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PIONEERING PROF

DR. NICOLE PINAIRE’S AFTERSCHOOL ACTIVITY: CANCER RESEARCH AT M.D. ANDERSON see pg. 11

10 HOLIDAY BUYS STUDENTS WON’T WANT TO RE-GIFT

FOR THIS ALUM, SIGNING THE WORD OF GOD

see pg. 9

see pg. 7

The Collegian THE OFFICIAL STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY SINCE 1963

HBUCOLLEGIAN.COM

DECEMBER 1, 2011

VOLUME 46, ISSUE 6

‘PRESENT’ING: by DANIEL CADIS

Southland Conference commissioner Tom Burnett speaks at a Nov. 21 press conference.

Athletics will add football, compete in Southland

COST CUTS FOR STUDENTS

Grant for juniors, s eniors

Meal planl coming overhau

By BRANDON PORTER Sports editor

By DANIEL CADIS & ASHLEY DAVENPORT

By DANIEL CADIS Editor in chief

Delivering what was arguably the biggest news in the history of the athletics department, the University announced during a Nov. 21 press conference that it will join the Southland Conference in 2013 and play football in 2014. The announcement came just three months after the NCAA approved the institution as a full Division I member, making this a watershed year for University athletics as the department transitions into a new level of competition after accepting the Southland’s offer on Nov. 16. The athletics department will play out its last two years in the Great West Conference, its current affiliate, before switching all sports except men’s soccer to the Southland on June 1, 2013. It will also begin laying the groundwork for a football program, a significant move for a

Editor in chief & advertising manager

T

he University administration has decided to reinstate the continuing student grant for rising juniors and seniors next year as part of a campuswide effort to reduce costs for students. This is the third consecutive year that the University has provided the continuing student grant, an uncommon practice in a nation of institutions of higher education that typically boost expenses on a yearly basis. President Robert B. Sloan Jr. said the decision was made in tandem with a

T

he administration has restructured meal plan options for the 201213 academic year, overhauling the program to provide students with greater flexibility and cutting costs for most plans by as much as $300. The move comes as part of a broad initiative to make attending college more affordable for students, with reductions occurring in the areas of on-campus housing and meal plans in addition to the reinstatement of the see MEALS, page 5

see CSG, page 5

Lake rate House s cut Desi gn b y

see SOUTHLAND, page 15

Nath an Ca dis

H

ousing rates for the Lake House were recently cut for the 201213 year, with the administration decreasing prices for double-occupancy rooms by as much as $1,000 in order to boost the number of students living in the residence college. See the Nov. 10 issue of The Collegian for more details.

SPOTLIGHT

Tankersley commands order in mock court, life By RAQUELLE JOHNSON Contributing writer

S

he stands tall and upright, with her back straight and her chin up, and presents herself with a confident disposition. She says being a lawyer perfectly suits her personality. RELIGION..................7 ENTERTAINMENT.......9

S&T.........................11 OPINION................12

Junior Shelby Tankersley remembers imagining herself as a successful lawyer when she was only 8 years old and living in Nashville, Tenn. Back then she did not fully comprehend what the profession entailed, but she says her friends and family recognized her see TANKERSLEY, page 4

CLASSIFIEDS............14 SPORTS...................15

GROUP WINS PEPSI PRIZE

photo illustration by DINA ROHIRA

Junior Shelby Tankersley, a mock trial team captain, won Outstanding Attorney and Outstanding Witness at a recent contest.

@hbucollegian

facebook.com/hbucollegian

Students in Free Enterprise recently won a grand prize worth $30,000 for its participation in the Dream Machine Recycling 101 Contest, sponsored by PepsiCo Inc. Page 4.

Read. Recycle.


2

THE COLLEGIAN | NEWS

CAMPUS BRIEFING Winter Formal The Student Programming Board will host its annual Winter Formal on Dec. 1 at 9 p.m. in the M.D. Anderson Student Center located in the Brown Administrative Complex. The event is free.

Late-Night Breakfast The Baugh Center will be open for students to eat a late snack on Dec. 5 at 9 p.m. Faculty and staff will serve the free breakfast before the week of exams.

Polar Bear Plunge Residence Life will hold its annual Polar Bear Plunge on Jan. 20 at the Husky Village Club House. Students will compete for the longest time spent in the ice-filled pool. The event will have music, games and refreshments.

Winter Move-Out Students who live in the Men’s Residence College, the Women’s Residence College or the Lake House must leave their dorms by Dec. 14 at 5 p.m. Only residents who have approved housing appeals will be allowed to stay on campus over the break. Appeal forms can be picked up from the Residence Life office in the Lake House.

DECEMBER 1, 2011

Revenue doubles for annual fund By AYLA SYED News editor

Annual fund revenue more than doubled this year after the office of advancement hired a professional firm to launch a comprehensive campaign to gather additional financial support for the University. Revenue for the annual fund, a tool for the University to garner financial contributions from alumni, increased 121 percent to $25,238 given in the June-October span this year from $11,420 collected over the same interval in 2010. The number of donors rose by 205.3 percent to 287 from 94, according to the annual fund report released by Royall & Company, the firm hired in June to oversee the initiative. The donations, which generally amount to less than $5,000 per gift and factor into the University’s rank in U.S. News and World Report’s national college rankings, averaged $64 in October, according to the report. The University hired Royall & Company, which also helps admissions market to prospective students, to increase alumni involvement and develop the campaign, which included multiple digital and traditional mailings to University graduates. Charles Bacarisse, vice president for advancement, said the office of advancement made efforts in the past to reach out to alumni for the annual fund but needed assistance in reaching a broader audi-

ence. This was remedied this year with the help of the marketing firm. “We needed to engage help to create a more effective approach that connects with the broad audience we want to reach,” he said. Gifts to the annual fund help bridge the gap between tuition dollars and the operating cost of the University, according to the institution’s website. Bacarisse said most of the fund goes toward providing students with scholarships and added that any contribution, big or small, greatly benefits the University. “We are sensitive to our younger alumni who are still paying back debts,” he said. “Even $5 or $10 is great. If everyone did that, it would have a major impact.” Royall & Company helped advancement create a marketing strategy that included a series of emails and mail letters to possible donors worded specifically for the intended audience. Possible donors were classified into different segments based on a variety of criteria, including previous donation patterns and the specific interests of the individual. The office of advancement can adjust segments to target different audiences, depending on whom it wants to reach. “There are millions of ways we can individualize it,” Bacarisse said about the data. Two mailings have been sent out so far, and both were preceded and followed by emails. Previous packets have included a letter signed by

Revenue:

$25,238

Annual Fund $5,771

$11,519 $8,222

$4,097

$11,420

$4,335

$2,423

June

July

Aug.

$6,117

Sept.

$7,572

Fiscal Year 2011 2012

Oct.

information courtesy of the office of advancement by CHELSEA VOLKER

President Robert B. Sloan Jr., a letter from a current student expressing her gratitude for her scholarship, a response page for donations and a sheet of personalized address labels. The contents of the December mailing are still being finalized. Many alumni have responded to the letters not only through donations but also by giving feedback through email and phone calls. Jennifer Davis, associate director of alumni relations and the annual fund, said she responds to feed-

back almost immediately to provide personal attention to alumni. “We are hearing from silent alums who are now responding,” she said. “Any feedback is better than none.” The office of advancement is currently preparing for its year-end mailing, traditionally the most successful component of its fundraising efforts that will include faculty and staff in addition to alumni who have either not responded or have not been contacted yet.

Corrections: • Augsburg College was spelled incorrectly as “Augsburgh” on page eight in the caption for the photo of the men’s basketball exhibition game during Homecoming week.

Errors and comments can be reported to: thecollegian@hbucollegian.com (281) 649-3670 Brown Administrative Complex, room 225


NEWS | THE COLLEGIAN

DECEMBER 1, 2011

3

C ampus S cene

by MARYAM GRAFFAR

Junior Joseph Banea shows off a navy blue dress shirt, slacks and a jacket from Express Inc. at the Students in Free Enterprise Fashion Show on Nov. 11 in Dillon ll. SIFE holds a fashion show every year to show University students how to dress professionally for a job interview or for a future career.

Development Council back after 3 year hiatus By DANIEL CADIS Editor in chief

The President’s Development Council, a collection of longtime University supporters who publicly commit to helping the institution reach its long-term goals, was relaunched this semester after a three-year hiatus, part of an institution-wide effort to reconnect with these patrons. The PDC met for the first time in three years on Nov. 8 at the River Oaks Country Club for a dinner where Archie Dunham, who co-chairs the committee with his wife Linda, and President Robert B. Sloan Jr. introduced the initiative and the Ten Pillars vision to the gathering of members. The organization counts among its membership both current and former board of trustees members, longtime University supporters, faculty and staff members, and others from the local community who want to invest in the institution that was named in 2010 by First Things, an ecumenical Christian journal well known throughout the nation, as a “school on the rise.” These members are tasked with being spokespersons for the University, attending PDC-sponsored events, assisting admissions by recruiting students, helping advancement by recruiting donors and making a personal financial commitment to the institution. Members in the past were required to make a $100 donation to the school in order to be a part of the PDC, but that stipulation has been dropped for the group’s current iteration. Speaking to the crowd of approximately 130 guests, Dunham asked the new members to join him in supporting the institution as it works to accomplish its goals. “Tonight, as we relaunch the PDC, Linda and I ask you for your help so that together we can sup-

port Dr. Sloan, the faculty and staff in making HBU the university it is destined to be,” he said. The group was originally founded in 1964 as the all-male President’s Council, according to “An Act of Providence,” a book chronicling the history of the University by Dr. Don Looser, vice president emeritus. It became the President’s Development Council in 1991, allowing in members of both genders and continuing to provide financial support for the institution. Reawakening the PDC comes three years after the administration put its meetings on hold, along with the Spirit of Excellence Gala and the President’s Luncheon. Charles Bacarisse, vice president for advancement, said the administration planned on bringing back the three events sequentially. “We really want to build a base of supporters who know the University intimately and are in tune with its mission,” he said. “It’s all about expanding the network and support for the University. This is just one more vehicle by which we can do it.” The University has brought back the three advancement programs in recent years, including last year’s Spirit of Excellence Gala. The November event, featuring former President George W. Bush, marked the 50th anniversary of the University and brought in close to $1 million in scholarship funds for students. The Presidential Luncheon series, which serves as a community outreach program for informal dialogue among leaders in the Greater Houston area and introduces them to the University, has also been reestablished. Now, the third and final advancement program has returned, meaning that all three of the initiatives are active.

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4

THE COLLEGIAN | NEWS

DECEMBER 1, 2011

Mock trial team takes third at tournament By ASHLEY DAVENPORT Advertising manager

photo illustration by DINA ROHIRA

Junior Shelby Tankersley, double-majoring in government and philosophy, juggles many activities as a captain of one of the mock trial teams and a member of Student Foundation, Best Buddies, Academy of Young Philosophers and Husky Ambassadors.

TANKERSLEY: Growing Continued from Page 1

natural aptitude for debating and presenting a logical argument. That natural aptitude, combined with her work ethic and passion for law, led the junior to become captain of the University’s mock trial Blue team, which she helped earn a third-place finish in November at the Seventh Annual Green and Gold Mock Trial Invitational in Waco, Texas. She took home two awards, one for Outstanding Attorney and one for Outstanding Witness, an exceptional feat at mock trial tournaments. Although her mental agility illuminates her intellectual capacity, Tankersley has a calm, tranquil temperament, maintains a modest posture and displays a demeanor that exudes maturity. She said her family has been instrumental in helping her lighten up and enjoy life. Tankersley’s family moved to Houston from Nashville when she was 13 years old, after her father, Brian, an expert in audio technology, accepted a full-time position at Lakewood Church. For several years after the move, her dreams of becoming a lawyer laid dormant. It was not until her senior year of high school, when Tankersley began participating in mock trial through the Youth and Government Program

in school, court

offered by her local YMCA, that team, she dedicates at least five she discovered her zeal for law and hours a week to preparation: partworking in a courtroom. T h e nering with team members to work experience led her to replace her on direct and cross examinations, childhood dreams with legitimate talking case strategy, reviewing witgoals and enact a plan to achieve ness statements, receiving coach them. and teammate feedback and becomPreviously home-schooled by ing familiar with courtroom proceher mother, Joan, Tankersley will dure and rules of evidence. be the first in her family to graduate Tim Rothberg, B.A. ’02, a civil from college. Affectionately known litigator for Coats Rose, Inc. and by her peers as head coach of “Shelbs,” Tankthe mock trial ersley said the team, said TankI’m happier when University and ersley is a very its Honors Colintelligent perI’m excessively lege were the son who leads busy. ideal fit for her. by example and -- Junior Shelby Tankersley Doublea hard worker majoring in who works well government and on her feet. “She philosophy, she works extremely said that her enrollment in the Hon- hard, and her recent performances ors College favorably complements are certainly a reflection of that hard her coursework and she was pleased work,” he said. with its offer to be well versed in She has worked part-time as a classical literature upon graduation. legal assistant for Gaddis & Associ“A great text program affords ates since this May. She said she has me literacy in the greatest ideas of been able to gain substantial handsWestern Civilization,” Tankersley on experience in paralegal work, said. “A strong foundation in the performing tasks such as preparing concepts that created our justice petitions and motions. system gives me a greater passion Her acclaim goes beyond the for the ethics of law and inspires classroom and the courtroom. Robme to pursue justice instead of profit ert P. Gaddis, attorney at law and with my law degree.” partner of Gaddis & Associates, said As a member of the mock trial Tankersley draws from an extreme-

One of the University’s mock trial teams placed third out of 15 teams at an invitational tournament held Nov. 11-13 at Baylor Law School in Waco, Texas. Divided into two teams, the 14 students competed at the Seventh Annual Green and Gold Mock Trial Invitational. Tim Rothberg, B.A. ’02, the mock trial head coach and a former member of the mock trial team, said he looks forward to what both teams will do at the regional tournament held on campus in February. “We have an extremely strong group of students,” he said. The Blue team, led by junior Shelby Tankersley, finished 8-0, defeating opponents from eight schools, including a team from the University of Texas at Austin. Tankersley said it has always been exciting for the team to compete against UT, but defeating one of its teams was a thrill. “We have this complex about it, so it was kind of fun to break that,” she said, adding that UT consistently finishes top ten in the nation each year. Judges at the tournament singled out Tankersley, naming her one of the best attorneys and witnesses. The top five attorneys in attendance as well as five witnesses are chosen for awards. Tankersley achieved both marks of distinction. “I was more surprised about the witness award because I have never played a witness before,” said Tankersley, who played an expert witness for the criminal case. The Blue team finished the competition with one of the highest records a University team has ever achieved at a tournament. The Orange team finished 2-6 against its opponents. Junior Crystal Dang, Orange team captain, said most of the challenges faced by the team stemmed from illnesses of team members and inexperience with courtroom procedures. “This was our first legitimate competition of the year, so it was good to get our new people used to courtroom procedures,” she said.

ly bright and quick mind. “She is extremely accurate, extremely flexible and has an outstanding attitude,” he said. “She always has a pleasant demeanor and communicates very professionally with clients.” Additionally, Tankersley interned for U.S. Sen. John Cornyn’s office in Houston from May to August. Her primary responsibilities included constituent relations and compiling regional news reports on a daily basis. Along with being captain of the Blue team, Tankersley’s extra-curricular activities include participating in four student groups. She also holds the position of president of the House of Homer in the Honors College. In the future, Tankersley plans to spend time in Washington, D.C., working on public policy. Looking at her long-term prospects, she intends to attend law school at the University of Texas if she remains in state and possibly pursue a doctorate in political philosophy. In the meantime, she is keeping her options open, taking into consideration both civil litigation and criminal law, as she looks forward to eventually having a career in the courtroom. As she looks deeper into her future, she no longer daydreams about what could be. Instead, she plans for what is to come.

SIFE wins prize worth $30,000 for green event By JESSICA ALDANA Entertainment editor

Students in Free Enterprise won a grand prize worth $30,000 on Nov. 10 for its participation in the Dream Machine Recycling 101 Contest, a nationwide competition sponsored by PepsiCo Inc. The group entered the drawing earlier this semester and, as a contest requirement, recycled more than 1,000 aluminum and plastic cans and bottles in the Dream Machine and hosted “Make a Scene,” a recycling awareness event held in the Hinton Center on Oct. 12. For the “Make a Scene” event,

members of SIFE spent all night on campus stringing together plastic bottles and hanging the recycled garland over the stair rails on the second floor of Hinton. They photographed the display the next day and sent it in to become official participants in the contest. Senior Cindy Tran, SIFE president, said she was shocked when she heard the news. “Considering the fact that we are a small university, for us to win a national challenge is a really big deal,” she said. The contest’s official rules state that one grand prize winner will receive a tailgate party sponsored by PepsiCo with products, catering, T-

shirts and other accessories worth a total of $30,000. SIFE plans to use the prize at the eco fair in Tranquility Park next semester. The Student Government Associations of many Houston universities, including HBU, will host the fair, with SIFE assisting SGA with promotion and labor. “The whole point of the eco fair is to showcase businesses and companies that are eco-friendly,” Tran said. SIFE also won the National Student Day competition hosted on campus by the University Bookstore, recycling more paper, plastic and aluminum products than any

other group on campus. The group hopes to demonstrate the importance of living in an eco-friendly environment to students and to provide the University community with more options for on-campus recycling through its Adopt-A-Bin and Dream Machine programs, collectively called the SIFE Recycling Initiative. One component of the Recycling Initiative involves efforts to increase use of the Dream Machine, a computerized recycling bin created by PepsiCo Inc. that offers users an additional incentive to recycle. To earn rewards, users create an account at the machine and use

the scanning card they are issued to track the weight of plastic and aluminum products they deposit into the machine located in the Hinton Center. Senior Liz Amaya, a member of SIFE’s recycling committee, said she believes the Recycling Initiative is something the University needed and added that although SIFE started recycling about two years ago by placing bins across campus, many people did not use them or simply ignored them. “I think this year, with all that went on, people are starting to take notice to the recycling program here at HBU,” Amaya said.


NEWS | THE COLLEGIAN

DECEMBER 1, 2011

Former professor Riley dies at age of 93 By CHASE HERNANDEZ Staff writer

Dr. James Stewart Riley, a founding member of the board of trustees and a former University professor who taught religion and philosophy, died on Nov. 21 at his home in Sugar Land after a decade-long battle with Alzheimer’s disease. He was 93. R i l e y graduated from Union University Riley in Jackson, Tenn., in 1939 and later enrolled in the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Ft. Worth where he received a master’s degree and doctorate in theology. He met his wife, Margaret Cansler, while pastoring in Memphis, Tenn., and would marry her in 1942. After his graduation from SBTS, Riley pastored at First Baptist Churches in Caddo Mills, Wills Point and Paris, Texas. In 1956, he became the pastor at Second Baptist Church in Houston, now led by Dr. Ed Young. While at Second Baptist, Riley helped the church relocate from the downtown area to its present site on Woodway and led efforts to build educational, recreational and worship facilities. In 1960, the Baptist General Convention of Texas appointed Riley and several others to the founding board of trustees for the University, then known as Houston Baptist College. He also led the board of trustee committee tasked with locating the first president for the University. The committee eventually brought in Dr. William H. Hinton, who took the position in 1962. Riley retired from Second Baptist in 1976 and became a professor at the University, where he taught religion and philosophy and served as faculty adviser for the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity until his retirement in 1988. While teaching at the University, Riley served as an interim pastor and was invited to preach at many local churches to promote harmony between different denominations. Until his Alzheimer’s diagnosis in 1999, he continued to teach a men’s Bible class at South Main Baptist Church in downtown Houston, where he also served as a deacon and interim associate pastor. His students honored him on his 92nd birthday by giving him a title as “a master scholar, an expositor of scripture, pastor, professor and teller of 1,001 humorous stories.” Riley is survived by his wife; sons James Jr. and Jay; daughters Jan and Jeanne; and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Services for Riley were held Nov. 26 at South Main Baptist Church. He was buried at Forest Park Westheimer Cemetery.

5

Police investigate campus burglary By AYLA SYED News editor

The University Police Department recently filed arrest warrants as part of its investigation involving three suspects who allegedly stole thousands of dollars of electronics from a Husky Village apartment. The three individuals, described as African American males, two in their late teens and one in his 50s, stole two plasma TVs, a personal TV, two laptops and an iPhone after entering through the unlocked door of seniors Simone Greenleaf and Shirolacille Holloway’s on-campus apartment. Police were able to recover the 42-inch plasma TV and the MacBook but have not yet located the other items. Charles Miller, University Police chief, said the investigation is still ongoing and that he hopes to make arrests soon. “It should be pretty easy to arrest the suspects now that we have

CSG:

their information,” he said. Greenleaf said the crime must have occurred during a 50-minute period around 3 p.m. on Nov. 5 when she left campus to get food. She returned to find that her bedroom door had been pried open and her Macbook, personal TV and iPhone stolen. “I just feel violated,” said Greenleaf, who had schoolwork saved on her MacBook. “This is my fourth year here, and I have never had a problem. The cops do a good job of making us feel safe, but there is a whole other world outside of those gates.” Police were able to identify the men after more than a week’s worth of groundwork and with the help a program called LeadsOnline, which allows them to search sales made to local pawnshops by using the serial numbers of missing items or the name of a suspect. Pawnshops must provide the state with a daily list of all merchandise

received and the corresponding serial numbers of the items so law enforcement officers can compare the serial numbers against records of stolen merchandise, according to the Texas Pawnshop Act of 1997. Officer Jason Colon tracked down the serial number for the 42inch TV by spending hours communicating with the Walmart from which Holloway had purchased the TV. Police used the TV’s serial number to track it down to a Houston-area Cash America pawnshop, where they also recovered the Macbook. One of the robbers had provided his driver’s license number when he sold the items, and University officers used that information to file the first arrest warrant. The officers went through the store’s surveillance footage from the day the items were sold and captured still photographs of the other suspects. One of Holloway’s friends was

able to identify two of the men. Holloway said she once allowed a friend to briefly bring one of the men to her apartment when she was not there and that she thinks he took notice of her belongings at that time. “You can’t just let anyone into your apartment,” she said. “I will most definitely lock my doors from now on. We never used to lock our doors because we did not expect anything like this to happen.” There were 11 incidences of theft and larceny in residential area reported in the University’s 2010 crime statistics. More than 30 percent of the nation’s burglaries in 2010 were classified as unlawful entry, or crimes that do not involve forceful entry, according to the FBI’s Uniform Crime report. Miller said most on-campus crimes could be prevented if people locked their doors. “That’s the most important thing you could do,” he said. “Just lock your door.”

Grant part of broad effort to reduce costs

Continued from Page 1

number of other initiatives designed to help students fund their college education. “This is part of a plan to help students financially,” he said, adding that lower housing prices and the meal plan structure overhaul are included in this effort. Seniors with 90 or more credit hours by the conclusion of the summer term will receive a grant of $1,300, which means their tuition will be $23,945 for the coming academic year, according to data provided by Sandy Mooney, vice president for financial operations. That is 4.82 percent more than their current tuition rate of $22,845, an increase on par with national trends for private nonprofit four-year institutions of higher education. Rising juniors, or those students who have 64 or more credit hours, will receive a grant of $1,000. Their tuition will be $24,245, a 6.13 percent bump from this year’s rate of $22,845. That increase falls short of the $25,245 they would have paid without the grant. Those not receiving the grant include rising sophomores, many of whom received larger aid packages when they first enrolled in the University, and incoming transfer students, who have access to award packages that were also increased in recent years. The University’s tuition for the coming academic year is below national levels, even when combined with the increase in fees to $1,350 from $1,300, a 3.84 percent rise. The combined figures, which vary depending on classification, are several thousand dollars less than last year’s national average for private nonprofit four-year institutions, according to the latest report by the College Board. In 2011-12, institutions in this category increased their tuition from $27,265 to $28,500, more than what students currently pay to attend the University and are expected to pay in the coming academic year. The reinstatement of the grant upends the financial equation for

many current students, making college more affordable for those at the University who achieve junior or senior classification in the fall. One such student, junior Joshua Velasquez, said the grant would help him continue his education at the University. “The grant will personally help

me because I really am having trouble financially paying for school,” he said. “This will help my family pay for my school.” Other students voiced their approval of the administration’s decision to continue the grant for rising juniors and seniors. Sophomore Cynthia Calderon

became really excited when she first heard about the continuing student grant. “They’re trying to help students as much as they can, and they are actually listening to what students want and need,” she said. Ayla Syed contributed reporting.

MEAL: New options offer greater

flexibility, lower prices for students

Continued from Page 1

continuing student grant for rising juniors and seniors. “We feel that these revised rates make our dining options extremely competitive while providing students a great deal of flexibility,” said Sandy Mooney, vice president for financial operations. Freshmen living in residential housing will be able to choose between three of the plans: Pack 19, the 15-65 plan and the Pack 12. Sophomores and upperclassmen living in residential housing without kitchens may select from these three plans as well as the new 9-375 Plan. The first option includes 19 meals per week with $25 in declining balance dollars, or funds that can be utilized at all on-campus eateries. This plan will cost $1,695 per semester, a $145 reduction from this year’s rate. Option two offers students 15 meals per week with a declining balance of $65. The plan will be $105 cheaper than the current pack of 15 meals and includes an additional $5 in declining balance funds. The pack of 12 meals provides the said amount of meals per week with $175 in declining balance, $50 more than the current amount. It is priced at $1,395, a $155 drop over this year’s rate. Students living in apartment-

style units either in the Lake House or Husky Village will have a default five meals per week plan that also provides them with $215 in declining balance, $5 more than they currently receive, but they may select another option if they so desire. Mooney said that this plan may appeal to commuter student, but they may choose any of the other option. The last option, which is available for sophomores and upperclassmen, features nine meals per week and $375 in declining balance dollars. This new plan will replace the Block 128 and Block 160 plans, which provided students with eight meals per week with $290 in declining balance dollars and 10 meals per week with $130 in declining balance, respectively. The new option, costing $1,250, will save students $300 per semester. Husky Village residents will receive an extra meal per week with next fall’s five meal option. This plan, which costs $725, will provide $215 in declining balance. Mooney said the administration decided to make these changes as part of an effort to reduce costs for students. “We just think the meal plans will go hand in hand with the reductions we made in housing to make it more affordable for students,” she said.

Peter Huber, director of dining services, said Aramark Food Services and the University administration have been working to facilitate these changes since early this semester and finalized them this week. “I just think it’s great — the partnership with HBU and what we’re doing to attract and retain more students and help build more of a residential campus,” Huber said. This spring, Aramark will institute another change in on-campus dining with the creation of the meal equivalency program that will allow students to use their meal plans at all five food retail outlets on campus. Currently, meal plan holders can only use their meals in the Baugh Center. With the new meal equivalency program, students will be able to substitute one meal for specific combos at Tila’s, Husky Express, Java City and the Provisions on Demand. Huber said these changes are designed to promote a greater sense of community among residential students. Junior Anthony Perez said he appreciates the changes the University will implement to help offset the costs of the next academic school year. “The meal plan drop will be a big plus and will help offset tuition,” he said.


12

THE COLLEGIAN | OPINION

DECEMBER 1, 2011

STAFF EDITORIAL

backtalk

Cuts, grant beneficial for entire community The University has implemented three recent changes that will impact nearly all students and improve their overall experience by reducing costs and making attending this institution more affordable. These decisions are remarkable signs of the administration’s attention to the needs of students and desire to help them. The decision to help offset next year’s tuition increase for rising juniors and seniors with a continuing student grant, as well as the recent overhaul of the meal plan options and slashes to Lake House prices, are clear indications that the administration is working to reduce the cost of a college education. While tuition is increasing, the University is making a sincere effort to help make the school more affordable and has shown initia-

tive by recognizing that students are feeling the pinch of the current economic times and may need assistance with funding their education. The University will once again offer a continuing student grant of $1,300 for rising seniors and $1,000 for rising juniors. This will dramatically curb the tuition increase for upperclassmen in addition to helping students who may have otherwise lacked the financial means to return to the University next fall. The administration has also overhauled meal plan options and prices, boosting the flexibility of meal plans for the next academic year and cutting costs by as much as $300. It will also allow students to use their meals at all on-campus eateries come the spring semester,

What historical era would you choose to live in?

illustration by MAX ANTON

another positive development that will be beneficial for both residential and commuter students. The final change was the recent decision to cut prices for doubleoccupancy rooms in the Lake House for the 2012-13 academic year. This price cut should help students better afford the rising costs of living and, perhaps more importantly, demonstrates the adminis-

tration’s commitment to creating a residential campus. Students everywhere are struggling to bear the expense of higher education in addition to the rising cost of living, but the administration’s generous efforts to reduce costs during these difficult economic times addresses the needs of students and will be beneficial for the entire University community.

Antithesis

by Daniel Cadis, editor in chief

Manhood and the nail salon This column is part of a series on living life fully during college.

I am going to turn in my man card, that figurative item that signifies one’s membership in the male community, at the beginning of this column because of what happened on the morning of Nov. 19. I got my first manicure-pedicure that Saturday, not a usual practice in which I participate. But this column covers moving past perceived boundaries and into zones of discomfort, with the goal of discovering more about this world and, more importantly, about myself. Now, I am not an individual who believes in putting the “man” in manicure, but I am someone who cares about his professional appearance and proper grooming. I was quite unprepared, however, for what happened in the salon. Located about 10 minutes away from campus, the brightly-lit salon hummed with busyness as the Vietnamese immigrants who ran the business worked quickly. After I sat down, two ladies attacked my hands and feet with a series of pointy metallic objects, carving away cells and producing general discomfort for me. Then I noticed an older man, wearing shorts and a cutoff red and gray T-shirt, who sat several spots down from me. He leaned back in a tan chair, closed his eyes and folded his hands behind his head — the very image of relaxation a la Tom Sawyer fishing on the banks of the Mississippi on a lazy Sunday.

This biker-looking man directly contrasted my perception of the activity and made me question the nature of masculinity in the 20th and 21st centuries, when our evolving society largely redefined manhood. A large proportion of men in society struggle to identify their place during a time when women, to a large degree, no longer need protectors or providers. For example, the majority of college students are women, meaning they will comprise a larger portion of the workforce in future generations and may not need to depend on husbands. In these shifting times, my father taught my brothers and me that real men reject passivity, accept responsibility, lead courageously and expect greatness. He defined masculinity as something derived from internal things, not from outward displays of manliness. I believe that men who hold true to the principles of my father should not primarily concern themselves with external expressions of manliness. Instead, they should focus on developing the internal characteristics that will lead to their success in life and in their careers. So I will take back my man card. I may never get another manicure-pedicure, but I do know that true manliness, particularly in this century, should be derived from internal traits rather than external manifestations of machismo.

THE COLLEGIAN — EDITORIAL BOARD

Daniel Cadis Lauren Schoenemann Ashley Davenport Jessica Scott Ayla Syed Chelsea Volker Dina Rohira

Editor in chief Exec. managing editor Advertising manager Advertising asst. News editor Asst. news editor Photography editor

Maryam Ghaffar Brandon Porter Christopher James Jessica Aldana Reubin Turner Elysee Watson Alexis Shelly

By MARYAM GHAFFAR

By CHASE HERNANDEZ

The failure of the supercommittee, a bipartisan group tasked with developing a plan to reduce the federal deficit by $1.5 trillion, demonstrates the lack of leadership present in Congress. After months of hearings, members could not develop a plan to deal with the possible cuts. Their inability to compromise is indicative of their lax view toward their responsibilities. The committee was created along party lines with members who do not reach across the aisle. Knowingly, members raved on their determination to come to a solution while hypocritically “passing the buck” to the opposite party. Both parties refused to surrender their political dogmas while expecting the other side to make all of the concessions. Also, their fear of not getting reelected in the 2012 election kept them from participating zealously across party lines. Congress’ failure to agree on fiscal policies demonstrates its lack of leadership and dedication to improve the state of the nation. Their actions, or lack thereof, will lead to $1.2 trillion in automatic tax cuts across the board starting in 2013. As of now, Congress’ approval rating is at a record low of nine percent, as reported by CNN. That’s lower than that of the IRS.

Congress does not have a leadership deficit. Rather, it is constantly deliberating in order to arrive at the best solution for the country’s debt crisis, an issue that did not develop overnight and should not be expected to be resolved quickly. Many Americans complain about what members of Congress are not doing. The national debt rose for years before many of these representatives and senators were elected. Citizens impatient with Congress’ progress need only look in the mirror to see the real issue. Americans should remember that voters put these officials in office, and it is, therefore, the voters who are responsible for the actions of Congress. The bipartisan supercommittee, created this summer to deal with national debt, was unable to reach an agreement because the 12 officials who took part firmly held different beliefs on how the issue should be resolved. But even though the supercommittee did not achieve its mission, Congress will eventually resolve this issue. The formation of a committee displays willingness for compromise. Its failure only proves that a committee within Congress is not a viable way to handle the debt issue and that another plan of action should be pursued.

Carlos Grajales Asst. photography editor Justin M. Nguyen Sports editor Jessica Quach Asst. sports editor Naila Al Hasan Entertainment editor Nathan Cadis Asst. entertainment editor Dr. Alice J. Rowlands Opinion editor Religion editor

During the time of Jesus’ life

Mac Christensen junior

Does the U.S. Congress have a leadership deficit? Asst. photography editor

Sid Makhunga senior

1980s

Staff writer

Rod Osloub sophomore

1970s

Opinions on these pages do not necessarily reflect those of the University. The Collegian welcomes the views of readers who wish to help foster informed and interesting debates regarding issues that impact students’ lives.

Lindsay Knippel freshman

Present day

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RELIGION | THE COLLEGIAN

DECEMBER 1, 2011

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Hearing God’s word without sound

Alumnus uses sign language to preach to deaf community By ALEXIS SHELLY Religion editor

Brian Sims has worked the past decade and a half trying to ensure that members of the deaf community can at least see the Word of God even if they cannot hear it. Sims, who graduated from the University in 1988 with a double major in Christianity and physical education, not only created the first church space to cater to the local hearing-impaired community in Brentwood, Tenn., but he also ministers to the group. Working as a pastor at Brentwood Baptist Deaf Church, he began one of the first initiatives to train deaf pastors and missionaries and developed the first American Sign Language video Bible. EARLY LIFE PREPARATION Sims’ passion for the deaf community derives largely from his unique upbringing. At the age of 8, a deaf couple adopted Sims and taught him American Sign Language so he could communicate with his new parents. Two years later, he began interpreting services at Memorial Baptist Church in Baytown, Texas, where he would decide to pursue full-time ministry. Sims first attended Lee College, earning an associate degree in music and physical education. While at Lee, he became the president of the Baptist Student Union. At the time, HBU offered full tuition scholarships to students serving as presidents of BSU chapters at junior colleges. Sims took advantage of this opportunity and enrolled at the University to continue his education. He attributes his time at the University — both in and out of the classroom — as preparation for his career. “The educational part of my time at the University is the foundation of my ministry, while the actual hands-on aspect comes from the clubs and organizations I was a

part of while at school,” he said. During his tenure at the University, Sims was the assistant editor and then editor of the Ornogah, the University’s yearbook, manager of the men’s and women’s gymnastics team, a member of Alpha Phi Kappa, president of the Physical Club and vice president of Students for America. After graduation, Sims worked for five years with Deaf Opportunity Outreach, first in Houston and then in Louisville, Ky., to start deaf churches. Sims then became the associate pastor at Woodhaven Baptist Church before moving to the Rio Grande Valley as the pastor of Parkdale Baptist Deaf Church. “My adoptive parents believe this is what they were training me for,” Sims said about his ministry. His current church, Brentwood Baptist, located south of Nashville, Tenn., was founded in 1995 as a part of the overall Brentwood Baptist Church complex. FIRST OF ITS KIND While it is common for churches to offer assistance for the hearing impaired, including services for the deaf community, Brentwood Baptist Deaf Church is unique among American churches due to the facility’s design. “The church is built to be conducive to the deaf culture,” Sims said. Included in the complex is the Inman Deaf Chapel, which was funded by Gordon Inman, a businessman from Tennessee who donated the money after hearing about the renovations and expansions planned for the church. The chapel is also listed on “Ripley’s Believe It Or Not” because of its innovations in serving the hearing-impaired population. The chapel features no direct lighting, employing black lights instead to enhance the viewing of the stage. Alcoves also provide privacy for the invitation part of the service.

Generation finds God in popular novels By ALEXIS SHELLY Religion editor

photo illustration by BRANDON PORTER

Alumnus Brian Sims visits the Bettis Quadrangle in the Brown Administrative Complex on a recent trip to the University. Sims, who is not Deaf, currently serves as the pastor of Brentwood Baptist Deaf Church in Brentwood, Tenn. Sims said that in a non-deaf service when a person speaks with the pastor, he or she typically whispers in the pastor’s ear, even though the people are out in the open, their conversations are not. However, this is not the case in a deaf service. Because deaf people have to sign their conversations with the pastor, the whole congregation can also see what is being said. Sims said the alcoves were added to the floor plan to allow congregation members to experience having the pastor pray over individuals during the invitation part of the service. A floating floor was installed in the chapel so that the primarily deaf congregation can feel the vibrations created by the music. This special floor sits on 3,800 rubber tips and 38 transducers, which convert sound energy into vibrations that shake the floor. The attendees also have access to the chapel’s inductive loop system so that their hearing aids are able to connect directly into the chapel’s sound system. “Seats are in a stadium layout, but there are no cheap seats, so everyone has a direct line of sight to the stage,” Sims said. He added that

the seats are also spaced 39 inches apart instead of the normal 18 and that all of the rows are spaced 42 inches from one another. “The rows are designed so that the congregation is not knocking the person’s head in front or back of them while they are signing during the service,” Sims said. Each seat has an attached lapboard so that a person’s Bible can be placed on it, allowing the attendee to sign without restraint during the service. Brentwood Baptist, which has about 150 members who attend inhouse services, also reaches an audience of nearly 1,700 through 26 satellite locations. LOOKING TO THE FUTURE The church functions as a springboard for launching the ministries of those who want to go into deaf outreach. Sims is currently working to train pastors and missionaries to reach the deaf community. The church recently established a pastor in residence program to train deaf men to pastor a church as well as a missionary in residence program with the International Mission Board. Sims said the church is in the process of becoming the center for training people to work with all the different deaf communities of the world. “Our goal is to train three pastors and 60 missionaries in the next five years,” he said. To go along with the mission of training people to minister to the deaf around the world, Sims and his church are also in the process of developing a Bible specifically designed for this purpose. “We are currently working on a video Bible specifically for the deaf, which will be the first Bible to be translated into American Sign Language,” Sims said. Sharon Saunders, vice president for University relations, knew Sims while he worked on the yearbook, which was under her department at the time. She said having a former student make an impact in the lives of so many people is phenomenal. “He truly is a jewel in the University’s legacy,” she said.

Christian authors earned a surge of popularity in the 20th century with the emergence of writers such as C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien. That surge has carried over to Christians emerging as best-selling writers in recent years, bringing positive values and morals to the forefront of the public square. This is beneficial for readers because writers appeal to a wide audience consisting of both Christians and non-Christians, meaning that the former group can enjoy popular books with which they can identify and the latter can be positively influenced by the faith. The appeal of Christian fiction centers on how the genre is defined. Ranker.com, which ranked the most popular Christian fiction authors of all time, defines this type of writing as having a storyline that holds themes true to Christianity, not that the books are otherwise different from their mainstream companions. This genre has become more popular today, with many of the nation’s best sellers considered Christian fiction. The Nov. 20 edition of the New York Times Best Sellers list reflects this shift. More Christian-based novels and books that center on Christian values dominate the chart, which is a promising trend. For example, Nicholas Sparks, a devout Catholic, appears on the list in the No. 4 slot with his book “The Best of Me,” a reunion story about a former couple who reconnects over the loss of a mutual friend. Sparks is no stranger to this best-sellers list, on which eight of his books have made appearances. While some Christian authors are seasoned professionals, others are just starting out and finding an audience hungry for their stories. The first book by Todd Burpo, pastor at Crossroads Wesleyan Church in Imperial, Neb., “Heaven is For Real,” has spent 53 weeks on the list. It recounts the story of Burpo’s then 4-year-old son Colton, who underwent emergency surgery and slipped into unconsciousness on the operating table before apparently visiting heaven. The emergence of Christian writers like Sparks and Christian novels like “Heaven is For Real” shows hope for the future of reading. The newfound popularity of many Christian writers and their works will hopefully continue the legacy of Lewis and Tolkien, a positive trend for a world in need of salvation.


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THE COLLEGIAN | ADVERTISEMENT

DECEMBER 1, 2011


THE COLLEGIAN | ENTERTAINMENT

DECEMBER 1, 2011

HOLIDAY

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GIFT GUIDE Story by Elysee Watson Design by Jessica Aldana

The holiday season is a hectic time, especially for gift givers faced with the daunting task of finding the perfect presents for loved ones. These brilliant buys, great for college students and young professionals, can accommodate shoppers on any budget.

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10. DC390 Dual Dock For Him: G-Shock Keurig MINI Plus 1. Philips 3. 6900 Watch 2. Brewing System Clock Radio with Remote

4. Nook Simple Touch

Compatible with the iPod, iPhone and iPad, this multi-functional desktop clock can dock and charge two of these devices simultaneously. Students might never be late to class again because this gadget can also serve as an alarm clock whose wakeup call consists of music from a personal iPod, iPhone, iPad or favorite radio station. $149.95 at Apple.

5. Canon PowerShot A1200

Her: BB Da6. For 7. kota Romaine Belted Coat Keep her warm this winter with a thigh-length button-up coat with a belted waist. Made of polyester and available in yellow, red, white and black. $78 at Urban Outfitters.

Oversized watch with auto-calendar, multiple alarms, stopwatch and backlight to keep him organized and on time. It is water resistant to 200 meters and has a resin band and buckle closure. Available in white and red. $110 at Urban Outfitters.

Start their mornings off right with the Keurig MINI, a personal brewer for coffee, tea, hot cocoa or iced beverages. Drinks are ready in less than two minutes after users add water to the single-use reservoir and insert their K-Cup flavor of choice. $99 at Walmart.

Revolve XeMini Plus

This portable USB charger and battery backup recharges various cellphone makes and models including iPhone, Droid and Blackberry. It is equipped to charge two devices at a time from an outlet, car, computer or sunlight and also has a battery backup to provide emergency power for an on-the-go lifestyle. $67.65 Amazon.com.

This customizable touch-screen e-reader downloads books in less than 10 seconds while holding a charge for up to two months. The Nook offers more than 2.5 million titles in its online bookstore and also allows readers to borrow e-books from their local library, helping students by eliminating the need to haul around multiple books. $99 at Barnes & Noble. With 12.1 megapixels and 4x optical zoom, this compact camera operates on AA batteries to power up on the run and capture important college memories. The PowerShot A1200 selects from 32 predefined shooting situations and features a discrete mode for use in quiet areas. $89 at Walmart.

Sony Over-The-Ear Birds: 9. 8. “Angry Knock On Headphones Wood”

Students can gather friends for late-night study breaks as the popular smartphone app comes to life in a tabletop game for two to four players. $16.99 at Target.

Pressure-relieving, cushioned ear pads are practical for long-term listening while studying or during free time. Designed for comfort and extreme output levels, these headphones are essential for every music lover. Available in white and black. $15.99-19.99 at Best Buy.

Potter 10. “Harry and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” In the final installment of the Harry Potter series, the forces of good and evil are at war in the wizarding world. Makes an excellent gift for any Potter fan. $19.96 at Walmart.


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THE COLLEGIAN | ENTERTAINMENT

DECEMBER 1, 2011

Students mix finals with holiday cheer By KATIE BROWN Staff writer

With the anticipation of Christmas rising, decorating and preparing for the holiday can help relieve the stress of upcoming finals by spreading seasonal cheer. Decorations always amplify the spirit of the holiday season, but campus housing rules must be followed for those who live in the residential halls or Husky Village and want to decorate. As a general rule, students may not paint on the wall or brick, obscure entrances, exits or fire escapes with decorations or use fake snow. Despite these regulations, there are several creative ways students can decorate for Christmas, including putting up an artificial Christmas tree adorned with lights and ornaments in the common area of a dorm; setting up lights, streaming tinsel and hanging garland in dorms or apartments; using removable decals on windows or mirrors; and stringing popcorn. Christmas music and wickless Christmas-scented candles can be another fun addition to further liven up a dorm or apartment. Sophomore Stevanna Daniel, who lives in the Lake House, expressed her enthusiasm for deco-

rating her room. “We’re putting up Christmas lights around our dorm and decorating our windows,” Daniel said about her and her roommate’s plan to spruce up their room for the holidays. The Christmas season also brings many on-campus activities. The annual Winter Formal is a popular event planned by Student Programming Board. Starting on Dec. 1 at 9 p.m., attendees will gather in the Brown Administrative Complex’s Bettis Quadrangle, dressed to impress, for an evening of dancing and other activities such as a photo booth and complimentary hot chocolate. Sophomore Madeline Doucet, a member of SPB, expressed her anticipation for the event. “It should be a great study break as the school semester comes to an end,” she said. The annual Christmas choir concert is another festive event that students might want to attend. On Dec. 2 at 7:30 p.m., guests will arrive at Dunham Theater to enjoy a night filled with a variety of Christmas music. Also on Dec. 2, students can gather to eat holiday-themed food at the Baugh Center for the Christmas luncheon from 1:30-3:30 p.m. The cost is the same as a Baugh meal, and students can use their

meal plans. A table will also be set up for students to create Christmas cards to send to American troops overseas. Junior Terry Pierson, vice president of campus luncheons for SPB, said that the only thing a student needs to bring to make the Christmas cards is the spirit of hope. “Everyone just needs to come with a message of hope or encouragement for our military members,” Pierson said. Sophomore Nikki Ndukwe described how she and her roommates will spend the holiday season. “We’re all going to see ‘The Nutcracker’ together,” she said. “We’ll also watch Christmas movies back in our dorm to help bring in Christmas cheer.” There are also many different activities planned by the residential life staff to help students cope with the stress of finals week, events that will likely add more Christmas cheer to the season. It seems that whether they are decorating their dorms with garland and mistltoe or attending oncampus events, students will find ways to celebrate the season.

Holiday in danger of losing spirit By JESSICA ALDANA Entertainment editor

When stores, radio stations and artists start shoving Christmas music down the throats of consumers in October, they run the risk of causing customers to lose the holiday spirit before the season

even begins. Forcing consumers to listen to Christmas music before other holidays like Thanksgiving contributes to the recent trend of making the biggest holiday of the year more about consumerism than family. A study by the Journal of Business Research showed that Christmas music played in retail stores can affect the mood of shoppers, influencing them to spend more time in the store and increase the amount of products they purchase. But stores are not the only ones playing Christmas music early. Artists like Michael Buble, Toby Mac and the duet She and Him released their 2011 Christmas albums in October as a ploy to increase album sales. Justin Bieber and the cast of “Glee,” however, graciously waited to showcase their holiday tunes until November. These artists are promoting the holiday’s superficial

“buying-stuff” mentality by releasing their songs more than a month ahead of Dec. 25. Listening to Christmas music is great, but playing it before Thanksgiving devalues the most thankful day of the year. Part of the fun of the holidays is listening to radio stations such as Sunny 99.1 and 89.3 KSBJ that play festive music leading up to the holiday itself, but many people do not enjoy listening to Christmas music for more than one month. Radio stations generally play Christmas music immediately after Thanksgiving to get people in the holiday mood, yet each year radio stations move their start dates further ahead of Turkey Day. Sunny, for example, began inserting the occasional holiday song into its radio playlist in November. While the Christmas music was not played 24/7, hearing holiday songs so early in the year was disconcerting when the weather outside was anything but frightful. When the Christmas season starts too early, the public is in danger of forgetting what the holiday is all about. Instead of enjoying the fun, cheer and happiness brought on by Christmas songs, people might become grinches and completely tune out the music and its message before Dec. 25.

Faisal Hassan . Sophomore Biology

the

Scoop On... Q: As a returning student to the University, how does your sophomore year compare to your freshman year? A: My sophomore year consists of a lot more activities in which I am involved. I’ve joined two clubs, and I am a member of the pre-dental society. More importantly, I’ve learned to manage my time more effectively. Q: What aspect of the University stood out to you when you made a decision on what college you would attend? A: The strength of the science program really appealed to me, as well as the number of students who leave the University to go on to professional schools. Q: What do you enjoy most about the Christmas season? A: Spending time with my family is always great. Not to mention the egg nog, Christmas music and shopping. Q: How do you plan on using your major in the future? A: Ever since the eighth grade when I snapped two of my front teeth, I’ve been interested in becoming a dentist, which is the area in which I plan to apply my degree. I’ve interned at Family Dental every summer since then. Q: How has your University experience helped you mature as a student? A: With encouragement from my professors and the intense amount of coursework, I feel as though I have improved as both a student and an individual.

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CHRISTMAS CAROLS: Can you spot these Christmas carols in the word search below? Good luck!

W O CH R A E D

S G Silent Night B D Joy to the World L Away in a Manger S F Let It Snow Z Carol of the Bells B G Deck the Halls I I Star of the East S Jingle Bells A P O Holy Night The First Noel

N L M T U J X M Z C Y I I W L

D V L Y C V I X L O M L L A E

T Z J E V Q B R T M E R E Y O

E V M Q B H R J D T R D N I N

Z Q E J H E M H I H C C T N T

S L L A H E H T K C E D N A S

N J M S T F S T L V U A I M R

F P L I Z N G D F G S Z G A I

A T E X O W S R E O Y M H N F

D W K W Y Y Z N I D L M T G E

D L R O W E H T O T Y O J E H

J I N G L E B E L L S Y R R T

S T A R O F T H E E A S T A G

T H G I N Y L O H O U G M B C

Merrier Sounds of the Season Dec. 3 - Willowbrook Mall

New Year’s Eve Dec. 9 - PG-13

The Nutcracker Live Dec. 13 - Deerbrook Mall

Starting Dec. 3, local choirs from various churches and quartets will sing Christmas carols throughout Willowbrook Mall every Saturday until Christmas.

Halle Berry and Zac Efron star in “New Year’s Eve,” which chronicles how the romantic lives of several couples intertwine in the days leading up to New Year’s Day.

The Lincoln Center and the New York City Ballet present George Balanchine’s “The Nutcracker,” showing nationwide in select theaters, including the Deerbrook Mall.


S&T | THE COLLEGIAN

DECEMBER 1, 2011

Biology professor conducts lectures, researches cancer By REUBIN TURNER

Asst. entertainment editor

Many biology students recognize her as a dedicated teacher and adviser, evident from last year’s Opal Goolsby Outstanding Teacher Award displayed in her office. Many meet with her several times a week for labs and lectures and greet her as they pass her in the second-floor hallway of the Cullen Science Center. What many do not know is that Dr. Nicole Pinaire, assistant professor in biology, wears another hat in her field as an accomplished genetics researcher at one of the world’s most distinguished cancer research institutions. Pinaire, who has taught biology at the University since 2009, instructs these students while also conducting volunteer research at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in the Texas Medical Center, a passion inspired more than a decade ago. “I really like teaching students about life and the world around us, being a resource and using my experience to help them,” she said, adding that she became interested in genetic engineering as a senior in high school. INSPIRING RESEARCH An internship during her undergraduate career at Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital in St. Louis inspired Pinaire’s choice to pursue a career in genetics. While working in the facility’s cytogenetics lab as an undergraduate student at Saint Louis University, Pinaire researched new methods to identify chromosomal abnormalities, indicators of Down syndrome and various types of cancer. After earning a degree in biomedical engineering, Pinaire continued her studies of cancer genetics at The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, where she obtained a doctorate degree in molecular biology and cancer biology. Her concentration in this field is the progression of prostate cancer. “My Ph.D. project identified several genes that were important for cell migration, an event seen in cancer metastasis when tumors move,” Pinaire said, explaining that the expression of these genes

is different in cancer cells than in normal cells. During her doctoral studies at UTGSBS, Pinaire was a Texas American Legion Auxiliary fellow and a Sowell-Huggins fellow for the Cancers Answers group for three and two years, respectively. These honors were supplemented by her reception of the University’s 2011 Opal Goolsby Outstanding Teacher Award. Pinaire said she has continued to develop as a student even as she has entered the teaching profession and explained that she must feel she has mastered the information covered in her courses well enough to teach it.

Did You Know.. QUESTION:

How do hot air balloons work?

ANSWER:

Burning propane gas releases hot air that rises and fills the balloon, lifting it to the desired altitude. information courtesy of HowStuffWorks

Bill challenges Internet rights, not pirates By LAUREN SCHOENEMANN Exec. managing editor

CONTINUING STUDIES In addition to her work in the lab and in the classroom, Pinaire presented her recent cancer research on cell migration in prostate cancer patients, the primary subject of her dissertation, at the Innovative Minds in Prostate Cancer Today conference in Orlando, Fla., in March. “Dr. Pinaire is an excellent addition to the faculty of the College of Science and Mathematics,” said Dr. Doris Warren, dean of COSM, about Pinaire’s work as a researcher and instructor. “Her background as a female engineer, coupled with her Ph.D. from the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (M.D. Anderson) in molecular biology and cancer biology, gives her a unique perspective to offer our HBU students.” She continues to research this topic at M.D. Anderson, focusing on the migration of cancer cells during various stages of treatment. “Currently, Albert Teo, a graduate student at M.D. Anderson, and I are working closely in the laboratory to determine how cancer cells move under different conditions seen in cancer patients,” Pinaire said, explaining that cell movement is very relevant to cancer progression and treatment. She added that when she is not in the lab, Teo keeps the cancer cells alive and that the two geneticists discuss the results of the ongoing experiments on a weekly basis. These experiments completed at M.D. Anderson have led

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by MARYAM GHAFFAR

Dr. Nicole Pinaire, assistant professor in biology, adjusts the magnification settings to view a microscope slide during an Anatomy and Physiology II lab on Nov. 23. to Pinaire’s current authorship of two scientific articles on cell death mechanisms and the cell life cycle as they pertain to cancer progression. FOCUS ON STUDENTS Though she conducts groundbreaking research in the extensive area of cancer biology, Pinaire said she still makes it a priority to cultivate a helpful and active relationship with her students at the University. “I enjoy the student-professor relationships I develop with students, who sometimes become friends,” she said. In addition to teaching and advising biology students, Pinaire serves as the faculty sponsor for the American Red Cross Society and cosponsors the Tri Beta Biological Honor Society. She also mentors senior Heather Wilbourn in her microbiology research, which she will

present next April at the Tri Beta regional conference as well as at the Celebration of Scholarship Research Symposium at the University. “Dr. Pinaire is one of those rare professors who is really easy to talk to,” Wilbourn said. “As a mentor for my research project, she is very generous with her time and helpful with troubleshooting and problem solving.” Pinaire said that, in addition to working with upperclassmen, she appreciates the opportunity to meet the new biology majors each year. Courses that Pinaire teaches at the University include General Biology I and II, Anatomy and Physiology I and II, Environmental Science and Senior Seminar Research in Biology. In the spring, she will also teach Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering, a new upper-level biology course designed for students preparing for medical school.

Buoyancy basics A hot air balloon operates with three essential components: the burner, which heats the propane gas that lifts the balloon; the balloon itself, usually made of nylon or other lightweight fabric; and the wicker basket, which holds the propane tank and carries the passengers. Because hot air is less dense than cooler air, the pilot directs the heated propane into the opening at the bottom of the balloon, and a buoyant force, equal to the amount of air displaced by the balloon, maintains its upward motion. The balloon reaches its maximum altitude when the increasingly thin air weakens the buoyant force until it can no longer act to lift the vehicle.

The Stop Online Piracy Act, a controversial bipartisan bill working through Congress, is an overstep in censorship authority that could drastically limit American Web surfers’ access to online information and social networking. This legislation, aimed at protecting intellectual property and preserving jobs within the entertainment industry, would extend the federal government’s power to censor cyberspace as it works to shut down websites that break copyright laws, a major step in limiting free speech that will do little to prevent the most aggressive online pirates from making illegal profits. This measure to crack down on Internet piracy forces Internet service providers to block the domain names of websites containing any copyright violations and any companies that facilitate payment for these sites to sever ties with them. This would be an unnecessary extension of government power, as one improperly used photo or video clip on a Web page could make the entire domain largely inaccessible to the public. These sites could only be viewed by entering their IP addresses, sets of numbers unknown to many everyday Internet users but easy for determined pirates to find and use to continue to profit. SOPA proponents assert that the legislation will protect the intellectual property of copyright holders and preserve jobs in the entertainment industry, with House Judiciary Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) estimating that online piracy costs the American economy more than $100 billion and thousands of American jobs annually. Lawmakers should work to correct this problem, but their priority should be protecting freedom of speech, which would be uselessly hindered by this bill that is unlikely to serve its purpose and breaches First Amendment rights.

Controlling the craft Hot air balloon pilots can manipulate the path of the voyage with two basic controls. To change vertical speed and altitude, they adjust the flow of the propane to the burner, with a positive correlation between flow and height. Horizontal movement is controlled by changing altitude, as wind speed and direction vary with elevation. The operator can direct the balloon to a fairly predictable destination, but many crews keep members on the ground to follow the balloon by truck, collecting equipment and passengers wherever the balloon lands.

UP NEXT: How does night vision work?


12

THE COLLEGIAN | OPINION

DECEMBER 1, 2011

STAFF EDITORIAL

backtalk

Cuts, grant beneficial for entire community The University has implemented three recent changes that will impact nearly all students and improve their overall experience by reducing costs and making attending this institution more affordable. These decisions are remarkable signs of the administration’s attention to the needs of students and desire to help them. The decision to help offset next year’s tuition increase for rising juniors and seniors with a continuing student grant, as well as the recent overhaul of the meal plan options and slashes to Lake House prices, are clear indications that the administration is working to reduce the cost of a college education. While tuition is increasing, the University is making a sincere effort to help make the school more affordable and has shown initia-

tive by recognizing that students are feeling the pinch of the current economic times and may need assistance with funding their education. The University will once again offer a continuing student grant of $1,300 for rising seniors and $1,000 for rising juniors. This will dramatically curb the tuition increase for upperclassmen in addition to helping students who may have otherwise lacked the financial means to return to the University next fall. The administration has also overhauled meal plan options and prices, boosting the flexibility of meal plans for the next academic year and cutting costs by as much as $300. It will also allow students to use their meals at all on-campus eateries come the spring semester,

What historical era would you choose to live in?

illustration by MAX ANTON

another positive development that will be beneficial for both residential and commuter students. The final change was the recent decision to cut prices for doubleoccupancy rooms in the Lake House for the 2012-13 academic year. This price cut should help students better afford the rising costs of living and, perhaps more importantly, demonstrates the adminis-

tration’s commitment to creating a residential campus. Students everywhere are struggling to bear the expense of higher education in addition to the rising cost of living, but the administration’s generous efforts to reduce costs during these difficult economic times addresses the needs of students and will be beneficial for the entire University community.

Antithesis

by Daniel Cadis, editor in chief

Manhood and the nail salon This column is part of a series on living life fully during college.

I am going to turn in my man card, that figurative item that signifies one’s membership in the male community, at the beginning of this column because of what happened on the morning of Nov. 19. I got my first manicure-pedicure that Saturday, not a usual practice in which I participate. But this column covers moving past perceived boundaries and into zones of discomfort, with the goal of discovering more about this world and, more importantly, about myself. Now, I am not an individual who believes in putting the “man” in manicure, but I am someone who cares about his professional appearance and proper grooming. I was quite unprepared, however, for what happened in the salon. Located about 10 minutes away from campus, the brightly-lit salon hummed with busyness as the Vietnamese immigrants who ran the business worked quickly. After I sat down, two ladies attacked my hands and feet with a series of pointy metallic objects, carving away cells and producing general discomfort for me. Then I noticed an older man, wearing shorts and a cutoff red and gray T-shirt, who sat several spots down from me. He leaned back in a tan chair, closed his eyes and folded his hands behind his head — the very image of relaxation a la Tom Sawyer fishing on the banks of the Mississippi on a lazy Sunday.

This biker-looking man directly contrasted my perception of the activity and made me question the nature of masculinity in the 20th and 21st centuries, when our evolving society largely redefined manhood. A large proportion of men in society struggle to identify their place during a time when women, to a large degree, no longer need protectors or providers. For example, the majority of college students are women, meaning they will comprise a larger portion of the workforce in future generations and may not need to depend on husbands. In these shifting times, my father taught my brothers and me that real men reject passivity, accept responsibility, lead courageously and expect greatness. He defined masculinity as something derived from internal things, not from outward displays of manliness. I believe that men who hold true to the principles of my father should not primarily concern themselves with external expressions of manliness. Instead, they should focus on developing the internal characteristics that will lead to their success in life and in their careers. So I will take back my man card. I may never get another manicure-pedicure, but I do know that true manliness, particularly in this century, should be derived from internal traits rather than external manifestations of machismo.

THE COLLEGIAN — EDITORIAL BOARD

Daniel Cadis Lauren Schoenemann Ashley Davenport Jessica Scott Ayla Syed Chelsea Volker Dina Rohira

Editor in chief Exec. managing editor Advertising manager Advertising asst. News editor Asst. news editor Photography editor

Maryam Ghaffar Brandon Porter Christopher James Jessica Aldana Reubin Turner Elysee Watson Alexis Shelly

By MARYAM GHAFFAR

By CHASE HERNANDEZ

The failure of the supercommittee, a bipartisan group tasked with developing a plan to reduce the federal deficit by $1.5 trillion, demonstrates the lack of leadership present in Congress. After months of hearings, members could not develop a plan to deal with the possible cuts. Their inability to compromise is indicative of their lax view toward their responsibilities. The committee was created along party lines with members who do not reach across the aisle. Knowingly, members raved on their determination to come to a solution while hypocritically “passing the buck” to the opposite party. Both parties refused to surrender their political dogmas while expecting the other side to make all of the concessions. Also, their fear of not getting reelected in the 2012 election kept them from participating zealously across party lines. Congress’ failure to agree on fiscal policies demonstrates its lack of leadership and dedication to improve the state of the nation. Their actions, or lack thereof, will lead to $1.2 trillion in automatic tax cuts across the board starting in 2013. As of now, Congress’ approval rating is at a record low of nine percent, as reported by CNN. That’s lower than that of the IRS.

Congress does not have a leadership deficit. Rather, it is constantly deliberating in order to arrive at the best solution for the country’s debt crisis, an issue that did not develop overnight and should not be expected to be resolved quickly. Many Americans complain about what members of Congress are not doing. The national debt rose for years before many of these representatives and senators were elected. Citizens impatient with Congress’ progress need only look in the mirror to see the real issue. Americans should remember that voters put these officials in office, and it is, therefore, the voters who are responsible for the actions of Congress. The bipartisan supercommittee, created this summer to deal with national debt, was unable to reach an agreement because the 12 officials who took part firmly held different beliefs on how the issue should be resolved. But even though the supercommittee did not achieve its mission, Congress will eventually resolve this issue. The formation of a committee displays willingness for compromise. Its failure only proves that a committee within Congress is not a viable way to handle the debt issue and that another plan of action should be pursued.

Carlos Grajales Asst. photography editor Justin M. Nguyen Sports editor Jessica Quach Asst. sports editor Naila Al Hasan Entertainment editor Nathan Cadis Asst. entertainment editor Dr. Alice J. Rowlands Opinion editor Religion editor

During the time of Jesus’ life

Mac Christensen junior

Does the U.S. Congress have a leadership deficit? Asst. photography editor

Sid Makhunga senior

1980s

Staff writer

Rod Osloub sophomore

1970s

Opinions on these pages do not necessarily reflect those of the University. The Collegian welcomes the views of readers who wish to help foster informed and interesting debates regarding issues that impact students’ lives.

Lindsay Knippel freshman

Present day

BE HEARD.

Send your letters to

opinion@hbucollegian.com. We reserve the right to refuse publication and to edit for content, brevity, style or taste. Unsigned letters will not be published. Limit letters to 300 words or less.

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DECEMBER 1, 2011

Furnished room for rent in townhome 2.8 miles from HBU. Private full bath, covered parking, laundry facilities in home. Must not be allergic to cats. Christian landlady (713) 981-1567.

The Elie Wiesel

Prize in Ethics Essay Contest 2012

The Prize in Ethics Essay Contest is an annual competition designed to challenge college students to analyze the urgent ethical issues confronting them in today’s complex world. Full-time Juniors & Seniors at accredited four-year colleges and universities in the U.S. are invited to enter.

1. Will you hand me you’re notebook so I can copy the notes from last class period? 2. Her being out of a job effected her budget immensely. 3. My cat ate it’s food before I could even get back to the kitchen. 4. There over their with they’re friends, playing frisbee. 5. The hurricane will effect every one in the area with rain and wind. 6. After rotting in the cellar for weeks, my brother brought up some oranges. 7. That’s the professor that I must talk to. 8. Hopefully we’ll make it to Athens before nightfall. 9. This school book, that we got on sale, belongs to my brother and I. 10. The Texans always seem to win their games this season. 11. Does everyone know where their hat is? 12. A few countries produce almost all of the world’s drugs, but addiction affected many countries. 13. We hated the meat loaf, the restaurant served it every Friday. 14. The aluminum boat sitting on its trailer.

ONLINE ENTRY & GUIDELINES:

www.ethicsprize.org DEADLINE: ONLINE BY DEC. 5TH, 2011; 5PM PST www.eliewieselfoundation.org


DECEMBER 1, 2011

SPORTS | THE COLLEGIAN

15

P O R T E R ’ S

POINTS

Football highlights next era for athletics By BRANDON PORTER

Sports editor

It is football time in Houston, and with the acceptance of the University into the Southland Conference, it is also three years until football time on Fondren. The Nov. 21 announcement that the Huskies will join the Southland is one of the biggest moments in University athletics history, but now that the school has stated that a football team will be created in the near future, this moment trumps them all. The school, as a member of the NCAA Division I, views the addition of football as a necessity. Administrators said last summer that if an automatic qualifying conference was interested in adding the Huskies as a member, the process to implement the program would begin. The University is correct to push football because nothing brings more school spirit or revenue to colleges than the sport. Football is viewed as the money-making sport in the NCAA, and the University expects to make a profit after three years of participation in the sport. The Huskies will compete in the Football Championship Subdivision as a Southland member. President Robert B. Sloan Jr., who announced last summer that the University was willing to add a football program, said the school was not interested in looking at Football Bowl Subdivision conferences because the time period of turning a profit was significantly longer and the odds of being added were slim for such a small university that has never before competed in the sport. Located in Houston, the fourth most populous city in the U.S. that also has the most Southland alumni, the University should quickly attract athletes who want to stay in Houston, are slightly less courted recruits than the ones that larger colleges obtain or who would prefer to attend a Christian institution. The Huskies will also attract transfers who want to avoid missing a year of eligibility after leaving an FBS school. While it is a shame that most current students will never have an opportunity to play football for the Huskies, it is a glorious moment knowing that alumni can return to campus in 2014 to watch their alma mater play NCAA Division I football because of the plan to add this sport.

NEXT UP AT HOME

by DANIEL CADIS

President Robert B. Sloan Jr. credits athletics director Steve Moniaci, pictured here speaking during a Nov. 21 press conference, for providing the leadership that positioned the University for the Southland Conference invitation and the addition of football for 2014.

SOUTHLAND: President

calls conference invitation historic moment for University

Continued from Page 1

school located in a state known for its obsession with the gridiron sport, with plans to hire a head coach to lead that effort in the coming months. This individual will begin recruiting high school players and transfer students for a team to begin practicing as soon as fall 2012, said Steve Moniaci, athletics director. Sloan described the move as significant when he announced the switch at the press conference in the Brown Administrative Complex’s Denham Hall, where a flock of media professionals, coaches, faculty, staff and student-athletes gathered. “It is a dream come true and so historic for the University,” Sloan said. “There are so many dimensions to this with the travel, less

expense for the University, greater competitiveness, outstanding institutions that we get to associate with and then these automatic qualifiers. It is a tremendous step forward for the University.” This was Southland Conference commissioner Tom Burnett’s second visit to the University after he led a team of conference officials on a campus tour one week prior to the announcement to observe facilities and the school’s operations. Men’s soccer is the only University sport that the Southland, an automatic qualifying conference for national tournaments, does not field. The team has been one of the University’s top performing sports for the last six years and will join the

AQ Mountain Pacific Sports Federation in 2012. Joining the Southland will cut the Huskies’ travel by three quarters as the conference opponents are located an average of four hours and 16 minutes from campus. Great West members are an average of 18 hours and 47 minutes away. Sloan said he believes there will be legitimate rivalries created with Southland schools such as Lamar University, located 88.6 miles from campus, because they are much closer to HBU than Great West members. “It is hard to have a rivalry with someone in Chicago, Utah, California or New Jersey,” he said. “We love those schools and our colleagues there, but geography and

rivalries go together.” Moniaci said that while the University would like to hold football on campus as soon as possible, it is currently looking at numerous venues across the city until a stadium on campus can be built. The University has made many advancements in the athletics department since rejoining the NCAA in 2007 as an independent, but Sloan said he views the school’s addition to the Southland Conference and the start of a football program as a step toward the University’s destiny. “The completion of every step is the start of a lot more,” he said. “Now, there are many more challenges and opportunities we have to face, but we welcome them all.”

TIMEOUT with... Freshman Shanice Steenholdt Height: 6’0” Team leader in points per game with 14.6 and rebounds per game with 9.8 Why did you choose the University? I felt like it was where I could get a good education, grow spiritually with God and do well in the basketball program.

What are the difficulties of playing on a young team? We rush a lot of shots, and we get stuck in bad habbits we learned in high school.

What was your favorite gymnasium in which you have competed? State Gymnasium at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa.

If you could meet anyone alive, who would it be? Kobe Bryant of the Los Angeles Lakers.

What was the first sporting event you ever attended? A Los Angeles Lakers game in Denver when I was in the eighth grade.

What is your nickname? I have always been called Nee-C.

What are your goals for this year? Just to grow as a team.

Women’s Basketball Dec. 18 Dec. 20 Jan. 3 Jan. 10

2 p.m. 6 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m.

New Mexico Lamar Sam Houston State Huston-Tullotson

What are your plans for after college? To play basketball overseas.

Men’s Basketball Dec. 10 Dec. 14 Dec. 21 Jan. 7

7:05 p.m. 7:05 p.m. 7:05 p.m. 7:05 p.m.

Dallas Christian Campbell Santa Clara Eastern Illinois


16

THE COLLEGIAN | SPORTS

DECEMBER 1, 2011

Former Huskies reunite on UK team By CHASE HERNANDEZ Staff writer

Few college athletes see their dreams of playing a sport professionally become a reality. For two former men’s basketball players, their dreams did come true. Mario Flaherty and Fred Hinnenkamp, two former roommates at the University, began playing professional basketball for the Durham Wildcats of the British Basketball League in the U.K. earlier this year, allowing both to continue their athletic careers. Playing basketball overseas is not the only opportunity the two have had after joining the team. They are also pursuing their master’s degrees at Durham University. Flaherty is working toward a master’s degree in business management, and Hinnenkamp is pursuing a degree in financial management. During their playing careers at the University, Flaherty won the First-Team All Great West Conference award for the 2009-10 season and Hinnenkamp earned Great West Conference Academic AllConference selections. The two former Huskies took different paths to get to Durham, a city of 30,000 in northeast England. Flaherty had two previous stops overseas, playing for a tour team in China and in New Zealand shortly

courtesy of THE NORTHERN ECHO

Former Huskies men’s basketball players Mario Flaherty, left, and Fred Hinnenkamp, right, reunite on the Durham Wildcats, a professional basketball team in the United Kingdom. after returning to the University to complete his B.A. in business administration. Hinnenkamp heard about the opportunity in Durham from women’s basketball assistant coach Donna Finnie last spring. He did not pursue that option because he and Flaherty planned to go on a basketball exposure tour in China

after he graduated, but that fell through due to the turmoil of the NBA lockout. They then approached Durham Wildcats head coach Dave Elderkin and were soon headed to the U.K. Hinnenkamp said it was not a difficult decision to move across the pond and continue playing while earning their master’s de-

grees. “It is a great opportunity that no one in their right mind would pass up,” he said. Playing abroad does have its disadvantages, he added. They cannot always spend time with or talk to loved ones back home, leading to bouts of homesickness. But Flaherty said their friendship sustains

them when they miss home. “Fred is more than my best friend,” he said. “He is my brother. Having ‘family’ here makes everything much easier.” Now that he has adjusted to living abroad, Hinnenkamp said he likes many things about England. “I am enjoying the international exposure, the travel to other European countries and the people I am meeting, and the noticeable climate change from Houston to Durham is not bad either,” he said, adding that they have also had to adapt to the local English dialect. Men’s basketball head coach Ron Cottrell, who coached the two players, said they both deserve the opportunity to play in Europe. “Fred and Mario are quality guys,” Cottrell said. “It is not only satisfying for me, but it is also great for our University that these guys are representing us overseas.” Flaherty and Hinnenkamp both said they are living their childhood dreams and hope to set an example for future college players to continue athletics and further their educations. Flaherty said his pursuit of a master’s degree and playing professional basketball has surprised many people. “People have always told me what I can and cannot be in life, but I think in this case I have proved them wrong,” he said.


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