnwell

James Cormack

Edward Austin

BOW

Piers Feller

Alexander Campbell

Stuart Gardner

COACH

Rachael Kinninmonth

Blake Toll

Cameron Wallace and Pat Makeham

COX

Jaxon Fielding

Benjamin Fenwicke

Matthew Canavan

Thomas Daley

YEAR 11 COX

Bradley Bloom

Isaak Dove

Ziyang Huang

YEAR 10 1ST QUAD

2ND QUAD

3RD QUAD

4TH QUAD

5TH QUAD

6TH QUAD

STROKE

Dougal Hulme

Blair Paterson

Joel Marriner

Joshua Strickland

James Kajewski

Thomas Webber

3

Max Campbell

Max Kirsch

Lachlan Tait

Conor Thomas

Samuel Barrett

Adam Sherlock

2

Luis Plazibat

Riley Bowyer

Max Baldwin

Tavita Roma

Douglas Pollock

Oliver Gill

BOW

Liam Dillon

Jonathan Hawkins

Aviel Cohn

Jack Donohue

Daniel Griffin-Sheridan Rupert Williams

COACH

Nic Coates

Robert Lester

Nick Patchett

Courtney Donnelly

Andrew Williams

Michael Trew

JUNIOR 1

JUNIOR 2

JUNIOR 3

JUNIOR 4

JUNIOR 5

JUNIOR 6

STROKE

Connor Hayes

Morgan Jones

George Gibson

Blayke Pearson-Adams Benjamin Fenwicke

Oscar Church

3

Clancy Doe

Samuel Braithwaite

George Gilliland

Casey Fielding

Jonathon Vautin

Max Bennett

2

Jack Kelly

Thomas Hinwood

Lachlan MacMillan

Nathan Vassie

Samuel Kelly-Knowles Thomas Sharpe

BOW

Louie Buchan

Ali Petfield

Samuel Bolton

Toby Hobart

Sebastian Schurmann James Clayton

COACH

Brendan Ramsey and Maddie Cowan

Laura Beitzel and Tom Kubale

James Gordon and Megan Stafford

Tom Pickering and Tee Nguyen

Jason Kubale and Monica Gradwell

JUNIOR 7

JUNIOR 8

JUNIOR 9

STROKE

Nicholas Whiting

Benjamin Rodgers

Oskar Schulte

3

Oryaan Kalolo

Jordan Soldatic

Matthew Bill

2

Jake Tierney

Macauly Peabody

Nicholas Whiting

BOW

Henry Hulbert

Dario Falcao-Rassokha Finn Curtis

COACH

John Walker and Jamila Cox

Lucy Smith

COX

Joshua McLennan

Ricardo Hamze

Jake Drury

Riley Singer

Anton Tomei

Thomas Payne

YEAR 9 COX

Joshua Vincent

Nicholas Tsang

Judd Pratt

Lachlan Cooley

Will Stephen

Archibald Brice

Rowan Gardner and Will Edgerton

YEAR 9 COX

Christian Kovac

Ben Arya

Thomas Goffage

Lucy Smith

YEAR 8

COACHES

Michael Adams

Bryn Dalton

Samuel Hocking

Thomas Montgomery

William Stone

Chris Beech

Harry Ayres

Angus Deighton

BJ Jeavons

Nicholas Mungomery

James Talkington

Richard Bell

Henry Batt

Xavier Dixon

Alexander Jeffries

Godfrey Neame

Patrick Telfer

Sam Bloom

Samuel Beasley

Henry Doe

Tynan Jones

Dane Nicholson

Kurt Tozer

Charles Cunningham

William Blucher

Fraser Downes

Daniel Kath

Ryan Perina

Finn Trebilcock

Tim Foote

Lucas Bree

Max Edwards

Samuel Kenny

Christos Porfyriou

Nathan Tsang

Fergus Galloway

Liam Bridgefoot

Lachlan Ellis

Christian Kovac

Patrick Roach

Benjamin Ward

Sam Jacks

Brendan Cardiff

Thomas Fenton

Max Krawczyk

Louis Ryan

Darcy Watter

James McPherson

James Carey

Jamie Finlay

Darius Luamanu

Lachlan Shaw

Rupert Wells

Blake Newell

Angus Case

Sean Flynn

William Maclean

Blake Sheppard

Nicholas Wiggett

Liam Piper

Thomas Clarke

Thomas Gilmour

William McFarlane

Angus Shugg

Ryan Yang

Barb Robson

Will Clemments-Dawson

Mason Gordon

Angus McPherson

Lachlan Simpson

Mitchell Yarde

Lucy Smith

Lloyd Costa

Harvey Guest

Joshua Miller

Riley Singer

Matthew Young

Jon van Zandwijk

Noah Crivello

Angus Hedberg

Isaac Milnes

Ralph Soriano

48

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END NOTE

BY PAUL GARDNER, PRESIDENT BBC ROWING SUPPORT GROUP

On behalf of the Rowing Support Group I would like to extend a very warm welcome to all attending the regatta hosted by Brisbane Boys’ College. This year at BBC we celebrate 100 years of rowing and we are very proud of the history and the traditions built up over that period. What you see here today is the result of many

outcome. It’s the same story out of the boat and

hours of planning and hard work. And that is just

we can see that organising a regatta for our boys

from the rowers!

is also the ultimate team activity.

Putting a regatta together requires many hours

We look out today and we have the following

of meticulous planning followed by a great deal

people involved in this regatta: rowers,

of work from a large and enthusiastic group of

coaches, boatmen, physios, trainers, starters,

volunteers.

announcers, race officials, course officials, boat

Special thanks goes to Gerd Wimberger our regatta coordinator who has once again done a magnificent job marshalling the willing team of parents and supporters. This is Gerd’s last year in the role as he is passing the baton for 2017. In the boat, rowing is the ultimate team sport as everyone has to work together to achieve the

50

drivers, recorders, first aid officers, life savers, school representatives, parents, supporters, coffee makers, food stall attendants, carpark attendants, police officers, BBQ cooks etc. It is a big team! We thank you for your part in this big team and trust you have a great day at the BBC Regatta.


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BBC Rowing Regatta  
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Special Edition: Celebrating 100 Years of Rowing at Brisbane Boys' College