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HUMAN STUDIES in learning styles, sexual harassment in schools, or school sports programs, among others. Evaluations are based on participation, historical case, media analysis, oral presentation of fieldwork, written synthesis of literature, and two lesson plans. Writing focus optional. Offered every other year.

█ FILM THEORY Colin Capers Course limit: 12 Cost: $30 How do motion pictures express ideas? Why do we respond to them in the ways we do? Film theorists have approached these questions from contexts as diverse as formal composition (sound, mise en scene, color, cinematography, and editing), signs and symbols (semiotics), cultural and/ or gender concerns, and psychoanalysis. In this class, we practice using these and other theories to understand and analyze moving pictures. Each week we screen one or two feature length movies as well as a number of short films. Source texts from critics, theorists, artists/filmmakers, and cinephiles complement screenings. Students may take this course as writing intensive; those who do are required to write and revise three or four critical response essays based in analytical frameworks covered in the course. All students are required to complete a final paper and presentation. Students are evaluated on papers, final project, and participation. Recommended prerequisites: previous course in Art and Design. Writing focus optional.

█ FINANCIALS Jay Friedlander Course limit: 15 Cost: $30 Business, like all disciplines, has its own language. Being able to speak the language of business is critical for activists, social entrepreneurs, and business owners alike. Financial statements are key components of this language. These statements measure the fiscal health of both non-profit and for-profit organizations. They provide insight into all areas of the company. They are a powerful tool for determining investments, competitive positioning, and have impacts on all of an organization’s stakeholders. Unfortunately, most people, including many who run a variety of organizations, fail to grasp this language. In doing so, they undermine their organization’s opportunity for success, as well as create obstacles to using business as a means of social change. Without guidance, looking at these financial statements is similar to examining hieroglyphics for the first time. Starting from a basic level and layering in complexity, the course seeks to demystify these statements in a way that

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is informative and unintimidating. In addition, time is be spent advancing students’ understanding and familiarity with spreadsheets. Course topics include: creating and analyzing cash flow statements, profit and loss statements, balance sheets, and common-sized income statements; understanding each type of financial statement; relating statements to each other, streamlining, and varying statements depending on business models; comparing non-profit/ for-profit financial statements and approaches; examining financial ratios and comparing them for different businesses; and spreadsheet management and design. Students create their own financial statements and analyze a business through their financial statements. Taught within the business program, this class provides students skills for business plan projections, investing, management, leadership, or other finance courses. Students will be evaluated on class participation, projects, presentations, and other criteria.

█ FOOD, POWER, & JUSTICE Molly Anderson Course limit: 15 This course examines power and politics in the food system in which actors hold power over resources, decision making and markets; which actors want to hold more power; and how they are contesting or defending their respective positions. We study the role of social movements, as well as governmental and non-governmental actors, in domestic and international food systems. Students learn to identify the main actors in food politics and discover how to track their actions and agendas. They also gain experience in conference organizing, teamwork, and public speaking. Students are evaluated on demonstrated ability (and growth or deepening of ability) in thoughtful and respectful classroom participation, small group interaction, writing, and public speaking.

█ FRENCH LITERATURE & PHILOSOPHY Gray Cox Course limit: 12 Cost: TBA This course is part of an integrated trimester program at cavilam in Vichy, France. This course develops students’ abilities to read, contextualize, analyze, and critique key cultural texts in French; wrestle critically and fruitfully with the varying challenges and opportunities offered by working with texts in their original language as well as in translation; and learn how to research in a cross-cultural context, while pursuing independent projects in human ecology.

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014