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THE ONTARIO COLLEGE OF TRADES MAGAZINE | SPRING 2018 | VOLUME 5 EDITION 2

ONTARIO 'S AP P REN TIC ESHIP ST RAT E G Y 18

19 NE th, 20 JU

Zoomer's Celebrating the Trades

THE I M P O RTANC E OF T RA D E B OARD S Get involved in the future of your trade

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Providing the right tools for success


Live the SkiLLed Life

earnwhileyoulearn.ca

amal Chef apprentice


TRADESTODAY VOLUME 5 EDITION 2

FEATURES SPRING 2018 5 WORKING STRONGER TOGETHER

Looking at Ontario's new apprenticeship strategy

8 BUILDING WOMEN UP

with HGTV celebrity builder Kate Campbell

10 TRADES CERTIFICATION CREATES ENDLESS POSSIBILITIES How a C of Q is the ticket to success

12 CELEBRATING EXCELLENCE IN THE SKILLED TRADES

Zoomer's choice of talented and trustworthy tradespeople in Ontario 2 BUILDING ON ONTARIO'S SKILLED WORKFORCE A message from Registrar & CEO, George Gritziotis

4 BUILDING TOMORROW'S WORKFORCE AT SKILLS ONTARIO 2018 Partnering with Skills Ontario for Canada's largest skills competition

17 LEAD YOUR TRADE

How you can shape the future of your trade

18 COMPLIANCE & ENFORCEMENT: STATS AND FACTS Tips on how to ensure you're in compliance

19 COLLEGE UPDATES ON THE COVER Bailey Wood, Plumber Apprentice.

COVER PHOTO BY KRIS CAETANO

Trades Today is published quarterly by the Ontario College of Trades, delivering information to its members about College activities and news related to Ontario’s skilled trades community. Printed by Perkins Service Inc.

Ontario College of Trades 655 Bay St., Suite 600 Toronto, ON M5G 2K4

Telephone: (647) 847-3000 Toll free: 1-(855) 299-0028 Fax: (647) 340-4332 info@collegeoftrades.ca

Please credit the Ontario College of Trades for reproducing, in whole or in part, articles from this and/or past issues of this magazine’s contents.


BUILDING ON ONTARIO’S SKILLED TRADES WORKFORCE S

George Gritziotis , Registrar & CEO.

ince becoming Registrar & CEO in late 2017, I have spent many hours speaking with and learning from members and stakeholders about their experiences and expectations of the College. It has been time well spent. Hearing your thoughts and ideas has instilled in me a sense of excitement about what the College can achieve and the motivation to ensure it does. As a transparent, modern regulator, we look forward to strengthening our relationships with members and stakeholders and continuing to seek everyone’s input. These conversations have already helped in the development of our Strategic Plan and 2018 Priorities, and they will continue to inform the College’s strategic planning as we look ahead to the next five years.

I’d like to take some time now to introduce myself and speak to my experience. Although I’m new to the College, I hold decades of industry and government experience, making me no stranger to the challenges and opportunities of Ontario’s skilled trades system. I spent 10 years leading the Construction Sector Council, now BuildForce Canada. This is a national organization committed to developing a highly skilled workforce that will support the human resources needs of Canada’s construction industry. BuildForce Canada has been a leader in alerting

Canadians to the future shortage of skilled trades workers due to the retirement of hundreds of thousands of baby boomers. For years, I took that message across the country, encouraging youth to consider a career in the trades. I look forward to continuing to deliver that message on behalf of the College to strengthen the apprenticeship and skilled trades system in Ontario. Most recently I was Ontario’s first Chief Prevention Officer and Associate Deputy Minister at the Ministry of Labour where I integrated a prevention focus to Occupational Health and Safety. I led systemic reviews of health and safety in the mining and construction sectors, and produced Ontario’s first Occupational Health and Safety Strategy which formed the basis of a coordinated system-wide effort to improve health and safety outcomes. While there, my team and I also implemented mandatory health and safety training for workers, supervisors and for those who work at heights in construction, and we developed an employer accreditation program to motivate employers to achieve excellence in their health and safety programs. I look forward to applying my experience and commitment as the College moves forward on playing a leading role in protecting the public and workers from unsafe work practices, and im-


proving the quality of skilled trades work. As this work proceeds I’ll not only rely on my own experiences, but will continue to look to our members and stakeholders for their advice to envision the College’s future and how we can best serve Ontarians. It’s in this spirit of partnership and collaboration that the College released its strategic plan last December which was shared with hundreds of industry and government stakeholders. Our plan identifies a number of priority initiatives the College will be tackling throughout the year. Most notably, we will be building partnerships with employers and labour organizations, government, regulators, apprenticeship training providers and the consumer to better protect the public interest and promote the importance of qualified skilled tradespeople. And you can already see some of the exciting work we’re doing. When government released its multi-year apprenticeship strategy, A Stronger Apprenticeship System for Ontario: Ontario’s Apprenticeship Strateg y, it included advice collected through College consultations and numerous face-to-face meetings. We’ll continue to work closely with government on the implementation of this strategy. We also worked with the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development on an apprenticeship marketing campaign to promote the skilled trades to youth and attract a diversity of people to the trades. The campaign, featuring quotes and compelling images of apprentices and certified journeypersons, recently ran across the province in print, digital and web ads. Bailey Wood, the young apprentice on this issue’s cover, lent her voice to this apprenticeship campaign. Hearing her story delivers a powerful message on apprenticeship and the value of working in the skilled trades. I encourage you to read Bailey’s story and that of another young apprentice on page 5. I also encourage you to share your own story with us and with those who work in the industry and skilled trades community. If you have a story you’d like to share about your success in the skilled trades, please contact us at editor@collegeoftrades.ca. As the College moves ahead in its new direction, we will continue to seek your input, measure our progress and report back to you— members and stakeholders—on our results. I’m eager to lead the College forward, and I look forward to having engaged members to further strengthen Ontario’s skilled trades community. Sincerely,

George Gritziotis Registrar & CEO

MEETING THE CHANGING NEEDS OF ONTARIO, TOGETHER Here are the three areas of priorities for advancing our goals as set out in our Strategic Plan: Members, Partners and Our People.

MEMBERS

Make membership in the skilled trades more meaningful, attractive and rewarding

PARTNERS

Engage partners to identify issues and understand the current and future needs of the province

OUR PEOPLE

Be a modern regulator that protects the public while supporting a dynamic environment where skilled tradespeople succeed and help meet Ontario’s changing needs

ACHIEVING OUR VISION Excellence in the skilled trades makes Ontario the best place to be a tradesperson and makes Ontario more globally competitive in the modern economy

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BUILDING TOMORROW’S WORKFORCE AT SKILLS ONTARIO 2018 Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples, to consider rewarding careers in the trades and technology.

Participants at the 2017 Skills Ontario Competition

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or the fifth year in a row, the Ontario College of Trades is partnering with Skills Ontario for its annual competition. As Canada’s largest skills competition, the event is a three-day flurry of activity, bringing together nearly 30,000 visitors, including students, government, industry, trade unions and more. This competition, which takes place every May, attracts more than 2,000 students (from grades 4 to apprenticeship-level), vying for medals in areas like carpentry, culinary arts, hairstyling, plumbing and robotics. “The Skills Ontario Competition is a key initiative of Skills Ontario and its partners in providing skill development and career exploration opportunities to the thousands of youth across Ontario who attend,” said Ian Howcroft, who joined Skills Ontario as its new CEO in January

2018. “Through our partnership with the Ontario College of Trades, we can create an environment that promotes and values skilled workers for the benefit of our youth, our economy and the quality of life that we enjoy here in Ontario.” Hands-on learning, skill development and mentorship are just some of the outcomes students can expect from this unique career showcase. Students also have a chance to win monetary awards and job offers ─ this year by Magna and UA Canada/Mechanical Contractors of Ontario ─ as well as discover more than 70 interactive displays and meet with industry, college, government and labour representatives to get information about training and job opportunities. A shared goal between the College and Skills Ontario is to empower underrepresented groups, such as women and First

For instance, the Skills Ontario Young Women’s Conferences are the largest young women’s conferences in Canada, attracting more than 2,000 young women from across Ontario. This education and mentorship-based portion of the competition seeks to change misconceptions about the skilled trades being unsuitable to female workers. This year also marks the third annual Skills Ontario First Nations, Métis, and Inuit (FNMI) Student Conference. This conference offers FNMI youth in grades 7 to 12 the opportunity to be inspired by hands-on activities and challenges and hear from FNMI mentors working in the skilled trades and technologies. The College engages with Skills Ontario and related partners year-round to inspire youth through educational, hands-on experiences and mentorship opportunities to consider successful careers in the skilled trades. “I look forward to working closely with the Ontario College of Trades to strengthen and support opportunities like the Skills Ontario Competition for the next generation of skilled trade and technology professionals in our province,” said Howcroft. FOR MORE INFORMATION visit skillsontario.com


P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y K R I S C A E TA N O

Ontario’s new Apprenticeship Strategy I’m glad we’ll now be bringing better access and representation… AHMED ABDI Carpenter apprentice

Carpenter apprentice Ahmed Abdi learning the trade with his instructor.

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ailey Wood didn’t enter an apprenticeship in the skilled trades because of her dad or an uncle. It was on the advice of her sister, a licensed steamfitter, who assured her that not only could she physically do the job, but that she might actually like it, too. Coming from the York South - Weston area of the GTA, Ahmed Abdi understood first-hand the access issues those in his community experience—he applied to the carpenters’ union for many years before he was finally accepted. Now he’s a second year apprentice and the first Somali to become a member of the Carpenters’ Union Local 27.

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Bailey Wood learning to use a blowtorch

…I now have the confidence and skills to know this is truly my passion. BAILEY WOOD Plumber apprentice

It’s because of apprentices like Wood and Abdi that the Ontario College of Trades (College) is partnering with the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development (MAESD) on the development and implementation of Ontario's new apprenticeship strategy. A Stronger Apprenticeship System for Ontario: Ontario’s Apprenticeship Strateg y, was announced on Feb 7, by Mitzie Hunter, Minister of Advanced Education and Skills Development in Barrie.

Wood, a fifth-year plumbing apprentice in school at the UA Local 46 Training Centre, was happy to share her message during the announcement. “The amazing work I do on my apprenticeship gets me really excited. And with a high-quality education in trade school, gaining knowledge and experience, I now have the confidence and skills to know this is truly my passion.” Abdi is excited about the apprenticeship opportunities for others that lay ahead. “I was so happy to hear about this strategy because it will address the access issues that people from my community have. I was surprised to find out I was the first Somali in the Local 27 carpenter’s union so with this new system, I’m glad we’ll now be bringing better access and representation at the unions.”

Minster Mitzie Hunter announcing Ontario's new apprenticehip strategy.

The new strategy ensures Ontario’s apprenticeship system meets the changing demands of the economy by giving apprentices the skills they need to succeed and it provides employers with the talent they will need to thrive. The College is eager to be working with the province to improve the apprenticeship system by building on its current strengths. The goal is to develop a system that provides end-to-end supports for apprentices and employers and responds to the needs of a changing economy and workforce. “Working in the skilled trades is an empowering, rewarding experience—we want to make sure anyone who wants to become a tradesperson has the support to do so,” said George Gritziotis, CEO and Registrar of the College. “This strategy is client-focused and begins to move us towards a pathway that will increase the successful completion of apprenticeships. We’re happy to continue to work with government to ensure the apprenticeship system evolves to meet the needs of the changing labour market.” The minister was very encouraged about the opportunities for young Ontarians that lay ahead. “Completing an apprenticeship can set you up for a great future,” said Hunter. “Ontario’s apprentices deserve a system that opens opportunities, connects them with good jobs and helps them gain the skills needed to succeed in the workforce.” Working in partnership with the College and


day “ myends with

…I did that.

• Ontario invested $160.6 million in apprenticeship programs in 201617. An estimated $128.8 million was also provided to employers through the Apprenticeship Training Tax Credit in 2016-17.

PLUMBER (APPRENTICE)

Bailey Wood in the ministry's apprenticeship ad campaign

many other organizations who bring apprenticeship to life, the government will implement the new, multi-year apprenticeship strategy that is comprised of a suite of short- and long-term initiatives built around five essential pillars and future goals: 1. Promote apprenticeship by making young people, their families and educators in Ontario’s elementary and secondary schools more aware of the value of apprenticeship.

• Ontario’s Apprenticeship Strategy was developed following extensive engagement with partners in the apprenticeship system from across the province. • There were 25,000 active employer sponsors in 2016-17. • Approximately 9,800 Certificates of Apprenticeship have been issued annually over the past three years.

2. Support and retain apprentices by providing exceptional customer service through technology-enabled services and streamlined support though the apprenticeship pathway.

Source: Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development

3. Engage and support employers and sponsors by providing information and resources they need to successfully train and retain apprentices, including improved employer financial incentives.

In January 2018, an ad campaign to promote apprenticeships in the skilled trades was launched across the province. It featured images of College members, both apprentices and tradespeople. The campaign ran until late February in bus shelters, on public transportation and in digital ads throughout Ontario and featured the diversity and success of the College membership.

4. Increase accessmore for than underrepresented Learn a trade through 100 apprenticeships.groups including women, francophones, Indigenous peoples, people with disabilities, racialized people and newcomers by promoting apontario.ca/apprenticeship prenticeship and providing targeted supports to employers. Paid for by the Government of Ontario

5. Update the apprenticeship system through digital enhancement by providing online resources and services, including instant access to labour market information and a digital application process.

The strategy presents an exciting opportunity to bring Ontario’s apprenticeship system in line with the needs of apprentices, employers and other participants in the system. This work aligns with the College’s own Strategic Plan and 2018 Priorities and its objective to build an improved apprenticeship system. Working towards achieving its apprenticeship goals, the College was recently involved in another collaboration with MAESD.

Making sure more Ontarians, including young people, parents and guidance counsellors in Ontario’s elementary and secondary schools better appreciate the value of apprenticeship is one of the main goals of MAESD’s campaign, the apprenticeship strategy and especially for the College. Working together to promote apprenticeships to underrepresented groups and providing targeted supports to employers is key to modernizing the skilled trades in Ontario.

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t Toronto’s Corus Quay studio, celebrity builder and renovator Kate Campbell, known for HGTV shows Home to Win and Decked Out, just finished recording a live segment for Global TV’s The Morning Show.

Despite being accepted into university after high school, Campbell was unsure of her path. Trades were never presented to her as an option, and university was the preferred post-secondary route presented by guidance counsellors. This isn’t surprising. According to a 2010 survey by the Construction Sector Council, 50 per cent of women between the ages of 18 to 34 haven’t received information about careers in construction trades.

P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y K R I S C A E TA N O

HGTV star guides young women towards skilled trades pathways

Going head-to-head with The Morning Show host, Campbell makes drilling a series of screws in mere seconds look effortless.


Kate Campbell in the HGTV television spot.

Many people consider university the pathway to success. However, WIST/IT opened my eyes to other possibilities. K ATE CAMPBELL HGTV Personality

That’s why Campbell is passionate about encouraging youth, in particular young women, to consider the skilled trades as a rewarding career path; work that aligns with the Ontario College of Trades’ goal of attracting a diversity of people to the trades. Introduced to carpentry through a government sponsored program called Women in Skilled Trades and Information Technology (WIST/IT), Kate was hooked after using her first power tool. It was the perfect fit—she loves problem solving, being active and working with her hands. This experience opened up a whole new world of career options. “Many people consider university the pathway to success. However, WIST/IT opened my eyes to other possibilities.” To inspire other women, Kate launched Build Women Up. This scholarship program supports women in skilled trades through tool kits, scholarships and other supports to help them kick-start their construction careers.

“Many times I was the only woman on the job site, and was once told I was taking the job away from a man. I really wished I had a female mentor that I could go to with my experiences—with Build Women Up, we can provide that.” Campbell is also passionate about helping promote apprenticeships in high schools, and talking to students about the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program, which gives students in Grade 11 and 12 the opportunity to explore trades through their cooperative education program. “On television, you see the before and beautiful after transformation but you don’t see much of the process and that’s what the trades are all about. You learn so much about yourself through these processes and it’s been the most rewarding thing that I’ve done in my life.” FOR MORE INFORMATION on skilled trades promotion and trade certification, visit collegeoftrades.ca.

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Trades certification creates endless possibilities Earning your Certificate of Qualification (C of

Q) in the trades has the potential to bring limitless opportunities. Many certified tradespeople work for years in their trades and then have the opportunity to transition to management, training or leadership roles as they progress in their careers. In every case though, it’s the C of Q that opens the doors. Angela Martin sees the trades as “not just a job.” She’s the type of person who likes to see how things work and to fix what’s broken. “I tried more traditional jobs when I left high school—filing clerk, reception at a doctor’s office, but I realized those jobs weren’t for me,” said Martin. She decided to enter the Women in Trades and Technology course at Seneca College and upon completing the program, she earned her C of Q as an electrician - construction and maintenance. When an injury prevented Martin from continuing to work on the tools, she knew she could use the skills she learned on the job in a different and exciting way. When Don Gosen graduated from Conestoga College as a civil engineering technologist, he quickly landed a job working for the Grand River Conservation Authority. But he had to take a leave when his father became sick and wasn’t able to run his small electrical business, Gosen Electric. Don stepped in and served his apprenticeship while running the business, leading to its growth and success. “For me it was never just a job. It became my career, a profession, something I devoted my life to—my trade qualification is

a part of my DNA,” said Gosen. Both Gosen and Martin see their C of Q as the ticket to their current careers. The knowledge and skills Gosen learned while running a business and working on the tools helped him move on to serve in several leadership roles. He served as chair of the Council of Ontario Construction Associations and is currently chair of the College’s board of governors. Similarly, Martin used her C of Q and knowledge of the construction industry to work protecting the safety of workers and the public as a construction inspector with the Ontario Ministry of Labour. Like Gosen and Martin, Dal Gill credits the skilled trades to his career success. Gill started mechanical training in high school in the late '80s and began his apprenticeship through what was known then as the Motor Vehicle Mechanic program from the Ministry of Transportation. In 1996 he earned his C of Q in both the automotive service technician and truck and coach technician trades. Combining his skills with his passion for policing, cars and trucks, Gill applied to the Commercial Vehicle Unit with Toronto Police Service. We sat down with Gill to learn about his career journey and how working together with the College helps keep Ontarians safe. Trades Today: Did you enter the skilled trades with the intention to take what you’ve learned in the trades and apply it to policing? Is it a path automotive service and truck and coach technicians can take?


Dal Gill: Absolutely. My trades qualifications have been instrumental to my current success with the Commercial Vehicle Unit, which has been in existence for more than 15 years. Being certified in two trades has certainly helped further my career, particularly while training police officers and conducting commercial vehicle safety blitzes. TT: How has the relationship with the College and Toronto Police Commercial Vehicle Unit grown in the past few years? DG: The College’s compliance and enforcement officers are an important part of our regular commercial vehicle blitzes. Many of our investigations require verification of C of Q, so having College officers at the blitzes is essential. We’ve also been working closely for the past few years to educate the public and the trucking industry about the importance of road and maintenance safety. Together, we are ensuring everyone is complying with the laws about certification and road safety and our partnership is a great achievement towards keeping the public safe. TT: Can you describe why compulsory trades enforcement is so important for the future of the trades? DG: I believe Ontario has some of the highest standards for the skilled trades and because of this, we have the best trained tradespeople. The College is so important as it helps to uphold these standards by making sure tradespeople are in compliance. This ensures that not only our roadways are safe, but that our communities are also safe. TT: What are some great experiences that you’ve seen while working on the unit with the College’s enforcement team?

Dal Gill holds his C of Q in two motive power trades and is a police constable with Toronto Police Traffic Services.

DG: There was a situation where we received a 911 call about a school bus full of young children travelling on the Don Valley Parkway and the caller said one of the wheels was loose. The bus was pulled off to the side of the highway and no children were hurt, thanks to the fast actions of responding officers, Derek Page and Jay Gill. I was asked to attend the investigation and the bus was found to be unsafe and charges were laid. During the investigation, there were some questions about when the bus was certified so College enforcement was brought in to assist with the investigation. The work we do together is very essential—by making sure apprentices and technicians are certified to do the job, we keep unsafe vehicles off the roads. It's a great partnership. TT: What kind of advice would you give someone wanting to get in to the skilled trades today? DG: The trades can take you to so many different careers. A number of police officers in Police Services currently hold 310S [automotive service technician] or 310T [truck and coach technician] licenses and of course this helps them. I also know certified tradespeople throughout GTA Police Services that continue their work in the trades and in their investigations.

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C E L E B R A T I N G

E XCE LLE NCE I N

S K I L L E D

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udos to the nominees of Celebrating the Trades! – a partnership between the Ontario College of Trades (College) and ZoomerMedia recognizing businesses or tradespeople who were nominated for excelling in their trades. In early 2017, Zoomer magazine readers and station listeners were asked for nominations of excellence in three categories: businesses that offer apprenticeship training, skilled trade businesses, and self-employed tradespeople. Readers and listeners

T H E

T R A D E S

shared stories of exceptional service and heart-warming appreciation for a job well done. After careful deliberation, we selected the following nine nominees. Each nominee was an invited guest on Fight Back with Libby Znaimer. You can listen to their podcast interviews on ZoomerRadio. ca. The nominees also received advertising campaigns on both Zoomer Radio and EverythingZoomer.com.

Kevin McMaster

Refrigeration and air conditioning service mechanic

“It’s my job to go in there, figure out a problem, fix it or come up with a solution, and leave—not to sell anything, not to be a salesman, not to be a spin doctor,” he says. Helping people in his small Rockwood community is important to Kevin. “It’s not like I just stop by, fix a furnace or an air conditioner and then collect my money and never be seen again. I meet these people in the grocery stores, at gas stations, at the hardware store in my town, and I continue friendships and conversations with them.”

P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y K R I S C A E TA N O

After almost 20 years of experience, Kevin started McMaster Mechanical Services, which offers installations and service for heating and air conditioning in the Greater Toronto Area and southern Ontario.


Karola Dirnberger Hairstylist

Karola is a hairstylist to the stars who travels across the globe working in film and TV. Nominated twice for best hair at the Canadian Screen Awards, she won in 2014. Karola’s father once told her, “If you have a trade, if you have something you can do with your hands, you’ll always work. It doesn’t matter what happens in the world. It doesn’t matter where you are.” That filled her with excitement. She has owned and operated two salons and teaches classes at her business, Film Hair Academy. “One of the great things about hairdressing, why I love it so much, is we’re one of the very few professions that are hands-on. We actually touch other people. There’s something energetic that happens between a hairdresser and their client.”

Lou Trottier

Automotive service technician Lou started his Mississauga automotive repair and maintenance business, All About Imports, 21 years ago. A licensed automotive service technician, he’s dedicated 100 per cent customer satisfaction and providing professional, ethical service. “I treat everybody as I expect to be treated myself,” Lou says. He trains three full-time apprentices at his shop. The number one lesson is safety first, but he also teaches them to be ambitious. “Whatever you do in life, do it better than everybody else.” In addition to running his business, Lou is a weekly contributor to the Globe and Mail, sharing his automotive know-how in the Globe Drive section. And for the last five years, he’s been rocking the stage as a guitarist in the band Stephen’s Garage.

Glenn Croxall

Electrician – construction & maintenance Glenn loved electrical classes in high school, but life took him on a different path until he returned to his calling later in life. “I made a plan at 30 because I wanted to work for myself,” he says. He went to trade school, got work experience and became a master electrician. Two years ago, Glenn opened his residential and commercial electrical services business, KBL Electric, in Oakville. “When you have your own company, there’s no limit to how well you can do.” Glenn works all over the Greater Toronto Area, Hamilton and the Niagara area. Customers are referred through word of mouth, and he’s very busy—clearly they’re pleased with him. “People are happy. They know they can trust me and I’ll do whatever it takes to get the job done.”

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Rob Kisielewski Plumber

Rob’s business, ClearFlow Plumbing, is based in Hamilton and services customers along the Queen Elizabeth Way. A master plumber with 15 years of experience and a member of UA Local 67, Rob provides superior workmanship and honest, reliable service. “I have a high standard, so it’s a challenge to meet that. It takes a lot of effort and perseverance.” The rule he lives by and the slogan for his company, is “Done Right." Guaranteed. “If somebody’s going to do something, they may as well do it right. There’s no sense in doing something partly or not well, then go back and fix it.” Rob’s glad the College is making the trades in Ontario more reliable, especially having compliance and enforcement officers ensure people who work in the trades have licences, are certified and are up to date with their licensing. “They’ve raised the bar. This is something that I think has been long overdue and it’s good to see.”

Andrew Wood

Founding partner & director at Ecnomus Andrew started Ecnomus Construction Group with his partner, Craig Spivey, in 2009 when he was only 22. Ecnomus does custom homes, renovations, additions and infill construction in the Greater Toronto Area, Burlington, Oakville and Kitchener-Waterloo area. His role has changed over the last year to focus on developing the business and helping customers create their dream homes, but he still loves throwing on his tool belt and swinging a hammer. Andrew has confidence in his team of skilled tradespeople. “We’ve brought guys on board who are perfectly capable and excellent at running jobs and doing the work onsite.” It’s the personal connection that separates Ecnomus from the competition, as the business is small for the volume and size of jobs they do. “When people pick up the phone, they’re talking to the owner of the company.”

If you have a trade, if you have something you can do with your hands, you’ ll always work. - K AROL A DIRNBERGER HAIRS T YLIS T


Adam Price

Electrician, construction and maintenance For 20+ years, Adam has done residential, commercial and industrial electrical work across the Greater Toronto Area. He started CanNam Electric Ltd. in 2010 and is known for providing safe, reliable electrical service. Adam’s conscience motivates him to do good work. “You can’t be thinking in your head, I didn’t really do that part of the job right or I cut the corner there. Every night I go home, I sleep well, and that’s the biggest part.” His apprentice is working toward Red Seal certification—the Canadian standard of excellence for skilled trades that’s administered by the College. “Red Seal is important for myself, plumbers and HVAC people. It recognizes the schooling, the work that’s led up to our apprenticeship and it separates us from people who don’t have the Red Seal.”

Ken Sharp

Automotive service technician Ken started Sharp’s Auto Centre in West St. Catharines 25 years ago, providing automotive repair and services for the Niagara Region. “I’ve always believed that the job has to be done right at the best price for the customer,” he says. He has many titles under his belt: licensed automotive service technician, truck and coach technician, Drive Clean inspector and repair technician, air conditioning and heating technician, and diagnostic and electrical repair technician. For more than 50 years, the Sharp family has been in the automotive industry, and his business is a real family affair. His team includes six employees (his wife and cousin) and an apprentice. Also, visit Ken’s shop and you’ll be greeted by two canine family members: Sunny and Jasper. “The customers just love them.”

Sam Di Pietro Plumber

Sam’s family-owned and –operated business, SDP Plumbing, also known as Sam the Plumber, is in its 10th year. Based in Oakville and specializing in residential and commercial plumbing, they pride themselves on prompt and exceptionally professional service. “As a business, we strive for absolute quality,” he says. His sons are following in his footsteps (one is a certified plumber and two are apprentices). Sam’s strong commitment to his work comes from teaching his boys the importance of a job well done. Sam’s team are members of the College and proudly carry their College membership cards. “It gives a little peace of mind to our customers to let them know that we’re part of an organization that strives for both quality and safety.”

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YOUR EXPERTISE IS NEEDED!

Join the Ontario College of Trades Governance Structure Make a difference in your trade!

• Provide direct influence on the shape and direction of the trades and industry • Gain governance experience • Expand your community contacts • Great learning opportunities • Share knowledge with industry colleagues

APPLY TODAY at cot-appointments.ca There are employee/employer positions on the Board of Governors, four Divisional Boards and 49 active Trade Boards. If you have any questions, please email appointments.council@ontario.ca.


LEAD YOUR TRADE

Members of Ontario College of Trades’ governance structure shape skilled trades future

T

he skilled trades are constantly evolving. From changes in technology and equipment to new training and curriculum standards, there is a lot to filter through to ensure the Ontario workplace and economy is maximizing the opportunities modernization can provide. The Ontario College of Trades’ (College) understands that those on the shop floor, at the worksite or in the workplace talking to clients and hearing their needs, are best positioned to understand the developing trends and issues affecting their trade, and have the ability to identify solutions. That’s why the College is looking for tradespeople to participate in its governance structure by joining a trade board relevant to their professional skill. Trade boards give those working in the skilled trades the opportunity to shape the future of Ontario by influencing the growth and development of their trade and by extension, the Ontario economy. Working on a trade board also provides participants with opportunities for professional development, an expanded personal network and some remuneration. As the regulatory body for Ontario’s skilled trades, the College wants to work with knowledgeable members interested in working together for the greater good. “Trade boards play a vital role in ensuring policy makers are made aware of burning issues and new

opportunities that those working on the tools would recognize and see every day,” said Jason Bennett, director of corporate governance at the College. “It’s imperative for the long-term health and success of the trades to get this information from those who know the trades best. In return, the trade boards provide an opportunity for professional and personal growth.”

I first applied to the truck and coach trade board even though I had no prior experience on a board, but it made sense to start with the profession I knew.” Trevor Cox Member of the College's governance structure.

College member Trevor Cox has worked as a truck and coach technician for nearly 20 years and was on the first truck and coach trade board. He has now worked at all three levels of the College’s governance structure and currently lends his expertise to the College’s board of governors. “I first applied to the truck and coach trade board even though I had no prior experience on a board, but it made sense to start with the profession I knew,” says Cox. “This has been a rewarding experience. I continue to use new and enhanced skills I learned here while contributing to the modernization of the skilled trades in Ontario.”

IF YOU WANT TO HELP shape the future of your trade by demonstrating your commitment to your trade’s quality, safety and professionalism, please visit the Appointments Council website www.cot-appointments.ca

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COMPLIANCE AND ENFORCEMENT: STATS AND FACTS O

ur compliance and enforcement officers are in workplaces each day across the province protecting Ontarians and holding tradespeople to a high professional standard.

These officers are called in when work of compulsory trades place consumers, members of the public and workers at risk due to improper training or qualifications. They use various tools—from compliance assistance to enforcement action—to make sure the work is done by qualified workers.

MAKING SURE YOU’RE IN COMPLIANCE WORKERS

EMPLOYERS/SPONSORS

• For apprentices: Hold and carry (or be able to produce)

• Ensure that the employees or subcontractors assigned

a valid Registered Training Agreement from the Ministry

to do the work of a compulsory trade have the required

of Advanced Education and Skills Development and a

credentials to do so (have a valid Registered Training

valid Statement of Membership from the College in the

Agreement, Certificate of Qualification or Statement of

voluntary or compulsory trade.

Membership in the trade).

• For journeypersons in compulsory trades: Hold and carry (or be able to produce) a valid Certificate of Qualification (or Provisional Certificate of Qualification) from the College. • For journeyperson candidates in compulsory trades: Hold and carry (or be able to produce) a valid Statement of Membership from the College. • For all College members: Keep your College membership up to date to ensure your credentials (Certificate of Qualification or Statement of Membership) remain active/in good standing.

FOR MORE INFORMATION on the College’s compliance and enforcement activities, please visit collegeoftrades.ca

• Allow apprentices to work only in accordance with the ratio for the trade in the 33 construction trades subject to mandatory ratios—these 33 trades can be found on the College’s website (collegeoftrades.ca).

BY THE NUMBERS 2017 Compliance & Enforcement Stats (January – December)

1,788 11,370 129 59

COMPLAINTS/ INCIDENTS CALLS RECEIVED FIELD INSPECTIONS COMPLETED PROVINCIAL OFFENCES CHARGES NOTICES OF CONTRAVENTION


COLLEGE U P D AT E S UPDATES

Government announces new grant for employers In the 2017 Ontario Fall Economic Statement, the government proposed to transform the Apprenticeship Training Tax Credit into a new Graduated Apprenticeship Grant to help employers with the costs of training apprentices. More information can be found at www.ontario.ca. Updated training and curriculum standards available on the College’s website • Parts Technician Apprentices with initial training agreements registered on or after Feb 1, 2017 must be trained to the new standard. • Industrial Electrician Apprentices with initial training agreements registered on or after Feb 1, 2017 must be trained to the new standard. • Plumber Apprentices with initial training agreements registered on or after Jan 1, 2018 must be trained to the new standard. New Red Seal exam The first ever interprovincial Red Seal exam for the Cement (Concrete) Finisher trade is now available. All individuals interested in obtaining a Certificate of Qualification for the Cement (Concrete) Finisher trade will be required to write and pass the Interprovincial Red Seal exam to obtain a Red Seal Endorsement (RSE). The RSE is a professional designation that recognizes the knowledge,

skills and experience of the journeyperson and signifies the standard of excellence of the Red Seal Program.

REMINDERS

April 28 is National Day of Mourning Every year on April 28 we pay our respects to, and remember, the thousands of workers who have been killed, injured or suffered illness as a result of work-related incidents. Heads-up for future hairstylist apprentices Effective January 1, 2018 new apprentices registered in the hairstylist apprenticeship program will be required to complete a practical assessment as well as the written examination in order to obtain certification in the hairstylist trade. Although the first practical assessments will not take place until early 2019, those apprentices registering in 2018 must be aware of the new certification requirement.

Code of Ethics to provide members with greater clarity about how to engage in the practice of their trades in the most professional way possible. Using best practices from other regulatory bodies and the College’s own experiences, the Code of Ethics covers the following for all members: 1. Duty to perform work in a trade and meet their responsibilities to clients, the public, and other members and tradespeople, honourably, ethically and with integrity. 1. Duties in their relationships to apprentices, employees, tradespeople, and members of other professions or occupations. 1. Duties in their relationship with the College. More information on the College’s Code of Ethics can be found at collegeoftrades.ca. Important notice regarding payments To ensure payments are made in the most secure way, the College no longer accepts cash payments by mail or at our service counter at 655 Bay Street, Toronto. The following payment options remain available: • Cheques (non-postdated) • Money orders • Cash payments made at major chartered banks in Canada

Code of Ethics applies to all members

• Visa, MasterCard or American Express

Last year, the College released its first

• Debit

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DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE

Decision & Order

The Discipline Committee is an independent adjudicative tribunal of the College that holds public hearings to review allegations of professional misconduct or incompetence against members in a manner that is fair, transparent and in the public interest. Christopher A. Paquette (member no. 13252637 – Residential (Low Rise) Sheet Metal Installer) of Thunder Bay, Ont. and/or Maxville, Ont. was found guilty of professional misconduct in that he: a) undertook work that he knew or ought to have known he was not competent to perform by virtue of his certification, training and experience; b) knowingly provided false information and documents to the College with respect to his trade qualifications; c) was found guilty of contravening a law, the Ontario College of Trades and Apprenticeship Act, 2009, that is relevant to his suitability to hold a Certificate of Qualification. d) acted, in respect to the practice of a trade, in a manner that, having regard to all the circumstances, would reasonably be regarded by members as disgraceful, dishonourable or unprofessional; and e) engaged in fraudulent conduct. By Order dated Oct. 13, 2017, a panel of the Discipline Committee ordered: 1. the member to pay a $1,000 fine; 2. that the member’s Certificate of Qualification is suspended for 2 years; 3. the member shall not apply for reinstatement of his suspended Certificate of Qualification for 2 years; 4. the member be reprimanded at the conclusion of the hearing and the fact of the reprimand shall be recorded on the public register of the College for a period of 5 years; 5. the finding and the Order of the panel shall be published in summary with the name of the member, and the name

and address of the member’s former employer, in the official publication of the College and on the website of the College (Optimum Mechanical Solutions Inc., 84 Bentley Avenue, Nepean, ON, K2E 6T9); and 6. the member shall pay $2,000 in costs to the College. Huseyin Mikyas (member no. 13332805 – Auto Body and Collision Damage Repairer) of Maple, Ont. was found guilty of professional misconduct in that he: a) failed to take reasonable steps to safeguard the life, health or property of a person who may be affected by the work of any person for whom he is responsible, when he knew or ought to have known that there was a risk to life, health or property; b) failed to act to correct or report a situation that he knew or ought to have known may endanger the safety or welfare of the public; c) signed or issued, in his capacity as a member of the College, a document that he knew or ought to have known contained a false, improper or misleading statement; d) was found guilty of contravening a law, the Highway Traffic Act, that is relevant to his suitability to hold a certificate of qualification; e) failed to maintain the standards of a trade; and f) acted or failed to act, in respect to the practice of a trade, in a manner that, having regard to all the circumstances, would reasonably be regarded by members as disgraceful, dishonourable or unprofessional; By Order dated Oct. 23, 2017, a panel of the Discipline Committee ordered: 1. the member to pay a $2,000 fine; 2. that the member’s Certificate of Qualification be revoked; 3. that the member shall not apply for reinstatement of his Certificate of Qualification for 1 year; 4. the finding and the Order of the panel

shall be published in summary with the name of the member, and the name and address of the member’s business, in the official publication of the ON, L4K 1S4); 5. the member to pay $3,000 in costs to the College. Lindsay Priddle (member no. 13271632 – Hairstylist) of Sarnia, Ont. was found guilty of professional misconduct for employing an individual to perform the work of a Hairstylist – a trade for which certification and membership in the College is compulsory – who did not hold a Certificate of Qualification in that trade and who was not an apprentice in that trade working pursuant to a Registered Training Agreement, contrary to Section 4 of the Ontario College of Trades and Apprenticeship Act, 2009. By Order dated Nov. 13, 2017, a panel of the Discipline Committee ordered: 1. the member to pay a $850 fine; 2. that the panel’s finding be published in the official publication of the College and on the College’s website, including the name of the member and the name and address of the member’s former business (Fringe Beauty Studio, 446 Lyndoch Street, Corunna, ON, N0N 1G0); and 3. the member to pay $1,000 in costs to the College. Junior Lloyd Beckford (member no. 13237315 - Automotive Service Technician; Truck and Coach Technician) of Brampton, Ont. was found guilty of professional misconduct in that he: a) failed to take reasonable steps to safeguard the life, health or property of a person who may be affected by the work of a member or any person for whom the member is responsible, when the member knew or ought to have known that there was a risk to life, health or property; b) signed or issued, in his capacity as a member of the College, a document that he knew or ought to have known contained a false, improper or misleading statement; c) was found guilty of contravening a law,


the contravention of which is relevant to his suitability to hold a certificate of qualification or statement of membership; d) failed to maintain the standards of a trade: and e) acted or failed to act, in respect to the practice of a trade, in a manner that, having regard to all the circumstances, would reasonably be regarded by members as disgraceful, dishonourable or unprofessional. By Order dated Nov. 14, 2017, a panel of the Discipline Committee ordered: 1. the member to pay a $1,000 fine; 2. both of the member’s Certificates of Qualification be suspended for 6 months; 3. that the member was be reprimanded at the conclusion of the hearing; 4. that the panel’s finding and Order be published with the name of the member in the official publication of the College; and

practice of a trade, in a manner that, having regard to all the circumstances, would reasonably be regarded by members as disgraceful, dishonourable or unprofessional.

Technician be suspended for 12 months; 3. that the member shall not apply for reinstatement of his suspended Certificate of Qualification for 12 months;

1. the member pay a $500 fine;

4. that the panel’s finding and Order be published with the name of the member in the official publication of the College; and

2. that the member’s Certificate of Qualification in the trade of Automotive Service

5. the member to pay $1,500 in costs to the College.

By Order dated Feb. 13, 2018, a panel of the Discipline Committee ordered:

OUT AND ABOUT

5. the member to pay $2,510.90 in costs to the College. Ron E Heitto (member no. 13106333 -Automotive Service Technician; Truck and Coach Technician) of Longlac, Ont. was found guilty of professional misconduct in that he: a) failed to take reasonable steps to safeguard the life, health or property of a person who may be affected by the work of a person for whom he is responsible, when he knew or ought to have known that there was a risk to life, health or property; b) failed to act to correct or report a situation that he knew or ought to have known may endanger the safety or welfare of the public; c) signed or issued, in his capacity as a member of the College, a document that he knew or ought to have known contained a false, improper or misleading statement; d) was found guilty of contravening a law that is relevant to his suitability to hold a certificate of qualification; e) failed to maintain the standards of a trade; and f) acted or failed to act, in respect to the

1. College staff posing with "VIMY" at the Invictus Games Veterans Career Summit. 2. Don Gosen, Ontario College of Trades board chair, presenting to the Canadian Farm Builders Association . 3. Client services consultant, Felipe Virviescas talking to students during Student Life Expo 2017. 4. Sharp’s Auto Centre , Ken Sharp, at the Zoomer studios ready to talk car maintenance and hiring certified trades professionals alongside senior communications officer Tracey Shepherd of the College.

5. College program coordinator, Alice Power strikes a pose with Landscape Ontario’s Alexander Gibson at the Landscape Ontario Congress in Toronto. 6. College stakeholder relations and outreach supervisor, Perry Chao presents to a group of employers at the Skills for Change Employer Breakfast in Brampton. 7. College membership processing consultant, Julia Knox at the Watton Employment Services Skilled Trades & Apprenticeship Expo.

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Trades Today - Spring 2018  

Trades Today Spring 2018 Volume 5, Edition 2

Trades Today - Spring 2018  

Trades Today Spring 2018 Volume 5, Edition 2