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THE ONTARIO COLLEGE OF TRADES MAGAZINE | SUMMER 2017 | VOLUME 4 EDITION 2

TH E R OA D TO CE RTI F I C ATI ON Finding success through the Trade Equivalency Assessment Process

also TA L K I N G T R A D E S with Mark Cullen

COMPLIA N C E & EN FOR CEM E N T A look at the new policy

CELEBRATING 150

Evolution of the Skilled Trades in Ontario


The Appointments Council is accepting applications, including resumes, for Board of Governors, Divisional Boards, Trade Boards and Roster of Adjudicator positions – whether or not there is a current vacancy.

Visit cot-appointments.ca for more information

Applications will be reviewed as a given position becomes open or is coming to end of term and your application will be kept on file for a period of three years. During this time, you will be considered for the position(s) to which you have applied whenever vacancies occur. If, after three years, you are still interested in being considered for appointment, we will be pleased to receive a new application from you.


TRADESTODAY VOLUME 4 EDITION 2

FEATURES SUMMER 2017 6 TRADES TALK: MARK CULLEN

Getting into the weeds with Ontario's green master

8 2017 SKILLS ONTARIO COMPETITION Ontario students #SkillingIt

10 CELEBRATING 150

A red-letter day for skilled trades professionals in Ontario

12 RECOGNIZING TIME AND SKILL

Trades professionals share their TEA journey 2 COMPLIANCE & ENFORCEMENT POLICY How the new policy effects you

4 MAZDA CANADA'S NEWEST MASTER TECH Marcin Malocha's skills take him to the top 14 COLLEGE UPDATES

Announcing Chair's Award of Excellence winners

16 OUT WITH THE OLD, IN WITH THE NEW The College's new and improved youth website

ON THE COVER Chuluunbaatar Bayaraa, electrician.

COVER PHOTO BY KRIS CAETANO Trades Today is published quarterly by the Ontario College of Trades, delivering information to its members about College activities and news related to Ontario’s skilled trades community. Printed by Perkins Service Inc.

Ontario College of Trades 655 Bay St., Suite 600 Toronto, ON M5G 2K4

Telephone: (647) 847-3000 Toll free: 1-(855) 299-0028 Fax: (647) 340-4332 info@collegeoftrades.ca

Please credit the Ontario College of Trades for reproducing, in whole or in part, articles from this and/or past issues of this magazine’s contents.


COMPLIANCE AND ENFORCEMENT POLICY GUIDES OUR OFFICERS "To ensure that our compliance and enforcement policy helps the College fulfill its mandate to protect the public interest and ensure the people of Ontario feel confident that when they hire a qualified professional to fix their brakes or wire their homes — that the work is completed by certified skilled tradespeople — the Compliance and Enforcement Committee embarked on a period of dialogue and engagement," says Kate Poultney, chair of the College’s Compliance and Enforcement Committee. The College held an in-person consultation with more than 150 stakeholders, followed by a 30-day online survey with over 1,300 respondents. In addition, the Compliance and Enforcement Committee held regional town halls in Sudbury, Ottawa and London and in-person hearings in Toronto. Automotive service technician apprentice, Yvonne Inong-Farinas (left), and Afghan Auto Service and Used Cars Sale Ltd. owner Nader Shah Sarwari, with College's enforcement officer, Mary Kontopidis (right).

T

he Ontario College of Trades' (College) new compliance and enforcement policy, published on the College’s website May 18, 2017, provides a description of risk of harm and outlines what College enforcement officers look for when they enter a job site. The Ontario Legislature passed amendments to the Ontario College of Trades and Apprenticeship Act, 2009 (Act), in December 2016 based on recommendations from Tony Dean’s Supporting a Strong and Sustainable Ontario College of Trades report. As part of the amendments, the College was given 180 days to post a compliance and enforcement policy. The compliance and enforcement policy is the result of a process informed by broad-based consultations across Ontario with a wide cross-section of stakeholders from both voluntary and compulsory trades in the construction, industrial, motive power and service sectors.

During the consultations, several themes emerged and formed the focus for the compliance and enforcement policy, including addressing the underground economy, enforcing journeyperson-to-apprentice ratios and safeguarding vulnerable workers. The policy’s overall objective is to institutionalize a riskbased approach to promoting compliance under the Act. College inspectors and their managers will undergo training to make sure they have the right tools to implement the policy consistently to better protect Ontarians. The compliance and enforcement policy is responsive to realities and challenges on the ground and the need to protect the public. The policy is a living document and will be reviewed at least once a year by the Compliance and Enforcement Committee as part of the College’s commitment to continuous improvement. TO VIEW THE COMPLIANCE AND ENFORCEMENT POLICY visit collegeoftrades.ca


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE COMPLIANCE AND ENFORCEMENT POLICY WHAT ARE NOTICES OF CONTRAVENTION? Notices of contravention can be issued to an individual/corporation/partnership/sole proprietorship/association/organization/entity who employs/engages a tradesperson who does not meet the requirements to work in his/her trade. WHAT ARE ADMINISTRATIVE PENALTIES? Administrative penalties are reflected on notices of contraventions and can range from $250 to $10,000. All money from the administrative penalties are paid to the Minister of Finance.

CONTRAVENTION TYPE

3RD OR SUBSEQUENT CONTRAVENTION

1ST CONTRAVENTION

2ND CONTRAVENTION

AMOUNT FOR INDIVIDUALS

$250

$500

$1,000 (up to a maximum of $10,000)

AMOUNT FOR PERSONS (EMPLOYERS)

$500

$1,000

$2,000 (up to a maximum of $10,000)

WHAT ROLE DOES THE ONTARIO LABOUR RELATIONS BOARD HAVE? Where requested, reviews of the issuance of a notice of contravention will be heard by the Ontario Labour Relations Board (OLRB). The OLRB is an administrative tribunal and its decision-making is completely independent from the College and the Ministry of Labour. The OLRB will be required to consider risk of harm issues, scopes of practice, the objects under the Ontario College of Trades and Apprenticeship Act, 2009, plus the College’s new compliance and enforcement policy when making a decision.

MORE DETAILS on reviews are available on the OLRB’s website www.olrb.gov.on.ca

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MARCIN MALOCHA WINS 2017 MAZDA CANADA MASTER TECH COMPETITION strate their competency and challenge the C of Q exam. The TEA process ensures a fair assessment for applicants by confirming necessary skills, qualifications and experience needed to work in the province. Once Malocha passed his C of Q exam, he applied to Westowne Mazda in Toronto, where he has worked for the past seven years.

Marcin Malocha with his Mazda Canada Master Tech award.

A

utomotive service technician, Marcin Malocha, showed off his skills in this year’s Mazda Canada’s Master Tech competition finishing in first place overall. The Toronto event is designed to evaluate and challenge Mazda Canada’s top 10 automotive service technicians. Eligible only to those who have attained a Certificate of Qualification (C of Q) from the Ontario College of Trades (College), competitors must have at least three years working as Mazda technicians and passed Mazda's technical courses. “Back home (this field) was easier to get into, here it is more difficult,” explains Malocha, who

“There are a lot of advanced technologies, advanced systems and more regulations to follow,” he says. “You need to learn new techniques and make sure you’re working in safe conditions, which is most important and a huge change from back home.” In Ontario, Malocha had his automotive skills and experience assessed against the automotive service technician apprenticeship training standard. The College’s Trade Equivalency Assessment (TEA) process, allows Canadian or internationally experienced tradespeople the chance to demon-

As for advice, Malocha keeps it simple, “Pay attention to what the teacher says in trade school,” he says. “If you’re not interested in it and you don’t have that passion, you’re not going to do very well.” Congratulations, Marcin!

FOR MORE INFORMATION on the TEA program, visit collegeoftrades.ca/ trade-assessment

P H OTO G R A P H P R O V I D E D B Y R O B F I G L I A N O

immigrated to Canada from Poland in 2010, bringing with him 16 years of automotive service tech education and hands-on experience.

“I can be hired as an automotive service tech anywhere (in Canada),” he says. The certification also afforded him the chance to compete in the 2017 Mazda Canada Master Tech competition. Next year, Malocha has a chance to compete in Mazda’s Global Technician competition, which will be held at Mazda’s headquarters in Hiroshima, Japan.


STARTING A SKILLED TRADES BUSINESS

O

ntario’s skilled trades entrepreneurs not only boost Canada's economy, but are a reminder of how important independent business owners are. They are driven by their passion, and being their own boss. “You definitely need the experience beforehand,” explains Michael Hunter, chef and co-owner of Antler Kitchen & Bar in Toronto, an eclectic restaurant redefining traditional Canadian cuisine. Hunter describes his strenuous training, the importance of continuing to develop his craft and being versatile in every aspect of the industry. Prior to owning his own business, it took Hunter 15 years to earn his first head chef position. “It takes a good 10 years after culinary school to become a well-rounded chef that knows everything from pastry to baking bread to charcuterie and butchery,” he says. A crucial element of developing a business in the skilled trades are its employees. Master electrician Frank Cozzolino is the president and owner of Solutions Electrical & Maintenance Ltd. and key expert on the Mike Holmes HGTV television show, Holmes on Homes. After nearly 15 years in operation, he understands the true value of developing reliable employees and building solid professional relationships. Cozzolino believes that providing apprentices with the proper tools to learn, sets them up to become confident skilled trade professionals. When asked what aspect of his business is his favourite, he answers, “Having an apprentice obtain their licence and eventually teach me something new. It’s actually unbelievable.” Richard Harris, baker-patissier and CEO of La Pâtisserie in Kitchener, knew he wanted to open his own bakery since he was a teenager. Prior to opening his bakery which is celebrating 21 years in business, he worked on four different continents. His 45 years of culinary experience has enabled him to become an excellent mentor to his staff. “It’s really been my mandate since the beginning to have a happy, warm, family environment because it’s not usually the case,” Harris states. All up-and-coming entrepreneurs can learn something from skilled trade business owners. Acknowledging that it takes more than flashy advertising and a catchy slogan, it all comes down to building and developing the relationships and people around us.

The overall goal of having an apprentice obtain their licence and eventually teach me something new. It’s actually unbelievable. FR ANK COZZOLINO Electrician & president of Solutions Electrical & Maintenance Ltd.

It’s a whole lifetime of hard work, and it gets better when you own your own business… It’s a skilled trade, it’s really hard work. But it’s a passion, it’s a labour of love. MICHAEL HUNTER Chef & co-owner of Antler Kitchen & Bar

It’s really been my mandate since the beginning to have a happy, warm, family environment because it’s not usually the case. RICHARD HARRIS Baker-patissier & owner of La Pâtisserie


with

MARK CULLEN

T

here are almost 300 horticultural technician apprentices in Ontario focused on making our green spaces more beautiful. Mark Cullen can, in part, be thanked for inspiring many of these apprentices—he is known as perhaps the greatest cultivator of the green-thumbed.

Trades Today: Can you tell me a bit about yourself, where you’re from, and how you first started working in the horticultural technician trade? MARK CULLEN: I was born in Toronto and went to school in Scarborough. I was raised in a second generation family of gardeners with my

P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y K R I S C A E TA N O

Leader of the green-thumbed


Dad, who owned Weall and Cullen Nurseries Ltd. and I worked in the family business right out of school. I spent one year at Seneca in marketing but quit to work with my dad. My one regret—that I didn’t finish college and become certified. TT: How long did you work in horticulture and how did you end up in the position you are today – member of the Order of Canada? MC: : I worked in the family gardening business until I was 23. At that time my father turned our chain of five retail garden centres over to me to run. He said, “Here is my office, my secretary, my phone. I am going to Whitby to create my dream garden [Cullen Gardens and Miniature Village]. You know where I am when you need me.” I was nominated for the Order of Canada for my life-long communications to Canadians, about gardening and the environment. My wife and I also sponsor 13 students each year in Ontario, mostly providing scholarships to those studying to become horticultural technicians. My career in retail gardening has lead me to believe two important things: one, that we need more welltrained workers in the horticultural trade and two, that our profession provides tremendous opportunities to earn a living while enjoying many benefits that include; working outside, creativity, service, and flexible hours. TT: Tell me more about the work you do to provide so many scholarships for students entering the trade? MC: The Cullen Scholarships program began in 2015 and is offered through the Ontario Horticultural Trades Foundation, the acting foundation for Land-

scape Ontario. They are awarded to students involved in full-time landscape/ horticultural programs at 12 colleges across Ontario. Each scholarship is valued at $2,000 plus one additional scholarship for a post-grad program for $4,000. So far, a total of almost $90,000 has been awarded to horticulture students to help them complete their education. TT: What kind of training do think should be required to become an horticultural technician? MC: At one time our company employed over 1,000 people and I learned that certified horticultural technicians had not only acquired important technical knowledge but they had proof of their ability to discipline themselves, to get the education in the first place. A certified horticultural technician has to stick to the process and make an effort to earn their certification. That says a lot about their character. TT: Tell me what it’s like to be a member of the Order of Canada and about the ceremony? MC: The day of the ceremony at Rideau Hall on February 17, 2017 was incredible and one that I will remember for the rest of my life. I was most impressed by the people I met and that I was able to share the experience with my wife, kids and my sister Nora. TT: Why do you think it’s important to become certified in the trade? MC: Finding well qualified and willing employees in the horticultural profession is a challenge for employers. When you’re certified, you are ‘pre-approved’ and you come with a high level of skill based on your education and apprenticeship training.

I was so honoured to receive a Cullen Scholarship. I was even more honoured to meet Mark Cullen because he was so passionate about instilling the connection of people to nature through horticultural education. His enthusiasm reminded me why I'm in horticulture; to beautify and be in the natural elements, and tell people about it.”

Kathleen Minkowski

2016 Cullen Scholarship recipient

I will always be thankful to Mark and his family. Fate brought me to work with Mark's cousin Bruce Cullen in the summer 2016. I had not yet met Mark but I began to realize the passion the Cullen family had for horticulture. I still keep his book as a precious source of inspiration during my first steps.”

Marco Parisi

International student and 2016 Cullen Scholarship recipient

FOR MORE INFORMATION on the Cullen Scholarships program, please go to www.landscapeontario.com.

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AT THE 2017 SKILLS ONTARIO COMPETITON

Sherry Holmes Jr. & Mike Holmes

Mike Hol mes

Pat Bla

ckwo Chair, B oard of G od ov Ontario College of ernors Trades

il Smyth

Ga tor ve Direc Executi ntario Skills O

Hairstyling (Secondary School) Medal Winners

S t. Patr ick & S t. Ign Thnuder atius High Schools Bay, ON

Gail Smyth & Hon . Deb Matthews Minister of Ad

vanced Educ ation & Skills Deve lopment

P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y BOUNDLESS PRODUCTIONS & SOPRO STUDIOS


»FAST FORWARD FROM WINNING»

Every year, Skills Ontario hosts an event where students, apprentices and tradespeople from across the province showcase their skills in different competitions. Three winners from past Skills Ontario Competitions share how competitions like these helped them get to where they are today.

HARTLEY ELLIS

Auto body and collision damage repairer & College enforcement officer

Skills Competitions wins: • Auto Collision, Regional – Gold 2002, 2003, 2004 • Auto Collision, Provincial – Bronze 2002 • Auto Collision, National – Bronze 2003, Silver 2004 “Entering the competitions made me realize how good I was at something that I really enjoyed doing. It raised my level of confidence in performing my trade and introduced me to a level of success that was unforeseen. That success has brewed a passion for improving trades that I take now to work with me every day.”

ar

Anw

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il & Ga

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Smyt

BRANDI FERENC

Refrigeration and air conditioning systems mechanic, gas fitter 1

Skills Competitions win: • Hydrocarbon Instruction Gas Fitter 2 Bronze, 2007 “I largely owe the position I hold today at Johnson Controls to that win. After the competition I was contacted by a recruiter from Johnson Controls which led to an interview and ultimately my apprenticeship. I am now a licensed refrigeration and air conditioning systems mechanic (313A) and a gas fitter 1.”

LINA SHAMOUN Hairstylist Centenn ial Colle ge Gold Me dal Win ners

empt ld Record att Guinness Wor

Skills Competitions wins: • Hairstyling, Regional – Gold 2001, • Hairstyling, Provincial – Gold 2001, 2002, 2003 • Hairstyling, National – Gold 2002, Bronze 2003 Lina started out as a hairstyling apprentice in 2002. She competed in the Skills Ontario hairstyling competition three years in a row winning gold each time. In 2007, she founded Artline Salon at age 23. She has also competed at the OMC (Organisation Mondiale Coiffure) Hair Olympics representing Team Canada four years in a row, earning three world championships in the Progressive Women’s Cut and Style category. With regards to the regional, provincial, and national Skills Competitions, Lina says: “It literally started W W W . C O L L E G E Omy F Tcareer.” R A D E S .C A · S U M M ER 2 017 9


THE EVOLUTION OF SKILLED TRADES IN ONTARIO

ERIC Truck & coach technician apprentice AMAL Cook apprentice

1953

1880 CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY

1928

Ontario becomes the first province to regulate apprentices, the Apprenticeship Act is enacted

Motor vehicle repair trade is separated into four branches: 1963 Barber • Motor mechanic 1965 Plumber • Body repairer Steamfitter • Electrical & fuel system repairer Sheet metal worker • Metal worker

TRADES OVER THE YEARS 1922 1927 CENTRE BLOCK PARLIAMENT HILL 1944

1950 ST. LAWRENCE The Apprenticeship and SEAWAY Tradesmen’s Qualification Act, 1964 (TQAA) replaces Motor vehicle repair the Apprenticeship Act, 1928 (first compulsory trade)

Hairstylist

There are important, well-paying skilled trades jobs throughout the province, and they’re just waiting to be filled. JODY LAURIN Powerline technician

1964 1976

CN TOWER

Electrician

S

ince Canada’s inception in 1867, there`s no denying the impact skilled trades professionals have had on our daily lives. They style our hair, create delicious meals, build our homes and roads, maintain the vehicles that we drive, and install the quick IT networks on which we rely. Before the first regulated apprenticeship program was established, the most popular method for apprentices to learn their trade was either through direct instruction from a family member or a formal agreement with a craftsperson.

P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y K R I S C A E TA N O

SIR ADAM BECK GENERATING STATION NIAGARA


JODY Powerline Technician

ROGERS CENTRE (SKYDOME)

1982

1989

BENJAMIN Boilermaker apprentice

The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen’s Qualification Act, 1967 renamed to the Trades Qualification and Apprenticeship Act, 1990 (TQAA, 1990)

Hoisting trades transfer from Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Relations and a formal apprenticeship program is implemented for both mobile and tower crane operator

As industrialization grew in Canada, it changed the way products were manufactured, but also apprenticeship conditions. Apprentices were younger, worked longer hours and were often valued merely as inexpensive labour instead of being trained in a trade. As our nation continued to mature, shortages of skilled tradespeople emerged and a new way to teach, devel-

CINDY Child development practitioner

2009

1990 1991

Barber and hairstylist becomes single trade of hairstylist

Elevating devices mechanic

2002

Residential air conditioning systems mechanic

The Ontario government passes legislation, the Ontario College of Trades and Apprenticeship Act, 2009 to establish the College of Trades

2007 NIAGARA TUNNEL PROJECT, ONTARIO POWER GENERATION 2005 PIER F AT LESTER B. PEARSON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

op and protect apprentices was required. Thus, the first Apprenticeship Act in Ontario was enacted in 1928. Regulation was not limited to apprentices only. In an effort to protect the public, motor vehicle repair became the first trade to be designated as compulsory in Ontario. As the province continued to grow, so did its list of compulsory trades.

Sprinkler and fire protection installer

As we celebrate Canada’s and Ontario’s 150th anniversaries, we will continue to protect the public by ensuring that individuals performing the skills of compulsory trades have the training and certification required to legally practise in Ontario. Let’s show some appreciation for all that our skilled tradespeople have done to make our lives more comfortable, enjoyable and safe.

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2017


CHULUUNBAATAR BAYARAA Electrician

to Area as a sprinkler and fire protection installer, he was looking forward to homeownership and a secure future for his family.

Working for 10 years as an industrial electrician on projects ranging from the automation of coal fired power plants, to maintaining the energy grid’s supervisory control and data acquisition system, he had the right skills to excel in his field.

Around that time, the sprinkler and fire protection trade’s requirements were in the midst of changing. After feedback from industry and a series of public consultations, the trade classification would soon change from voluntary to compulsory. This meant that anyone working as a sprinkler and fire protection installer would legally have to hold a C of Q.

And after researching the Canadian job market, he realized his skills were in demand—over 8,000 km from home. In hopes of giving his family greater opportunities and a better quality of life, Bayaraa immigrated in 2015. Settling with his family in Mississauga, Bayaraa thought he would find a job easily, within one or two months. Unfortunately, that wasn’t the case. Like Bayaraa, William Sawatsky was a professional in his trade. Working for 12 years throughout the Greater Toron-

Before knowing about the College’s process which could help him earn his C of Q, Sawatsky felt he hit a snag in his career—his dreams of home-ownership were fading fast.

P H OTO G R A P H O F C H U L U U N B A ATA R B Y K R I S C A E TA N O

It’s there not only to protect and help employers but also to protect tradespeople and the safety of all Ontarians.

M

ongolian-born Chuluunbaatar Bayaraa couldn’t be prouder of his Ontario-issued, Red Seal-endorsed Certificate of Qualification (C of Q) from the Ontario College of Trades (College).

| P H OTO G R A P H S U P P L I E D B Y W I L L I A M S A W AT S K Y

GOING THROUGH THE TRADES EQUIVALENCY ASSESSMENT PROCESS


Best decision I ever made…I’ve been given a ticket to write my own way for the rest of my working life. WILLIAM SAWATSKY Sprinkler and fire protection installer

Back in Mississauga, Bayaraa was also feeling defeated. He had applied for hundreds of jobs, but wasn’t getting any bites. After two months without success, he heard about the Skills for Change Trades Win Support Program. He met with them and they let him know he’d have better job prospects by being certified in his trade. And the good news: there was a direct way of going about it. Sawatsky also had support through a friend who told him he deserved to achieve his dream of home ownership, and that certification in his trade was his ticket to success. He reached out to the College to find out about the Trade Equivalency Assessment (TEA)—a straightforward process that assesses one’s skilledtrades abilities and experience. “Everyone was very pleasant. I was instructed to contact a few past employers to obtain letters of proof of credentials, and I spoke with a kind and under-

standing agent about when and where I could write the test,” says Sawatsky. After providing the required documentation, Sawatsky was approved through the TEA process, and became eligible to write the sprinkler and fire protection C of Q exam. “Best decision I ever made,” says Sawatsky. “I was immediately hired by the most amazing company, Onyx Fire Protection, and I’ve been given a ticket to write my own way for the rest of my working life.” He is proud of what he’s accomplished in his trade, “My soldier work ethic and OTC [Officers' Training Corps] got me to where I've always dreamed I'd be.” When Bayaraa first contacted the College about the TEA process, he thought there were far too many regulations. However, after working closely with the College, he now sees that trades regulation is very important. “It’s there not only to protect and help employers but also to protect tradespeople and the safety of all Ontarians,” he says.

Bayaraa insists the TEA process wasn’t that difficult, “The only thing I needed to do was to contact a previous employer in my home country to get a letter that proved I had sufficient trade experience and apply to the TEA. The process took about four and half months and soon after, I received an approval letter from the College.” Both Bayaraa and Sawatsky are now certified, proud members of the College and working in trades they love. “Thank you for giving this old pipefitter a chance to buy his first house,” remarked Sawatsky about the College. And Bayaraa has a message for new Canadians with a skilled-trades background, “You are not alone. A lot of people who come to Canada experience the same situation as I have. It’s always difficult until you get certified. Just be strong, contact the College as soon as possible, and search for bridging programs in your area.” FOR MORE INFORMATION about the TEA process, please visit collegeoftrades.ca FOR MORE INFORMATION about the Skills for Change - Trades Win Support Program, visit skillsforchange.org.

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COLLEGE U P D AT E S UPDATES

Chair’s Award of Excellence recipients This year, the College is pleased to introduce the Chair’s Award of Excellence—an award to honour individuals and organizations that have made outstanding contributions to the skilled trades and apprenticeship training in Ontario. The winners are: James Bodanis

Program Coordinator, Ontario Youth Apprentice Cook and Baker Program – Humber College

Vince Kacaba

Director of Training – United Association Local 46, Plumbers, Steamfitters & Welders

Roy King

Coordinator, Motorcycle and Powersports Program – Centennial College

Katrina McFadden

Vice President, Corporate Administration and Human Resources – ArcelorMittal Dofasco

John Norris

Executive Director Collision Industry Information Assistance

Gail Smyth

Executive Director Skills Ontario

Stephen Speers

Chair, Trades and Apprenticeship, Motive Power Trades – Conestoga College

Algonquin College’s Apprenticeship Program College of Carpenters and Allied Trades

Welder practical assessment now required for welder Red Seal certification As of March 1, 2017 all apprentices and individuals going through the Trade Equivalency Assessment (TEA) process are required to complete a welder practical assessment prior to the written examination. Upon successful completion of both the practical assessment and the written examination, a Certificate of Qualification with a Red Seal Endorsement (RSE) will be issued. Apprentices will complete the practical assessment during the in-school portion of their apprenticeship. Welding testing centres have been set-up across the province for TEA applicants. More information on the practical assessment can be found at collegeoftrades.ca. Updated training standards available on the College’s website • Child Development Practitioner • Cabinetmaker Apprentices with initial training agreements registered on or after April 1, 2017 must be trained to the new standard . Sprinkler and fire protection installer trade implementation changes The sprinkler and fire protection installer trade is now a compulsory trade. Any individual practising this trade must legally be a member of the College.

In an effort to clarify application of qualification requirements for the sprinkler and fire protection installer trade, including work elements, the College will continue to post interpretation bulletins on its website­­— collegeoftrades.ca.

TRADE CLASSIFICATION REVIEW REFERRAL PROCESS CONSULTATION The College is seeking feedback on a proposed Board of Governors’ regulation that would set out the process for the College’s referral of trade classification review requests to the government’s new Classification Roster. The consultation runs from June 15, 2017 to July 30, 2017 and is open to all members and stakeholders. Information on the consultation, including how you can submit your feedback, can be found at collegeoftrades.ca/about/ legislation-and-regulations/ consultations. Enforcement offices at colleges across the province Across the province, community colleges are sharing their space with College enforcement officers. When they’re not visiting work sites and confirming credentials, you can find enforcement officers writing field reports at one of the following colleges:


• • • •

Durham College, Whitby campus St. Clair College, Windsor campus Fanshawe College, London campus Confederation College, Thunder Bay

Although enforcement officers don’t have scheduled office hours, they welcome visitors and are happy to answer questions about the College, skilled trades and apprenticeship. Partnership with College of Early Childhood Educators The College has been working closely with the College of Early Childhood Educators (CECE) to consult on training needs with a shared goal of elevating the apprenticeship pathway. With the child development practitioner apprenticeship program being an alternative pathway towards the Early Childhood Education diploma and designation, the colleges are ensuring sector competencies and safe learning environments for children, families and staff. In response to recommendations, the two organizations worked together on developing a new child development practitioner curriculum standard that included the expansion of 30 additional in school training hours. The CECE also provided feedback on the new child development practitioner apprenticeship training standard log book, which was released April 1, 2017. The College and the CECE will

continue working together to support common needs and deliver on professional learning requirements. StatsCan survey results on apprenticeship and employment rates released Results from the 2015 National Apprenticeship Survey show that there are clear benefits for apprentices in completing their programs. Those who completed an apprenticeship program were more likely to have a permanent job, employment benefits and income than those who left their programs before completion. For example, 81 per cent of those who completed their apprenticeships had a permanent job, compared with 77 per cent who had not completed their programs. To read the full report, visit statcan.gc.ca. Client services call centre operating hours changed The client services call centre hours of operation are now Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Client services call centre reaches 1 million inbound calls On Wednesday, May 24, at 4:00 p.m., the College received its millionth call from Brian Ferguson of Gravenhurst. Client services consultant Milinda from registration services answered the call.

RETIREMENT ANNOUNCEMENT David Tsubouchi Registrar & CEO

The Board of Governors wishes to announce that David Tsubouchi will be retiring as Registrar & CEO of the Ontario College of Trades (College) upon the successful hiring of a new Registrar and CEO. On behalf of the Board, the Executive Committee will begin the search for David’s successor immediately. It is the Executive Committee’s priority to find the best individual to lead, while still maintaining a stable and effective organization. Please join us in wishing David all the best in his retirement— and thank him for his passion and dedication to the College during his tenure as Registrar & CEO. The search for a new Registrar & CEO is underway. To view the posting, go to collegeoftrades.ca.

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YOUTH WEBSITE GET A FACE LIF T EARNWHILEYOULEARN.CA IMPROVES CONTENT, NAVIGATION

E

arnwhileyoulearn.ca, the College’s youth-oriented website, was redesigned to improve its visual storytelling and navigation.

Using clear language and strong visuals, the website engages youth to explore the skilled trades as a rewarding career choice. Read success stories from Ontario’s tradespeople, like Jody Laurin, a Métis powerline technician from Tiny Township who wants to get the word out to his peers that skilled trades careers are a worthwhile investment. Get answers to dozens of apprenticeship-related questions, including available financial incentives, finding an employer and signing a Registered Training Agreement.

Since its launch in 2014, earnwhileyoulearn.ca has been helping thousands of young people discover the skilled trades and apprenticeships. Recently it was recognized by the International Association of Business Communicators (IABC) with a Gold Quill Award. The Gold Quill Awards program recognizes business communications excellence globally, is the acknowledged as one of the most prestigious awards programs in the industry.

Discover the pathway to certification read about the requirements for each of Ontario’s 156 trades. To explore the redesigned website, please visit earnwhileyoulearn.ca. Stay tuned for changes to our collegeoftrades.ca website.


OUT AND ABOUT

1. College's Board of Governors Chair, Pat Blackwood with HGTV personalities Paul Lafrance (host of Decked Out) and Kate Campbell at the Canadian Apprenticeship Forum. 2. College Enforcement officer Daniel Carter with Toronto Police at the Commercial Vehicle Superblitz held at Woodbine Racetrack. 3. Pioneers For Change: Award for Excellence in the Arts recipient, Cameron Bailey with the College's Marketing Manager, Tyler Charlebois. 4. Left to right: John Poirier (College's Manager of Standards), Dan Tadic (Executive Director, Canadian Welding Association),

Pat Blackwood (Board of Governors Chair), Maggie Santos (ACORN Education & Product Specialist), David Tsubouchi (Registrar & CEO), Bill Gwynne (Vice President Sales and Business Development at CWB Group) and Bruce James (Technical Developer/Training at CWB Group) visiting CWB Group head office in Milton, ON.

Transportation), Steven de Sousa (Mack & Volvo Trucks Canada) and Pierre Valley (Chairperson, Truck/Coach, Heavy Duty and Motive Power Programs at Centennial College). 7. Celebrity TV host, Mike Holmes with the College's Board of Governors Chair, Pat Blackwood at the 2017 Skills Ontario Competiton.

5. College's client services consultants celebrating our one millionth inbound call.

8. College staff with Hon. Kevin Flynn, Minster of Labour at the 2017 Skills Ontario Competition.

6. Registrar & CEO, David Tsubouchi visiting Centennial College’s School of Transportation with (from left to right) Alan McClelland (Dean, Centennial College School of

9. College staff (from left to right): Kaliya Turdueva, Risa Abella, Monica Luzano, Tanya Luc and Staisha Davis celebrating the College's win for 2017 Canada's Best Diversity Employers.

WWW.COLLEGEOFTRADES.CA

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K AROLA Ha ir st ylist

SKILLED TRADES Transforming Ontario: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow collegeoftrades.ca/150

Trades Today - Summer 2017  

Trades Today Summer 2017 Volume 4, Edition 2

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